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Chelsea, London

On 17 Jul 1685 John Robartes 1st Earl Radnor 1606-1685 (79) died at Chelsea, London. His Grandson Charles Robartes 2nd Earl Radnor 1660-1723 (25) succeeded 2nd Earl Radnor (1C 1679), 2nd Viscount Bodmin, 2nd Baron Robartes, 2nd Baronet Robartes.

On 22 Jul 1700 Thomas Newport 1st Baron Torrington 1655-1719 (45) and Penelope Bridgeman were married at Chelsea, London.

On 05 Jul 1718 Francis Seymour-Conway 1st Marquess Hertford 1718-1794 was born to Francis Seymour-Conway 1679-1732 (39) and Charlotte Shorter at Chelsea, London.

On 10 Apr 1778 Thomas Grey 4th Baron Walsingham 1778-1839 was born to Thomas Grey 2nd Baron Walsingham -1818 at Chelsea, London.

On 06 Jul 1804 Thomas Grey 5th Baron Walsingham 1804-1870 was born to Thomas Grey 4th Baron Walsingham 1778-1839 (26) and Elizabeth North Baroness Walsingham 1776-1845 (27) at Chelsea, London.

On 15 Mar 1851 Augustus Frederick Keppel 5th Earl Albermarle 1794-1851 (56) died at Chelsea, London. His Brother George Thomas Keppel 6th Earl Albermarle 1799-1891 (51) succeeded 6th Earl Albermarle (1C 1697), 6th Viscount Bury in Lancashire, 6th Baron Ashford of Ashford in Kent.

On 25 Jun 1863 Charles William Cavendish 1822-1890 (40) and Louisa Cockburn 1839-1869 (24) were married at Chelsea, London.

On 14 Apr 1925 John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (69) died suddenly at his home in Chelsea, London.

