History of Berkshire

Death of Edward IV

870 Battle of Englefield

871 Battle of Reading

871 Battle of Ashdown

1121 Marriage of King Henry I and Adeliza of Louvain

1215 Magna Carta

1359 Double Royal Wedding

1361 Marriage of Edward "The Black Prince" and Joan "The Fair Maid of Kent"

1399 Epiphany Rising

1483 Execution of Hastings

1483 Funeral of Edward IV

1532 Anne Boleyn's Investiture as Marchioness of Pembroke

1560 Death of Amy Robsart wife of Robert Dudley

1643 First Battle of Newbury

1644 Second Battle of Newbury

1688 Glorious Revolution

1817 Death of Princess Charlotte

1820 Death of King George III

1820 Funeral of King George III

1837 Death of King William IV Succession of Queen Victoria

1861 Death of Prince Albert

1861 Funeral of Prince Albert

1863 Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra

1904 Marriage of Princess Alice and Alexander Teck

1952 Death of George VI Accession of Elizabeth II

Battle of Ashdown

On 08 Jan 871 Alfred "The Great" King England 849-899 (22) defeated the Viking army led by Halfdan Ragnarsson -877 at the Battle of Ashdown in Berkshire. Bagsecg Viking -871 was killed.

Abingdon

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 20th May, 1639. Accompanied with one Mr. J. Crafford (who afterward being my fellow-traveler in Italy, there changed his religion), I took a journey of pleasure to see the Somersetshire baths, Bristol, Cirencester, Malmesbury, Abington, and divers other towns of lesser note; and returned the 25th.

Cumnor Place, Abingdon

Death of Amy Robsart wife of Robert Dudley

On 08 Sep 1560 , the day of the Abingdon Fair, Amy Robsart -1560 died from falling down stairs at Cumnor Place, Abingdon. She was married to Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (28), favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (27), who was with Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (27) at Windsor Castle at the time. Foul play was suspected but not proven. The event was regarded as suspicious by many. The Queen's reputation being tarnished she could not risk a marriage with Dudley.

North Court House, Abingdon

On 26 Oct 1878 Theresa Stourton Baroness Arundel Wardour 1812-1878 (66) died at North Court House, Abingdon.

St Edmund's Lane, Abingdon

On 20 Nov 1174 Edmund Rich Archbishop of Canterbury 1174-1240 was born at St Edmund's Lane, Abingdon.

Ascot

Sunningdale, Ascot

Bagshot

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 15 Sep 1685. I accompanied Mr. Pepys (52) to Portsmouth, whither his Ma* (51) was going the first time since his coming to the Crowne, to see in what state the fortifications were. We tooke coach and six horses, late after dinner, yet got to Bagshot that night. Whilst supper was making ready I went and made a visit to Mrs. Graham (34), some time maid of honour to ye Queene Dowager (46), now wife to James Graham, Esq (36) of the privy purse to the King; her house being a walke in the forest, within a little quarter of a mile from Bagshot towne. Very importunate she was that I would sup, and abide there that night, but being obliged by my companion, I return'd to our inn, after she had shew'd me her house, wch was very commodious and well furnish'd, as she was an excellent housewife, a prudent and virtuous lady. There is a parke full of red deere about it. Her eldest son was now sick there of the small-pox, but in a likely way of recovery, and other of her children run about, and among the infected, wnh she said she let them do on purpose that they might whilst young pass that fatal disease she fancied they were to undergo one time or other, and that this would be the best: the severity of this cruell disease so lately in my poore family confirming much of what she affirmed.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Bagshot Park, Bagshot

On 20 Apr 1770 George Keppel 3rd Earl Albermarle 1724-1772 (46) and Anne Miller Countess Albermarle -1824 were married at Bagshot Park, Bagshot. Anne Miller Countess Albermarle -1824 by marriage Countess Albermarle (1C 1697).

Bisham

Bisham Abbey, Bisham

On 23 Nov 1349 Catherine Grandison Countess Salisbury 1304-1349 (45) died at Bisham Abbey, Bisham.

In 1474 Geoffrey Pole 1430-1474 (44) died at Bisham Abbey, Bisham. He was buried at Bisham Abbey, Bisham.

After 28 Nov 1499 Edward "Last Plantagenet" York 17th Earl Warwick 1475-1499 was buried at Bisham Abbey, Bisham.

In 1560 Edward Hoby 1560-1617 was born at Bisham Abbey, Bisham.

Bisham Priory, Bisham

After 14 Apr 1471 Richard "Kingmaker" Neville 16th Earl Warwick, 6th Earl Salisbury 1428-1471 was buried at Bisham Priory, Bisham.

After 14 Apr 1471 John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 was buried at Bisham Priory, Bisham.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

Boveney

Around 1429 Edward Montagu 1429-1529 was born to Richard Montagu 1389-1429 (40) at Boveney.

In 1455 Robert Montagu 1455-1520 was born to Edward Montagu 1429-1529 (26) at Boveney.

In 1520 Robert Montagu 1455-1520 (65) died at Boveney.

Bray

St Michael's Church, Bray

Norreys Chapel, St Michael's Church, Bray

On 01 Sep 1466 John Norreys 1400-1466 (66) died. He was buried in the Norreys Chapel, St Michael's Church, Bray.

Buckland

In 1605 John Yate 2nd Baronet Yate 1605-1658 was born to Edward Yate 1st Baronet 1575-1645 (30) in Buckland.

In 1634 Charles Yate 3rd Baronet Yate 1634-1680 was born to John Yate 2nd Baronet Yate 1605-1658 (29) and Mary Pakington 1611-1696 (23) in Buckland.

Around 1664 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687 (30). Portrait of Charles Yate 3rd Baronet Yate 1634-1680 (30).

Around 1664 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687 (30). Portrait of Mary Pakington 1611-1696 (53).

Clewer

On 02 Dec 1858 Anthony Henry Ashley-Cooper 1807-1858 (51) died at Clewer.

Crowthorne

Donnington

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 June. 09 Jun 1654. . Dined at Marlborough, which having been lately fired, was now new built. At one end of this town, we saw my Lord Seymour's (64) house, but nothing observable save the Mount, to which we ascended by windings for near half a mile. It seems to have been cast up by hand. We passed by Colonel Popham's (49), a noble seat, park, and river. Thence, to Newbury, a considerable town, and Donnington, famous for its battle, siege, and castle, this last had been in the possession of old Geoffrey Chaucer. Then to Aldermaston, a house of Sir Humphrey Forster's, built à la moderne. Also, that exceedingly beautiful seat of my Lord Pembroke (33), on the ascent of hill, flanked with wood, and regarding the river, and so, at night, to Cadenham, the mansion of Edward Hungerford, Esq, uncle to my wife (19), where we made some stay. The rest of the week we did nothing but feast and make good cheer, to welcome my wife (19).

Donnington Castle, Donnington

In 1386 Richard Adderbury of Donnington Casatle 1331-1399 (55) was given permission by Richard II King England 1367-1400 (18) to fortify Donnington Castle, Donnington.

Eaton

On 23 Jul 1577 Thomas Wenman 1548-1577 (29) died. He left significant debts to the Crown requiring some of his lands to be sold. Eaton was sold to John Danvers 1540-1594 (37) for £7700. Richard Wenman 1st Viscount Wenman 1573-1640 (4) was made a ward of his mother Jane West 1558-1606 (19) and Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (45). Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (45) sold his interest to James Cressy who subsequently married Jane West 1558-1606 (19).

Hungerford

In 1440 Richard Mayew Bishop of Hereford 1440-1516 was born in Hungerford. His surname sometimes Mayo.

On or before 08 Jun 1738 Francis Stonehouse 1654-1738 (84) died. On 08 Jun 1738 he was buried in Hungerford.

Eddington House, Hungerford

On 21 May 1893 Charles Portal 1893-1971 was born at Eddington House, Hungerford.

Hungerford Church, Hungerford

Walter Hungerford was buried at Hungerford Church, Hungerford.

Lambourne

On 27 Jun 1335 William Grandison 1st Baron Grandison 1262-1335 (73) died at Lambourne. His son Piers Grandison 2nd Baron Grandison -1358 succeeded 2nd Baron Grandison. Blanche Mortimer Baroness Grandison 1312-1347 (23) by marriage Baroness Grandison. His son John Grandison Bishop of Exeter 1292-1369 (43) succeeded 3rd Baron Grandison.

Midgham

On 17 Dec 1750 Stephen Poyntz 1685-1750 (65) died at Midgham.

Mortimer

Around 1332 Edward Zouche 1332- was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Mortimer 1265-1336 (67) and Eleanor Clare Baroness Zouche Mortimer 1292-1337 (39) at Mortimer.

Moulsford

In 1215 William Carew 1215-1279 was born at Moulsford.

Around 1235 Nicholas Carew 1235-1297 was born to William Carew 1215-1279 (20) and Alice Marshal 1215-1271 (20) in Moulsford.

Around 1253 Nicholas Carew 1253-1311 was born to Nicholas Carew 1235-1297 (18) in Moulsford.

On 04 Oct 1369 Leonard Carew 1342-1369 (26) died in Moulsford.

Newbury

In 1628 Thomas Millington Doctor 1628-1704 was born in Newbury.

In 1635 Thomas Chamberlayne 2nd Baronet Chamberlayne 1635-1682 was born to Thomas Chamberlayne 1st Baronet Chamberlayne -1643 at Newbury.

After 1635 James Chamberlayne 3rd Baronet Chamberlayne 1635-1699 was born to Thomas Chamberlayne 1st Baronet Chamberlayne -1643 at Newbury.

First Battle of Newbury

On 20 Sep 1643 the First Battle of Newbury was fought at Newbury with Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (42) commanding the Royalist army and Robert Devereux 3rd Earl Essex 1591-1646 (52) commanding the victorious Parliamentary army. For Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (42) John Byron 1st Baron Byron 1599-1652 (44) fought with distinction. Henry Bertie -1643, Robert Dormer 1st Earl Carnarvon 1610-1643 (33) was killed.
William Villiers 2nd Viscount Grandison 1614-1643 (29) was killed. His brother John Villiers 3rd Viscount Grandison -1661 succeeded 3rd Viscount Grandison (1C 1620).
Edward Villiers 1620-1689 (23) fought.
Lucius Carey 2nd Viscount Falkland 1610-1643 (33) was killed. His son Lucius Carey 3rd Viscount Falkland 1632-1649 (11) succeeded 3rd Viscount Falkland.
Richard Neville 1615-1676 (28) served under the Earl Carnarvon (33). Carnarvon was killed and Neville took up the command as a Colonel of Horse.
Charles Fleetwood 1618-1692 (25) was wounded.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 June. 09 Jun 1654. . Dined at Marlborough, which having been lately fired, was now new built. At one end of this town, we saw my Lord Seymour's (64) house, but nothing observable save the Mount, to which we ascended by windings for near half a mile. It seems to have been cast up by hand. We passed by Colonel Popham's (49), a noble seat, park, and river. Thence, to Newbury, a considerable town, and Donnington, famous for its battle, siege, and castle, this last had been in the possession of old Geoffrey Chaucer. Then to Aldermaston, a house of Sir Humphrey Forster's, built à la moderne. Also, that exceedingly beautiful seat of my Lord Pembroke (33), on the ascent of hill, flanked with wood, and regarding the river, and so, at night, to Cadenham, the mansion of Edward Hungerford, Esq, uncle to my wife (19), where we made some stay. The rest of the week we did nothing but feast and make good cheer, to welcome my wife (19).

Reading

Battle of Englefield

On 31 Dec 870 Aethelwulf Mercia Earldorman Berkshire 824-871 (45) defeated the Viking army at the Battle of Englefield at Englefield, Reading. The Viking Army retreated to Reading. Sidrac Viking was killed.

Battle of Reading

On 04 Jan 871 Aethelred King Wessex 847-871 (24) and Alfred the Great's (22) army attacked, but were repulsed by, the Viking army at Battle of Reading at Reading. Aethelwulf Mercia Earldorman Berkshire 824-871 (46) was killed.

On 07 Oct 1573 William Laud Archbishop of Canterbury 1573-1645 was born to William Laud and Lucy Webbe at Reading.

In 1591 Thomas Turner Dean Canterbury 1591-1672 was born in Reading.

In 1656 Constantine Henry Phipps 1656-1723 was born to Francis Phipps at Reading.

Caversham, Reading

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 July. 22 Jul 1654. We departed and dined at a farm of my Uncle Hungerford's, called Darnford Magna, situated in a valley under the plain, most sweetly watered, abounding in trouts caught by spear in the night, when they come attracted by a light set in the stern of a boat.
After dinner, continuing our return, we passed over the goodly plain, or rather sea of carpet, which I think for evenness, extent, verdure, and innumerable flocks, to be one of the most delightful prospects in nature, and reminded me of the pleasant lives of shepherds we read of in romances.
Now we arrived at Stonehenge, indeed a stupendous. Monument, appearing at a distance like a castle; how so many and huge Pillars of stone should have been brought together, some erect, others transverse on the tops of them, in a circular area as rudely representing a cloister or heathen and more natural temple, is wonderful. The stone is so exceedingly hard, that all my strength with a hammer could not break a fragment; which hardness I impute to their so long exposure. To number them exactly is very difficult, they lie in such variety of postures and confusion, though they seemed not to exceed 100; we counted only 95. As to their being brought thither, there being no navigable river near, is by some admired; but for the stone, there seems to be the same kind about 20 miles distant, some of which appear above ground. About the same hills, are divers mounts raised, conceived to be ancient intrenchments, or places of burial, after bloody fights. We now went by Devizes, a reasonable large town, and came late to Cadenham.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 July. 31 Jul 1654. Taking leave of Cadenham, where we had been long and nobly entertained, we went a compass into Leicestershire, where dwelt another relation of my wife's (19); for I indeed made these excursions to show her the most considerable parts of her native country, who, from her childhood, had lived altogether in France, as well as for my own curiosity and information.
About two miles before coming to Gloucester, we have a prospect from woody hills into a most goodly vale and country. Gloucester is a handsome city, considerable for the church and. Monuments. The minster is indeed a noble fabric. The whispering gallery is rare, being through a passage of twenty-five yards in a many-angled cloister, and was, I suppose, either to show the skill of the architect, or some invention of a cunning priest, who, standing unseen in a Recess in the middle of the chapel, might hear whatever was spoken at either end. This is above the choir, in which lies buried King Stephen under a. Monument of Irish oak, not ill carved considering the age. The new library is a noble though a private design. I was likewise pleased with the Severn gliding so sweetly by it. The Duke's house, the castle works, are now almost quite dismantled; nor yet without sad thoughts did I see the town, considering how fatal the siege had been a few years before to our good King.

On 21 Feb 1722 William Anne Keppel 2nd Earl Albermarle 1702-1754 (19) and Anne Lennox Countess Albermarle 1703-1789 (18) were married at Caversham, Reading. Anne Lennox Countess Albermarle 1703-1789 (18) by marriage Countess Albermarle (1C 1697).

