History of Mayfair

On 31 Oct 1817 William Henry Frederick Cavendish 1817-1881 was born to Henry Frederick Compton Cavendish 1789-1873 (27) and Sarah Fawkener 1789-1817 (28) at Mayfair.

Cavendish Arms

On 26 Mar 1836 William Archer Amherst 3rd Earl Amherst 1836-1910 was born to William Amherst 2nd Earl Amherst 1805-1886 (30) and Gertrude Percy Countess Amherst at Mayfair.

Percy Arms

On 18 Apr 1893 William Craven 4th Earl Craven 1868-1921 (24) and Cornelia Martin Countess Craven 1877-1961 (21) were married at Grace Church, Manhattan, New York. She an heiress bringing an allowance of $75000 per year and property in Mayfair.

On 09 Aug 1914 Alastair Windsor 2nd Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1914-1943 was born to Prince Arthur of Connaught 1883-1938 (31) and Alexandra Duff 1891-1959 (23) at Mayfair.

Duff Arms

Albermarle Street

On 21 May 1724 Robert Harley 1st Earl Oxford and Earl Mortimer 1661-1724 (62) died at Albermarle Street. His son Edward Harley 2nd Earl Oxford and Earl Mortimer 1689-1741 (34) succeeded 2nd Earl Oxford and Earl Mortimer. Henrietta Cavendish Holles Countess Oxford and Countess Mortimer 1694-1755 (30) by marriage Countess Oxford and Countess Mortimer.

On 08 Mar 1726 Richard Howe 1st Earl Howe 1726-1799 was born to Emanuel Howe 2nd Viscount Howe 1700-1735 (26) at Albermarle Street.

1794 John Singleton Copley Painter 1738-1815 (55). Portrait of Richard Howe 1st Earl Howe 1726-1799 (67). He wears an admiral's undress uniform of 1783 to 1787, of a blue jacket with gold braid.

York House Hotel, Albermarle Street

On 16 Jan 1801 George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis 1755-1801 (45) died at York House Hotel, Albermarle Street. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Welshpool, Radnorshire, Welsh March. His sister Henrietta Antonia Herbert 3rd Countess Powis 1758-1830 (42) succeeded 3rd Earl Powis (2C 1748).

In 1776 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787 (67). Portrait of George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis 1755-1801 (20).

Around 1778 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (54). Portrait of Henrietta Antonia Herbert 3rd Countess Powis 1758-1830 (19).

Audley Square

On 22 Nov 1777 John West 2nd Earl De La Warr 1729-1777 (48) died at Audley Square. His son William Augustus West 3rd Earl De La Warr 1757-1783 (20) succeeded 3rd Earl De La Warr (1761), 3rd Viscount Cantalupe, 9th Baron De La Warr (2C 1570).

Berkeley Gardens

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 June. 12 Jun 1684. I went to advise and give directions about the building two streetes in Berkeley Gardens, reserving the house and as much of the garden as the breadth of the house. In the meanetime I could not but deplore that sweete place (by far the most noble gardens, courts, and accommodations, stately porticos, &c. any where about the towne) should be so much straighten'd and turn'd Into tenements. But that magnificent pile and gardens contiguous to it, built by the late Lord Chancellor Clarendon, being all demolish'd, and design'd for Piazzas and buildings, was some excuse for my Lady Berkeley's (30) resolution of letting out her ground also for so excessive a price as as offer'd, advancing neere £1000 per in mere ground-rents ; to such a mad intemperance was the age of building about a citty, by far too disproportionate already to the nation I having in my time seene it almost as large again as it was within my memory.

Berkeley House

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 September. 25 Sep 1672. I dined at Lord John Berkeley's (70), newly arrived out of Ireland, where he had been Deputy; it was in his new house, or rather palace; for I am assured it stood him in near £30,000. It was very well built, and has many noble rooms, but they are not very convenient, consisting but of one Corps de Logis; they are all rooms of state, without closets. The staircase is of cedar, the furniture is princely: the kitchen and stables are ill placed, and the corridor worse, having no report to the wings they join to. For the rest, the fore-court is noble, so are the stables; and, above all, the gardens, which are incomparable by reason of the inequality of the ground, and a pretty piscina. The holly hedges on the terrace I advised the planting of. The porticos are in imitation of a house described by Palladio; but it happens to be the worst in his book, though my good friend, Mr. Hugh May (50), his Lordship's architect, effected it.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 October. 27 Oct 1675. Lord Berkeley (47) coming into Council, fell down in the gallery at Whitehall, in a fit of apoplexy, and being carried into my Lord Chamberlain's (57) lodgings, several famous doctors were employed all that night, and with much ado he was at last recovered to some sense, by applying hot fire pans and spirit of amber to his head; but nothing was found so effectual as cupping him on the shoulders. It was almost a miraculous restoration. The next day he was carried to Berkeley House. This stopped his journey for the present, and caused my stay in town. He had put all his affairs and his whole estate in England into my hands during his intended absence, which though I was very unfit to undertake, in regard of many businesses which then took me up, yet, upon the great importunity of my lady (23) and Mr. Godolphin (30) (to whom I could refuse nothing) I did take it on me. It seems when he was Deputy in Ireland, not long before, he had been much wronged by one he left in trust with his affairs, and therefore wished for some unmercenary friend who would take that trouble on him; this was to receive his rents, look after his houses and tenants, solicit supplies from the Lord Treasurer (43), and correspond weekly with him, more than enough to employ any drudge in England; but what will not friendship and love make one do?.

John Evelyn's Diary 1695 January. 13 Jan 1695. The Thames was frozen over. The deaths by smallpox increased to five hundred more than in the preceding week. The King and Princess Anne reconciled, and she was invited to keep her Court at Whitehall, having hitherto lived privately at Berkeley House; she was desired to take into her family divers servants of the late Queen; to maintain them the King has assigned her £5,000 a quarter.

Berkeley Square

On 09 Jul 1677 William Berkeley 1605-1677 (71) died at Berkeley Square. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Twickenham, Richmond.

On 23 May 1804 George Child Villiers 5th Earl Jersey 1773-1859 (30) and Sarah Sophia Fane Countess Jersey 1785-1867 (19) were married at Berkeley Square.

On 16 Nov 1805 John Ponsonby 4th Earl Bessborough 1781-1847 (24) and Maria Fane Countess Bessborough 1787-1834 (18) were married at Berkeley Square. Maria Fane Countess Bessborough 1787-1834 (18) by marriage Countess Bessborough.

On 14 Aug 1831 Benjamin Hobhouse 1st Baronet Hobhouse 1757-1831 (74) died at Berkeley Square.

On 26 Jun 1832 Elizabeth Dashwood Duchess Manchester 1740-1832 (92) died at Berkeley Square. She was buried at Kimbolton.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter V: Country House Visits. From Badminton we went on a visit to Lord Forester at Willey Park, Shropshire, where I met Lady Jersey (72) and her daughter, Lady Clementina Villiers (34).
Lady Jersey was the greatest grande dame in London Society, and her house in Berkeley Square was the centre of the Tory party. She knew all the artistic and literary celebrities of the day, and her popularity was most remarkable. Lady Clementina Villiers (34) was a beautiful and accomplished girl, and everybody loved her. Once when some one said to her father (84) that " no one was perfect," Lord Jersey (84) replied : " There is one who is perfect — there is Clementina (34)." Many suitors proposed for her, a most persistent one being the Duke d'Ossuna, a grandee of Spain, and an immensely rich man. He must have been deeply in love with the beautiful English girl, for he used to keep many drawings and portraits of Lady Clementina in his palace at Madrid.
"Those whom the gods love die young," and so it was with Clementina Villiers ; she was taken ill during a visit to Germany with her mother and only returned to England to die..
Her portraits were in all the " Books of Beauty " of the day, but although they faithfully portray her perfect features, they cannot convey the beauty of colour and changing expression that were her greatest charms.

On 22 Jun 1904 Richard Boyle 9th Earl Cork 1829-1904 (75) died at Berkeley Square. His son Charles Spencer Boyle 10th Earl Cork 1861-1925 (42) succeeded 10th Earl Cork.

11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair

Before 15 Jun 1778 Cecil Bisshop 6th Baronet Bishopp 1700-1778 owned a house at 11 Berkeley Square, Mayfair which was subsequently bought from his heirs by Horace Walpole 4th Earl Orford 1717-1797 in 1779.

13 Berkeley Square, Mayfair

On 19 Jun 1877 Admiral Henry John Rous 1795-1877 (82) died at 13 Berkeley Square, Mayfair.

38 Berkeley Square, Mayfair

Times Newspaper Marriages. 28 Jan 1937. THE DUKE OF NORFOLK AND MISS STRUTT
Princess Alice Countess of Athlone (53) and Major-General the Earl of Athlone (63), and Prince Arthur of Connaught (54) were present yesterday afternoon at the marriage at Brompton Oratory of the Duke of Norfolk, Premier Peer and Hereditary Earl Marshal of England (28), and the Hon. Lavinia Mary Strutt (20), only daughter of Lord Belper (53) and the Countess of Rosebery (44).
Princess Alice (53) wore a mink coat over a dress of burgundy-red crepe, with a small red hat to match.
The Oratory was decorated with four large stands of flowers, placed at the chancel steps. They were in mixed shades of red and included amaryllis lilies, poinsettia, anthuriums, roses, carnations, and red leaves. While the guests were arriving the organist played Mendelssohn's Allegretto from the Fourth Sonata, Elgar's Allegro Maestoso from the First Sonata, and the prelude and fugue in E flat, and the organ choral "Mortify us by Thy Goodness" by J. S. Bach.
The bride (20) arrived with her father, Lord Belper (53), and was loudly cheered by the crowd outside the Oratory, who broke through the police cordon. She walked up the nave to Handel's March from the Occasional Oratorio, and was met by Father Talbot and Father John Cuddon. Miss Strutt (20) wore a classically simple dress of silver lame, cut on straight sheath lines with long tight sleeves and a high round roll collar. The skirt just touched the ground and was continued at the back to form a long square train. She wore a girdle of silver cord knotted in front. Her long veil of white tulle fell from a simple coronet of orange-blossom and green leaves, and she carried a sheaf of arum lilies. She was followed by six little pages-Robin Herbert, Timothy Hunloke, Bob McCreery, John Scrope, George Vivian-Smith, and Michael Watt; and by six bridesmaids-Lady Katharine (25) and Lady Winefride Howard (23) (sisters of the bridegroom), Lady Anne Bridgeman (23), the Hon. Pamela Digby (16), Miss Gillian Drummond, and Miss Nancy Malcolmnson. The bridegroom's (28) racing colours, pale blue and scarlet, were introduced into the dresses and suits of the attendants. The pages were in pale blue satin suits piped with scarlet, and the bridesmaids wore dresses of sky-blue corded crepe, with touches of scarlet at the waistline. They had high rounded necklines with long bell sleeves and their headdresses of red bavardia were massed in front. They carried bouquets of red flowers, including tulips, amaryllis lilies, carnations, and euphorbia. The bridegroom gave them brooches showing his and his bride's initials in rubies and diamonds. The Earl of Eldon (37) was best man.
The marriage service was very short and non-choral, as the bride (20) is not a Roman Catholic. After they had plighted their troth Father Ronald Knox gave an address from the centre of the transept. The bride (20) and bridegroom (28) remained kneeling at the chancel steps, facing the altar. They then went in procession to the vestry, where the registrar, Mr. J. P. Bond, conducted the civil ceremony.
Afterwards the bride (20) and bridegroom (28) left for 38, Mayfair (the residence of the Earl of Rosebery (55)), where the Countess of Rosebery (44) held a reception. The bride (20) went away for the honeymoon in a dress of black and red shot silk taffeta, under a broadtail coat with a fur cap to match.
Among those present at the Oratory were:
The Earl (55) and Countess of Rosebery (44).
The Duchess of Norfolk (60),
Lady Rachel Howard (32).
Lady Belper,
the Hon. Alexander (24) and the Hon. Michael Strutt (23), the Hon. Mrs. Parry-Evans. Mr. and the Hon. Mrs. Vernon Malcolmsonson, Lord and Lady Aberdare, the Hon. Margaret Strutt, the Hon. Mrs. Frank Hormsby, etc.