Beaufort House

Survey London Volume 4 Chelsea Part II. The Site of Beaufort House
In the whole history of Chelsea, a history which is indeed famous, so many notable men and women has this little village known—the chief interest has centred about Beaufort House. From those early days in the 16th century, when it was the well-loved home of Sir Thomas More, until the 18th, when it was the seat of the Duke of Beaufort, it yielded to no other house in importance, not to King Henry VIII's manor house in Cheyne Walk, nor to the Earl of Shrewsbury's mansion, nor to the old manor house with which it shared the dignity of a proprietary chapel in the old Church. It did not carry with it the lordship of the manor, but its property was extensive, including practically the frontage of the Thames between Milman Street and Church Street, and its gardens stretched northwards as far as the King's Road.
The house stood across the line of the present Beaufort Street and rather nearer King's Road than the river. Between it and the way along the waterside were two large courtyards, and opposite was a quay. The remainder of the estate, south of the present King's Road, was laid out in gardens and orchards, with the exception of the stable buildings, where now is the Moravian Burial Ground, and the farmhouse and barns on the site of Lindsey House. The situation, attractive as it is now, was far lovelier then, when across the Surrey bank was a view of undisturbed wood and pasture.
Sir Thomas More lived here for some fourteen years until his attainder in 1535. He loved to escape from London and from the Court, and to give himself up to his family and his own literary pursuits in his Chelsea home, and here he entertained many friends, among whom were Erasmus and Holbein. The latter may well have designed the beautiful capitals in the More chapel, in the old church (dated 1528), which show his hand as plainly as the ceiling of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, which was executed in 1540.
More's estate was granted to Sir William Paulet [See Patent Roll, I Edward VI., pt. 3.] (first Marquess of Winchester): it was inherited by his son the second Marquess, and in 1575 passed to Gregory Fiennes, Lord Dacre of the South, and his wife Anne — the foundress of those charming almshouses, Emmanuel Hospital, Westminster, now destroyed — who was a daughter of the Marchioness of Winchester by her former husband, Sir Robert Sackville. Lady Dacre, who died in 1595, left the house to Lord Burleigh, who is said to have lived here, and he was followed by his youngest son, Sir Robert Cecil, afterwards Earl of Salisbury, who took possession in 1597. It is to Cecil's passion for building, which was not exhausted until he had parted with his fortune in completing Hatfield, that we owe the earliest representations on paper of the house at Chelsea. In his Chelsea Old Church Mr. Randall Davies published a reproduction of a beautiful plan of the Chelsea Estate, preserved among the Hatfield papers, and the present writer in some further research among Lord Salisbury's MSS. found five plans to a larger scale, all of which have reference to Cecil's schemes for rebuilding Sir Thomas More's house. For a detailed examination of these plans, the reader is referred to the Architectural Review of March and May, 1911, but by the courtesy of the proprietors of the Review, the reproductions are included here.
Cecil does not seem to have carried out his larger schemes and he sold the house to Henry Clinton, second Earl of Lincoln, in 1599.
Lincoln settled the estate on Sir Arthur Gorges, who had married his daughter. He lived in the house just mentioned, adjoining the great house, built for him by his father-in-law, and some four years after the latter's death in 1615, he sold Sir Thomas More's house to Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex. [See Close Roll, 18 Jas. I., pt. 18.] The new owner purchased several additions to the property, including "Brick Barn Close" and "The Sandhills," both north of the King's Road. These he converted into the Park, which is shown in Kip's view and was not built upon until after 1717. Cranfield fell under the displeasure of the King, and in consequence forfeited his property, which Charles I. granted in 1627 to George Villiers, first Duke of Buckingham. After the Duke's assassination, the family continued to reside here until the outbreak of the Civil War, when the house was seized by the Parliament, and Mr. Randall Davies has referred to the record in the Perfect Occurrences of the petition in 1646 of the Duchess of Lennox, Buckingham's daughter, for leave to come to London, or to her house in Chelsea, to be under Dr. Mayerne's hands for her health. The great physician was then living at Lindsey House, the old farmhouse belonging to the estate.
In the account in the Architectural Review (May, 1911) I have summarised the later history of the house as follows:—"After the great house had been occupied during the Commonwealth by the Parliamentary Commissioners, Sir Bulstrode Whitlocke and John Lisle, the second Duke of Buckingham regained possession. Lost to him, through his debts, the house ultimately passed (1674) into the hands of the trustees for George Digby, Earl of Bristol, and his Countess sold it in 1682 to Henry, Marquess of Worcester, afterwards Duke of Beaufort, the house remaining in his family until 1720. It was during this period, about the year 1699, that Kip's beautiful view of the mansion - now called Beaufort House — was published, a priceless record of the property, so ruthlessly defaced and destroyed by Sir Hans Sloane after he purchased it in 1737. Mr. Randall Davies, whom I have followed in the account of the occupants of the house, has printed the interesting conveyance of the property to Sloane, and if its description is carefully collated with the information in Kip's view, one is struck by the wonderful accuracy of the latter. Here is the great house as shown by Thorpe, its lodges and its forecourts, the wharf, with its brick towers east and west, the orchard and 'one garden environed with brick walls … and a terrace on the north end, with a banqueting house on the east end of the terrace,' as well as 'one great garden … extending from the terrace and banqueting house into the highway on the north.' This banqueting house is alike in detail to the sketch of 'a summer house, Chelsea,' in the Smithson collection of seventeenth-century drawings, now in the possession of Colonel Coke. But valuable as is the representation of the great house, the print has much more information to give us. The great park is there shown in all its original beauty; the Duke of Beaufort's stables and yard, since converted into the historic chapel and burying ground of the Moravians is to the west; and nearer the river the beautiful Jacobean house of Sir Arthur Gorges (our sole evidence of its character and design) and the house and gardens of the Earls of Lindsey. And to the east, below the wide area of Dovecote Close, laid out as a huge kitchen garden, are the fine pleasure grounds of Danvers House, which had been destroyed but three years before the drawing was published.".