Englefield, Reading

Battle of Englefield

On 31 Dec 870 Aethelwulf Mercia Earldorman Berkshire 824-871 (45) defeated the Viking army at the Battle of Englefield at Englefield, Reading. The Viking Army retreated to Reading. Sidrac Viking was killed.

Around 1455 Thomas Englefield Speaker of the House of Commons 1453-1514 probably in Englefield, Reading.

Reading Abbey, Reading

On 23 Apr 1151 Adeliza of Louvain Queen Consort England (48) died. She was buried at Reading Abbey, Reading.

In Apr 1156 William Plantagenet IX Count Poitiers 1153-1156 (2) died at Wallingford Castle. He was buried at Reading Abbey, Reading at the feet of his great-grandfather King Henry I "Beauclerc" England.

On 22 Sep 1232 John Cornwall 1232-1232 died at Marlow. He was buried at Reading Abbey, Reading.

After 13 Mar 1271 Henry "Almain" Cornwall 1235-1271 was buried at Reading Abbey, Reading.

Double Royal Wedding

On 19 May 1359 John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster 1340-1399 (19) and Blanche Plantagenet Duchess Lancaster 1345-1368 (14) were married (he was her half second-cousin once-removed) at Reading Abbey, Reading. Blanche Plantagenet Duchess Lancaster 1345-1368 (14) by marriage Countess Richmond (5C 1342). John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster 1340-1399 (19) by marriage 5th Earl Lancaster, 2nd Earl Derby (2C 1337).

On 24 Aug 1369 Edmund Mortimer 3rd Earl March, 5th Earl Ulster 1352-1381 (17) and Philippa Plantagenet Countess March, 5th Countess Ulster 1355-1382 (14) were married at Reading Abbey, Reading. Philippa Plantagenet Countess March, 5th Countess Ulster 1355-1382 (14) by marriage Countess March (1C 1328). Edmund Mortimer 3rd Earl March, 5th Earl Ulster 1352-1381 (17) by marriage 5th Earl Ulster.

On 29 Nov 1416 Constance York Countess Gloucester 1374-1416 (42) died at Reading Abbey, Reading.

On 11 Jun 1446 Henry Beauchamp 1st Duke Warwick 1425-1446 (21) died. His daughter Anne Beauchamp 15th Countess Warwick 1443-1448 (3) succeeded 15th Earl Warwick (1C 1088), 7th Baron Burghesh (2C 1330). She was buried at Reading Abbey, Reading.

Woodcote, Reading

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 January. 1st January, 1655. Having with my family performed the public offices of the day, and begged a blessing on the year I was now entering, I went to keep the rest of Christmas at my brother's, R. Evelyn (32), at Woodcot.

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 February. 17 Feb 1688. I received the sad news of my niece Montague's death at Woodcot on the 15th.

Sandhurst

Shrivenham

On 09 Feb 1867 William Keppel Barrington 6th Viscount Barrington 1793-1867 (73) died at Shrivenham. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Shrivenham. His son George Barrington 7th Viscount Barrington 1824-1886 (42) succeeded 7th Viscount Barrington of Ardglass in County Down, 6th Viscount Barrington of Ardglass in County Down.

Beckett Hall, Shrivenham

Slough

Upton-cum-Chalvey, Slough

St Laurence's Church, Upton-cum-Chalvey, Slough

In 1598 Edward Bulstrode of Hedgerley Bulstrode Buckinghamshire -1598 died. He was buried in St Laurence's Church, Upton-cum-Chalvey, Slough.

Sparsholt

Sunninghill

On 18 May 1795 Thomas Pelham-Clinton 3rd Duke Newcastle-under-Lyne 1752-1795 (42) died at Sunninghill. His son Henry Pelham-Clinton 4th Duke Newcastle-under-Lyne 1785-1851 (10) succeeded 4th Duke Newcastle-under-Lyne, 11th Earl Lincoln (8C 1572).

Swallowfield

On 03 May 1257 Katherine Plantagenet 1253-1257 (3) died at Swallowfield. She buried in the Ambulatory, Chancel, Westminster Abbey.

In 1274 John Despencer 1235-1274 (39) died at Swallowfield.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 October. 22 Oct 1685. I accompanied my Lady Clarendon to her house at Swallowfield in Berks, dining by the way at Mr. Graham's (36) lodge at Bagshot; the house, new repair'd and capacious enough for a good family, stands in a Park. Hence we went to Swallowfield; this house is after the antient build ing of honourable gentlemen's houses, when they kept up antient hospitality, but the gardens and waters as elegant as 'tis possible to make a flat, by art and industrie, and no meane expence, my lady being so extraordinarily skill'd in ye flowery part, and my lord in diligence of planting; so that I have hardly seene a seate whrch shews more tokens of it than what is to be found here, not only in the delicious and rarest fruits of a garden, but in those innumerable timber trees in the ground about the seate, to the greatest ornament and benefit of the place. There is one orchard of 1000 golden, and other cider pippins; walks and groves of elms, limes, oaks, and other trees. The garden is so beset with all manner of sweete shrubbs, that it per fumes the aire. The distribution also of the quarters, walks, and parterres, is excellent. The nurseries, kitchin garden full of ye most desireable plants; two very noble Orangeries well furnished; but above all, the canall and fishponds, the one fed with a white, the other with a black running water, fed by a quick and swift river, so well and plen tifully stor'd with fish, that for pike, carp, breame and tench, I never saw any thing approching it. We had at every meale carp and pike of size fit for the table of a Prince, and what added to ye delight was to see the hundreds taken by the drag, out of which, the cooke standing by, we pointed out what we had most mind to, and had carp that would have ben worth at London twenty shillings a piece. The waters are flagg'd about with Calamus aromaticus, with wch my lady has hung a closet, that retains the smell very perfectly. There is also a certaine sweete willow and other exotics : also a very fine bowllng-greene, meadow, pasture, and wood; in a word, all that can render a country seate delightful. There is besides a well furnish'd library in ye house.

Swallowfield House

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 August. 15 Aug 1687. I went to visit Lord Clarendon at Swallowfield, where was my Lord Cornbury (25) just arrived from Denmark, whither he had accompanied the Prince of Denmark (34) two months before, and now come back. The miserable tyranny under which that nation lives, he related to us; the King keeps them under an army of 40,000 men, all Germans, he not daring to trust his own subjects. Notwithstanding this, the Danes are exceedingly proud, the country very poor and miserable.

Tilehurst

On 18 Aug 1627 William Lloyd Bishop 1617-1717 was born in Tilehurst.

Waltham St Lawrence

Billingbear House, Waltham St Lawrence

On 30 May 1615 Richard Neville 1615-1676 was born to Henry Neville 1588-1629 (27) and Elizabeth Smythe 1586-1669 (29) at Billingbear House, Waltham St Lawrence.

In 1667 King Chales II (36), his brother James (33), Prince Rupert (47) and James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (17) dined with Richard Neville 1615-1676 (51) at Billingbear House, Waltham St Lawrence.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

Wantage

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849-887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 849 was born Alfred, king of the Anglo-Saxons, at the royal village of Wanating, in Berkshire, which country has its name from the wood of Berroc, where the box-tree grows most abundantly. His genealogy is traced in the following order. King Alfred was the son of king Ethelwulf, who was the son of Egbert, who was the son of Elmund, was the son of Eafa, who was the son of Eoppa, who the son of Ingild. Ingild, and Ina, the famous king of the West-Saxons, were two brothers. Ina went to Rome, and there ending this life honourably, entered the heavenly kingdom, to reign there for ever with Christ. IngildIna were the sons of Coenred, who was the son of Ceolwald, who was the son of Cudam, who was the son of Cuthwin, who was the son of Ceawlin, who was the son of Cynric, who was the son of Creoda, who was the son of Cerdic, who was the son of Elesa, who was the son of Gewis, from whom the Britons name all that nation Gegwis, (2) who was the son of Brond, who was the son of Beldeg, who was the son of Woden, who was the son of Frithowald, who was the son of Frealaf, who was the son of Frithuwulf, who was the son of Finn of Godwulf, who was the son of Gear, which Geat the pagans long worshipped as a god. Sedulius makes mention of him in his metrical Paschal poem, as follows:
When gentile poets with their fictions vain, In tragic language and bombastic strain, To their god Geat, comic deity, Loud praises sing, &c.
Geat was the son of Taetwa, who was the son of Beaw, who was the son of Sceldi, who was the son of Heremod, who was the son of Itermon, who was the son of Hathra, who was the son of Guala, who was the son of Bedwig, who was the son of Shem, who was the son of Noah, who was the son of Lamech, who was the son of Methusalem, who was the son of Enoch, who was the son of Malaleci, who was the son of Cainian, who was the son of Enos, who was the son of Seth, who was the son of Adam.
The mother of Alfred was named Osburga, a religious woman, noble both by birth and by nature; she was daughter of Oslac, the famous butler of king Ethtelwulf, which Oslac was a Goth by nation, descended from the Goths and Jutes, of the seed, namely, of Stuf and Whitgar, two brothers and counts; who, having received possession of the Isle of Wight from their uncle, King Cerdic, and his son Cynric their cousin, slew the few British inhabitants whom they could find in that island, at a place called Gwihtgaraburgh; for the other inhabitants of the island had either been slain, or escaped into exile.
Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849-887 Page 1.

In 849 Alfred "The Great" King England 849-899 was born to Aethelwulf King Wessex -858 and Osburgh Queen Consort Wessex at Wantage.

On 10 May 1692 Joseph Butler Bishop 1692-1792 was born in Wantage.

Church of St Mary, Wantage

On 28 Oct 1361 William Fitzwarin 1310-1361 (51) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary, Wantage.

Windsor

In 1120 Gerald Windsor 1120- was born at Windsor.

In 1251 Gwladus verch Llewelyn "Dark Eyed" Aberffraw 1194-1251 (56) died at Windsor.

On 19 Aug 1284 Alfonso Plantagenet 1273-1284 (10) died at Windsor. He was buried at Westminster Abbey.

Epiphany Rising

On 17 Dec 1399 the conspirators met at Abbey House, Westminster Abbey including Thomas Blount 1352-1400 (47), Thomas Despencer 1st Earl Gloucester 1373-1400 (26), Thomas Holland 1st Duke Surrey 1374-1400 (25), John Holland 1st Duke Exeter 1352-1400 (47), Ralph Lumley 1st Baron Lumley 1360-1400 (39), John Montagu 3rd Earl Salisbury 1350-1400 (49), Edward York 1st Duke Albemarle aka Aumale, 2nd Duke York 1373-1415 (26), Bernard Brocas 1354-1400 (45). They plotted to capture Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (32) at a Tournament in Windsor on the Feast of Epiphany hence the Epiphany Rising.

Death of Edward IV

On 25 Mar 1483 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (40) returned to Westminster from Windsor. A few days later he became sufficiently unwell to add codicils to his will, and to have urged reconciliation between William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28); it isn't clear what the cause of the friction between the two men was although it appears well known that Hastings resented the Woodville family.

On 20 Jun 1527 Thomas Wharton 1st Baron Wharton 1495-1568 (32) was knighted at Windsor.

In 1530 the Prior of Llanthony Priory, Llanthony, Vale Ewyas, Monmouthshire, South-East Wales sent cheese, carp and baked lamphreys to Henry VIII (38) at Windsor.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

On 09 Jul 1603 Amyas Bampfylde of Poltimore and North Molton 1560-1626 (77) was knighted at Windsor.

On 03 Apr 1630 Christopher Villiers 1st Earl Anglesey 1593-1630 (37) died at Windsor. He was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. His son Charles Villiers 2nd Earl Anglesey -1661 succeeded 2nd Earl Anglesey (1C 1623), 2nd Baron Villiers Daventry.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 June. 08 Jun 1654. . my wife (19) and I set out in a coach and four horses, in our way to visit relations of hers in Wiltshire, and other parts, where we resolved to spend some months. We dined at Windsor, saw the Castle and Chapel of St. George, where they have laid our blessed Martyr, King Charles, in the vault just before the alter. The church and workmanship in stone is admirable. The Castle itself is large in circumference; but the rooms melancholy, and of ancient magnificence. The keep, or mount, hath, besides its incomparable prospect, a very profound well; and the terrace toward Eton, with the park, meandering Thames, and sweet meadows, yield one of the most delightful prospects. That night, we lay at Reading. Saw my Lord Craven's (46) house at Causam [Caversham], now in ruins, his goodly woods felling by the Rebels.

In 1664 William Heveningham 1604-1678 (60) was imprisoned at Windsor.

John Evelyn's Diary 1669 July. 15 Jul 1669. Having two days before had notice that the University intended me the honor of Doctorship, I was this morning attended by the beadles belonging to the Law, who conducted me to the Theater, where I found the Duke of Ormond (58) (now Chancellor of the University) with the Earl of Chesterfield (35) and Mr. Spencer (40) (brother to the late Earl of Sunderland). Thence, we marched to the Convocation House, a convocation having been called on purpose; here, being all of us robed in the porch, in scarlet with caps and hoods, we were led in by the Professor of Laws, and presented respectively by name, with a short eulogy, to the Vice-Chancellor, who sat in the chair, with all the Doctors and Heads of Houses and masters about the room, which was exceedingly full. Then, began the Public Orator his speech, directed chiefly to the Duke of Ormond, the Chancellor; but in which I had my compliment, in course. This ended, we were called up, and created Doctors according to the form, and seated by the Vice-Chancellor among the Doctors, on his right hand; then, the Vice-Chancellor made a short speech, and so, saluting our brother Doctors, the pageantry concluded, and the convocation was dissolved. So formal a creation of honorary Doctors had seldom been seen, that a convocation should be called on purpose, and speeches made by the Orator; but they could do no less, their Chancellor being to receive, or rather do them, this honor. I should have been made Doctor with the rest at the public Act, but their expectation of their Chancellor made them defer it. I was then led with my brother Doctors to an extraordinary entertainment at Doctor Mewes's, head of St John's College, and, after abundance of feasting and compliments, having visited the Vice-Chancellor and other Doctors, and given them thanks for the honor done me, I went toward home the 16th, and got as far as Windsor, and so to my house the next day.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 August. 20 Aug 1670. At Windsor I supped with the Duke of Monmouth (21); and, the next day, invited by Lord Arlington (52), dined with the same Duke and divers Lords. After dinner my Lord and I had a conference of more than an hour alone in his bedchamber, to engage me in the History. I showed him something that I had drawn up, to his great satisfaction, and he desired me to show it to the Treasurer (40).

On 14 Jul 1674 Pelham Humfrey Composer 1647-1674 (27) died in Windsor.