Charles Street, Mayfair

On 10 Jan 1810 Charles Bennet 6th Earl Tankerville 1810-1899 was born to Charles Augustus Bennet 5th Earl Tankerville 1776-1859 (33) and Corisande Armandine Sophie Léonie Hélène Gramont Countess Tankerville -1865 at Charles Street, Mayfair.

On 28 Mar 1818 George Greville 4th Earl Warwick, 4th Earl Brooke Warwick Castle 1818-1893 was born to Henry Greville 3rd Earl Warwick, 3rd Earl Brooke Warwick Castle 1779-1853 (38) at Charles Street, Mayfair.

Times Newspaper Marriages. 25 Jan 1865. MARRIAGE IN HIGH LIFE. The marriage of the Earl of Coventry (26) and Lady Blanche Craven (22), third daughter of Earl Craven (55), was solemnized yesterday morning at St. George's Church, Hanover-square. The bridegroom and the frieNds of both families assembled at the church at 11 o'clock, and shortly afterwards were joined by the bride (22), accompanied by her mother, the Countess Craven (48). The bride (22) was received by her father (26) at the church door, and, attended by eight bridesmaids, proceeded at once to the communion table, in front ot which a numerous company had assembled, including the Earl (65) and Countess of Clarendon (54) and Lady Emily Villiers (22), the Countess of Verulam (40) and Lady Harriet Grimston (20), Viscount and Viscountees Folkestone (43) and Hon. Miss Bouverie, the Countess of Sefton (27) and Lady Cecilia Molyneux, Viscount Chelsea (24), and Lady Caroline Townley (27) and Miss Townley, Viscount Uffington (23), Sir Henry and Latly Sophia Des Voeux, Hon. Mr. and Mrs Coventry, Hon. Gerald and Ladv Maria Ponsonby, Mr. Oswald andl Miss Oswald, Dr. Quin, Mr. Cecil Boothby, Mr. James Oswald, Miss Talbot, Viscount (32) and Viscountess Grey de Wilton (28), Lady Evelyn Bruce, Hon. Mrs. Grimston and Miss Griniston, &c.
The Hon. and Rev. Edward Grimston (52), uncle of the bride, performed the religious rite. After the registration of the marriage the wedding party left the church, and procceded to the Earl (55) and Countess Craven's (48) mansion in Charles-street, Mayfair. At 2 o'clock the newly-wedded couple took their departure for Croome Court, tbe Earl of Coventry's (26) seat, near Upton, there to pass the honeymoon. At Croome Pirton and Severn Stoke, the marriage was celebrated yesterday by the tenantry and neighbours of the Earl of Coventry (26). The tenantry of the Croome Pirton and Severn Stoke estates, to ths number of about 100, dined together in two parties yesterday at Severn Stoke and High-green. At Pirton and Severn Stoke garlands of evergreens and flags were hung out over the roads, and at night a bonfire was lighted at High-green. The rejoicings have extended over all his Lordship's (26) large estates in the southern portion of Worcestershire. The inhabitants of Worcester celebrated the marriage by hoisting flags frem tile windows and streamers across the streets. The bells from the various churches rang merry peals all day.
George Coventry 9th Earl Coventry (26) and Blanche Craven Countess Coventry 1842-1930 (22) were married. Blanche Craven Countess Coventry 1842-1930 (22) by marriage Countess Coventry.

6 Charles Street, Mayfair

On 24 Dec 1824 Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 was born to Spencer de Horsey 1790-1860 (34) and Louisa Rous -1843 at 6 Charles Street, Mayfair.

Earl of Powis' House, Mayfair

On 07 Mar 1812 William Eliot 2nd Earl St Germans 1767-1845 (44) and Charlotte Robinson 1790-1813 (22) were married at Earl of Powis' House, Mayfair.

John Street, Mayfair

Lansdowne House, Mayfair

On 30 Mar 1811 William Petty-Fitzmaurice 1811-1836 was born to Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice 3rd Marquess Lansdowne 1780-1863 (30) and Louisa Fox-Strangeways Marchioness Lansdowne -1851 at Lansdowne House, Mayfair.

On 21 Aug 1836 William Petty-Fitzmaurice 1811-1836 (25) died at Lansdowne House, Mayfair.

Brook Street

In 1876 Beatrice Charlotte Elizabeth Vesey Baroness Stalbridge -1876 died of pleurisy at Brook Street.

Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street

On 30 Mar 1852 George Montagu Bennet 7th Earl Tankerville 1852-1931 was born to Charles Bennet 6th Earl Tankerville 1810-1899 (42) and Olivia Montagu Countess Tankerville 1830-1922 (21) at Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street.

Lower Brooke Street, Brook Street

On 14 Feb 1824 George Barrington 7th Viscount Barrington 1824-1886 was born to William Keppel Barrington 6th Viscount Barrington 1793-1867 (30) and Jane Elizabeth Liddell Viscountess Barrington 1804-1883 (19) in Lower Brooke Street, Brook Street.

Bruton Street

On 03 Apr 1819 Charles William Vane 3rd Marquess Londonderry 1778-1854 (41) and Frances Vane-Tempest Marchioness Londonderry 1800-1865 (19) were married at Bruton Street.

Chesterfield House

On 24 May 1773 Philip Stanhope 4th Earl Chesterfield 1694-1773 (78) died at Chesterfield House. His third-cousin once-removed Philip Stanhope 5th Earl Chesterfield 1755-1815 (17) succeeded 5th Earl Chesterfield.

On 29 Aug 1815 Philip Stanhope 5th Earl Chesterfield 1755-1815 (59) died at Chesterfield House. His son George Stanhope 6th Earl Chesterfield 1805-1866 (10) succeeded 6th Earl Chesterfield.

On 03 Nov 1834 Evelyn Stanhope Countess Carnarvon 1834-1875 was born to George Stanhope 6th Earl Chesterfield 1805-1866 (29) and Anne Weld-Forester Countess Chesterfield 1802-1885 (32) at Chesterfield House.

On 07 Feb 1923 George Henry Hubert Lascelles 7th Earl Harewood 1923-2011 was born to Henry Lascelles 6th Earl Harewood 1882-1947 (40) and Mary Windsor Countess Harewood 1897-1965 (25) at Chesterfield House.

Chesterfield Street

On 03 May 1884 Richard Henry Fitzroy Somerset 2nd Baron Raglan 1817-1884 (66) died at Chesterfield Street. His son George Somerset 3rd Baron Raglan 1857-1921 (26) succeeded 3rd Baron Raglan (1852). Ethel Jemima Ponsonby Baroness Raglan 1857-1940 (27) by marriage Baroness Raglan (1852).

Christ Church

Around 1825 William Russell 8th Duke Bedford 1809-1872 (15) educated at Christ Church.

On 16 Aug 1892 Spencer Cavendish 8th Duke Devonshire 1833-1908 (59) and Louisa Vonalten Duchess Devonshire and Manchester 1832-1911 (60) were married at Christ Church. Louisa Vonalten Duchess Devonshire and Manchester 1832-1911 (60) by marriage Duchess Devonshire.

On 08 Apr 1899 Aldred Frederick George Beresford Lumley 10th Earl Scarborough 1857-1945 (41) and Lucy Cecilia Margetts Countess Scarborough -1931 were married at Christ Church. Lucy Cecilia Margetts Countess Scarborough -1931 by marriage Countess Scarborough.