1527 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 (48) wearing a Lancastrian Esses Collar with Beaufort Portcullis and Tudor Rose Pendant.

Around 1576 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Paulet 1st Marquess Winchester 1483-1572 wearing his Garter Collar and Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

In 1559 Hans Eworth 1520-1574 (39). Portrait of Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 (35) and her son Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (19).

After 1585 Marcus Gheeraerts 1562-1636 (attributed). Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Around 1565 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (44). His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

After 1590 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His left-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Around 1602 John Critz 1551-1642 (51). Portrait of Robert Cecil 1st Earl Salisbury 1563-1612 (38).

Around 1604 John Critz 1551-1642 (53) is believed to have contributed to the Somerset House Conference painting of the negotiation of the Treaty of London in which Thomas Sackville 1st Earl Dorset 1536-1608 (68), Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624 (68), Charles Blount 1st Earl Devonshire 1563-1606 (41), Henry Howard 1st Earl Northampton 1540-1614 (63) and Robert Cecil 1st Earl Salisbury 1563-1612 (40) are represented on the right side.

In 1620 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (30). Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645 (45).

Before 11 Dec 1643 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648. Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645.

Before 1628 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt 1566-1641. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628.

In 1616 William Larkin 1582-1619 (34). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (23) wearing his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (30). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (27).

In 1619 Cornelius Johnson 1593-1661 (25). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (26).

Around 1625 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640 (47). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (32).

In 1634. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (28).

In 1650. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (44).

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677 (24) and William Russell 1st Duke Bedford 1616-1700 (20).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677 (25).

Cadogan Street

Pont Street

Farm House, Pont Street

Times Newspaper Marriages. 17 Jan 1918. THE EARL OF CARLISLE (23) AND MISS RUTHVEN
The Marriage of Lieutenant the Earl of Carlisle (23) and Miss Bridget Helen Ruthven eldest daughter of the Master of Ruthven (47) and the Hon. Mrs. Ruthven took place yesterday at St Paul's Church, Knightsbridge. The ceremony was performed by the Bishop of Oxford (Dr. Charles Gore) (64), cousin of the bride. assisted bv the Rev. Canon Sheppard, D.D. Sub-Dean of the Chapel Royal (37).
The bride, who was given away by her father (47) wore a gown of cloth of silver, covered with Old Brussels lace. and lace sleeves, and as tulle veil vith wreath of real orange blossom. and carried a bouquet of myrtle. She was attended by three little pages and one bridesmaid. The pages were Master Patrick Hore-Ruthven, son of Lieutenant-Colonel the Hon. Alexander and Mrs. Hore-Ruthvcn, couson of the bride Master Michael Henley son or the Hon. Francis and Lady Dorothy Henley; and Master Anthony Toynbee son of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Toynbee, cousins of the bridegroom. They wore Kate Greenaway costumes of pale pink satin, with lawn collars and cuffs. The bridesmaid, Miss Jean Ruthven, sister of the bride, also wore pale pink satin, with a ruby-coloured velvet waistband embroidered in silver, a pale pink veil, with wreath of green leaves. She carried a small bouquet of myrtle. Lioutetant Henry Bovell, R.N.. was best man.
Among those present were:-
The Hon. Mrs. Ruthven and the Misses Ruthven, Mrs. Jampson grandmother of the bride. Lord Ruthven, the Hon. Mrs. Alexander Hore-Ruthin. the Hon. Geoffrey Howard. M.P.. ProFessor Gilbert Murray and Lady Mary Murray. Lady Cecelia Roberts. Lady Dorothy Hanley, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Toynbee. the Duchess of Buccleuch and lady Sybil Scott, Winifred Countess of Arran, Lady Winifred Gore and Mrs. Dougal Malcolm, Mr. and Lady Mary Ehart, Viscountess Hambleden and the Hon. Edith Smith, Lord Sheffield, Viscount and Viscountess Dunluce. the Countess of Selkirk, Lord and Lady Stuart-Wortley, Grace Countess of Weymss, the Dowager Countems of Airlie. Lady Helen Mitford, Mrs. L'Estrange. Mrs. L'Estrange Malone, Lady Alwyne Compton. Lady Victoria Russell and the Misses Russell. Lady Jane Combe and the Misses Combe. Lady Blanche Conyngham, Lady (Francis) Howard, Lady Gore, Lady Paget aind Miss Winifred Paget. ....
Men from nthe ship on which the Earl of Carlislc served at the Battle of Jutlaud formed a Guard of honour as the brlde and bridegroom left the church. There was no reception after the ceremony, but relatives went on to Farm House, Pont Street. Later the Earl (23) and Countess of Carlisle left to spend the honeymoon at Muncaster Castle, the brlde vearing a dress of mole-coloured chiffon velvet with a fur coat aud a mole velvet toque.