John Evelyn's Diary 1674 July. 22 Jul 1674. I went to Windsor with my wife (39) and son (19) to see my daughter Mary (9), who was there with my Lady Tuke and to do my duty to his Majesty (44). Next day, to a great entertainment at Sir Robert Holmes's (52) at Cranbourne Lodge, in the Forest; there were his Majesty (44), the Queen (35), Duke (40), Duchess (15), and all the Court. I returned in the evening with Sir Joseph Williamson (40), now declared Secretary of State. He was son of a poor clergyman somewhere in Cumberland, brought up at Queen's College, Oxford, of which he came to be a fellow; then traveled with ... and returning when the King (44) was restored, was received as a clerk under Mr. Secretary Nicholas. Sir Henry Bennett (56) (now Lord Arlington) succeeding, Williamson is transferred to him, who loving his ease more than business (though sufficiently able had he applied himself to it) remitted all to his man Williamson; and, in a short time, let him so into the secret of affairs, that (as his Lordship himself told me) there was a kind of necessity to advance him; and so, by his subtlety, dexterity, and insinuation, he got now to be principal Secretary; absolutely Lord Arlington's creature, and ungrateful enough. It has been the fate of this obliging favorite to advance those who soon forgot their original. Sir Joseph was a musician, could play at Jeu de Goblets, exceedingly formal, a severe master to his servants, but so inward with my Lord O'Brien (32), that after a few months of that gentleman's death, he married his widow (34), who, being sister and heir of the Duke of Richmond, brought him a noble fortune. It was thought they lived not so kindly after marriage as they did before. She was much censured for marrying so meanly, being herself allied to the Royal family.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. Francois de Troy 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 June. 28th June, 1678. I went to Windsor with my Lord Chamberlain (60) (the castle now repairing with exceeding cost) to see the rare work of Verrio (42), an incomparable carving of Gibbons (30).

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 August. 24th August, 1678. I went to see my Lord of St. Alban's (73) house, at Byfleet, an old, large building. Thence, to the papermills, where I found them making a coarse white paper. They cull the rags which are linen for white paper, woolen for brown; then they stamp them in troughs to a pap, with pestles, or hammers, like the powder mills, then put it into a vessel of water, in which they dip a frame closely wired with wire as small as a hair and as close as a weaver's reed; on this they take up the pap, the superfluous water draining through the wire; this they dexterously turning, shake out like a pancake on a smooth board between two pieces of flannel, then press it between a great press, the flannel sucking out the moisture; then, taking it out, they ply and dry it on strings, as they dry linen in the laundry; then dip it in alum water, lastly, polish and make it up in quires. They put some gum in the water in which they macerate the rags. The mark we find on the sheets is formed in the wire.
25th August, 1678. After evening prayer, visited Mr. Sheldon (nephew to the late Archbishop of Canterbury), and his pretty melancholy garden; I took notice of the largest arbor thuyris I had ever seen. The place is finely watered, and there are many curiosities of India, shown in the house.
There was at Weybridge the Duchess of Norfolk (35), Lord Thomas Howard (a worthy and virtuous gentleman, with whom my son (23) was sometime bred in Arundel House), who was newly come from Rome, where he had been some time; also one of the Duke's daughters, by his first lady. My Lord (50) leading me about the house made no scruple of showing me all the hiding places for the Popish priests, and where they said mass, for he was no bigoted Papist. He told me he never trusted them with any secret, and used Protestants only in all businesses of importance.
I went this evening with my Lord Duke (50) to Windsor, where was a magnificent Court, it being the first time of his Majesty's (48) removing thither since it was repaired.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 July. 22d July, 1679. Dined at Clapham, at Sir D. Gauden's; went thence with him to Windsor, to assist him in a business with his Majesty (49). I lay that night at Eton College, the Provost's lodgings (Dr. Craddock), where I was courteously entertained.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 July. 23d July, 1679. To Court: after dinner, I visited that excellent painter, Verrio (43), whose works in fresco in the King (49)'s palace, at Windsor, will celebrate his name as long as those walls last. He showed us his pretty garden, choice flowers, and curiosities, he himself being a skillful gardener.
I went to Clifden, that stupendous natural rock, wood, and prospect, of the Duke of Buckingham's (51), and buildings of extraordinary expense. The grots in the chalky rocks are pretty: it is a romantic object, and the place altogether answers the most poetical description that can be made of solitude, precipice, prospect, or whatever can contribute to a thing so very like their imaginations. The stand, somewhat like Frascati as to its front, and on the platform is a circular view to the utmost verge of the horizon, which, with the serpenting of the Thames, is admirable. The staircase is for its materials singular; the cloisters, descents, gardens, and avenue through the wood, august and stately; but the land all about wretchedly barren, and producing nothing but fern. Indeed, as I told his Majesty (49) that evening (asking me how I liked Clifden) without flattery, that it did not please me so well as Windsor for the prospect and park, which is without compare; there being but one only opening, and that narrow, which led one to any variety; whereas that of Windsor is everywhere great and unconfined.
Returning, I called at my cousin Evelyn's, who has a very pretty seat in the forest, two miles by hither Clifden, on a flat, with gardens exquisitely kept, though large, and the house a staunch good old building, and what was singular, some of the rooms floored dove tail-wise without a nail, exactly close. One of the closets is pargeted with plain deal, set in diamond, exceeding staunch and pretty.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 September. 13th September, 1679. To Windsor, to congratulate his Majesty (49) on his recovery; I kissed the Duke's (45) hand, now lately returned from Flanders to visit his brother the King (49), on which there were various bold and foolish discourses, the Duke of Monmouth (30) being sent away.

John Evelyn's Diary 1680 July. 24th July, 1680. Went with my wife (45) and daughter to Windsor, to see that stately court, now near finished. There was erected in the court the King (50) on horseback, lately cast in copper, and set on a rich pedestal of white marble, the work of Mr. Gibbons (32), at the expense of Toby Rustate, a page of the back stairs, who by his wonderful frugality had arrived to a great estate in money, and did many works of charity, as well as this of gratitude to his master, which cost him £1,000. He is very simple, ignorant, but honest and loyal creature.
We all dined at the Countess of Sunderland's (34), afterward to see Signor Verrio's (44) garden, thence to Eton College, to salute the provost, and heard a Latin speech of one of the alumni (it being at the election) and were invited to supper; but took our leave, and got to London that night in good time.

John Evelyn's Diary 1680 September. 2d September, 1680. I had an opportunity, his Majesty (50) being still at Windsor, of seeing his private library at Whitehall, at my full ease. I went with expectation of finding some curiosities, but, though there were about 1,000 volumes, there were few of importance which I had not perused before. They consisted chiefly of such books as had from time to time been dedicated, or presented to him; a few histories, some Travels and French books, abundance of maps and sea charts, entertainments and pomps, buildings and pieces relating to the navy, some mathematical instruments; but what was most rare, were three or four Romish breviaries, with a great deal of miniature and monkish painting and gilding, one of which is most exquisitely done, both as to the figures, grotesques, and compartments, to the utmost of that curious art. There is another in which I find written by the hand of King Henry VII., his giving it to his dear daughter, Margaret, afterward Queen of Scots, in which he desires her to pray for his soul, subscribing his name at length. There is also the process of the philosophers' great elixir, represented in divers pieces of excellent miniature, but the discourse is in high Dutch, a MS. There is another MS. in quarto, of above 300 years old, in French, being an institution of physic, and in the botanical part the plants are curiously painted in miniature; also a folio MS. of good thickness, being the several exercises, as Themes, Orations, Translations, etc., of King Edward VI., all written and subscribed by his own hand, and with his name very legible, and divers of the Greek interleaved and corrected after the manner of schoolboys' exercises, and that exceedingly well and proper; with some epistles to his preceptor, which show that young prince to have been extraordinarily advanced in learning, and as Cardan, who had been in England affirmed, stupendously knowing for his age. There is likewise his journal, no less testifying his early ripeness and care about the affairs of state.
There are besides many pompous volumes, some embossed with gold, and intaglios on agates, medals, etc. I spent three or four entire days, locked up, and alone, among these books and curiosities. In the rest of the private lodgings contiguous to this, are divers of the best pictures of the great masters, Raphael, Titian, etc., and in my esteem, above all, the "Noli me tangere" of our blessed Savior to Mary Magdalen after his Resurrection, of Hans Holbein; than which I never saw so much reverence and kind of heavenly astonishment expressed in a picture.
There are also divers curious clocks, watches, and pendules of exquisite work, and other curiosities. An ancient woman who made these lodgings clean, and had all the keys, let me in at pleasure for a small reward, by means of a friend.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Known as "Lady with a Squirrel and a Starling". The subject is believed to be Anne Ashby -1539 wife of Francis Lovell -1552 (18). The starling is probably intended as a rhyming pun of East Harling, where the family had recently inherited the estate of East Harling Hall, East Harling. Squirrels nibbling on nuts feature on the heraldry of the Lovell family: the windows of the Church of St Peter and St Paul, East Harling include two of the family’s arms in stained glass, each showing six red squirrels. The commission may commemorate the birth of a son to the couple in the spring of 1526, but it also showed off their new status as wealthy landowners.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) wearing the Garter and Inter-twined Knots Collar with St George Pendant. Standing three-quarter length, richly dressed in velvet, fur and cloth-of-gold. Holbein has meticulously shown the varied texture of his cloth-of-gold double which is woven into a pomegranate pattern with a variety of different weaves including loops of gold thread. Similarly, he has carefully articulated the band of black satin running down Guildford’s arm against the richer black of the velvet of his sleeve. A lavish use of both shell-gold paint and gold leaf (which has been used to emulate the highlights of the gold thread in the material) emphasises the luxuriousness of the sitter’s dress and his high status. In his right-hand he holds the Comptroller of the Household Staff of Office.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Mary Wotton 1499-1535 (28) when she was thirty-two commissioned with that of her husband Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) possibly to celebrate their marriage. Hung with gold chains and embellished with pearls, Lady Guildford embodies worldly prosperity, and with her prayer book she is also the very image of propriety.

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (36). Drawing of Thomas Elyot 1490-1546 (43).

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (36). Drawing of Margaret Barrow 1500-1560 (33).

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (39). Drawing of Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542 (33).

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (39). Drawing of Margaret More 1505-1544 (31) known by her married name of "Margaret Roper".

Around 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (40). Drawing of Elizabeth Jenks Baroness Rich Leez 1510-1558 (27).

Around 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (41). Drawing of the wife of Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (55). He had three wives. The sitter is believed to his third wife.

After 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Elizabeth Grey Baroness Audley Waldon -1564 based on she having become Lady Audley on 29 Nov 1538. Coloured chalks, silverpoint, pen and ink on pink-primed paper, 29.2 × 20.7 cm, Royal Collection, Windsor Castle. The drawing is inscribed, by a later hand than Holbein's, "The Lady Audley".

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (42). Portrait of Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557 (23).

Around 1542 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (45). Drawing of William Sharington 1495-1553 (47).

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

Glorious Revolution

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 December. 13 Dec 1688. The King (55) flies to sea, puts in at Faversham for ballast; is rudely treated by the people; comes back to Whitehall.
The Prince of Orange (38) is advanced to Windsor, is invited by the King (55) to St. James's, the messenger sent was the Earl of Faversham (47), the General of the Forces, who going without trumpet, or passport, is detained prisoner by the Prince (38), who accepts the invitation, but requires his Majesty (38) to retire to some distant place, that his own guards may be quartered about the palace and city. This is taken heinously and the King (38) goes privately to Rochester; is persuaded to come back; comes on the Sunday; goes to mass, and dines in public, a Jesuit saying grace (I was present)..

John Evelyn's Diary 1701. 08 Jul 1701. My grandson (19) went to Sir Simon Harcourt (39), the Solicitor General, to Windsor, to wait on my Lord Treasurer. There had been for some time a proposal of marrying my grandson (19) to a daughter (26) of Mrs. Boscawen, sister of my Lord Treasurer (56), which was now far advanced.

John Evelyn's Diary 1704. Jan 1704. The King of Spain landing at Portsmouth, came to Windsor, where he was magnificently entertained by the Queen (38), and behaved himself so nobly, that everybody was taken with his graceful deportment. After two days, having presented the great ladies, and others, with valuable jewels, he went back to Portsmouth, and immediately embarked for Spain.

On 19 Dec 1712 John Berkeley 4th Viscount Fitzhardinge 1650-1712 (62) died at Windsor. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

On 29 Jan 1733 Henry Godolphin 1648-1733 (84) died at Windsor. He was buried at Eton College Chapel, Eton College.

On 02 Sep 1880 Hugh Richard Lawrie Sheppard Priest 1880-1937 was born in Windsor.

Eton, Windsor

On 06 Nov 1386 Hugh Hastings 7th Baron Hastings 1350-1386 (36) died at Eton, Windsor. His son Edward Hastings 8th Baron Hastings 1382-1437 (4) succeeded 8th Baron Hastings (1C 1295). Muriel Dinham Baroness Hastings 1382-1412 (4) by marriage Baroness Hastings (1C 1295).

On 29 Jun 1794 George Waldegrave 1784-1794 (9) drowned whilst swimming in the River Thames near Eton, Windsor. His brother John James Waldegrave 6th Earl Waldegrave 1785-1835 (8) succeeded 6th Earl Waldegrave (1C 1729).

Eton College

Around 1603 Robert Devereux 3rd Earl Essex 1591-1646 (11) educated at Eton College.

In 1613 James Wriothesley 1605-1624 (7) took custody of at Eton College.

In 1613 Charles Berkeley 2nd Viscount Fitzhardinge 1599-1668 (13) educated at Eton College.

Around 1617 Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (11) educated at Eton College.

In 1634. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (28).

In 1650. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (44).

In 1623 William Willoughby 6th Baron Willoughby Parham 1616-1673 (7) educated at Eton College.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 21st October, 1632. My eldest sister (18) was married to Edward Darcy, Esq, who little deserved so excellent a person, a woman of so rare virtue. I was not present at the nuptials; but I was soon afterward sent for into Surrey, and my father (45) would willingly have weaned me from my fondness of my too indulgent grandmother, intending to have placed me at Eton College; but, not being so provident for my own benefit, and unreasonably terrified with the report of the severe discipline there, I was sent back to Lewes; which perverseness of mine I have since a thousand times deplored. This was the first time that ever my parents had seen all their children together in prosperity. While I was now trifling at home, I saw London, where I lay one night only. The next day, I dined at Beddington, where I was much delighted with the gardens and curiosities. Thence, we returned to the Lady Darcy's (18), at Sutton; thence to Wotton; and, on the 16th of August following, 1633, back to Lewes.

Around 1644 Roger Palmer 1st Earl Castlemaine 1634-1705 (10) educated at Eton College.

On 08 Oct 1665 Henry Godolphin 1648-1733 (17) educated at Eton College.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 July. 22d July, 1679. Dined at Clapham, at Sir D. Gauden's; went thence with him to Windsor, to assist him in a business with his Majesty (49). I lay that night at Eton College, the Provost's lodgings (Dr. Craddock), where I was courteously entertained.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 September. 19th September, 1679. My Lord Sunderland (38), one of the principal Secretaries of State, invited me to dinner, where was the King's (49) natural son, the Earl of Plymouth (22), the Earl of Shrewsbury, Earl of Essex (48), Earl of Mulgrave (31), Mr. Hyde, and Mr. Godolphin (34). After dinner I went to prayers at Eton College, and visited Mr. Henry Godolphin (31), fellow there, and Dr. Craddock.