Conduit Street

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter IV: Presented at Court. The intimate history of Society is full of unsuspected tragedy, but when the veil is torn aside, the unhappiness of many a husband and wife becomes tragedy in real earnest, and the light-hearted butterflies who sip the sweets of the good things of this life are horrified at the idea of such things happening in their midst. The grim story I am about to relate concerned particular friends of mine, and it made a great impression upon me. Constance de Burgh (22) was one of my great friends, she was a very pretty, charming girl who married Lord Ward (34), who had always been considered a great parti by mothers with marriageable daughters.
Constance (22) was not in love with her husband (34) ; he had proposed and she was told she must accept him. A dutiful daughter of rather colourless character, Constance never dreamt of opposition, and so she became Lady Ward.
Marriage frequently means disillusion, and the Ward marriage was not a success.
William Ward (34) was a pleasant man, but he had extraordinary ideas of how to treat a wife, ideas which could only be tolerated by a tactful woman who could laugh at them, and forget all the unpleasantness they entailed. Poor Constance was not tactful, and not accommodating. Her husband worshipped the beautiful ; he had selected his wife partly on account of her beauty, and he treated her like some lovely slave he had bought. He had a strange, almost barbaric passion for precious stones, and he bought quantities of them and lavished them on his wife, who appeared at great entertainments literally ablaze with diamonds.
What pleased Lord Ward more than anything was to make Constance put on all her jewels for his special benefit when they were alone. He would admire her thus for hours, delighting in her lovely unclothed figure, and contrasting the sheen of her ropes of pearls with her delicate skin, as she sat on a black satin-covered couch.
These strange proceedings at first terrified and then disgusted Constance. She appealed to her father, but her parents decided that her husband's peculiarities came within the meaning of the marriage vows, and she was told she must submit to her husband's humours.
Fate then threw Constance (22) across Lord Dupplin's (24) path, with the result that the tragedy began.
I knew Blanche Dupplin (23) very well, and often when I was lunching with her she would tell me sorrowfully about her husband's (24) infatuation. "It is useless to expostulate," said Blanche; " Dupplin will not abandon the affair, and I don't know how it will end if William Ward (34) finds out his wife's (22) infidelity."
Matters came to a crisis at a fancy dress ball given by Lady Londonderry (22) at Holderness House, the chief feature being a quadrille danced by ladies representing famous European queens. I met the Wards there ; Constance looked delicate, and early in the evening she said she felt ill and must go home. She came over to where her husband and I were standing, and asked him whether he intended to accompany her.
" No, I shall stay," said Lord Ward (34), " I mean to have several dances with Miss de Horsey. Go home by all means if you are tired."
Constance was enceinte, so her absence excited no comment as she was far from strong. Her husband remained until nearly 3 a.m., when he departed for his house in Park Lane — it was daylight, and, as he approached the house, he suddenly noticed a man leaving it. Their eyes met ; it was Lord Dupplin (24), who turned and ran for his life down the street.
Lord Ward entered, and startled the sleepy footman by telling him to rouse the servants and bid them assemble in the hall. He then went upstairs to his wife's bedroom.
What passed between them was told by Constance to a friend ; her husband came to her bedside and accused her of committing adultery with Lord Dupplin (24). " Get up, madame," he continued, "my house is yours no longer; arrangements shall be made for your future, but henceforth you are no wife of mine."
Tears and entreaties were useless, and Constance was obliged to dress ; William Ward (34) then led her past the scandalised servants who were waiting downstairs, and — turned her out of doors.
The poor frightened girl managed to reach her parents' house in Grosvenor Crescent, and implored them to give her shelter, but they were as heartless as her husband, and told her they could not take her in. More dead than alive, she turned her steps to Conduit Street, where her singing-master lived, and this gentleman, full of compassion for his unfortunate pupil, allowed her to remain there until the next day, when she went to Ostend. From Ostend she went to Ems, where her child was prematurely born and the unhappy young mother died. Her husband brought her body to England, and once again Constance Ward (22) lay in her darkened bedroom.
On the evening of the day before her burial, Lord Colville came to see Lord Ward. They talked for some time and then the widower suddenly turned to his friend.
" Colville — you admired my wife ? " "Yes," replied Lord Colville, " I did." " Well, come and look your last on her," said Lord Ward, and lighting a candle he led the way upstairs.
The room was full of shadows, and the flickering light fell on the lovely face of the dead woman. Silently Lord Colville stood by her, and his heart ached when he thought of her fate. Ward was watching him attentively. "Still admiring my wife? Well, she was a pretty woman — but — you'd never credit she had such bad teeth." He put down the candle on a table as he spoke, and raised his wife's head from the pillow. With cold deliberation he wrenched the jaws apart. " I always told you she had bad teeth," he repeated, "look here, man." But Lord Colville had hurriedly left the room. He told me afterwards it was the most ghastly sight he had ever seen.

Trinity Chapel, Conduit Street

John Evelyn's Diary 1691 July. 18 Jul 1691. To London to hear Mr. Stringfellow preach his first sermon in the newly erected Church of Trinity, in Conduit Street; to which I did recommend him to Dr. Tenison (54) for the constant preacher and lecturer. This Church, formerly built of timber on Hounslow-Heath by King James (57) for the mass priests, being begged by Dr. Tenison (54), rector of St. Martin's, was set up by that public-minded, charitable, and pious man near my son's dwelling in Dover Street, chiefly at the charge of the Doctor (54). I know him to be an excellent preacher and a fit person. This Church, though erected in St. Martin's, which is the Doctor's parish, he was not only content, but was the sole industrious mover, that it should be made a separate parish, in regard of the neighborhood having become so populous. Wherefore to countenance and introduce the new minister, and take possession of a gallery designed for my son's family, I went to London, where, [NOTE. Text runs out?].

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 January. 12 Jan 1692. My granddaughter was christened by Dr. Tenison (55), now Bishop of Lincoln, in Trinity Church (assumed to be a reference to the new church described on 18 Jul 1691), being the first that was christened there. She was named Jane.

Curzon Street

Grosvenor Square

On 05 Jul 1765 Charles Powlett 5th Duke Bolton 1718-1765 (47) committed suicide at Grosvenor Square. His brother Harry Powlett 6th Duke Bolton 1720- succeeded 6th Duke Bolton, 10th Marquess Winchester.

On 07 Sep 1776 Mary Henrietta Juliana Osborne Countess Chichester 1776-1862 was born to Francis Osborne 5th Duke Leeds 1751-1799 (25) and Amelia Darcy 12th Baroness Darcy Knayth, 9th Baroness Conyers 1754-1784 (21) at Grosvenor Square.

On 16 Apr 1833 Henry George Herbert 2nd Earl Carnarvon 1772-1833 (60) died at Grosvenor Square. He was buried at Burghclere. His son Henry John George Herbert 3rd Earl Carnarvon 1800-1849 (32) succeeded 3rd Earl Carnarvon (3C 1793) 3rd Baron Porchester. Henrietta Anna Howard-Molyneux-Howard Countess Carnarvon 1804-1876 (28) by marriage Countess Carnarvon (3C 1793).

Grosvenor Street

On 29 May 1773 Princess Sophia of Gloucester 1773-1844 was born to William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (29) and Maria Walpole Duchess Gloucester and Edinburgh 1736-1807 (36) at Grosvenor Street.

In 1775 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (47). Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (31).

Around 1804. John Opie Painter 1761-1807 (42). Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (60).

In 1780 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (56). Known as The Ladies Waldegrave. From left to right three sisters: Charlotte Maria Waldegrave Duchess Grafton 1761-1808 (18), Elizabeth Laura Waldegrave Countess Waldegrave 1760-1816 (19) and Anne Horatia Waldegrave 1762-1801 (18). Believed to have been commissioned by their mother (43) in the hope of attracting suitors since at the time of the painting all three were unmarried. All three did subsequently marry.

On 02 May 1799 Philip Stanhope 5th Earl Chesterfield 1755-1815 (43) and Henrietta Thynne 1762-1813 (36) were married at Grosvenor Street.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter VI: The Count Montemolin. The fresh Carlist war (managed from London) raged in the east of Spain under the famous Cabrera, and was continued through 1848, Montemolin remaining in London, much to the discontent of his party in Spain. In February 1849, Cabrera was indignantly demanding more men and resources to carry on the war, and, above all, the presence of the Prince (31) himself in the field. Montemolin (31), therefore was obhged to return to Spain, but he could not bring himself to remain there, and so he obtained a pass from Louis Napoleon which enabled him to come back to London.
He lost no time in at once seeing me, but I was shocked at his leaving Spain for my sake, as I had all a romantic girl's idea and love of one's country, and I was not even flattered that my beaux yeux had dulled the Count's sense of honour and rendered him a traitor to his cause. I did not hesitate to tell him so, and poor weak Montemolin (31) could not understand why I was so mortified. I also naturally concluded that after so lightly renouncing his obligations to those who trusted him and who gave up their lives and fortunes for him I, too, might one day be as easily forgotten, and the prospect did not please me.
In April 1849, the great Cabrera threw up the task in disgust, escaped to France and afterwards to England, where he married a rich English wife who still lives, and he determined to fight for Carlism no more.
After this mv misofivings were auorumented by the annoyance I was subjected to by innumerable Carlist spies, who seemed to regard me as the Delilah who had ruined Carlism. My footsteps were dogged by them everywhere ; if I walked or rode, I encountered desperate looking Spaniards either in Grosvenor Street or hanging about the Row ; if I went to the Opera, I saw dark faces glowering at me, and when I returned home from balls or parties I was sure to see a Spaniard waiting near our house.
My life became unendurable, and I told papa to inform the Count that I wished to break off my engagement. Papa therefore wrote him the following letter :
8 Upper Grosvenor Street,
June 02, 1849.
Sir, — When you did me the honour of proposing marriage to my daughter, you will recollect I said that before it could be entertained it was absolutely necessary, in case my daughter should consider the proposal favourably, that three points should be fully and clearly ascertained.
First, that the marriage should be in every respect valid and legal by the laws of Spain.
Secondly, that it could only take place with the full and entire consent and approbation of your own family.
And thirdly, that there were the means of making suitable provision for my daughter and for any children she might have.
Upon the first of these points there is no doubt whatever that by the laws of Spain the marriage would not be considered as valid.
This being the case, there is hardly any occasion to enter on the other two.
With every feeling therefore of respect, sir, and every assurance how much I feel the honour done me, I have but one course to take, which is most respectfully and decidedly upon my daughter's part, and by her desire, to decline the proposal you have made.
With every wish for your future prosperity, I have the honour to be, sir,
Your faithful and obedient servant,
(Sgd.) Spencer de Horsey (59).

Mount Street, Grosvenor Square

On 26 Dec 1786 Colonel William Berkeley 1st Earl Fitzhardinge 1786-1857 was born illegitimately to Frederick Augustus Berkeley 5th Earl Berkeley 1745-1810 (41) at Mount Street, Grosvenor Square and Mary Cole.

On 03 Jan 1788 Admiral Maurice Frederick Fitzhardinge Berkeley 1788-1867 was born illegitimately to Frederick Augustus Berkeley 5th Earl Berkeley 1745-1810 (43) at Mount Street, Grosvenor Square and Mary Cole.

On 26 Mar 1789 Augustus Fitzhardinge Berkeley 1789-1872 was born illegitimately to Frederick Augustus Berkeley 5th Earl Berkeley 1745-1810 (44) at Mount Street, Grosvenor Square and Mary Cole.

On 02 Apr 1790 Maria FitzHardinge Berkeley 1790-1793 was born illegitimately to Frederick Augustus Berkeley 5th Earl Berkeley 1745-1810 (45) at Mount Street, Grosvenor Square and Mary Cole. On 02 Jun 1793 Maria FitzHardinge Berkeley 1790-1793 (3) died.

On 13 Jun 1793 Henrietta FitzHardinge Berkeley 1793-1819 was born illegitimately to Frederick Augustus Berkeley 5th Earl Berkeley 1745-1810 (48) at Mount Street, Grosvenor Square and Mary Cole.

On 07 Dec 1794 Francis Henry FitzHardinge Berkeley 1794-1870 was born illegitimately to Frederick Augustus Berkeley 5th Earl Berkeley 1745-1810 (49) at Mount Street, Grosvenor Square and Mary Cole.

Board of Guardians, Mount Street, Grosvenor Square

On 20 Mar 1878 Archibald Philip Primrose 5th Earl Rosebery 1847-1929 (30) and Hannah Rothschild Countess Camden 1851-1890 (26) were married at Board of Guardians, Mount Street, Grosvenor Square. Hannah Rothschild Countess Camden 1851-1890 (26) by marriage Countess Camden.

Upper Grosvenor Street, Grosvenor Street

On 08 Apr 1788 Horace Pitt-Rivers 3rd Baron Rivers 1777-1831 (10) and Frances Rigby -1860 were married at her father's house in Upper Grosvenor Street, Grosvenor Street.