St Mary's Church, Cadogan Street

On 18 Aug 1828 Henry Pelham 3rd Earl Chichester 1804-1886 (23) and Mary Brudenell Countess Chichester 1806-1867 (22) were married at St Mary's Church, Cadogan Street. Mary Brudenell Countess Chichester 1806-1867 (22) by marriage Countess Chichester (3C 1801).

Chelsea Manor

On 16 Jul 1557 Anne of Cleves (41) died at Chelsea Manor. He was buried at Westminster Abbey.

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (42). Portrait of Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557 (23).

Around 1747. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Westminster Abbey and Westminster Hall.

1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath. St Margaret's Church adjacent with the flag.

Around 1750. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster from near the Terrace of Somerset House, Strand In the distance the Banqueting House, Whitehall Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge.

Around 1801. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (62). Milkmaids in St James' Park, St James' with Westminster Abbey Beyond.

Chelsea Old Church

Around 1565 Elizabeth Fiennes 1565-1565 died. She was buried at Chelsea Old Church.

On 25 Dec 1594 Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (55) died. He was buried at Chelsea Old Church. His Sister Margaret Fiennes 11th Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1541-1612 (53) succeeded 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321). Samson Lennard 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1544-1615 (50) by marriage 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1559 Hans Eworth 1520-1574 (39). Portrait of Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 (35) and her son Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (19).

On 25 Feb 1603 Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 (53) died at Arundel House. She was buried in Chelsea Old Church on 25 Apr 1603.

In 1590 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619 (39). Portrait of Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 (40).

Cheyne Walk

Lindsey House, Cheyne Walk

On 01 May 1729 Brownlow Bertie 5th Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1729-1809 was born to Peregrine Bertie 2nd Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1686-1741 (43) and Jane Brownlow Duchess Ancaster and Kesteven -1736 at Lindsey House, Cheyne Walk.