Around 1680 Francis Godolphin 2nd Earl Godolphin 1678-1766 (1) educated at Eton College.

John Evelyn's Diary 1680 July. 24th July, 1680. Went with my wife (45) and daughter to Windsor, to see that stately court, now near finished. There was erected in the court the King (50) on horseback, lately cast in copper, and set on a rich pedestal of white marble, the work of Mr. Gibbons (32), at the expense of Toby Rustate, a page of the back stairs, who by his wonderful frugality had arrived to a great estate in money, and did many works of charity, as well as this of gratitude to his master, which cost him £1,000. He is very simple, ignorant, but honest and loyal creature.
We all dined at the Countess of Sunderland's (34), afterward to see Signor Verrio's (44) garden, thence to Eton College, to salute the provost, and heard a Latin speech of one of the alumni (it being at the election) and were invited to supper; but took our leave, and got to London that night in good time.

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 June. 09 Jun 1692. I went to Windsor to carry my grandson (10) to Eton School, where I met my Lady Stonehouse and other of my daughter-in-law's relations, who came on purpose to see her before her journey into Ireland. We went to see the castle, which we found furnished and very neatly kept, as formerly, only that the arms in the guard chamber and keep were removed and carried away. An exceeding great storm of wind and rain, in some places stripping the trees of their fruit and leaves as if it had been winter; and an extraordinary wet season, with great floods.

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 July. 23 Jul 1692. I went with my wife (57), son (37), and daughter (23), to Eton, to see my grandson (10), and thence to my Lord Godolphin's (47), at Cranburn, where we lay, and were most honorably entertained. The next day to St. George's Chapel, and returned to London late in the evening.

Around 1695 Charles Talbot 1st Baron Talbot 1685-1737 (10) educated at Eton College.

John Evelyn's Diary 1696 April. 23 Apr 1696. I went to Eton, and dined with Dr. Godolphin, the provost. The schoolmaster assured me there had not been for twenty years a more pregnant youth in that place than my grandson (14). I went to see the King's House at Kensington. It is very noble, though not great. The gallery furnished with the best pictures [from] all the houses, of Titian, Raphael, Correggio, Holbein, Julio Romano, Bassan, Vandyke, Tintoretto, and others; a great collection of porcelain; and a pretty private library. The gardens about it very delicious.

1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Known as "Lady with a Squirrel and a Starling". The subject is believed to be Anne Ashby -1539 wife of Francis Lovell -1552 (18). The starling is probably intended as a rhyming pun of East Harling, where the family had recently inherited the estate of East Harling Hall, East Harling. Squirrels nibbling on nuts feature on the heraldry of the Lovell family: the windows of the Church of St Peter and St Paul, East Harling include two of the family’s arms in stained glass, each showing six red squirrels. The commission may commemorate the birth of a son to the couple in the spring of 1526, but it also showed off their new status as wealthy landowners.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) wearing the Garter and Inter-twined Knots Collar with St George Pendant. Standing three-quarter length, richly dressed in velvet, fur and cloth-of-gold. Holbein has meticulously shown the varied texture of his cloth-of-gold double which is woven into a pomegranate pattern with a variety of different weaves including loops of gold thread. Similarly, he has carefully articulated the band of black satin running down Guildford’s arm against the richer black of the velvet of his sleeve. A lavish use of both shell-gold paint and gold leaf (which has been used to emulate the highlights of the gold thread in the material) emphasises the luxuriousness of the sitter’s dress and his high status. In his right-hand he holds the Comptroller of the Household Staff of Office.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Mary Wotton 1499-1535 (28) when she was thirty-two commissioned with that of her husband Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) possibly to celebrate their marriage. Hung with gold chains and embellished with pearls, Lady Guildford embodies worldly prosperity, and with her prayer book she is also the very image of propriety.

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (36). Drawing of Thomas Elyot 1490-1546 (43).

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (36). Drawing of Margaret Barrow 1500-1560 (33).

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (39). Drawing of Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542 (33).

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (39). Drawing of Margaret More 1505-1544 (31) known by her married name of "Margaret Roper".

Around 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (40). Drawing of Elizabeth Jenks Baroness Rich Leez 1510-1558 (27).

Around 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (41). Drawing of the wife of Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (55). He had three wives. The sitter is believed to his third wife.

After 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Elizabeth Grey Baroness Audley Waldon -1564 based on she having become Lady Audley on 29 Nov 1538. Coloured chalks, silverpoint, pen and ink on pink-primed paper, 29.2 × 20.7 cm, Royal Collection, Windsor Castle. The drawing is inscribed, by a later hand than Holbein's, "The Lady Audley".

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (42). Portrait of Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557 (23).

Around 1542 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (45). Drawing of William Sharington 1495-1553 (47).

Around 1621 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (21). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel.

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox.

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox wearing his Leg Garter and Garter Collar.

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of James Stanley 7th Earl Derby 1607-1651 (27) and Charlotte Thouars Countess Derby 1599-1664 (35) and their daughter.

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox.

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel and Alethea Talbot Countess Arundel.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Ruthven Countess Atholl.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Diana Cecil Countess Oxford.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Hanmer 2nd Baronet Hamner 1612-1678 (26).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Mary Hill 1615-1690 (23).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Anne Boteler 1st Countess Newport.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Isabella Edmondes 4th Baroness De La Warr 1607-1677 (31).

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (25) and (probably) William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (27).

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of Charles Seton 2nd Earl Dunfermline 1615-1672 (24).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

In 1699 Thomas Wyndham 1686-1752 (13) educated at Eton College.

Around 1702 Benjamin Bathurst 1692-1767 (10) educated at Eton College.

Around 1705 Robert Grosvenor 6th Baronet Grosvenor 1695-1755 (9) educated at Eton College.

In 1706 Charles Beauclerk 2nd Duke St Albans 1696-1751 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1706 Francis Willoughby 2nd Baron Middleton 1692-1758 (13) educated at Eton College.

Around 1707 Francis Scott 2nd Duke Buccleuch 1695-1751 (11) educated at Eton College.

On 28 Jan 1712 Thomas Coventry 3rd Earl Coventry 1702-1712 (9) died at Eton College. His brother Gilbert Coventry 4th Earl Coventry 1702-1719 (10) succeeded 4th Earl Coventry, 7th Baron Coventry.

Around 1714 Stephen Fox-Strangeways 1st Earl Ilchester 1704-1776 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1716 Henry Archer 1700-1768 (16) educated at Eton College.

In 1718 Francis Godolphin 2nd Baron Goldolphin 1706-1785 (11) educated at Eton College.

In 1719 John Egerton 1704-1719 (15) died at Eton College.

In 1725 William Talbot 1st Earl Talbot 1710-1782 (14) educated at Eton College.

Around 1726 William Howard 1714- (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1728 James Waldegrave 2nd Earl Waldegrave 1715-1763 (12) educated at Eton College.

Around 1741 Other Lewis Windsor 4th Earl Plymouth 1731-1771 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1742 Archibald Hamilton 9th Duke Hamilton, 6th Duke Brandon 1740-1819 (1) educated at Eton College.

Around 1750 Thomas Orde-Powlett 1st Baron Bolton 1740-1807 (9) educated at Eton College.

In 1753 George Greville 2nd Earl Warwick, 2nd Earl Brooke Warwick Castle 1746-1816 (6) educated at Eton College.

On 04 Mar 1753 Cecil Parker Perceval 1739-1753 (13) died at Eton College.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

Around 1754 Edward Smith-Stanley 12th Earl Derby 1752-1834 (1) educated at Eton College.

In 1755 James Dutton 1st Baron Sherborne 1744-1820 (10) educated at Eton College.

In 1755 Lucius Knightley 1742-1791 (12) educated at Eton College.

Around 1758 Robert Bertie 4th Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1756-1779 (1) educated at Eton College.

Around 1758 Henry Scott 3rd Duke Buccleuch 1746-1812 (11) educated at Eton College.

In 1761 Thomas Frankland 6th Baronet Thirkleby 1750-1831 (10) took custody of at Eton College.

In 1763 James Hamilton 7th Duke Hamilton, 4th Duke Brandon 1755-1769 (7) educated at Eton College.

Around 1763 Douglas Hamilton 8th Duke Hamilton, 5th Duke Brandon 1756-1799 (6) educated at Eton College.

Around 1764 Charles Manners 4th Duke Rutland 1754-1787 (9) educated at Eton College.

In 1764 George Lumley-Sanderson 5th Earl Scarborough 1753-1807 (10) educated at Eton College.

Around 1764 Algernon Percy 1st Earl Beverley 1750-1830 (13) educated at Eton College.

Around 1765 George Legge 3rd Earl Dartmouth 1755-1810 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1768 Peter Burrell 21st Baron Willoughby Eresby, 1st Baron Gwydyr 1754-1820 (13) educated at Eton College.

Around 1773 Thomas Wyndham 1763-1814 (10) educated at Eton College.

Around 1773 John Lumley-Savile 7th Earl Scarborough 1761-1835 (12) educated at Eton College.

Around 1778 Frederick North 5th Earl Guildford 1766-1827 (11) educated at Eton College.

In 1785 Charles Marsham 2nd Earl Romney 1777-1845 (7) educated at Eton College.

Around 1788 Thomas Reynolds-Moreton 1st Earl Ducie 1776-1840 (11) educated at Eton College.

In 1789 Henry George Herbert 2nd Earl Carnarvon 1772-1833 (16) educated at Eton College.

Around 1793 William Cavendish 1783-1812 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1795 Booth Grey 1783-1850 (11) educated at Eton College.

In 1805 Henry Edward John Howard 1795-1868 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1809 Thomas Cecil 1797-1873 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1811 Edward Chichester 4th Marquess County Donegal 1799-1889 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1812 Edward Smith-Stanley 14th Earl Derby 1799-1869 (12) educated at Eton College.

Around 1812 Henry John George Herbert 3rd Earl Carnarvon 1800-1849 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1814 Henry Moreton 1802- educated at Eton College.

Around 1816 Edward Adolphus Seymour 12th Duke Somerset 1804-1885 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1817 Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl Cowley 1804-1884 (12) educated at Eton College.

Around 1818 Wilbraham Egerton 1st Baron Egerton Tatton 1806-1883 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1818 Charles Wellesley 1808-1858 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1821 William Russell 8th Duke Bedford 1809-1872 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1823 Charles Manners 6th Duke Rutland 1815-1888 (7) educated at Eton College.

Around 1829 Edward Frederick Leveson-Gower 1819-1907 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1829 Henry Willoughby 8th Baron Middleton 1817-1877 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1830 John James Robert Manners 7th Duke Rutland 1818-1906 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1832 Poulett George Henry Somerset 1822-1875 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1834 Washington Sewallis Shirley 9th Earl Ferrers 1822-1859 (11) educated at Eton College.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter IV: Presented at Court. After mamma's death I kept house for papa at 8 Upper Grosvenor Street. My brothers were rarely at home. William (17) was educated at Eton, and when he was sixteen years old the Duke of Wellington (73) gave him a commission in the Grenadier Guards. Later he went through the Crimean War, and he retired from the Army in 1883, on account of ill-health, with the rank of Lieutenant-General.
Algernon (16) entered the Navy in 1840 as a midshipman, and the same year took part in the operations on the coast of Syria. After the battle of Acre he received the Turkish medal and clasps : his promotion was rapid, and as Admiral, his flagship, the Shah, engaged the Huascar, which he forced to surrender to the Peruvian authorities.
Now that I was so much alone I occasionally found time hang heavy on my hands, and I welcomed any excitement as a break in the monotony, for of course our period of mourning prevented us entertaining or accepting invitations. One day my maid told me about a fortune-teller who had a wonderful gift for predicting the future. I was very much interested, and made up my mind to consult the oracle. My maid attempted to dissuade me, saying that the woman lived in Bridge Street, Westminster, which was not at all a nice neighbourhood. I have always had my own way and, disguised in a borrowed cloak, bonnet and thick veil, and accompanied by my protesting servant, I started off to Bridge Street late one November afternoon.
It was dusk when we reached Westminster and found Bridge Street, badly lighted and evil-smelling. We knocked at the door, stated whom we wished to see, and we were ushered through a dark passage into a dirty room reeking of tobacco.
The fortune-teller was a wrinkled old woman who was smoking a short clay pipe with evident enjoyment. When I told her what I had come for, she produced a greasy pack of cards, and after I had "crossed her pahn " she commenced to tell my future.
" Ah ! " said she at last, and she looked curiously, " my pretty young lady, fate holds a great deal in store for you. You will not marry for several years, but when you do it will be to a widower — a man in a high position. You will suffer much unkindness before you experience real happiness, you will obtain much and lose much, you will marry again after your husband's death, and you will live to a great age."
I was quite impressed by my "fortune," but I was a little disappointed, for like most girls I had my day-dreams of a young husband, and the prospect of a widower was thus rather depressing.
Strangely enough, the prediction came true, for Lord Cardigan (45) was a widower, and nearly all the men who proposed to me were widowers ! I was asked in marriage by Lord Sherborne (38), a widower with ten children ; by the Duke of Leeds (40), who was a widower with eleven children, and by Christopher Maunsell Talbot (39), once Father of the House of Commons, also a widower with four children. Prince Soltykoff, the Duke of St. Albans (41), Harry Howard, and Disraeli (38) were other widowers who proposed to me, so I suppose I must have had some unaccountable fascination for bereaved husbands.

Around 1845 Francis Edmund Cecil Byng 5th Earl Strafford 1835-1918 (9) educated at Eton College.

In 1850 William Henry Wellesley 2nd Earl Cowley 1834-1895 (15) educated at Eton College.

Around 1856 Digby Wentworth Bayard Willoughby 9th Baron Middleton 1844-1922 (11) educated at Eton College.

Times Newspaper Deaths. 13 Feb 1867. DEATH OF LORD FEVERSHAM. We regret to announce the death, after a short illness, of Lord Feversham, which occurred on Monday night at his residence in Great Cumberland Street. The late William Duncombe Baron Feversham, of Dancombe Park, County York, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, was son of Charles first Lord by his marriage with Lady Charlotte Legge, only daughter of William, second Earl of Dartmouth. He was born on the 14th of January, 1798, so that he was in his 69th year. The deceased nobleman was educted at Eton, and afterwards proceeded to Christ Church, Oxford. He married l8th of December, 1823, Lady Louisa Stewart (63), third daugtter of George, eighth Earl of Galloway, by whom,who survives his Lordship, he leaves issue the Hon. Wiliam E. Duncombe (38), M.P., and Captain the Hon. Cecil Duncombe, of the 1st Life Guards, and three daughters, the Hon Jane, married l1th of April, 1849, to the Hon. Laurence Parsons; the Hon. Gertrude (39), married 27th of November 1&19, to Mr. Francis Horatio Fitzroy (43); and the Hon. Helen, married 18th of July, 1855, to Mr. William Becket Denison. Previously to his accession to tbe peerage on the death of his father in July, 1841, he repreeented Yorkshire in the House of Cormmons from 1826 to 1830. At the general election in 1831 he was unsuceessful candidatu for the coenty, but was returned for the North Riding in the following year, which he continued to represent till 18S1. He voted against the Reforzn Bill of 1832, and was uniformly in favour of agricultural protection. He took great interest in agricultural pursuit, And was a distinguished member of the Royal Agricultural Society, of which he was one of the trustees The deceased noblemna is succeded by his eldest son, the Hon. Wiliam Ernest Duncombe (38), above me6tioned, who was born January 28 1829, and married, August 7, 1851, Mabel Violet, second daughter of the late Right Hon. Sir James Graham, of Netherby. He was M.P. for East Retford from February, 1852, to 1857 and elected for the North Riding of Yorkshire inI 1859, anA was also returned at the last general election After a sharp contest, being second on the poll. He is Captain of the Yorkshire Yeomianry (Hussars) Cavalry, and Lientenent Colonel of the 2d North Riding like his deceased father, he is a supporter of Lord Derby, but in favour of such a measure of Parliamentary Reforms would give no undue preponderance to any one class, but would ensure to a fair distribution of political privileges.