On 23 Jul 1802 Anne Maria Bonnell Duchess Somerset -1802 died in Upper Grosvenor Street, Grosvenor Street.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter IV: Presented at Court. One of my most amusing experiences about this time originated in my wish to see a rather risque play at the Princess's Theatre.
" Papa," said I one morning at breakfast, " I wish you would take me to the Princess's Theatre : every one's talking about the play. Do let us go this evening."
" Quite impossible," answered papa, with great decision. "Quite impossible, Adeline — I am dining to-night with General Cavendish at the Club, a long-standing engagement, and," he continued, in a tone of conscious virtue, "even if I were disengaged, I should not think of taking my daughter to see such a play ; nothing, my dear, is so degrading as a public display of lax morals, and it is the duty of every self-respecting person to discountenance such a performance. Let me hear no more about it " ; and he opened the Times with an air of finality.
The evergreen fabrication of "going to the Club," the most obvious and clumsy of lies invented by man to deceive woman, was as flourishing then as it is to-day. Perhaps it was more successful, as the telephone was not invented. I quite believed papa's statement, but I was deceived, as subsequent events proved.
I was very much annoyed. All the morning I brooded over papa's refusal, and then I suddenly made up my mind that I would go to the play in spite of him.
I rang for my maid. " Parker," I said, "go at once to the Princess's Theatre and bespeak a box for me, and be ready to come with me to-night."
"Alone, miss?" ventured Parker.
" Yes, alone, now don't waste a moment " ; and no sooner had she set off than I wrote and despatched a letter to Lord Cardigan, who was a friend of papa, and asked him to come to my box at the Princess's that evening.
Parker and I arrived early and I settled down to enjoy myself. The overture commenced, and I was just about to inspect the audience when Lord Cardigan came into the box ; he was rather agitated. " Miss de Horsey," he said, without any preliminaries, "you must leave the theatre at once."
" I'll do no such thing," I cried angrily. " What on earth is the matter? "
" Well," reluctantly answered Cardigan — "well, Miss de Horsey, your father and General Cavendish are in the box opposite — with " (he looked at me apologetically) — " with their mistresses ! It will never do for you to be seen. Do, I implore you, permit me to escort you home before the performance begins."
I was seized with an uncontrollable desire to laugh. So this was the long-standing engagement, this papa's parade of morality ! I peeped out from the curtains of the box — it was quite true ; directly opposite to me there sat papa and the General, with two very pretty women I did not remember seeing before.
" I shall see the play," I said to Lord Cardigan, "and you'll put me into a cab before it is over ; I shall be home before papa returns from — the ' Club ' " ; and I laughed again at the idea.
I spent a most exciting evening hidden behind the curtains, and I divided my attention between papa and the performance. About the middle of the last act we left. Lord Cardigan hailed a hackney-carriage and gave the driver directions where to go ; he then wished me good-night and a safe return. It was a foggy evening, and the drive seemed interminable. I became impatient. "Parker," I said, " lower the window and tell the man to make haste."
Parker obeyed, and I heard an angry argument in the fog. She sat down with a horrified face and announced : " we are nearly at Islington — and the driver's drunk ! "
Here was a pretty state of things ! " Parker, tell him to stop at once." She did so, and I got out to ascertain what was happening. The man was drunk, but I succeeded in fightening him into turning his horse's head in the direction of Upper Grosvenor Street, and we set off again.
Theatres were " out " much earlier then than now, but it must have taken a long time to reach Mayfair, for I heard midnight strike when the cab stopped at the end of the street. I sent Parker on to open the door while I paid the man, and I devoutly hoped the " Club " had proved attractive enough to prevent papa returning; home before me. As I stood in front of No. 8 the door was opened — not by Parker but by papa. I felt I was in for a mauvais quart d'heure, but I walked quietly into the hall. " Adeline," said papa in an awful voice, "explain yourself. Where have you been.-* Is this an hour for a young lady to be out of doors? How dare you conduct yourself in this manner ? ". The courage of despair seized me — and, let me confess it, a spice of devilment also. I faced my angry parent quite calmly. "I've been to the Princess's Theatre, papa, I said demurely (he started) ; and I saw you and General Cavendish there ; I thought you were dining at the Club . . . and I saw . . .". "Go to bed at once, Adeline," interrupted papa, looking very sheepish, "we'll talk about your behaviour later." But he never mentioned the subject to me again !.

8 Upper Grosvenor Street

From 1830 to 1858 Spencer de Horsey 1790-1860 (68) lived at 8 Upper Grosvenor Street.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter IV: Presented at Court. After mamma's death I kept house for papa at 8 Upper Grosvenor Street. My brothers were rarely at home. William (17) was educated at Eton, and when he was sixteen years old the Duke of Wellington (73) gave him a commission in the Grenadier Guards. Later he went through the Crimean War, and he retired from the Army in 1883, on account of ill-health, with the rank of Lieutenant-General.
Algernon (16) entered the Navy in 1840 as a midshipman, and the same year took part in the operations on the coast of Syria. After the battle of Acre he received the Turkish medal and clasps : his promotion was rapid, and as Admiral, his flagship, the Shah, engaged the Huascar, which he forced to surrender to the Peruvian authorities.
Now that I was so much alone I occasionally found time hang heavy on my hands, and I welcomed any excitement as a break in the monotony, for of course our period of mourning prevented us entertaining or accepting invitations. One day my maid told me about a fortune-teller who had a wonderful gift for predicting the future. I was very much interested, and made up my mind to consult the oracle. My maid attempted to dissuade me, saying that the woman lived in Bridge Street, Westminster, which was not at all a nice neighbourhood. I have always had my own way and, disguised in a borrowed cloak, bonnet and thick veil, and accompanied by my protesting servant, I started off to Bridge Street late one November afternoon.
It was dusk when we reached Westminster and found Bridge Street, badly lighted and evil-smelling. We knocked at the door, stated whom we wished to see, and we were ushered through a dark passage into a dirty room reeking of tobacco.
The fortune-teller was a wrinkled old woman who was smoking a short clay pipe with evident enjoyment. When I told her what I had come for, she produced a greasy pack of cards, and after I had "crossed her pahn " she commenced to tell my future.
" Ah ! " said she at last, and she looked curiously, " my pretty young lady, fate holds a great deal in store for you. You will not marry for several years, but when you do it will be to a widower — a man in a high position. You will suffer much unkindness before you experience real happiness, you will obtain much and lose much, you will marry again after your husband's death, and you will live to a great age."
I was quite impressed by my "fortune," but I was a little disappointed, for like most girls I had my day-dreams of a young husband, and the prospect of a widower was thus rather depressing.
Strangely enough, the prediction came true, for Lord Cardigan (45) was a widower, and nearly all the men who proposed to me were widowers ! I was asked in marriage by Lord Sherborne (38), a widower with ten children ; by the Duke of Leeds (40), who was a widower with eleven children, and by Christopher Maunsell Talbot (39), once Father of the House of Commons, also a widower with four children. Prince Soltykoff, the Duke of St. Albans (41), Harry Howard, and Disraeli (38) were other widowers who proposed to me, so I suppose I must have had some unaccountable fascination for bereaved husbands.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter VI: The Count Montemolin. I made the acquaintance of the Count Montemolin (29) in 1848, when he was staying with the Due (33) and Duchesse de Nemours (25) at Orleans House, Twickenham. He was a very distinguished-looking man, but his good looks were marred by the hereditary defect of the Bourbon Eye, peculiar to the family.
The Count (29) was a beautiful dancer, and we danced together a great deal at the numerous balls where we met, and after Montemolin had made my father's acquaintance he used often to visit us at Upper Grosvenor Street.
We had many tastes in common ; the Count (29) was passionately fond of music, so we sang together in French and Spanish, and thus gradually friendship became love, at least on his part. I, myself, was dazzled by the romance of the affair, and by the rank of my would-be suitor, for I do not think any girl in my position could have been quite unmoved if a Prince of the Blood selected her for his wife instead of one of the Royalties he could have chosen.
The Count (31) proposed to me in February '49, but I quite appreciated the difficulties that beset such a marriage, and, after the Count's declaration, I hesitated to definitely consent to become his wife. He apparently was greatly distressed, and sent me the following letter :
Mademoiselle, — I am taking the liberty of writing to you to open my heart, but under the greatest secrecy, as without that I shall be completely lost. I was the most unhappy man in the world after what you said to me at the last ball. How could you believe me capable of deceiving you ! I should never have any peace of mind were I to do so. I did not dare to speak to you again, and nevertheless I sought by every means to meet you, because I could not live without at least seeing you, and also because I hoped for the chance of speaking to you and proving to you that I am a man of honour, and not such a one as people would have you believe. But your kind and gracious manner on Thursday last has dispelled all my fears.
Now, I am going to tell you what you must have felt for a long time ; it is that I love you. You alone can make my happiness ; any other marriage is impossible for me.
I hope you will grant me the happiness of marrying you one day, because I dare think you too love me. But above all things I desire your happiness, and if I thought you would ever become unhappy with me, I would rather suffer alone, although the greatest and most terrible sacrifice I could make would be to renounce your love. I should, however, wish before you decide definitely that you would grant me a secret interview in the presence of your father, in order that I can say certain things to you. I trust that you will grant me this interview, as it will decide my future happiness.
I beg you again to maintain the greatest reserve in the matter. It must be a secret from everybody, even from my own family, Nobody except your father must know anything about it ; for if they did, believe me, I should be completely lost.
I will call at your house at three o'clock in the afternoon, and if you cannot be alone then with your father, you can send me word by him to the following address when it will be convenient to you.
M. LE COMTE DE MoNTEMOLIN,
Travellers Club, Pall Mall.
I shall be there until two o'clock exactly. I am, with the deepest respect and attachment,
Your devoted,
Le Comte de Montemolin.
My father and I therefore saw the Count, who successfully overcame our doubts about the wisdom of his marriage to an Englishwoman in view of the political situation in Spain. Montemolin was so much in love that he easily waived every obstacle my father placed in the way, and at last it was settled that we were to be formally engaged, subject to certain conditions which my father insisted on the Count complying with.