King's Road

Survey London Volume 4 Chelsea Part II. The Site of Beaufort House
In the whole history of Chelsea, a history which is indeed famous, so many notable men and women has this little village known—the chief interest has centred about Beaufort House. From those early days in the 16th century, when it was the well-loved home of Sir Thomas More, until the 18th, when it was the seat of the Duke of Beaufort, it yielded to no other house in importance, not to King Henry VIII's manor house in Cheyne Walk, nor to the Earl of Shrewsbury's mansion, nor to the old manor house with which it shared the dignity of a proprietary chapel in the old Church. It did not carry with it the lordship of the manor, but its property was extensive, including practically the frontage of the Thames between Milman Street and Church Street, and its gardens stretched northwards as far as the King's Road.
The house stood across the line of the present Beaufort Street and rather nearer King's Road than the river. Between it and the way along the waterside were two large courtyards, and opposite was a quay. The remainder of the estate, south of the present King's Road, was laid out in gardens and orchards, with the exception of the stable buildings, where now is the Moravian Burial Ground, and the farmhouse and barns on the site of Lindsey House. The situation, attractive as it is now, was far lovelier then, when across the Surrey bank was a view of undisturbed wood and pasture.
Sir Thomas More lived here for some fourteen years until his attainder in 1535. He loved to escape from London and from the Court, and to give himself up to his family and his own literary pursuits in his Chelsea home, and here he entertained many friends, among whom were Erasmus and Holbein. The latter may well have designed the beautiful capitals in the More chapel, in the old church (dated 1528), which show his hand as plainly as the ceiling of the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, which was executed in 1540.
More's estate was granted to Sir William Paulet [See Patent Roll, I Edward VI., pt. 3.] (first Marquess of Winchester): it was inherited by his son the second Marquess, and in 1575 passed to Gregory Fiennes, Lord Dacre of the South, and his wife Anne — the foundress of those charming almshouses, Emmanuel Hospital, Westminster, now destroyed — who was a daughter of the Marchioness of Winchester by her former husband, Sir Robert Sackville. Lady Dacre, who died in 1595, left the house to Lord Burleigh, who is said to have lived here, and he was followed by his youngest son, Sir Robert Cecil, afterwards Earl of Salisbury, who took possession in 1597. It is to Cecil's passion for building, which was not exhausted until he had parted with his fortune in completing Hatfield, that we owe the earliest representations on paper of the house at Chelsea. In his Chelsea Old Church Mr. Randall Davies published a reproduction of a beautiful plan of the Chelsea Estate, preserved among the Hatfield papers, and the present writer in some further research among Lord Salisbury's MSS. found five plans to a larger scale, all of which have reference to Cecil's schemes for rebuilding Sir Thomas More's house. For a detailed examination of these plans, the reader is referred to the Architectural Review of March and May, 1911, but by the courtesy of the proprietors of the Review, the reproductions are included here.
Cecil does not seem to have carried out his larger schemes and he sold the house to Henry Clinton, second Earl of Lincoln, in 1599.
Lincoln settled the estate on Sir Arthur Gorges, who had married his daughter. He lived in the house just mentioned, adjoining the great house, built for him by his father-in-law, and some four years after the latter's death in 1615, he sold Sir Thomas More's house to Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex. [See Close Roll, 18 Jas. I., pt. 18.] The new owner purchased several additions to the property, including "Brick Barn Close" and "The Sandhills," both north of the King's Road. These he converted into the Park, which is shown in Kip's view and was not built upon until after 1717. Cranfield fell under the displeasure of the King, and in consequence forfeited his property, which Charles I. granted in 1627 to George Villiers, first Duke of Buckingham. After the Duke's assassination, the family continued to reside here until the outbreak of the Civil War, when the house was seized by the Parliament, and Mr. Randall Davies has referred to the record in the Perfect Occurrences of the petition in 1646 of the Duchess of Lennox, Buckingham's daughter, for leave to come to London, or to her house in Chelsea, to be under Dr. Mayerne's hands for her health. The great physician was then living at Lindsey House, the old farmhouse belonging to the estate.
In the account in the Architectural Review (May, 1911) I have summarised the later history of the house as follows:—"After the great house had been occupied during the Commonwealth by the Parliamentary Commissioners, Sir Bulstrode Whitlocke and John Lisle, the second Duke of Buckingham regained possession. Lost to him, through his debts, the house ultimately passed (1674) into the hands of the trustees for George Digby, Earl of Bristol, and his Countess sold it in 1682 to Henry, Marquess of Worcester, afterwards Duke of Beaufort, the house remaining in his family until 1720. It was during this period, about the year 1699, that Kip's beautiful view of the mansion - now called Beaufort House — was published, a priceless record of the property, so ruthlessly defaced and destroyed by Sir Hans Sloane after he purchased it in 1737. Mr. Randall Davies, whom I have followed in the account of the occupants of the house, has printed the interesting conveyance of the property to Sloane, and if its description is carefully collated with the information in Kip's view, one is struck by the wonderful accuracy of the latter. Here is the great house as shown by Thorpe, its lodges and its forecourts, the wharf, with its brick towers east and west, the orchard and 'one garden environed with brick walls … and a terrace on the north end, with a banqueting house on the east end of the terrace,' as well as 'one great garden … extending from the terrace and banqueting house into the highway on the north.' This banqueting house is alike in detail to the sketch of 'a summer house, Chelsea,' in the Smithson collection of seventeenth-century drawings, now in the possession of Colonel Coke. But valuable as is the representation of the great house, the print has much more information to give us. The great park is there shown in all its original beauty; the Duke of Beaufort's stables and yard, since converted into the historic chapel and burying ground of the Moravians is to the west; and nearer the river the beautiful Jacobean house of Sir Arthur Gorges (our sole evidence of its character and design) and the house and gardens of the Earls of Lindsey. And to the east, below the wide area of Dovecote Close, laid out as a huge kitchen garden, are the fine pleasure grounds of Danvers House, which had been destroyed but three years before the drawing was published.".