Around 1880 Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley 1866-1919 (13) educated at Eton College.

Around 1897 Edward William Spencer Cavendish 10th Duke Devonshire 1895-1950 (1) educated at Eton College.

Around 1898 John Henry Montagu Manners 9th Duke Rutland 1886-1940 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1900 Hastings William Russell 12th Duke Bedford 1888-1953 (11) educated at Eton College.

Around 1915 Charles Arthur Francis Cavendish 1905-1944 (9) educated at Eton College.

Around 1925 Alexander Ramsay 1919-2000 (5) educated at Eton College.

Around 1925 Charles Beauclerk 13th Duke St Albans 1915-1988 (9) educated at Eton College.

William Cavendish 1917-1944 educated at Eton College.

William Feilding 6th Earl Desmond, 7th Earl Denbigh 1796-1865 educated at Eton College.

Roger Grey 10th Earl Stamford, 6th Earl Warrington 1896-1976 educated at Eton College.

Henry Howard 4th Earl Carlisle 1694-1758 educated at Eton College.

George Howard 9th Earl Carlisle 1843-1911 educated at Eton College.

Charles James Ruthven Howard 12th Earl Carlisle 1923-1994 educated at Eton College.

George William Beaumont Howard 13th Earl Carlisle 1949- educated at Eton College.

William Neville 1st Marquess Abergavenny 1826-1915 educated at Eton College.

John Henry Guy Neville 5th Marquess Abergavenny 1914-2000 educated at Eton College.

David Fitzroy 11th Duke Beaufort educated at Eton College.

Eton College Chapel, Eton College

On 29 Jan 1733 Henry Godolphin 1648-1733 (84) died at Windsor. He was buried at Eton College Chapel, Eton College.

On 22 Apr 1751 Francis Scott 2nd Duke Buccleuch 1695-1751 (56) died. He was buried at Eton College Chapel, Eton College. His grandson Henry Scott 3rd Duke Buccleuch 1746-1812 (4) succeeded 3rd Duke Buccleuch.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

Bray, Windsor

Holyport, Bray, Windsor

Philiberts' Manor, Holyport, Bray, Windsor

In Jul 1691 William Chiffinch 1602-1691 (89) died at Philiberts' Manor, Holyport, Bray, Windsor.

Home Park, Windsor

Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor

On 18 Dec 1862 Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 was buried at Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861.

10 Feb 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (47). Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Hayter included portraits of fifty-six of those present at the occasion and sittings took place over the next year. The Queen (20) sat for him in March in her 'Bridal dress, veil, wreath & all', and Prince Albert (20) also posed for his portrait several times during the following months. Hayter's family too helped out with his son, Henry, modelling the Prince's costume, while his daughter Mary posed for the Queen's arm and wearing the veil. Victoria's aunt Queen Adelaide (47), however, was unwilling to co-operate and the artist had to refer to a miniature for her likeness. Hayter included himself in the painting, on the lower right, with his sketchbook and pencil.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26).

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (53). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (39).

Duchess of Kent's Mausoleum, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor

On 16 May 1861 Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (74) died. She was buried at Duchess of Kent's Mausoleum, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

1835. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (42). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (48).

Around 1857. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (51). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (70).

Around 1832. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (31). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (45).

Frogmore House, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor

On 08 Jan 1864 Albert Victor Windsor 1864-1892 was born to Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (22) and Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (19) at Frogmore House, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (4).

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith Painter 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Drawing of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 on his deathbed.

Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor

On 28 Oct 1928 Rupert Teck 1907-1928 was reburied at Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

On 30 Aug 1968 Marina Glücksburg Duchess Kent 1906-1968 funeral was held at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. She was buried in the Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

On 28 May 1972 Edward VIII King United Kingdom 1894-1972 (77) died. He was buried at Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

On 16 Apr 1981 George Cambridge 2nd Marquess Cambridge 1895-1981 (85) died at Little Abington. He was buried at Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

On 29 May 1994 Princess May of Teck 1906-1994 (88) died. She was buried at Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

Long Walk House, Windsor

Times Newspaper Court Circulars. 04 Feb 1905.
We have to announce the death of Florence, Marchioness of Hastings (62), wife of Sir George Chetwynd, Bart., which took place on Sunday morning at Long Walk House, Windsor, after a few days' illness. The funeral will take place at Grendon, Atherstone, on Thursday next, at 2 o'clock.
NOTE. On 03 Feb 1907 Florence Cecilia Paget Marchioness Hastings 1842-1907 (64) died.

Runnymede, Windsor

Magna Carta

On 15 Jun 1215 John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 (48) met with his Baron's at Runnymede, Windsor where he agreed to the terms of the Magna Carta which attempted to reduce the King's authority through political reform. Those who signed as surety included:
Roger Bigod 2nd Earl Norfolk 1144-1221 (71),
his son Hugh Bigod 3rd Earl Norfolk 1182-1225 (33),
Henry Bohun 1st Earl Hereford 1176-1220 (39),
Richard Clare 3rd Earl Hertford 1153-1217 (62),
his son Gilbert Clare 5th Earl Gloucester, 4th Earl Hertford 1180-1230 (35),
William "The Younger" Marshal 2nd Earl Pembroke 1190-1231 (25),
William Mowbray 6th Baron Thirsk, 4th Baron Mowbray 1173-1224 (42),
Saer Quincy 1st Earl Winchester 1170-1219 (45),
Robert Ros 1172-1226 (43), Richard Percy 5th Baron Percy Topcliffe 1170-1244 (45),
Robert Vere 3rd Earl Oxford 1165-1221 (50),
Eustace Vesci 1169-1216 (46),
John Fitzrobert 3rd Baron Warkworth 1190-1241 (25),
John Lacy 2nd Earl Lincoln 1192-1240 (23),
William Dalbini -1236, Geoffrey Mandeville 2nd Earl Essex 1191-1216 (24),
Robert Clare-Fitzwalter -1235,
William Forz 3rd Earl Albermarle aka Aumale -1242,
William Hardell Lord Mayor,
William Huntingfield -1291,
William Llanvallei -1217,
William Malet 1st Baron Curry Mallet 1174-1215,
Roger Montbegon -1226, Richard Montfichet -1267,
Geoffrey Saye 1155-1230 (60) signed as surety the Magna Carta.
Ranulf de Blondeville Gernon 6th Earl Chester, 1st Earl Lincoln 1170-1232 (45) witnessed.

St John's Church, Windsor

Times Newspaper Funerals. 24 Dec 1861. Yesterday, with little of the pomp and pageantry of a State ceremonial, but with every outward mark of respect, and with all the solemnity which befitted his high station and his public virties, the mortal remains of the husband of our Queen (42) were interred in the last resting-place of England's Sovereigns-the Chapel Royal of St. George's, Windsor. By the express desire of his Royal Highness the funeral was of the plainest and most private character; but in the Chapel, to do honour to his obsequies, were assembled all the chiefest men of the State, and throughout England, by every sign of sorrow and imourning, the nation manifested its sense of the loss wlhich it has sustaiined. Windsor itself wore an aspect of the most profound gloom. Every shop was closed and every blind drawn down. The streets were silent and almost deserted, and all wvho appeared abroad were dressed in the deepest mourning. The great bell of Windsor Castle clanged out: its doleful sound at intervals from an early hour, and minute bells were tolled also at St. John's Church. At the parish church of Cleover and at St. John's there were services in the morning and: aternoon, and the day was observed throughout the Royal borough in the strictest manner. The weather was in character with the occasion, a chill, damp air, with a dull leaden sky above, increased the gloom which hung over all. There were but few visitors in the town, for the procession did not pass beyond the immediate precincts of the Chapel and Castle, and none were admitted except those connected with the Castle andi their friends. At 11 o'clock a strong force of the A division took possession of the avenues leading to the Chapel Royal, and from that time only the guests specially invited and those who were to take part in the ceremonial were allowed to pass. Shortly afterwards a of honour of the Grenadier Guards, of which regiment his Royal Highness was Colonel, with the colonrs of the regiment shrouded in crape, marched in and took up its position before the principal entrance to the Chapel Royal. Another guard of honour from the same regiment was also on duty in the Quadrangle at the entrance to the State apartments. They were speedily followed by a squadron of the 2nd Life Guards dismounted, and by two companies of the Fusileer Guards, who were drawn uip in single file along each side of the road by which the procession was to pass, from the Norman gateway to the Chapel door. The officers wore the deepest military mourning-scarves, sword-knots, and rosettes of crape. In the Rome Park was stationed a troop of Horse Artillery, which commenced firing minute guns at the end of the Long Walk, advancing slowly until it reached the Castle gates just at the close of the ceremony. The Ministers, the officers of the Queen's Household, and other distinguished personages who had been honoured with an invitation to attend the ceremonial, reached Windsor a special train from Paddington. They were met by carriages provided for them at the station, and began to arrive at the Chapel Royal soon after 11 o'clock. The Earl of Derby (62), the Archbishop of Canterbury (81), Earl Russell (69), and the Duke of Buccleuch were among the first to make their appearance, and as they alighted at the door of the Chapel they were received by the proper officials and conducted to the seats appointed for them in the Choir. In the Great Quadrangle were drawn up the hearse and the mourning coaches, and, all the preparations having been completed within the Castle, the procession began to be formed shortly before 12 o'clock. It had been originally intended that it should leave the Castle by the St. George's gate, and, proceeding down Castle-hill, approach the Chapel through Henry VII.'s gateway, but at a late hour this arrangement was changed, and the shorter route by the Norman gatewvay was chosen.
The crowd which had gradually collected at the foot of Castle-hill, owing to this change, saw nothing of the procession but the empty carriages as they returned to the Castle after setting down at the Chapel. The few spectators who were fortunate enough to gain admission to the Lower Ward stood in a narrow fringe along the edge of the flags in front of the houses of the Poor Knights, and their presence was the only exception to the strict privacy of the ceremonial. The Prince of Wales (20) and the other Royal mourners assembled in the Oak Room, but did not form part of the procession. They were conveyed to the Chapel in private carriages before the coffin was placed in the hearse, passing through St. George's gatewayinto the Lower Ward. In the first carriage were the Prince of Wales (20), Prince Arthur (11), and the Duke of Saxe Coburg (8). The Crown Prince of Prussia (30), the Duke of Brabant (26), and the Count of Flanders (24) followed in the next; and in the others were the Duke de Nemours (47), Prince Louis of Hesse (24), Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar (38), and the Maharajah Dhuleep Singh, with the gentlemen of their respective suites. Scarcely had they alighted at the door of Wolsey's Chapel, from which they were conducted through the Chapter Room to the door of the Chapel Royal to be in readiness to meet the coffin, when the first minute gun fired in tlhe distance, and the rattle of the troops reversing arms announced that the procession had started, and exactly at 12 o'clock the first mourning coach moved from under the Norman gateway. First came nine mourning coaches, each drawn by four horses, conveying the Physicians, Equerries, and other members of the household of the late Prince. In the last were the Lord Steward (63) (Earl St. Germans), the Lord Chamberlain (56) (Viscount Sidney), and the Master of the Horse (57) (the Marquis of Ailesbury). The carriages and trappings were of the plainest description; the horses had black velvet housings and feathers, but on the carriages there, were no feathers or ornaments of any kind. The mourning coaches were followed by one of the Queen's carriages, drawn by six horses, and attended by servants in State liveries, in which was the Groom of the Stole (26), Earl Spencer, carrying the crowvn, and a Lord of the Bedchamber, Lord George Lennox, carrying the baton, sword, and hat of his late Royal Highness. Next escorted by a troop of the 2nd Life Guards, came the hearse, drawn by six black horses, which, like the carriages, was quite plain and unornamented. On the housings of the horses and on the sides of theW hearse were emblazoned the scutcheons of Her Majesty and of the Prince, each surmounted by a, crown, the Prince's arms being in black and Her Majesty's in white. The procession was closed by four State carriages.

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861.

10 Feb 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (47). Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Hayter included portraits of fifty-six of those present at the occasion and sittings took place over the next year. The Queen (20) sat for him in March in her 'Bridal dress, veil, wreath & all', and Prince Albert (20) also posed for his portrait several times during the following months. Hayter's family too helped out with his son, Henry, modelling the Prince's costume, while his daughter Mary posed for the Queen's arm and wearing the veil. Victoria's aunt Queen Adelaide (47), however, was unwilling to co-operate and the artist had to refer to a miniature for her likeness. Hayter included himself in the painting, on the lower right, with his sketchbook and pencil.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26).

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (53). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (39).

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith Painter 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

Before 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871. Portrait of John Russell 1st Earl Russell 1792-1878 and Henry Vassall-Fox 3rd Baron Holland 1773-1840.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (4).

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Drawing of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 on his deathbed.

In 1908 John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (51). Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (57).

Around 1862. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (56). Victoria Empress Germany Queen Consort Prussia 1840-1901 (21) and Frederick III King Prussia 1831-1888 (30) and their chlidren.

Around 1842 . John Phillip Painter 1817-1867 (24). Victorias Wedding with Victoria Empress Germany Queen Consort Prussia 1840-1901 (1) and Frederick III King Prussia 1831-1888 (10)

1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Princess Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1822-1857 (17) around the time of her marriage to Prince Louis Duke Nemours 1814-1896 (25) on 26 Apr 1840.

Windsor Castle

Around 1075 Gerald Fitzwalter 1075-1135 was born at Windsor Castle.

In 1105 Maurice Fitzgerald 1105-1176 was born to Gerald Fitzwalter 1075-1135 (30) and Nest ferch Rhys Dinefwr 1085-1135 (20) at Windsor Castle.

Marriage of King Henry I and Adeliza of Louvain

On 24 Jan 1121, three months after the disaster that was the Sinking of The White Ship in which Henry's only legitimate son was drowned, Henry needed an heir quickly. He (53) and Adeliza of Louvain Queen Consort England (18) were married at Windsor Castle. She (18) by marriage Queen Consort England. Despite fourteen years of marriage they didn't have any children. Following Henry's death she married William Daubigny 1st Earl Lincoln, 1st Earl Arundel 1109-1176 (12) with whom she had seven children.