1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Princess Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1822-1857 (17) around the time of her marriage to Prince Louis Duke Nemours 1814-1896 (25) on 26 Apr 1840.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter VI: The Count Montemolin. The fresh Carlist war (managed from London) raged in the east of Spain under the famous Cabrera, and was continued through 1848, Montemolin remaining in London, much to the discontent of his party in Spain. In February 1849, Cabrera was indignantly demanding more men and resources to carry on the war, and, above all, the presence of the Prince (31) himself in the field. Montemolin (31), therefore was obhged to return to Spain, but he could not bring himself to remain there, and so he obtained a pass from Louis Napoleon which enabled him to come back to London.
He lost no time in at once seeing me, but I was shocked at his leaving Spain for my sake, as I had all a romantic girl's idea and love of one's country, and I was not even flattered that my beaux yeux had dulled the Count's sense of honour and rendered him a traitor to his cause. I did not hesitate to tell him so, and poor weak Montemolin (31) could not understand why I was so mortified. I also naturally concluded that after so lightly renouncing his obligations to those who trusted him and who gave up their lives and fortunes for him I, too, might one day be as easily forgotten, and the prospect did not please me.
In April 1849, the great Cabrera threw up the task in disgust, escaped to France and afterwards to England, where he married a rich English wife who still lives, and he determined to fight for Carlism no more.
After this mv misofivings were auorumented by the annoyance I was subjected to by innumerable Carlist spies, who seemed to regard me as the Delilah who had ruined Carlism. My footsteps were dogged by them everywhere ; if I walked or rode, I encountered desperate looking Spaniards either in Grosvenor Street or hanging about the Row ; if I went to the Opera, I saw dark faces glowering at me, and when I returned home from balls or parties I was sure to see a Spaniard waiting near our house.
My life became unendurable, and I told papa to inform the Count that I wished to break off my engagement. Papa therefore wrote him the following letter :
8 Upper Grosvenor Street,
June 02, 1849.
Sir, — When you did me the honour of proposing marriage to my daughter, you will recollect I said that before it could be entertained it was absolutely necessary, in case my daughter should consider the proposal favourably, that three points should be fully and clearly ascertained.
First, that the marriage should be in every respect valid and legal by the laws of Spain.
Secondly, that it could only take place with the full and entire consent and approbation of your own family.
And thirdly, that there were the means of making suitable provision for my daughter and for any children she might have.
Upon the first of these points there is no doubt whatever that by the laws of Spain the marriage would not be considered as valid.
This being the case, there is hardly any occasion to enter on the other two.
With every feeling therefore of respect, sir, and every assurance how much I feel the honour done me, I have but one course to take, which is most respectfully and decidedly upon my daughter's part, and by her desire, to decline the proposal you have made.
With every wish for your future prosperity, I have the honour to be, sir,
Your faithful and obedient servant,
(Sgd.) Spencer de Horsey (59).

Charge of the Light Brigade

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter VII: My Marriage. Among those who came to our house at 8 Upper Grosvenor Street, the Earl of Cardigan was my father's particular friend, and in consequence we saw a great deal of him. Lord Cardigan has sometimes been described as a favourite of fortune, for he possessed great wealth, great personal attractions, and he was much liked by the late Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Commanding the 11th Hussars, he was the first person to welcome the Prince at Dover when he arrived to marry the Queen, and his regiment was afterwards known as Prince Albert's own Hussars.
His Lordship was a typical soldier, and after the Crimean War there was perhaps no more popular hero in all England. So much has been written about him that it is unnecessary for me to retail matters that are well known. I have often been asked whether he confided to me anything particular about the Charge of the Light Brigade, but the truth is that he never seemed to attach any importance to the part he played. Such matters are the property of the historian, and as his widow I am naturally his greatest admirer.

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

10 Feb 1840. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (47). Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Hayter included portraits of fifty-six of those present at the occasion and sittings took place over the next year. The Queen (20) sat for him in March in her 'Bridal dress, veil, wreath & all', and Prince Albert (20) also posed for his portrait several times during the following months. Hayter's family too helped out with his son, Henry, modelling the Prince's costume, while his daughter Mary posed for the Queen's arm and wearing the veil. Victoria's aunt Queen Adelaide (47), however, was unwilling to co-operate and the artist had to refer to a miniature for her likeness. Hayter included himself in the painting, on the lower right, with his sketchbook and pencil.

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith Painter 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26).

Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (53). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (39).

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter XI: Newmarket and Melton. John Lyster used to visit us at Upper Grosvenor Street ; he was very wealthy, but he speculated and lost everything he possessed. He came to dine with us one evening, outwardly as charming and cheerful as ever, but the next day, before people knew he was ruined, he left England and went to America, and was never heard of again.

Hanover Square

On 10 Oct 1730 William Talbot Bishop 1658-1730 (72) died at Hanover Square.

On Jun 1758 Hugo Meynell 1735-1808 (23) and Ann Scrimpshire were married at Hanover Square.

Around 1789 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (30). Portrait of Hugo Meynell 1735-1808 (53).

On 14 May 1763 Isabella Blackett Countess Buchan 1691-1763 (72) died in Hanover Square.

Around 1743 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman Painter 1694-1744 (49). Portrait of Isabella Blackett Countess Buchan 1691-1763 (51).

In 1743 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman Painter 1694-1744 (49). Portrait of Isabella Blackett Countess Buchan 1691-1763 (51).

On 10 Jan 1764 Edward Lascelles 1764-1814 was born to Edward Lascelles 1st Earl Harewood 1740-1820 (23) and Anne Chaloner Baroness Harewood 1742-1805 (21) at Hanover Square.

On 22 Mar 1767 Robert Grosvenor 1st Marquess Westminster 1767-1845 was born to Richard Grosvenor 1st Earl Grosvenor 1731-1802 (35) at Hanover Square.

On 08 Oct 1788 Arthur Blundell Sandys Trumbull Hill 3rd Marquess Downshire 1788-1845 was born to Arthur Hill 2nd Marquess Downshire 1753-1801 (35) and Mary Sandys Marchioness Downshire 1764-1836 (24) at Hanover Square.

In 1799 Frederick Richard West 1799-1862 was born to Frederick West 1767-1852 (32) at Hanover Square.

On 13 Jul 1836 Henry Agar 2nd Viscount Clifden 1761-1836 (75) died in Hanover Square.

Charlotte Augusta Hill Countess Talbot -1804 was born to Wills Hill 1st Marquess Downshire 1718-1793 and Margaretta Fitzgerald -1766 in Hanover Square.

In 1781 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (57). Portrait of Charlotte Augusta Hill Countess Talbot -1804.

Around 1781 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (57). Portrait of Charlotte Augusta Hill Countess Talbot -1804.

St George's Church, Hanover Square

On 21 Feb 1733 William Talbot 1st Earl Talbot 1710-1782 (22) and Mary Cardonnel Countess Talbot were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

Before 23 Dec 1739 John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739. Portrait of Mary Cardonnel Countess Talbot.

On 10 Apr 1744 George Venables-Vernon 1st Baron Vernon Kinderton Chester 1709-1780 (35) and Martha Harcourt Baroness Vernon Kinderton Chester 1715-1794 (28) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 22 Jun 1744 William Fitzwilliam 3rd Earl Fitzwilliam 1720-1756 (24) and Anne Watson Countess Fitzwilliam -1769 were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square. Anne Watson Countess Fitzwilliam -1769 by marriage Countess Fitzwilliam, Baron Fitzwilliam.

On 29 Sep 1746 Henry Scott 3rd Duke Buccleuch 1746-1812 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

Before 17 May 1748 Charles Mordaunt 1748-1780 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 15 Jun 1749 John Mordaunt 1749-1795 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 03 Dec 1749 Charles Henry Sloane 2nd Earl Cadogan 1749-1832 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 30 Jan 1752 Harriat Mordaunt 1752-1753 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 11 Jun 1753 Harriat Mordaunt 1753- was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 12 May 1761 Edward Lascelles 1st Earl Harewood 1740-1820 (20) and Anne Chaloner Baroness Harewood 1742-1805 (18) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 10 Oct 1765 Samuel Bulkeley and Frances Mordaunt 1736-1798 (29) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 19 May 1768 Noel Hill 1st Baron Berwick 1745-1789 (23) and Anna Vernon were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 01 Apr 1771 George Greville 2nd Earl Warwick, 2nd Earl Brooke Warwick Castle 1746-1816 (24) and Georgiana Peachey Baroness Brooke -1772 were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

Around 1771 George Romney Painter 1734-1802 (36). Portrait of Georgiana Peachey Baroness Brooke -1772.

On 22 Jun 1772 Henry George Herbert 2nd Earl Carnarvon 1772-1833 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

In 1774 Reginald Courtenay Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Exeter 1741-1803 (32) was appointed Rector at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 19 Jul 1788 William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley 4th Earl Mornington 1788-1857 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 15 Jan 1789 Robert Henry Herbert 1789-1854 was born to Edward Clive 1st Earl Powis 1754-1839 (34) and Henrietta Antonia Herbert 3rd Countess Powis 1758-1830 (30) at the parish of St George's Church, Hanover Square.

Around 1778 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (54). Portrait of Henrietta Antonia Herbert 3rd Countess Powis 1758-1830 (19).

On 10 Mar 1792 John Perceval 4th Earl Egmont 1767-1835 (24) and Bridget Wynn Countess Egmont -1826 were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 05 Dec 1793 Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 (20) and Augusta Murray Duchess Sussex 1768-1830 (25) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

1817. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (39). Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 (43).

1837. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (66). Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 (63) sat in the chair of the President of the Royal Society.

On 08 Mar 1794 Robert Brudenell 6th Earl Cardigan 1769-1837 (24) and Penelope Cooke Countess Cardigan 1770-1826 (24) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 29 Nov 1794 Richard Wellesley 1st Marquess Wellesley 1760-1842 (34) and Hyacinthe-Gabrielle Roland Marchioness Wellesley 1766-1816 (28) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square. Hyacinthe-Gabrielle Roland Marchioness Wellesley 1766-1816 (28) by marriage Countess Mornington (1C 1760).

On 26 Apr 1796 Henry George Herbert 2nd Earl Carnarvon 1772-1833 (23) and Elizabeth Kitty Acland Countess Carnarvon 1772-1813 (23) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 30 Sep 1800 William John Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck 5th Duke Portland 1800-1879 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

In 1804 Charles William Vane 3rd Marquess Londonderry 1778-1854 (26) and Catherine Bligh 1775-1812 (29) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 16 Feb 1805 Edward Adolphus Seymour 12th Duke Somerset 1804-1885 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 15 Aug 1808 John Gore 1772-1836 (36) and Georgiana Montagu were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 22 May 1810 John Loftus 2nd Marquess Ely 1770-1845 (40) and Anna Maria Dashwood Marchioness Ely were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 11 May 1814 George Pitt-Rivers 6th Baron Rivers 1814-1880 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 31 Oct 1814 Sarah Fairbrother 1814-1890 was born at James Street, Covent Garden. She was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 18 Jun 1822 Francis Egerton 1st Earl Ellesmere 1800-1857 (22) and Harriet Greville Countess Ellesmere 1803-1870 (19) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 17 Jul 1828 John Cust 1st Earl Brownlow 1779-1853 (48) and Emma Sophie Edgecumbe Countess Brownlow 1791-1872 (36) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square. Emma Sophie Edgecumbe Countess Brownlow 1791-1872 (36) by marriage Countess Brownlow.

On 13 Aug 1829 Walter Francis Montagu-Douglas-Scott 5th Duke Buccleuch, 7th Duke Queensberry -1884 and Charlotte Anne Thynne Duchess Buccleuch, Duchess Queensbury 1811-1895 (18) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square. Charlotte Anne Thynne Duchess Buccleuch, Duchess Queensbury 1811-1895 (18) by marriage Duchess Buccleuch Duchess Queensberry.