1527 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 (48) wearing a Lancastrian Esses Collar with Beaufort Portcullis and Tudor Rose Pendant.

Around 1576 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Paulet 1st Marquess Winchester 1483-1572 wearing his Garter Collar and Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

In 1559 Hans Eworth 1520-1574 (39). Portrait of Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 (35) and her son Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (19).

After 1585 Marcus Gheeraerts 1562-1636 (attributed). Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Around 1565 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (44). His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

After 1590 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His left-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Around 1602 John Critz 1551-1642 (51). Portrait of Robert Cecil 1st Earl Salisbury 1563-1612 (38).

Around 1604 John Critz 1551-1642 (53) is believed to have contributed to the Somerset House Conference painting of the negotiation of the Treaty of London in which Thomas Sackville 1st Earl Dorset 1536-1608 (68), Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624 (68), Charles Blount 1st Earl Devonshire 1563-1606 (41), Henry Howard 1st Earl Northampton 1540-1614 (63) and Robert Cecil 1st Earl Salisbury 1563-1612 (40) are represented on the right side.

In 1620 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (30). Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645 (45).

Before 11 Dec 1643 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648. Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645.

Before 1628 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt 1566-1641. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628.

In 1616 William Larkin 1582-1619 (34). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (23) wearing his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (30). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (27).

In 1619 Cornelius Johnson 1593-1661 (25). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (26).

Around 1625 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640 (47). Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke Buckingham 1592-1628 (32).

In 1634. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (28).

In 1650. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (44).

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677 (24) and William Russell 1st Duke Bedford 1616-1700 (20).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677 (25).

211 King's Road, King's Road

Argyll House, 211 King's Road, King's Road

On 20 Dec 1790 Elizabeth Gunning Duchess Hamilton 1733-1790 (57) died in Argyll House, 211 King's Road, King's Road. Her Son Douglas Hamilton 8th Duke Hamilton, 5th Duke Brandon 1756-1799 (34) succeeded 2nd Baron Hamilton of Hamilton in Leicestershire. Elizabeth Anne Burrell Duchess Hamilton, Duchess Brandon 1757-1837 (33) by marriage Baroness Hamilton of Hamilton in Leicestershire.

Around 1754 Gavin Hamilton 1723-1798 (31). Portrait of Elizabeth Gunning Duchess Hamilton 1733-1790 (20).

Chelsea Town Hall, King's Road

Lowndes Square

14 William Street, Lowndes Square

On 08 Aug 1871 Olga de Meyer 1871-1931 was born at 14 William Street, Lowndes Square. Possibly a daughter of the Prince of Wales (29).

1907. Glyn Philpot Painter 1884-1937 (22). Portrait of Olga de Meyer 1871-1931 (35).

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (4).

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Drawing of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 on his deathbed.