On 06 Jan 1156 Matilda Plantagenet Duchess Saxony 1156-1189 was born to Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (22) and Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (34) at Windsor Castle (probably) and named after her paternal grandmother Empress Matilda Duchess Normandy 1102-1167 (53).

Before 1202 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain, 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 was appointed Count Mortain (Mortagne), and as Constable Dover Castle, Constable Windsor Castle, Constable Chinon Castle.

In 1210 Maud "Lady of Hay" St Valery Baroness Bramber 1155-1210 (55) was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

In 1210 William Braose -1210 was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

On 29 Sep 1240 Margaret Plantagenet 1240-1275 was born to Henry III King England 1207-1272 (32) and Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (17) at Windsor Castle.

13 Feb 1254. Letter XII. Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 and Richard Cornwall 1st Earl Cornwall 1209-1272 to Henry III King England 1207-1272. 13 Feb 1254. Letter XII. Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (31) and Richard Cornwall 1st Earl Cornwall 1209-1272 (45) to Henry III King England 1207-1272 (46).
To their most excellent lord, the lord Henry, by God's grace the illustrious king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, his most devoted consort Eleanora, by the same grace queen of England, and his devoted and faithful Richard earl of Cornwall, send health with all reverence and honour.
Be it known to your revered lordship that the lords the earl marshall (45) and John de Bailiol (46), being hindered at sea by a contrary wind during twelve days, came to us in England on the Wednesday after the Purification of Blessed Mary last past.
We had been treating with your prelates and the magnates of your kingdom of England before the advent of the said Earl and John, on the quinzaines of St. Hilary last past about your subsidy, and after the arrival of the said Earl and John, with certain of the aforesaid prelates and magnates, the archbishops and bishops answered us that if the King of Castile (32) should come against you in Gascony each of them would assist you from his own property, so that you would be under perpetual obli gations to them; but with regard to granting you an aid from their clergy, they could do nothing without the assent of the said clergy; nor do they believe that their clergy can be induced to give you any help, unless the tenth of clerical goods granted to you for the first year of the crusade, which should begin in the present year, might be relaxed at once by your letters patent, and the collection of the said tenth for the said crusade, for the two following years, might be put in respite up to the term of two years before your passage to the Holy Land; and they will give diligence and treat with the clergy submitted to them, to induce them to assist you according to that form with a tenth of their benefices, in case the King of Castile should attack you in Gascony; but at the departure of the bearer of these presents no subsidy had as yet been granted by the aforesaid clergy. Moreover, as we have elsewhere signified to you, if the King of Castile should come against you in Gascony, all the earls and barons of your kingdom, who are able to cross the sea, will come to you in Gascony, with all their power; but from the other laymen who do not sail over to you we do not think that we can obtain any help for your use, unless you write to your lieutenants in England firmly to maintain your great charters of liberties, and to let this be distinctly perceived by your letters to each Sheriff of your kingdom, and publicly proclaimed through each county of the said kingdom; since, by this means, they would be more strongly animated cheerfully to grant you aid; for many persons complain that the aforesaid charters are not kept by your sheriffs and other bailiffs as they ought to be kept. Be it known, therefore, to your lordship, that we shall hold a conference with the aforesaid clergy and laity at Westminster, in the quinzaines of Passover next, about the aforesaid aid, and we supplicate your lordship that you will write us your good pleasure concerning these affairs with the utmost possible haste. For you will find us prepared and devoted, according to our power, to solicit the aforesaid aid for your use, and to do and procure all other things . . . .* which can contribute to your convenience and the increase of your honour. Given at Windsor, the 13th of February, in the thirty-eighth year of your reign.

On Apr 1266 Guy Montfort Count Nola 1244-1288 (22) escaped at Windsor Castle.

After 15 May 1266 Robert Ferrers 6th Earl Derby 1239-1279 was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

On 05 May 1269 Henry "Almain" Cornwall 1235-1271 (33) and Constance Béarn -1310 were married at Windsor Castle.

On 18 Jun 1269 Eleanor Plantagenet 1269- was born to Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (30) and Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (28) at Windsor Castle.

On 15 Mar 1275 Margaret Plantagenet Duchess Brabant 1275-1333 was born to Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (35) and Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (34) at Windsor Castle.

On 12 Nov 1312 King Edward III England was born to King Edward II of England (28) and Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (17) at Windsor Castle.

In 1328 Thomas Foxley 1305-1360 (23) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle which position he held for life.

Marriage of Edward "The Black Prince" and Joan "The Fair Maid of Kent"

On 10 Oct 1361 Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince Wales 1330-1376 (31) and Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Plantagenet Princess Wales 1328-1385 (33) were married (he was her half first-cousin once-removed) at Windsor Castle. Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Plantagenet Princess Wales 1328-1385 (33) by marriage Prince Wales.
His first wife, her second (or third depending on how you count them) husband. She had four children already. They had known each other since childhood. Thirty-one and thirty-three respectively. A curious choice for the heir to the throne; foreign princesses were usual. They were married nearly fifteen years and had two children.

On 27 Jul 1365 Enguerrand de Coucy 1340-1397 (25) and Isabella Plantagenet 1332-1382 (33) were married at Windsor Castle.

In 1377 Simon Burley 1340-1388 (37) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

On 06 Dec 1421 Henry VI King England, II King France 1421-1471 was born to Henry V King England 1386-1422 (35) and Catherine of Valois Queen Consort England 1401-1437 (20) at Windsor Castle.

In 1454 Edward of Westinster Prince Wales 1453-1471 was appointed Prince Wales at Windsor Castle.

In 1461 John Bourchier 1st Baron Berners 1416-1474 (45) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

On 11 Aug 1467 Mary York 1467-1482 was born to Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (25) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (30) at Windsor Castle.

On Mar 1477 George York 1st Duke Bedford 1477-1479 was born to Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (34) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (40) at Windsor Castle.

On Mar 1479 George York 1st Duke Bedford 1477-1479 (2) died of plague at Windsor Castle.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1486. This yeare Prince Arthure was borne at Windsore.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1507. This yeare, about the latter ende of Januarye, the Kinge of Castell and his wife (28) were driven into Englande, and had here great cheare. The King was made Knight of the Garter at Windsore. Note. possibly 1506 rather tan 1507?.

Around 1498. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519 (38). Portrait of Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555 (19).

Anne Boleyn's Investiture as Marchioness of Pembroke

On 01 Sep 1532 Anne Boleyn Queen Consort England (31) was created 1st Marquess Pembroke with Henry VIII (41) performing the investiture at Windsor Castle. Note she was created Marquess rather than the female form Marchioness alhough Marchioness if a modern form that possibly didn't exist at the time.
Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire, 1st Earl Ormonde 1477-1539 (55), Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (48), Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (59), Eleanor Paston Baroness Ros Helmsley 1495-1551 (37), Jean Dinteville, Edward Lee Archbishop of York 1482-1544 (50), John Stokesley Bishop of London 1475-1539 (57) were present.
Stephen Gardiner Bishop of Winchester 1483-1555 (49) read the Patent of Creation.
Mary Howard Duchess Richmond and Somerset 1519-1557 (13) carried Anne's (31) train replacing her mother Elizabeth Stafford Duchess Norfolk 1497-1558 (35) who had been banished from Court. Anne (31)she were cousins.

Around 1580 based on a work of around 1534.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Anne Boleyn Queen Consort England.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

Around 1543 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (59).

Death of Amy Robsart wife of Robert Dudley

On 08 Sep 1560 , the day of the Abingdon Fair, Amy Robsart -1560 died from falling down stairs at Cumnor Place, Abingdon. She was married to Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (28), favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (27), who was with Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (27) at Windsor Castle at the time. Foul play was suspected but not proven. The event was regarded as suspicious by many. The Queen's reputation being tarnished she could not risk a marriage with Dudley.

On 16 May 1605 Prince Ulrik Oldenburg 1578-1624 (26) was appointed 399th Knight of the Garter: James I at Windsor Castle.

In 1628 Henry Rich 1st Earl Holland 1590-1649 was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

In 1658 Robert Howard Playwright Politician 1626-1698 (31) was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 November. 23 Nov 1666. At London, I heard an extraordinary case before a Committee of the whole House of Commons, in the Commons' House of Parliament, between one Captain Taylor and my Lord Viscount Mordaunt (40), where, after the lawyers had pleaded and the witnesses been examined, such foul and dishonorable things were produced against his Lordship (40), of tyranny during his government of Windsor Castle, of which he was Constable, incontinence, and suborning witnesses (of which last, one Sir Richard Breames was most concerned), that I was exceedingly interested for his Lordship (40), who was my special friend, and husband of the most virtuous lady (34) in the world. We sat till near ten at night, and yet but half the counsel had done on behalf of the plaintiff. The question then was put for bringing in of lights to sit longer. This lasted so long before it was determined, and raised such a confused noise among the members, that a stranger would have been astonished at it. I admire that there is not a rationale to regulate such trifling accidents, which consume much time, and is a reproach to the gravity of so great an assembly of sober men.
Note. John Mordaunt 1st Viscount Mordaunt 1626-1675 (40) was accused by William Taylor, Surveyor of Windsor Castle, of having imprisoned him and raped his daughter. He was subsequently pardoned by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (36) and left the country.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 August. 28 Aug 1670. One of the Canons preached; then followed the offering of the Knights of the Order, according to custom; first the poor Knights, in procession, then, the Canons in their formalities, the Dean and Chancellor, then his Majesty (40) (the Sovereign), the Duke of York (36), Prince Rupert (50); and, lastly, the Earl of Oxford (43), being all the Knights that were then at Court.
I dined with the Treasurer (40), and consulted with him what pieces I was to add; in the afternoon the King (40) took me aside into the balcony over the terrace, extremely pleased with what had been told him I had begun, in order to his commands, and enjoining me to proceed vigorously in it. He told me he had ordered the Secretaries of State to give me all necessary assistance of papers and particulars relating to it and enjoining me to make it a LITTLE KEEN, for that the Hollanders had very unhandsomely abused him in their pictures, books, and libels.
Windsor was now going to be repaired, being exceedingly ragged and ruinous. Prince Rupert (50), the Constable, had begun to trim up the keep or high round Tower, and handsomely adorned his hall with furniture of arms, which was very singular, by so disposing the pikes, muskets, pistols, bandoleers, holsters, drums, back, breast, and headpieces, as was very extraordinary. Thus, those huge steep stairs ascending to it had the walls invested with this martial furniture, all new and bright, so disposing the bandoleers, holsters, and drums, as to represent festoons, and that without any confusion, trophy-like. From the hall we went into his bedchamber, and ample rooms hung with tapestry, curious and effeminate pictures, so extremely different from the other, which presented nothing but war and horror.
The King (40) passed most of his time in hunting the stag, and walking in the park, which he was now planting with rows of trees.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 March. 01 Mar 1671. I caused Mr. Gibbon (22) to bring to Whitehall his excellent piece of carving, where being come, I advertised his Majesty (40), who asked me where it was; I told him in Sir Richard Browne's (66) (my father-in-law) chamber, and that if it pleased his Majesty (40) to appoint whither it should be brought, being large and though of wood, heavy, I would take care for it. "No," says the King (40), "show me the way, I'll go to Sir Richard's (66) chamber," which he immediately did, walking along the entries after me; as far as the ewry, till he came up into the room, where I also lay. No sooner was he entered and cast his eyes on the work, but he was astonished at the curiosity of it; and having considered it a long time, and discoursed with Mr. Gibbon (22), whom I brought to kiss his hand, he commanded it should be immediately carried to the Queen's (32) side to show her. It was carried up into her bedchamber, where she (32) and the King (40) looked on and admired it again; the King (40), being called away, left us with the Queen (32), believing she would have bought it, it being a crucifix; but, when his Majesty (40) was gone, a French peddling woman, one Madame de Boord, who used to bring petticoats and fans, and baubles, out of France to the ladies, began to find fault with several things in the work, which she understood no more than an ass, or a monkey, so as in a kind of indignation, I caused the person who brought it to carry it back to the chamber, finding the Queen (32) so much governed by an ignorant Frenchwoman, and this incomparable artist had his labor only for his pains, which not a little displeased me; and he was fain to send it down to his cottage again; he not long after sold it for £80, though well worth £100, without the frame, to Sir George Viner (32).
His Majesty's (40) Surveyor, Mr. Wren (47), faithfully promised me to employ him (22). I having also bespoke his Majesty (40) for his work at Windsor Castle, which my friend, Mr. May (49), the architect there, was going to alter, and repair universally; for, on the next day, I had a fair opportunity of talking to his Majesty (40) about it, in the lobby next the Queen's (32) side, where I presented him with some sheets of my history. I thence walked with him through St. James's Park to the garden, where I both saw and heard a very familiar discourse between ... and Mrs. Nelly (21), as they called an impudent comedian, she looking out of her garden on a terrace at the top of the wall, and ... [Note. the elipsis here is John Evelyn being coy about the King (40)'s conversation with Nell Gwyn.] standing on the green walk under it. I was heartily sorry at this scene. Thence the King (40) walked to the Duchess of Cleveland (30), another lady of pleasure, and curse of our nation.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1664 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (45). Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 (23) and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 June. 01 Jun 1671. An installation at Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 1674 August. 21 Aug 1674. In one of the meadows at the foot of the long Terrace below the Windsor Castle, works were thrown up to show the King (44) a representation of the city of Maestricht, newly taken by the French. Bastians, bulwarks, ramparts, palisadoes, graffs, horn-works, counter-scarps, etc., were constructed. It was attacked by the Duke of Monmouth (25) (newly come from the real siege) and the Duke of York (40), with a little army, to show their skill in tactics. On Saturday night they made their approaches, opened trenches, raised batteries, took the counter-scarp and ravelin, after a stout defense; great guns fired on both sides, grenadoes shot, mines sprung, parties sent out, attempts of raising the siege, prisoners taken, parleys; and, in short, all the circumstances of a formal siege, to appearance, and, what is most strange all without disorder, or ill accident, to the great satisfaction of a thousand spectators. Being night, it made a formidable show. The siege being over, I went with Mr. Pepys (41) back to London, where we arrived about three in the morning.

On 25 May 1682 Charles Lennard 1682-1684 was born to Thomas Lennard Earl of Sussex 1654-1715 (28) and Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 (21) at Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 June. 09 Jun 1692. I went to Windsor to carry my grandson (10) to Eton School, where I met my Lady Stonehouse and other of my daughter-in-law's relations, who came on purpose to see her before her journey into Ireland. We went to see the castle, which we found furnished and very neatly kept, as formerly, only that the arms in the guard chamber and keep were removed and carried away. An exceeding great storm of wind and rain, in some places stripping the trees of their fruit and leaves as if it had been winter; and an extraordinary wet season, with great floods.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

On 21 May 1718 George Henry Lee 3rd Earl Lichfield 1718-1772 was born to George Henry Lee 2nd Earl Lichfield 1690-1743 (28) and Frances Hales Countess Lichfield 1697-1769 (21) at Windsor Castle.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Frances Hales Countess Lichfield 1697-1769.