On 03 May 1836 William Archer Amherst 3rd Earl Amherst 1836-1910 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 11 Oct 1836 Richard White 2nd Earl Bantry 1800-1868 (35) and Mary Obrien Countess Bantry were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 26 Sep 1839 Charles William Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck 1817-1865 (21) and Sinetta Lambourne 1820-1850 (19) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

In 1841 Francis Baring 1st Baron Northbrook 1796-1866 (44) and Arabella Georgina Howard Baroness Northbrook 1809-1884 (31) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 25 Aug 1842 Algernon Percy 4th Duke Northumberland 1792-1865 (49) and Eleanor Grosvenor Duchess Northumberland 1820-1911 (21) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 28 Jul 1845 Horatio Nelson 3rd Earl Nelson 1823-1913 (21) and Mary Jane Agar Countess Nelson 1822-1904 (23) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 23 May 1854 George Frederick D'Arcy Lambton 2nd Earl Durham 1828-1879 (25) and Beatrix Frances Hamilton Countess Durham 1835-1871 (19) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 18 Jan 1864 Henry Vane 2nd Duke Cleveland 1788-1864 (76) died at St George's Church, Hanover Square. His brother William Vane 3rd Duke Cleveland 1792-1864 (71) succeeded 3rd Duke Cleveland (2C 1833), 4th Earl Darlington, 4th Viscount Barnard, 7th Baron Barnard. Grace Caroline Lowther Duchess of Cleveland -1883 by marriage Duchess Cleveland (2C 1833).

Times Newspaper Marriages. 25 Jan 1865. MARRIAGE IN HIGH LIFE. The marriage of the Earl of Coventry (26) and Lady Blanche Craven (22), third daughter of Earl Craven (55), was solemnized yesterday morning at St. George's Church, Hanover-square. The bridegroom and the frieNds of both families assembled at the church at 11 o'clock, and shortly afterwards were joined by the bride (22), accompanied by her mother, the Countess Craven (48). The bride (22) was received by her father (26) at the church door, and, attended by eight bridesmaids, proceeded at once to the communion table, in front ot which a numerous company had assembled, including the Earl (65) and Countess of Clarendon (54) and Lady Emily Villiers (22), the Countess of Verulam (40) and Lady Harriet Grimston (20), Viscount and Viscountees Folkestone (43) and Hon. Miss Bouverie, the Countess of Sefton (27) and Lady Cecilia Molyneux, Viscount Chelsea (24), and Lady Caroline Townley (27) and Miss Townley, Viscount Uffington (23), Sir Henry and Latly Sophia Des Voeux, Hon. Mr. and Mrs Coventry, Hon. Gerald and Ladv Maria Ponsonby, Mr. Oswald andl Miss Oswald, Dr. Quin, Mr. Cecil Boothby, Mr. James Oswald, Miss Talbot, Viscount (32) and Viscountess Grey de Wilton (28), Lady Evelyn Bruce, Hon. Mrs. Grimston and Miss Griniston, &c.
The Hon. and Rev. Edward Grimston (52), uncle of the bride, performed the religious rite. After the registration of the marriage the wedding party left the church, and procceded to the Earl (55) and Countess Craven's (48) mansion in Charles-street, Mayfair. At 2 o'clock the newly-wedded couple took their departure for Croome Court, tbe Earl of Coventry's (26) seat, near Upton, there to pass the honeymoon. At Croome Pirton and Severn Stoke, the marriage was celebrated yesterday by the tenantry and neighbours of the Earl of Coventry (26). The tenantry of the Croome Pirton and Severn Stoke estates, to ths number of about 100, dined together in two parties yesterday at Severn Stoke and High-green. At Pirton and Severn Stoke garlands of evergreens and flags were hung out over the roads, and at night a bonfire was lighted at High-green. The rejoicings have extended over all his Lordship's (26) large estates in the southern portion of Worcestershire. The inhabitants of Worcester celebrated the marriage by hoisting flags frem tile windows and streamers across the streets. The bells from the various churches rang merry peals all day.
George Coventry 9th Earl Coventry (26) and Blanche Craven Countess Coventry 1842-1930 (22) were married. Blanche Craven Countess Coventry 1842-1930 (22) by marriage Countess Coventry.

On 30 May 1865 Evelyn Gascoyne-Cecil 1st Baron Rockley 1865-1941 was born to Eustace Brownlow Henry Gascoyne-Cecil 1834-1921 (31) and Gertrude Louisa Scott at the parish of St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 30 Mar 1867 Henry Peter Pitt-Rivers 5th Baron Rivers 1849-1867 was baptised at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 08 Jan 1873 Harry Chichester 2nd Baron Templemore 1821-1906 (51) and Victoria Elizabeth Ashley-Cooper Baroness Templemore 1837-1927 (35) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square. Victoria Elizabeth Ashley-Cooper Baroness Templemore 1837-1927 (35) by marriage Baroness Templemore of Templemore in Donegal.

On 31 Aug 1876 Charles Henry Wynn 1847-1911 (29) and Frances Georgiana Romer were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

On 17 Dec 1889 Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley 1866-1919 (23) and Violet Neville Countess Cowley 1866-1910 (23) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square.

Times Newspaper Marriages. 22 Jun 1910. LORD ACHESON (33) AND MISS CARTER (22).
The marriage of Viscount Acheson (33), elder son of the Earl (68) and Countess of Gosford (54), and Miss Mildred Carter (22), only daughter of Mr. J. Ridgely Carter (46), American Minister to Rumania, and Mrs. Ridgely Carter (45), took place yesterday at St. George's, Hanover-square. The Sub-Dean of the Chapels Royal (the Rev. Edgar Sheppard, D.D.) performed the ceremony, assisted by the Rev. David Anderson and other clergy, and Mr. Ridgely Carter (46) gave his daughter away. She wore a very simple wedding gown of soft white satin with a long train draped with old point de Venise, and a Venetian lace cap over a spray of myrtle and orange blossom, covered by a plain tulle veil. Master David Stanley, Master Julian Ward, and Miss Diana Roberts, dressed all in white, followed the bride, and there were seven bridesmaids, Lady Theo Acheson (28) (sister of the bridegroom), Lady Victoria Stanley, Mlle. Irene deo La Grange, Miss Canilla Morgan, the Hon. Rhoda Astley, Miss Elsie Nicholl, and Miss Marian Scranton, who wore white chiffon dresses with draped bodices and wreaths of myrtle beneath tulle veils. They also wore diamond neckislides and carried loose bunches of red roses. The Hon. Patrick Acheson (26) was best man to his brother.
Mrs. Ridgely Carter (45) afterwards held a large reception at Dorchester House (lent by the American Ambassador and Mrs. Whitelaw Reid), and among the many who came on from the church were the French, Russian, German, Spanish, and Italian Ambassadors, the Danish Minister, tho Rumanian Minister, the Swedish Minister and Countess Wrangel, Mme. Dominguez, the Servian Charge d'Affaires and Mme. Grouitel, the Chilian Minister and Mme. Gana, the Belgian Minister and Countess de Lalaing, the Duke (63) and Duchess of Somerset (57), Katharine Duchess of Westminster (53) and Lady Helen Grosvenor (22), Prince and Princess Alexis Dolgorouki, the Marquis and Marchioness of Hamilton, the Marchioness of Tweeddale, the Marquis (48) and Marchioness of Salisbury (42), the Marchioness of Anglesey (26), the Countess of Powis (45), the Earl (56) and Countess of Chesterfield, the Countess of Kintore and Lady Hilda Keith-Falconer, the Earl (68) and Countess of Gosford (54), Prince and Princess Frederick Liechtenstein, the Countess of Kimberley, Countess Grey, the Marquis d'Hautpoul, the Countess of Leicester (54) and Lady Bridget Coke (19), the Earl (41) and Countess of Craven (38), the Earl of Desart, Countess Fritz Hochberg, the Earl and Countess of Meath, the Countess of Bilmorey, the Countess of Londesborough (49) and Lady Irene Denison (19), the Earl and Countess of Derby (70), the Earl (51) and Countess of Yarborough (51), Ellen Lady Inchiquin and the Hon Lilah O'Brien, Lord and Lady Charles Beresford, Lord and Lady Leith of Fyvie, Lady Saltoun, Lady Nunburnholme (30), Lady Newborough, Sir John and Lady Lister-Raye, Lord and Lady Monson, Lord and Lady Savile, Lady Rothschild, Viscount and Viscountess AIdleton, Lady Alexander Paget, Lady Harcourt, Lady Desborough, Lord Suffield, Sir Herbert and Lady Jekyll and Miss Jekyll, the Hon. Sir Francis and Lady Villiers and Miss Viliers, Lady Heien Vincent, Lord Knaresborough and the Hon. Helen Meysey-Thompson, Lady Pauncefote, Lord and Lady Weardale, Lady Grace Baring, Lord Strathcona, Lady Margaret Graham and Miss Graham, Sir Francis and Lady Channing, Mary Lady Gerard, Lady Manners and the Hon. Misses Manners, Lady Edward Cavendish, Mme. Langenbach, Lord Revelstoke, the Countess of Bessborough (84) and Ladv Gweneth Ponsonby (22), Lord Aberdare and the Hon. Eva Bruce, the Hon. Harry and Mrs. Lawson, Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Martin, Mrs. F. Vanderbilt, Mrs. Arthur James, Mrs. Walter Burns, Mrs. Lewis Harcourt, Mrs. Lowther and Miss Lokther, Mine. Vagliano, Captain and Mrs. Clonman, Miss Ralli, Mr. William Giuett, Mrs: Hwfa Williams, the Hon. Mrs. Derek Keppel, Mr. William Phillips, Mrs. Frank D'Arcy, the Hon. Lady Murray, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Sassoon, Sir Bartle Frere, Mme. de Bille, Mrs. Featherston- haugh, Mrs. Cotton Jodrell, Mrs. Frank Mackay, the Hon. Urs. Charles Lawrence, the Hon. Mrs. Rochfort Maguire, Lady Barrymore, Mrs. Chauncey, and Mrs. Ronalds.
Lord (33) and Lady Acheson (22) left later in the afternoon for the Continent, the bride (22) travelling in a dress of grey chiffon and a large hat swathed in tulle to match the dress.
A list of the principal wedding presents was published in The Times yesterday.

In 1908.John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (51). Portrait of Mildred Carter Countess Gosford 1888-1965 (19).

1901. John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (44). Portrait of John Ridgeley Carter 1864-1944 (36).

In 1902 John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (45). Known as the Acheson Sisters: Portrait of Alexandra Louise Elizabeth Acheson 1878–1958 (24), Mary Acheson 1881– and Theodosia Louisa Augusta Acheson 1882–1977 (20).

1925. Glyn Philpot Painter 1884-1937 (40). Portrait of Irene Denison Marchioness Carisbrooke 1890-1956 (34).

In 1911 Arthur Claud Spencer Chichester 4th Baron Templemore 1880-1953 (30) and Clare Meriel Wingfield Baroness Templemore 1886-1969 (24) were married at St George's Church, Hanover Square. Clare Meriel Wingfield Baroness Templemore 1886-1969 (24) by marriage Baroness Templemore of Templemore in Donegal.

Hertford Street

In 1767 Charles Cope Baronet Cope 1743-1781 (24) and Catherine Bisshop Countess Liverpool 1744-1827 (22) were married at her house in Hertford Street. Catherine Bisshop Countess Liverpool 1744-1827 (22) by marriage Lady Cope.