Old Manor

After 31 Jan 1547 Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548 resided at Old Manor.

In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548 (31).

Ranelagh House

On 05 Jan 1712 Richard Jones 1st Earl Ranelagh 1641-1712 (70) died. Catherine Jones 1672-1740 (40) inherited Ranelagh House.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Richard Jones 1st Earl Ranelagh 1641-1712.

In 1687 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (31). Portrait of Frances Jones Countess Coningsbury 1673-1716 (14) and Catherine Jones 1672-1740 (15).

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea

In 1742 Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea were opened to the public as a more fashionable, and more expensive, competitor to Vauxhall Gardens. The Rotunda was 37 metres across. It was closed in 1803 and demonlished in 1805.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View of the interior of the Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea.

Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea

In 1742 Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea were opened to the public as a more fashionable, and more expensive, competitor to Vauxhall Gardens. The Rotunda was 37 metres across. It was closed in 1803 and demonlished in 1805.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View of the interior of the Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View of the interior of the Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea.

Royal Hospital Chelsea

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 Jan. 27 Jan 1682. This evening, Sir Stephen Fox (54) acquainted me again with his Majesty's (51) resolution of proceeding in the erection of a Royal Hospital Chelsea for emerited soldiers on that spot of ground which the Royal Society had sold to his Majesty for £1,300, and that he would settle £5,000 per annum on it, and build to the value of £20,000 for the relief and reception of four companies, namely, 400 men, to be as in a college, or monastery. I was therefore desired by Sir Stephen (54) (who had not only the whole managing of this, but was, as I perceived, himself to be a grand benefactor, as well it became him who had gotten so vast an estate by the soldiers) to assist him, and consult what method to cast it in, as to the government. So, in his study we arranged the governor, chaplain, steward, housekeeper, chirurgeon, cook, butler, gardener, porter, and other officers, with their several salaries and entertainments. I would needs have a library, and mentioned several books, since some soldiers might possibly be studious, when they were at leisure to recollect. Thus we made the first calculations, and set down our thoughts to be considered and digested better, to show his Majesty and the Archbishop. He also engaged me to consider of what laws and orders were fit for the government, which was to be in every respect as strict as in any religious convent.
After supper, came in the famous treble, Mr. Abel, newly returned from Italy; I never heard a more excellent voice; one would have sworn it had been a woman's, it was so high, and so well and skillfully managed, being accompanied by Signor Francesco on the harpsichord.

Sinking of HMS Gloucester

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 May. 25 May 1682. I was desired by Sir Stephen Fox (55) and Sir Christopher Wren (58) to accompany them to Lambeth, with the plot and design of the college to be built at Royal Hospital Chelsea, to have the Archbishop's approbation. It was a quadrangle of 200 feet square, after the dimensions of the larger quadrangle at Christ Church College, Oxford University, Oxford, for the accommodation of 440 persons, with governor and officers. This was agreed on.
The Duke (48) and James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (48) and Duchess of York (23) were just now come to London, after his escape and shipwreck, as he went by sea for Scotland. See Sinking of HMS Gloucester.

In 1711 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Christopher Wren Architect 1632-1723 (87).

Around 1665 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. François de Troy 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 Aug. 04 Aug 1682. With Sir Stephen Fox (55), to survey the foundations of the Royal Hospital Chelsea begun at Chelsea.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda, Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

On 13 Oct 1791 Elizabeth Beckford Countess Effingham -1791 died at Royal Hospital Chelsea.

Sloane Street

91 Sloane Street, Sloane Street

On 01 Apr 1861 Charlotte Susan Maria Campbell 1775-1861 (86) died at 91 Sloane Street, Sloane Street.

The Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity with Saint Jude, Sloane Street

On 30 Apr 1892 Henry Arthur Cadogan 1868-1908 (23) and Mildred Cecilia Sturt 1869-1942 (23) were married at The Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity with Saint Jude, Sloane Street.