In 1730 Charles Beauclerk 2nd Duke St Albans 1696-1751 (33) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle and Warden of the Windsor Forest.

In 1791 James Brudenell 5th Earl Cardigan 1725-1811 (65) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

Death of King George III

On 29 Jan 1820 George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (81) died at Windsor Castle. His son George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (57) succeeded IV King United Kingdom: Hanover. Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (51) by marriage Queen Consort England. His reign the third longest after Victoria and Elizabeth II.

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (19).

Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.

In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (33). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29) when Prince of Wales.

In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (48). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (44) in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

In 1798. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830 (28). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (29).

In 1823. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (30). The Trial of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.

1819. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (41). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (50).

1820. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (42). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (51).

Death of King William IV Succession of Queen Victoria

On 20 Jun 1837 William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (71) died at Windsor Castle. His niece Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (18) succeeded I King United Kingdom: Hanover. His brother Ernest Augustus King Hanover 1771-1851 (66) succeeded King Hanover. Frederica Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort Hanover (59) by marriage Queen Consort Hanover.
At 5am Francis Nathaniel Conyngham 2nd Marquess Conyngham 1797-1876 (40) and William Howley Archbishop of Canterbury 1766-1848 (71) went to Kensington Palace to inform the Princess she was now Queen. Francis Nathaniel Conyngham 2nd Marquess Conyngham 1797-1876 (40) was the first to address her as 'Your Majesty'.

Around 1830. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (76). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

1830. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (52). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

10 Feb 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (47). Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Hayter included portraits of fifty-six of those present at the occasion and sittings took place over the next year. The Queen (20) sat for him in March in her 'Bridal dress, veil, wreath & all', and Prince Albert (20) also posed for his portrait several times during the following months. Hayter's family too helped out with his son, Henry, modelling the Prince's costume, while his daughter Mary posed for the Queen's arm and wearing the veil. Victoria's aunt Queen Adelaide (47), however, was unwilling to co-operate and the artist had to refer to a miniature for her likeness. Hayter included himself in the painting, on the lower right, with his sketchbook and pencil.

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith Painter 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

On 06 Aug 1844 Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 was born to Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (24) and Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25) at Windsor Castle.

On 23 Jan 1874 Unknown Artist. The Wedding of Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (29) and Maria Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov 1853-1920 (20).

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26).

Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (53). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (39).

Death of Prince Albert

On 14 Dec 1861 Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (42) died at Windsor Castle. His wife, Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (42) never recovered from his death spending, more or less, the remainder of her life in mourning.

Times Newspaper Funerals. 24 Dec 1861. Yesterday, with little of the pomp and pageantry of a State ceremonial, but with every outward mark of respect, and with all the solemnity which befitted his high station and his public virties, the mortal remains of the husband of our Queen (42) were interred in the last resting-place of England's Sovereigns-the Chapel Royal of St. George's, Windsor. By the express desire of his Royal Highness the funeral was of the plainest and most private character; but in the Chapel, to do honour to his obsequies, were assembled all the chiefest men of the State, and throughout England, by every sign of sorrow and imourning, the nation manifested its sense of the loss wlhich it has sustaiined. Windsor itself wore an aspect of the most profound gloom. Every shop was closed and every blind drawn down. The streets were silent and almost deserted, and all wvho appeared abroad were dressed in the deepest mourning. The great bell of Windsor Castle clanged out: its doleful sound at intervals from an early hour, and minute bells were tolled also at St. John's Church. At the parish church of Cleover and at St. John's there were services in the morning and: aternoon, and the day was observed throughout the Royal borough in the strictest manner. The weather was in character with the occasion, a chill, damp air, with a dull leaden sky above, increased the gloom which hung over all. There were but few visitors in the town, for the procession did not pass beyond the immediate precincts of the Chapel and Castle, and none were admitted except those connected with the Castle andi their friends. At 11 o'clock a strong force of the A division took possession of the avenues leading to the Chapel Royal, and from that time only the guests specially invited and those who were to take part in the ceremonial were allowed to pass. Shortly afterwards a of honour of the Grenadier Guards, of which regiment his Royal Highness was Colonel, with the colonrs of the regiment shrouded in crape, marched in and took up its position before the principal entrance to the Chapel Royal. Another guard of honour from the same regiment was also on duty in the Quadrangle at the entrance to the State apartments. They were speedily followed by a squadron of the 2nd Life Guards dismounted, and by two companies of the Fusileer Guards, who were drawn uip in single file along each side of the road by which the procession was to pass, from the Norman gateway to the Chapel door. The officers wore the deepest military mourning-scarves, sword-knots, and rosettes of crape. In the Rome Park was stationed a troop of Horse Artillery, which commenced firing minute guns at the end of the Long Walk, advancing slowly until it reached the Castle gates just at the close of the ceremony. The Ministers, the officers of the Queen's Household, and other distinguished personages who had been honoured with an invitation to attend the ceremonial, reached Windsor a special train from Paddington. They were met by carriages provided for them at the station, and began to arrive at the Chapel Royal soon after 11 o'clock. The Earl of Derby (62), the Archbishop of Canterbury (81), Earl Russell (69), and the Duke of Buccleuch were among the first to make their appearance, and as they alighted at the door of the Chapel they were received by the proper officials and conducted to the seats appointed for them in the Choir. In the Great Quadrangle were drawn up the hearse and the mourning coaches, and, all the preparations having been completed within the Castle, the procession began to be formed shortly before 12 o'clock. It had been originally intended that it should leave the Castle by the St. George's gate, and, proceeding down Castle-hill, approach the Chapel through Henry VII.'s gateway, but at a late hour this arrangement was changed, and the shorter route by the Norman gatewvay was chosen.
The crowd which had gradually collected at the foot of Castle-hill, owing to this change, saw nothing of the procession but the empty carriages as they returned to the Castle after setting down at the Chapel. The few spectators who were fortunate enough to gain admission to the Lower Ward stood in a narrow fringe along the edge of the flags in front of the houses of the Poor Knights, and their presence was the only exception to the strict privacy of the ceremonial. The Prince of Wales (20) and the other Royal mourners assembled in the Oak Room, but did not form part of the procession. They were conveyed to the Chapel in private carriages before the coffin was placed in the hearse, passing through St. George's gatewayinto the Lower Ward. In the first carriage were the Prince of Wales (20), Prince Arthur (11), and the Duke of Saxe Coburg (8). The Crown Prince of Prussia (30), the Duke of Brabant (26), and the Count of Flanders (24) followed in the next; and in the others were the Duke de Nemours (47), Prince Louis of Hesse (24), Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar (38), and the Maharajah Dhuleep Singh, with the gentlemen of their respective suites. Scarcely had they alighted at the door of Wolsey's Chapel, from which they were conducted through the Chapter Room to the door of the Chapel Royal to be in readiness to meet the coffin, when the first minute gun fired in tlhe distance, and the rattle of the troops reversing arms announced that the procession had started, and exactly at 12 o'clock the first mourning coach moved from under the Norman gateway. First came nine mourning coaches, each drawn by four horses, conveying the Physicians, Equerries, and other members of the household of the late Prince. In the last were the Lord Steward (63) (Earl St. Germans), the Lord Chamberlain (56) (Viscount Sidney), and the Master of the Horse (57) (the Marquis of Ailesbury). The carriages and trappings were of the plainest description; the horses had black velvet housings and feathers, but on the carriages there, were no feathers or ornaments of any kind. The mourning coaches were followed by one of the Queen's carriages, drawn by six horses, and attended by servants in State liveries, in which was the Groom of the Stole (26), Earl Spencer, carrying the crowvn, and a Lord of the Bedchamber, Lord George Lennox, carrying the baton, sword, and hat of his late Royal Highness. Next escorted by a troop of the 2nd Life Guards, came the hearse, drawn by six black horses, which, like the carriages, was quite plain and unornamented. On the housings of the horses and on the sides of theW hearse were emblazoned the scutcheons of Her Majesty and of the Prince, each surmounted by a, crown, the Prince's arms being in black and Her Majesty's in white. The procession was closed by four State carriages.

Before 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871. Portrait of John Russell 1st Earl Russell 1792-1878 and Henry Vassall-Fox 3rd Baron Holland 1773-1840.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (4).

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Drawing of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 on his deathbed.

In 1908 John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (51). Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (57).

Around 1862. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (56). Victoria Empress Germany Queen Consort Prussia 1840-1901 (21) and Frederick III King Prussia 1831-1888 (30) and their chlidren.

Around 1842 . John Phillip Painter 1817-1867 (24). Victorias Wedding with Victoria Empress Germany Queen Consort Prussia 1840-1901 (1) and Frederick III King Prussia 1831-1888 (10)

1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Princess Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1822-1857 (17) around the time of her marriage to Prince Louis Duke Nemours 1814-1896 (25) on 26 Apr 1840.

On 05 Apr 1863 Victoria Hesse-Darmstadt Marchioness Milford Haven 1863-1950 was born to Prince Louis Hesse-Darmstadt IV Grand Duke 1837-1892 (25) and Alice Windsor 1843-1878 (19) at Windsor Castle..

On 25 Feb 1885 Alice Mountbatten 1885-1969 was born to Louis Mountbatten 1st Marquess Milford Haven 1854-1921 (30) and Victoria Hesse-Darmstadt Marchioness Milford Haven 1863-1950 (21) at Windsor Castle.

On 09 Apr 2021 Philip Mountbatten Duke Edinburgh 1921-2021 (99) died at Windsor Castle.

Chapel Royal, Windsor Castle

In 1375 Richard Mitford Bishop -1407 was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor which he held until 1390.

In 1677 Richard Meggot -1692 was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor.

Around 1683 Antonio Verrio Painter 1636-1707 (47). Chapel Royal, Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

In 1813 Henry Cockayne Cust 1780-1861 (32) was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor.

In 1822 Richard Bagot Bishop of Oxford, Bishop Bath and Wells 1782-1854 (39) was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor.

St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

On 23 May 1482 Mary York 1467-1482 (14) died at Palace of Placentia. She was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 08 May 1491 Arthur Tudor Prince Wales 1486-1502 (4) was appointed 240th Knight of the Garter: Henry VII at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 10 Sep 1497 Anne Fiennes Marchioness Berkeley -1497 died. She was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 24 Jun 1503 Reginald Bray 1440-1503 (63) died. He was buried in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On Aug 1507 Elizabeth Herbert 3rd Baroness Herbert Raglan 1476-1507 (31) died. She was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. Henry Somerset 2nd Earl Worcester 1496-1549 (11) was succeeded as 4th Baron Herbert Raglan.

On 15 Mar 1526 Charles Somerset 1st Earl Worcester 1460-1526 (66) died. He was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. His son Henry Somerset 2nd Earl Worcester 1496-1549 (30) succeeded 2nd Earl Worcester (5C 1514).

On 03 Apr 1630 Christopher Villiers 1st Earl Anglesey 1593-1630 (37) died at Windsor. He was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. His son Charles Villiers 2nd Earl Anglesey -1661 succeeded 2nd Earl Anglesey (1C 1623), 2nd Baron Villiers Daventry.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 06 Sep 1685. Sunday. I went to prayer in the Chapell, and heard Dr. Standish. The second sermon was preach'd by Dr. Creighton (46), on 1 Thess. 4, 11, persuading to unity and peace, and to be mindfull of our owne businesse, according to the advise of the Apostle. Then I went to heare a Frenchman who preached before the King (51) and Queene (26) in that splendid Chapell next St. George's Hall. Their Maties going to masse, I withdrew to consider the stupendous painting of ye Hall, which, both for the art and invention, deserve the inscription in honour of the painter, Signior Verrio (49). The history is Edward the 3rd receiving the Black Prince, coming towards him in a Roman triumph. The whole roofe is the history of St. George. The throne, the carvings, &e. are incomparable, and I think equal to any, and in many circumstances exceeding any, I have seene abroad.
I din'd at Lord Sunderland's (44), with (amongst others) Sr Wm Soames (40), design'd Ambass. to Constantinople.
About 6 o'clock came Sl Dudley (44) and his brother Roger North (32), and brought the greate seale from my Lord Keeper, who died ye day before at his house in Oxfordshire. the King went immediately to Council; every body guessing who was most likely to succeed this greate officer; most believing it could be no other than my Lord Chief Justice Jefferies (40), who had so vigorously prosecuted the late rebells, and was now gone the Western circuit, to punish the rest that were secur'd in the several counties, and was now neere upon his returne. I tooke my leave of his Ma* (51), who spake very graciously to me, and supping that night at Sr Stephen Fox's (58), I promis'd to dine there the next day.

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. Francois de Troy 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 July. 08 Jul 1686. Dr. Meggot, Dean of Winchester preached before the household in St. George's Chapel at Windsor, the late King's glorious chapel now seized on by the mass priests. Dr. Cartwright (52), Dean of Ripon, preached before the great men of the Court in the same place.
We had now the sad news of the Bishop of Oxford's (61) death, an extraordinary loss to the poor Church at this time. Many candidates for his Bishopric and Deanery, Dr. Parker, South, Aldrich, etc. Dr. Walker (now apostatizing) came to Court, and was doubtless very busy.

Before 1680 Gilbert Soest Painter 1605-1681. Portrait of Thomas Cartwright Bishop of Chester 1634-1689.

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 July. 23 Jul 1692. I went with my wife (57), son (37), and daughter (23), to Eton, to see my grandson (10), and thence to my Lord Godolphin's (47), at Cranburn, where we lay, and were most honorably entertained. The next day to St. George's Chapel, and returned to London late in the evening.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

On 20 Aug 1715 James Butler 2nd Duke Ormonde 1665-1745 (50) was attainted for having supported the Jacobite cause. His estates and honours were forfeit. His banner as a Garter Knight was Removed from St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 14 Mar 1775 Caroline Hanover 1774-1775 died after having been inoculated against smallpox. She was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

In 1790 Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (19) travelled to London with an introduction to Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (51) who found him employment on the painted-glass windows of St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

1797. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (26). Portrait of Elizabeth Ilive Countess Egremont Polymath 1769-1822 (28).

1799. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (28). Portrait of Alicia Carpenter Countess Egremont 1726-1794.

Around 1800. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (29). Portrait of Mary Palmer Marchioness Thomond 1750-1820.

1805. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (34). Portrait of Charles Watson 2nd Marquess Rockingham Prime Minister 1730-1782.

1805. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (34). Portrait of Elizabeth Mary Anne Langton 1774-1835 (31).

1807. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (36). Portrait of Frances Thomasine Lambart Countess Talbot 1772-1819 (35).

1807. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (36). Portrait of the children of Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot 1777-1849 (29) and Frances Thomasine Lambart Countess Talbot 1772-1819 (35).

1811. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (40). Portrait of the children of Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot 1777-1849 (33) and Frances Thomasine Lambart Countess Talbot 1772-1819 (39).