On 22 Jun 1782 Charles Jenkinson 1st Earl Liverpool 1729-1808 (53) and Catherine Bisshop Countess Liverpool 1744-1827 (37) were married at her house in Hertford Street.

On 17 Jun 1804 Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl Cowley 1804-1884 was born to Henry Wellesley 1st Baron Cowley 1773-1847 (31) and Charlotte Cadogan Marchioness Anglesey 1781-1853 (22) at Hertford Street.

On 01 Oct 1827 Catherine Bisshop Countess Liverpool 1744-1827 (82) died at her house in Hertford Street.

Hill Street

On 20 Aug 1879 Louisa Barbara Catherine Phillips Countess Lichfield 1800-1879 (79) died in Hill Street.

1832. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (39). Portrait of Louisa Barbara Catherine Phillips Countess Lichfield 1800-1879 (32) with two of her children Thomas George Anson 2nd Earl Lichfield 1825-1892 (6) and Harriet Frances Maria Anson 1827-1898 (4).

Hyde Park Corner

Park Lane

In Jul 1939 Victor Hervey 6th Marquess Bristol 1915-1985 (23) was arrested and charged with stealing jewellery, rings and a mink fur coat with a total value of £2,500 from a premises in Queen Street and £2,860 of jewellery from a property on Park Lane. He was refused bail, and imprisoned for three years.

Dorchester House, Park Lane

Times Newspaper Marriages. 22 Jun 1910. LORD ACHESON (33) AND MISS CARTER (22).
The marriage of Viscount Acheson (33), elder son of the Earl (68) and Countess of Gosford (54), and Miss Mildred Carter (22), only daughter of Mr. J. Ridgely Carter (46), American Minister to Rumania, and Mrs. Ridgely Carter (45), took place yesterday at St. George's, Hanover-square. The Sub-Dean of the Chapels Royal (the Rev. Edgar Sheppard, D.D.) performed the ceremony, assisted by the Rev. David Anderson and other clergy, and Mr. Ridgely Carter (46) gave his daughter away. She wore a very simple wedding gown of soft white satin with a long train draped with old point de Venise, and a Venetian lace cap over a spray of myrtle and orange blossom, covered by a plain tulle veil. Master David Stanley, Master Julian Ward, and Miss Diana Roberts, dressed all in white, followed the bride, and there were seven bridesmaids, Lady Theo Acheson (28) (sister of the bridegroom), Lady Victoria Stanley, Mlle. Irene deo La Grange, Miss Canilla Morgan, the Hon. Rhoda Astley, Miss Elsie Nicholl, and Miss Marian Scranton, who wore white chiffon dresses with draped bodices and wreaths of myrtle beneath tulle veils. They also wore diamond neckislides and carried loose bunches of red roses. The Hon. Patrick Acheson (26) was best man to his brother.
Mrs. Ridgely Carter (45) afterwards held a large reception at Dorchester House (lent by the American Ambassador and Mrs. Whitelaw Reid), and among the many who came on from the church were the French, Russian, German, Spanish, and Italian Ambassadors, the Danish Minister, tho Rumanian Minister, the Swedish Minister and Countess Wrangel, Mme. Dominguez, the Servian Charge d'Affaires and Mme. Grouitel, the Chilian Minister and Mme. Gana, the Belgian Minister and Countess de Lalaing, the Duke (63) and Duchess of Somerset (57), Katharine Duchess of Westminster (53) and Lady Helen Grosvenor (22), Prince and Princess Alexis Dolgorouki, the Marquis and Marchioness of Hamilton, the Marchioness of Tweeddale, the Marquis (48) and Marchioness of Salisbury (42), the Marchioness of Anglesey (26), the Countess of Powis (45), the Earl (56) and Countess of Chesterfield, the Countess of Kintore and Lady Hilda Keith-Falconer, the Earl (68) and Countess of Gosford (54), Prince and Princess Frederick Liechtenstein, the Countess of Kimberley, Countess Grey, the Marquis d'Hautpoul, the Countess of Leicester (54) and Lady Bridget Coke (19), the Earl (41) and Countess of Craven (38), the Earl of Desart, Countess Fritz Hochberg, the Earl and Countess of Meath, the Countess of Bilmorey, the Countess of Londesborough (49) and Lady Irene Denison (19), the Earl and Countess of Derby (70), the Earl (51) and Countess of Yarborough (51), Ellen Lady Inchiquin and the Hon Lilah O'Brien, Lord and Lady Charles Beresford, Lord and Lady Leith of Fyvie, Lady Saltoun, Lady Nunburnholme (30), Lady Newborough, Sir John and Lady Lister-Raye, Lord and Lady Monson, Lord and Lady Savile, Lady Rothschild, Viscount and Viscountess AIdleton, Lady Alexander Paget, Lady Harcourt, Lady Desborough, Lord Suffield, Sir Herbert and Lady Jekyll and Miss Jekyll, the Hon. Sir Francis and Lady Villiers and Miss Viliers, Lady Heien Vincent, Lord Knaresborough and the Hon. Helen Meysey-Thompson, Lady Pauncefote, Lord and Lady Weardale, Lady Grace Baring, Lord Strathcona, Lady Margaret Graham and Miss Graham, Sir Francis and Lady Channing, Mary Lady Gerard, Lady Manners and the Hon. Misses Manners, Lady Edward Cavendish, Mme. Langenbach, Lord Revelstoke, the Countess of Bessborough (84) and Ladv Gweneth Ponsonby (22), Lord Aberdare and the Hon. Eva Bruce, the Hon. Harry and Mrs. Lawson, Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Martin, Mrs. F. Vanderbilt, Mrs. Arthur James, Mrs. Walter Burns, Mrs. Lewis Harcourt, Mrs. Lowther and Miss Lokther, Mine. Vagliano, Captain and Mrs. Clonman, Miss Ralli, Mr. William Giuett, Mrs: Hwfa Williams, the Hon. Mrs. Derek Keppel, Mr. William Phillips, Mrs. Frank D'Arcy, the Hon. Lady Murray, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Sassoon, Sir Bartle Frere, Mme. de Bille, Mrs. Featherston- haugh, Mrs. Cotton Jodrell, Mrs. Frank Mackay, the Hon. Urs. Charles Lawrence, the Hon. Mrs. Rochfort Maguire, Lady Barrymore, Mrs. Chauncey, and Mrs. Ronalds.
Lord (33) and Lady Acheson (22) left later in the afternoon for the Continent, the bride (22) travelling in a dress of grey chiffon and a large hat swathed in tulle to match the dress.
A list of the principal wedding presents was published in The Times yesterday.

In 1908.John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (51). Portrait of Mildred Carter Countess Gosford 1888-1965 (19).

1901. John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (44). Portrait of John Ridgeley Carter 1864-1944 (36).

In 1902 John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (45). Known as the Acheson Sisters: Portrait of Alexandra Louise Elizabeth Acheson 1878–1958 (24), Mary Acheson 1881– and Theodosia Louisa Augusta Acheson 1882–1977 (20).

1925. Glyn Philpot Painter 1884-1937 (40). Portrait of Irene Denison Marchioness Carisbrooke 1890-1956 (34).

Dudley House, Park Lane

On 07 May 1885 William Ward 1st Earl Dudley 1817-1885 (68) died at Dudley House, Park Lane.

Grosvenor House, Park Lane

On 11 Oct 1895 George Cambridge 2nd Marquess Cambridge 1895-1981 was born to Adolphus Cambridge Duke Teck 1868-1927 (27) and Margaret Evelyn Grosvenor Duchess Teck 1873-1929 (22) at Grosvenor House, Park Lane.

Holderness House, Park Lane

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter IV: Presented at Court. The intimate history of Society is full of unsuspected tragedy, but when the veil is torn aside, the unhappiness of many a husband and wife becomes tragedy in real earnest, and the light-hearted butterflies who sip the sweets of the good things of this life are horrified at the idea of such things happening in their midst. The grim story I am about to relate concerned particular friends of mine, and it made a great impression upon me. Constance de Burgh (22) was one of my great friends, she was a very pretty, charming girl who married Lord Ward (34), who had always been considered a great parti by mothers with marriageable daughters.
Constance (22) was not in love with her husband (34) ; he had proposed and she was told she must accept him. A dutiful daughter of rather colourless character, Constance never dreamt of opposition, and so she became Lady Ward.
Marriage frequently means disillusion, and the Ward marriage was not a success.
William Ward (34) was a pleasant man, but he had extraordinary ideas of how to treat a wife, ideas which could only be tolerated by a tactful woman who could laugh at them, and forget all the unpleasantness they entailed. Poor Constance was not tactful, and not accommodating. Her husband worshipped the beautiful ; he had selected his wife partly on account of her beauty, and he treated her like some lovely slave he had bought. He had a strange, almost barbaric passion for precious stones, and he bought quantities of them and lavished them on his wife, who appeared at great entertainments literally ablaze with diamonds.
What pleased Lord Ward more than anything was to make Constance put on all her jewels for his special benefit when they were alone. He would admire her thus for hours, delighting in her lovely unclothed figure, and contrasting the sheen of her ropes of pearls with her delicate skin, as she sat on a black satin-covered couch.
These strange proceedings at first terrified and then disgusted Constance. She appealed to her father, but her parents decided that her husband's peculiarities came within the meaning of the marriage vows, and she was told she must submit to her husband's humours.
Fate then threw Constance (22) across Lord Dupplin's (24) path, with the result that the tragedy began.
I knew Blanche Dupplin (23) very well, and often when I was lunching with her she would tell me sorrowfully about her husband's (24) infatuation. "It is useless to expostulate," said Blanche; " Dupplin will not abandon the affair, and I don't know how it will end if William Ward (34) finds out his wife's (22) infidelity."
Matters came to a crisis at a fancy dress ball given by Lady Londonderry (22) at Holderness House, the chief feature being a quadrille danced by ladies representing famous European queens. I met the Wards there ; Constance looked delicate, and early in the evening she said she felt ill and must go home. She came over to where her husband and I were standing, and asked him whether he intended to accompany her.
" No, I shall stay," said Lord Ward (34), " I mean to have several dances with Miss de Horsey. Go home by all means if you are tired."
Constance was enceinte, so her absence excited no comment as she was far from strong. Her husband remained until nearly 3 a.m., when he departed for his house in Park Lane — it was daylight, and, as he approached the house, he suddenly noticed a man leaving it. Their eyes met ; it was Lord Dupplin (24), who turned and ran for his life down the street.
Lord Ward entered, and startled the sleepy footman by telling him to rouse the servants and bid them assemble in the hall. He then went upstairs to his wife's bedroom.
What passed between them was told by Constance to a friend ; her husband came to her bedside and accused her of committing adultery with Lord Dupplin (24). " Get up, madame," he continued, "my house is yours no longer; arrangements shall be made for your future, but henceforth you are no wife of mine."
Tears and entreaties were useless, and Constance was obliged to dress ; William Ward (34) then led her past the scandalised servants who were waiting downstairs, and — turned her out of doors.
The poor frightened girl managed to reach her parents' house in Grosvenor Crescent, and implored them to give her shelter, but they were as heartless as her husband, and told her they could not take her in. More dead than alive, she turned her steps to Conduit Street, where her singing-master lived, and this gentleman, full of compassion for his unfortunate pupil, allowed her to remain there until the next day, when she went to Ostend. From Ostend she went to Ems, where her child was prematurely born and the unhappy young mother died. Her husband brought her body to England, and once again Constance Ward (22) lay in her darkened bedroom.
On the evening of the day before her burial, Lord Colville came to see Lord Ward. They talked for some time and then the widower suddenly turned to his friend.
" Colville — you admired my wife ? " "Yes," replied Lord Colville, " I did." " Well, come and look your last on her," said Lord Ward, and lighting a candle he led the way upstairs.
The room was full of shadows, and the flickering light fell on the lovely face of the dead woman. Silently Lord Colville stood by her, and his heart ached when he thought of her fate. Ward was watching him attentively. "Still admiring my wife? Well, she was a pretty woman — but — you'd never credit she had such bad teeth." He put down the candle on a table as he spoke, and raised his wife's head from the pillow. With cold deliberation he wrenched the jaws apart. " I always told you she had bad teeth," he repeated, "look here, man." But Lord Colville had hurriedly left the room. He told me afterwards it was the most ghastly sight he had ever seen.