1826. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (55). Portrait of Edward Coplestone Bishop 1776-1849 (49).

1826. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (55). Portrait of John Wodehouse 2nd Baron Wodehouse 1771-1846 (54).

1837. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (66). Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 (63) sat in the chair of the President of the Royal Society.

1839. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (68). Portrait of Windham Wyndham-Quin 2nd Earl Dunraven and Mount Earl 1782-1850 (56).

Before 1771. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820. Portrait of Jocosa Drury Baronetess Cust -1771.

1772. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (33). Portrait of Anna-Maria Schutz as the Cumaean Sibyl reading music at a table.

1772. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (33). Portrait of Catherine Clayton Baroness Howard de Walden 1748-1807 (24) as the Perisan Sibyl reading at a table writing.

1772. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (33). Portrait of John Griffin Griffin 4th Baron Howard Walden 1st Baron Braybrooke 1719-1797 (52).

Around 1773. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (34). Portrait of the artist's wife Elizabeth Shewell and their son Raphael.

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

1778. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (39). Portrait of the Mary Palmer 1760-1848 (18).

1805. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (66). Portrait of the artist's wife Elizabeth Shewell and their son Benjamin West III.

1812. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (73). Portrait of John Eardley Wilmot 1748-1815 (64).

Death of Princess Charlotte

On 06 Nov 1817 Princess Charlotte Augusta Hanover 1796-1817 (21) died in childbirth at Claremont House, Esher. He buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 12 Feb 1820 Edward Augustus Hanover 1st Duke Kent and Strathearn 1767-1820 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

In 1787 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (59). Portrait of Edward Augustus Hanover 1st Duke Kent and Strathearn 1767-1820 (19).

Funeral of King George III

On 16 Feb 1820 George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

On 30 Nov 1834 William Frederick Hanover 2nd Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1776-1834 (58) died at Bagshot Park, Bagshot. He was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 08 Jul 1837 William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Around 1830. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (76). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

1830. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (52). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

On 29 Nov 1844 Princess Sophia of Gloucester 1773-1844 (71) died at Ranger's House, Blackheath. She was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Funeral of Prince Albert

On 23 Dec 1861 Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861.

10 Feb 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (47). Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Hayter included portraits of fifty-six of those present at the occasion and sittings took place over the next year. The Queen (20) sat for him in March in her 'Bridal dress, veil, wreath & all', and Prince Albert (20) also posed for his portrait several times during the following months. Hayter's family too helped out with his son, Henry, modelling the Prince's costume, while his daughter Mary posed for the Queen's arm and wearing the veil. Victoria's aunt Queen Adelaide (47), however, was unwilling to co-operate and the artist had to refer to a miniature for her likeness. Hayter included himself in the painting, on the lower right, with his sketchbook and pencil.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26).

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (53). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (39).

Times Newspaper Funerals. 24 Dec 1861. Yesterday, with little of the pomp and pageantry of a State ceremonial, but with every outward mark of respect, and with all the solemnity which befitted his high station and his public virties, the mortal remains of the husband of our Queen (42) were interred in the last resting-place of England's Sovereigns-the Chapel Royal of St. George's, Windsor. By the express desire of his Royal Highness the funeral was of the plainest and most private character; but in the Chapel, to do honour to his obsequies, were assembled all the chiefest men of the State, and throughout England, by every sign of sorrow and imourning, the nation manifested its sense of the loss wlhich it has sustaiined. Windsor itself wore an aspect of the most profound gloom. Every shop was closed and every blind drawn down. The streets were silent and almost deserted, and all wvho appeared abroad were dressed in the deepest mourning. The great bell of Windsor Castle clanged out: its doleful sound at intervals from an early hour, and minute bells were tolled also at St. John's Church. At the parish church of Cleover and at St. John's there were services in the morning and: aternoon, and the day was observed throughout the Royal borough in the strictest manner. The weather was in character with the occasion, a chill, damp air, with a dull leaden sky above, increased the gloom which hung over all. There were but few visitors in the town, for the procession did not pass beyond the immediate precincts of the Chapel and Castle, and none were admitted except those connected with the Castle andi their friends. At 11 o'clock a strong force of the A division took possession of the avenues leading to the Chapel Royal, and from that time only the guests specially invited and those who were to take part in the ceremonial were allowed to pass. Shortly afterwards a of honour of the Grenadier Guards, of which regiment his Royal Highness was Colonel, with the colonrs of the regiment shrouded in crape, marched in and took up its position before the principal entrance to the Chapel Royal. Another guard of honour from the same regiment was also on duty in the Quadrangle at the entrance to the State apartments. They were speedily followed by a squadron of the 2nd Life Guards dismounted, and by two companies of the Fusileer Guards, who were drawn uip in single file along each side of the road by which the procession was to pass, from the Norman gateway to the Chapel door. The officers wore the deepest military mourning-scarves, sword-knots, and rosettes of crape. In the Rome Park was stationed a troop of Horse Artillery, which commenced firing minute guns at the end of the Long Walk, advancing slowly until it reached the Castle gates just at the close of the ceremony. The Ministers, the officers of the Queen's Household, and other distinguished personages who had been honoured with an invitation to attend the ceremonial, reached Windsor a special train from Paddington. They were met by carriages provided for them at the station, and began to arrive at the Chapel Royal soon after 11 o'clock. The Earl of Derby (62), the Archbishop of Canterbury (81), Earl Russell (69), and the Duke of Buccleuch were among the first to make their appearance, and as they alighted at the door of the Chapel they were received by the proper officials and conducted to the seats appointed for them in the Choir. In the Great Quadrangle were drawn up the hearse and the mourning coaches, and, all the preparations having been completed within the Castle, the procession began to be formed shortly before 12 o'clock. It had been originally intended that it should leave the Castle by the St. George's gate, and, proceeding down Castle-hill, approach the Chapel through Henry VII.'s gateway, but at a late hour this arrangement was changed, and the shorter route by the Norman gatewvay was chosen.
The crowd which had gradually collected at the foot of Castle-hill, owing to this change, saw nothing of the procession but the empty carriages as they returned to the Castle after setting down at the Chapel. The few spectators who were fortunate enough to gain admission to the Lower Ward stood in a narrow fringe along the edge of the flags in front of the houses of the Poor Knights, and their presence was the only exception to the strict privacy of the ceremonial. The Prince of Wales (20) and the other Royal mourners assembled in the Oak Room, but did not form part of the procession. They were conveyed to the Chapel in private carriages before the coffin was placed in the hearse, passing through St. George's gatewayinto the Lower Ward. In the first carriage were the Prince of Wales (20), Prince Arthur (11), and the Duke of Saxe Coburg (8). The Crown Prince of Prussia (30), the Duke of Brabant (26), and the Count of Flanders (24) followed in the next; and in the others were the Duke de Nemours (47), Prince Louis of Hesse (24), Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar (38), and the Maharajah Dhuleep Singh, with the gentlemen of their respective suites. Scarcely had they alighted at the door of Wolsey's Chapel, from which they were conducted through the Chapter Room to the door of the Chapel Royal to be in readiness to meet the coffin, when the first minute gun fired in tlhe distance, and the rattle of the troops reversing arms announced that the procession had started, and exactly at 12 o'clock the first mourning coach moved from under the Norman gateway. First came nine mourning coaches, each drawn by four horses, conveying the Physicians, Equerries, and other members of the household of the late Prince. In the last were the Lord Steward (63) (Earl St. Germans), the Lord Chamberlain (56) (Viscount Sidney), and the Master of the Horse (57) (the Marquis of Ailesbury). The carriages and trappings were of the plainest description; the horses had black velvet housings and feathers, but on the carriages there, were no feathers or ornaments of any kind. The mourning coaches were followed by one of the Queen's carriages, drawn by six horses, and attended by servants in State liveries, in which was the Groom of the Stole (26), Earl Spencer, carrying the crowvn, and a Lord of the Bedchamber, Lord George Lennox, carrying the baton, sword, and hat of his late Royal Highness. Next escorted by a troop of the 2nd Life Guards, came the hearse, drawn by six black horses, which, like the carriages, was quite plain and unornamented. On the housings of the horses and on the sides of theW hearse were emblazoned the scutcheons of Her Majesty and of the Prince, each surmounted by a, crown, the Prince's arms being in black and Her Majesty's in white. The procession was closed by four State carriages.

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith Painter 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

Before 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871. Portrait of John Russell 1st Earl Russell 1792-1878 and Henry Vassall-Fox 3rd Baron Holland 1773-1840.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (4).

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Drawing of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 on his deathbed.

In 1908 John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (51). Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (57).

Around 1862. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (56). Victoria Empress Germany Queen Consort Prussia 1840-1901 (21) and Frederick III King Prussia 1831-1888 (30) and their chlidren.

Around 1842 . John Phillip Painter 1817-1867 (24). Victorias Wedding with Victoria Empress Germany Queen Consort Prussia 1840-1901 (1) and Frederick III King Prussia 1831-1888 (10)

1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Princess Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1822-1857 (17) around the time of her marriage to Prince Louis Duke Nemours 1814-1896 (25) on 26 Apr 1840.

Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra

On 10 Mar 1863 Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (21) and Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (18) were married at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 13 Mar 1879 Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (28) and Luise Margarete Alexandra Victoria Agnes Hohenzollern Duchess Connaught and Strathearn 1860-1917 (18) were married at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 27 Apr 1882 Leopold Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1st Duke Albany 1853-1884 (29) and Helena Waldeck Duchess Albany were married at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. Helena Waldeck Duchess Albany by marriage Duchess Albany.

On 05 Apr 1884 Leopold Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1st Duke Albany 1853-1884 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 27 Oct 1897 Princess Mary Adelaide Hanover 1833-1897 (63) died at White Lodge, Richmond Park, Richmond. He was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 27 Jan 1900 Francis Teck 1837-1900 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Marriage of Princess Alice and Alexander Teck

On 10 Feb 1904 Alexander Teck 1st Earl Athlone 1874-1957 (30) and Princess Alice Countess Athlone 1883-1981 (20) were married (he was her second-cousin once-removed) at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 20 May 1910 Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 24 Oct 1927 Adolphus Cambridge Duke Teck 1868-1927 (59) died. He was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. His son George Cambridge 2nd Marquess Cambridge 1895-1981 (32) succeeded 2nd Marquess Cambridge.

On 20 Apr 1928 Rupert Teck 1907-1928 was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 30 Aug 1968 Marina Glücksburg Duchess Kent 1906-1968 funeral was held at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. She was buried in the Royal Burial Ground, Frogmore Estate, Home Park, Windsor.

Death of Edward IV

The History of King Richard the Third. This noble prince died at his palace of Westminster and, with great funeral honor and heaviness of his people from thence conveyed, was interred at Windsor. He was a king of such governance and behavior in time of peace (for in war each part must needs be another’s enemy) that there was never any prince of this land attaining the crown by battle so heartily beloved by the substance of the people, nor he himself so specially in any part of his life as at the time of his death.

King George VI Memorial Chapel, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

Death of George VI Accession of Elizabeth II

On 06 Feb 1952 George VI King United Kingdom 1895-1952 (56) died at Sandringham Estate, Sandringham. He was buried at King George VI Memorial Chapel, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. His daughter Elizabeth II Queen United Kingdom 1926- succeeded II King United Kingdom: Saxe-Coburg-Gotha aka Windsor; she was at her Kenyan home Sagana Lodge.

On 09 Feb 2002 Princess Margaret 1930-2002 (71) died at King Edward VII's Hospital. He was buried at King George VI Memorial Chapel, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Quire, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

Henry VIII Vault, Quire, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

Funeral of Jane Seymour

On 12 Nov 1537 Jane Seymour Queen Consort England 1509-1537 was buried in the Henry VIII Vault in St George's Chapel in Windsor.
Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558 (21) was Chief Mourner.
Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire, 1st Earl Ormonde 1477-1539 (60), Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (53), John Gage Lord Chamberlain 1479-1556 (58), Henry Grey 1st Duke Suffolk 1517-1554 (20), Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (64), Thomas Manners 1st Earl Rutland 1492-1543 (45), Ralph Neville 4th Earl Westmoreland 1498-1549 (39), Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (54), John Vere 15th Earl Oxford 1471-1540 (66) and Henry Courtenay 1st Marquess Exeter 1496-1539 (41) attended.

Funeral of King Henry VIII

On 16 Feb 1547 Henry VIII was buried in the Henry VIII Vault, Quire, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. John Gage Lord Chamberlain 1479-1556 (67) attended.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

On 09 Feb 1649 Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 was buried in the Henry VIII Vault, Quire, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle without ceremony.

St George's Hall, Windsor Castle

Around 1683 Antonio Verrio Painter 1636-1707 (47). St George's Hall, Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

Windor Castle Keep

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 October. 03 Oct 1686. Went with the Countess of Sunderland (40) to Cranbourne, a lodge and walk of my Lord Godolphin's (41) in Windsor park. There was one room in the house spared in the pulling down the old one, because the late Duchess of York was born in it; the rest was built and added to it by Sir George Carteret, Treasurer of the Navy; and since, the whole was purchased by my Lord Godolphin (41), who spoke to me to go see it, and advise what trees were fit to be cut down to improve the dwelling, being environed with old rotten pollards, which corrupt the air. It stands on a knoll which though insensibly rising, gives it a prospect over the Keep of Windsor, about three miles N. E. of it. The ground is clayey and moist; the water stark naught; the park is pretty; the house tolerable, and gardens convenient. After dinner, we came back to London, having two coaches both going and coming, of six horses apiece, which we changed at Hounslow.

Windsor Park

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 October. 03 Oct 1686. Went with the Countess of Sunderland (40) to Cranbourne, a lodge and walk of my Lord Godolphin's (41) in Windsor park. There was one room in the house spared in the pulling down the old one, because the late Duchess of York was born in it; the rest was built and added to it by Sir George Carteret, Treasurer of the Navy; and since, the whole was purchased by my Lord Godolphin (41), who spoke to me to go see it, and advise what trees were fit to be cut down to improve the dwelling, being environed with old rotten pollards, which corrupt the air. It stands on a knoll which though insensibly rising, gives it a prospect over the Keep of Windsor, about three miles N. E. of it. The ground is clayey and moist; the water stark naught; the park is pretty; the house tolerable, and gardens convenient. After dinner, we came back to London, having two coaches both going and coming, of six horses apiece, which we changed at Hounslow.

Cranbourne, Windsor

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 July. 23 Jul 1692. I went with my wife (57), son (37), and daughter (23), to Eton, to see my grandson (10), and thence to my Lord Godolphin's (47), at Cranburn, where we lay, and were most honorably entertained. The next day to St. George's Chapel, and returned to London late in the evening.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

Cranbourne Lodge

John Evelyn's Diary 1674 July. 22 Jul 1674. I went to Windsor with my wife (39) and son (19) to see my daughter Mary (9), who was there with my Lady Tuke and to do my duty to his Majesty (44). Next day, to a great entertainment at Sir Robert Holmes's (52) at Cranbourne Lodge, in the Forest; t