Londonderry House, Park Lane

On 06 Mar 1854 Charles William Vane 3rd Marquess Londonderry 1778-1854 (76) died at Londonderry House, Park Lane. His son Frederick William Robert Stewart 4th Marquess Londonderry 1805-1872 (48) succeeded 4th Marquess Londonderry.

Norfolk Street, Park Lane

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter VII: My Marriage. If Lord Cardigan (60) and I had met in 1909 instead of in 1857 no particular comment would have been made on our friendship, but in 1857 Society was scandalised because I had the courage to ride and drive with a married man who had an unfaithful wife.
There was another and a stronger reason for the wagging tongues of slander, for they were prompted by jealousy. Lady Cardigan (60) was then very ill, and every one knew that her death was only a question of a year or two. Once free, Lord Cardigan (60) would be a prize well worth winning by match-making matrons with marriageable daughters, and his openly avowed affection for me had put an end to these hopes, I was not in the least disturbed by the incessant gossip, but my father (68) and my brothers were much worried and annoyed at the reports which were circulated, and although Lady Georgina Codrington (41) wrote to my father and begged him not to make a fuss about things, he suddenly became very angry and declared he would leave London for good and take me with him.
A most distressing scene followed. I said that, as there was no evil in my friendship with Lord Cardigan (60), I refused to give up his acquaintance, or to be taken into the country against my will, and I steadily defied my father and brothers to make me alter my decision. Family quarrels are, perhaps, the most rankling of any, for they are generally retaliative, and much is said that is never forgotten or quite forgiven ; ours was no exception, and the result of it was that I decided to leave home. With me, to think has always been to act, so I ordered my horse " Don Juan " to be brought round, and I rode away to liberty. My own income rendered me perfectly independent ; I put up at a quiet hotel in Hyde Park Square, and looked about for a furnished house. I did not go into exile alone, for my father's valet, Mathews, came with me, and his fidelity was well rewarded when he entered Lord Cardigan's service after our marriage.
I was lucky enough to find a charming little furnished house in Norfolk Street, Park Lane, and I installed myself there with Mathews and three other servants. It was a quiet household, and although at first things seemed strange to me, I was very happy. I rode with Cardigan (60) every day in the Park, regardless of the averted glances of those who had once called themselves my friends. I often wonder why friendship is so apostrophised, for real friends in trouble are practically non-existent, especially at the moment they are most needed. The ideal friend, whose aim in life should be to forget "base self," as the poets say, is as extinct as the Dodo, and those who talk most about friendship are usually the first to forget what is the true meaning of the word.
On the morning of July 12, 1858, I was awakened by a loud knocking at the front door. I looked at my watch, and saw that it was not seven o'clock ; I was, needless to say, very alarmed, as I wondered whether anything had happened to my father or my brothers. The knocking continued — I heard the bolts drawn, the door opened, and a voice I knew well called impatiently for me. It was Lord Cardigan (60) ! I had just time to slip on a dressing-gown before he came into my room, sans ceremonie, and taking me in his arms he said, "' My dearest, she's (60) dead . . . let's get married at once." Then I knew that the trying period of our probation was over, and that we were free to be happy together at last.
When Cardigan (60) grew calmer he told me he had just come from his wife's (60) death-bed. The poor lady (60) had urged him to marry me, saying she knew that I should make him happy. She had also warned him against Maria, Marchioness of Ailesbury (45), the extent of whose love affairs, it appears, was only known to Lady Cardigan (60), who told his Lordship (60) the unvarnished truth about them.
As I did not wish to insult the memory of the dead woman (60), who had shown me so many kindnesses, I refused to marry Cardigan (60) until some time had elapsed. He went to Ireland in his official capacity of Inspector of Cavalry, and I lived on quietly at Norfolk Street till September, when I left London for Cowes. I then went on board Lord Cardigan's yacht the Airedale, where he and a party of friends were awaiting me, and we sailed for Gibraltar.
Nothing particular occurred en route; we were all in the best of spirits, and I felt as though I were the Princess in some delightful fairy-tale. The day after we arrived at Gibraltar there was a terrible storm, almost tropical in its violence. Roofs were torn off houses and whirled, light as dead leaves, through the air, great trees were uprooted, heavy masonry fell everywhere, and the ships tossed about like cockle-shells in the harbour. It was almost a scene from the Inferno, and our horror was intensified when we saw the signals from a French vessel in distress. Nobody seemed inclined to put out, so I begged Lord Cardigan (60) to send the Airedale to try and save the crew. He assented, and through this timely aid from our yacht fourteen men were rescued, and we also took a French poodle off a raft to which he was clinging, his owner doubtless having been drowned.

Somerset House (40), Park Lane

On 15 Aug 1855 Edward Seymour 11th Duke Somerset 1775-1855 (80) died at Somerset House (40), Park Lane. He was buried at Kensal Green Cemetery, Kensal Green. His son Edward Adolphus Seymour 12th Duke Somerset 1804-1885 (50) succeeded 12th Duke Somerset (4C 1547). Jane Georgiana Sheridan Duchess Somerset 1809-1884 (45) by marriage Duchess Somerset (4C 1547).

South Street, Park Lane

13 South Street, Park Lane

On 10 Nov 1888 George Charles Bingham 3rd Earl Lucan 1800-1888 (88) died at 13 South Street, Park Lane. His son Charles George Bingham 4th Earl Lucan 1830-1914 (58) succeeded 4th Earl Lucan of Castlebar in Mayo, 4th Baron Lucan of Castlebar in Mayo. Cecilia Catherine Gordon-Lennox Countess Lucan 1838-1910 (50) by marriage Countess Lucan of Castlebar in Mayo.

36 South Street, Park Lane

On 15 Jul 1858 Elizabeth Tollemache Countess Cardigan 1797-1858 (60) died at 36 South Street, Park Lane.

The Dorchester, Park Lane

On 12 Jun 1946 Rose Marie Kennedy 1918-2005 (27) attended at The Dorchester, Park Lane.

Queen Street

In Jul 1939 Victor Hervey 6th Marquess Bristol 1915-1985 (23) was arrested and charged with stealing jewellery, rings and a mink fur coat with a total value of £2,500 from a premises in Queen Street and £2,860 of jewellery from a property on Park Lane. He was refused bail, and imprisoned for three years.

Savile Row

16 Savile Row

Around 1795 Anthony Hamilton Archdeacon 1739-1812 (56) lived at 16 Savile Row.

Savile Street, Savile Row

8 Savile Street, Savile Street, Savile Row

On 31 Mar 1753 Thomas Howard 1684-1753 (68) died at 8 Savile Street, Savile Street, Savile Row. He was buried at Great Bookham.

Seymour Place

On 21 Jan 1811 James Hamilton 1st Duke Abercorn 1811-1885 was born to James Hamilton 1786-1814 (24) and Harriet Douglas Countess Aberdeen 1792-1833 (18) at Seymour Place.

On 19 Apr 1814 Thomas Brudenell 1st Earl Ailesbury 1729-1814 (84) died at Seymour Place. His son Charles Brudenell 1st Marquess Ailesbury 1773-1856 (41) succeeded 2nd Earl Ailesbury (2C 1776).

South Audley Street

Grosvenor Chapel

On 18 Oct 1693 George Gilbert Archbishop of York 1693-1761 was buried in Grosvenor Chapel.

On 22 May 1781 Garrett Wellesley 1st Earl Mornington 1735-1781 (45) died at Kensington. He was buried at Grosvenor Chapel. On 22 May 1781 His son Richard Wellesley 1st Marquess Wellesley 1760-1842 (20) succeeded 2nd Earl Mornington (1C 1760), 2nd Viscount Wellesley of Dangan Castle.

In 1803 Reginald Courtenay Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Exeter 1741-1803 (61) died. He was buried at Grosvenor Chapel.

On 10 Sep 1831 Anne Hill Countess Mornington 1742-1831 (89) died at Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. She was buried at Grosvenor Chapel.

On 02 Apr 1895 Clarissa Hall 1825–1895 (70) died. Her funeral was held at the Grosvenor Chapel on 05 Apr 1895 attended by her daughters Clarita "Clara" Jerome 1851–1935 (44), Jenny Jerome 1854-1921 (41) and Leonie Blanche Jerome 1859–1943 (36), her grandsons Winston Churchill Prime Minister 1874-1965 (20) and John Strange "Jack" Spencer-Churchill 1880-1947 (15) and the Dowager Frances Anne Emily Vane Duchess Marlborough 1822-1899 (72).

Upper Brook Street, Mayfair

4 Upper Brook Street, Mayfair

On 07 Sep 1841 Robert George Cecil Fane 1796-1864 (45) and Harriet Anne Blackwood -1869 were married. They lived at 4 Upper Brook Street, Mayfair.

27 Upper Brook Street, Mayfair

On 28 May 1828 Anne Seymour-Conway 1748-1828 (79) died in 27 Upper Brook Street, Mayfair.

In 1775 Daniel Gardner Painter 1750-1805 (25). Witches Round the Cauldron. Portraits of Elizabeth Milbanke Viscountess Melbourne, Georgiana Spencer Duchess Devonshire 1757-1806 (17) and Anne Seymour-Conway 1748-1828 (26).

31 Upper Brook Street, Mayfair

On 07 Jun 1877 George Herbert Hyde Villiers 6th Earl Clarendon 1877-1955 was born to Edward Villiers 5th Earl Clarendon 1846-1914 (31) and Caroline Elizabeth Agar Countess Clarendon 1857-1894 (20) at 31 Upper Brook Street, Mayfair.