Nottinghamshire

Around 1114 Margaret Peverell Countess Derby 1114-1154 was born to William "The Younger" Peverell 1080-1155 (34) and Avicia Taillebois at Nottinghamshire.

Allerton, Nottinghamshire

In 1552 Alice Skipwith 1461-1552 (91) died at Allerton, Nottinghamshire.

Annesley, Nottinghamshire

In 1341 Thomas Annesley 1341-1429 was born at Annesley, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1366 Isabel Annesley 1366-1416 was born to Hugh Annesley 1364-1429 (2) and Benedicta Babington 1368-1426 (-2) at Annesley, Nottinghamshire. Date adjusted from 1383 to 1366 to be consistent with birth of son in 1380.

After 1415 John Annesley 1415-1437 was born at Annesley, Nottinghamshire.

On 10 Feb 1459 Thomas Chaworth 1375-1459 (84) died at Annesley, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1554 George Chaworth 1st Viscount Chaworth 1554-1639 was born to John Chaworth 1534-1558 (34) at Annesley, Nottinghamshire.

Around Jun 1693 Patrick Chaworth 3rd Viscount Chaworth 1635-1693 (57) was buried at Annesley, Nottinghamshire.

Aslockton, Nottinghamshire

On 02 Jul 1489 Thomas Cranmer Archbishop Canterbury 1489-1556 was born at Aslockton, Nottinghamshire.

1533 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (36). Portrait of Thomas Cranmer Archbishop Canterbury 1489-1556 (43).

In 1544 Gerlach Flicke 1520-1558 (24). Portrait of Thomas Cranmer Archbishop Canterbury 1489-1556 (54).

Averham, Nottinghamshire

Around 1422 Robert Sutton 1422-1500 was born at Averham, Nottinghamshire.

Bingham, Nottinghamshire

Bingham Church, Bingham, Nottinghamshire

On 15 Oct 1458 Thomas Rempston 1389-1458 (69) died. He was buried at Bingham Church, Bingham, Nottinghamshire.

Bonnington, Nottinghamshire

In 1305 John Crophull 1305-1383 was born at Bonnington, Nottinghamshire.

Chilwell, Nottinghamshire

Around 1368 Benedicta Babington 1368-1426 was born to John Babington 1333-1409 (35) and Benedicta Warde 1339-1382 (29) at Chilwell, Nottinghamshire.

Cromwell, Nottinghamshire

Around 1292 Ralph Cromwell 1292- was born to Ralph Cromwell 1269-1298 (23) and Margaret Somery Baroness Basset Drayton 1225-1293 (67) in Cromwell, Nottinghamshire.

In 1297 Idoine Vipont 1255-1297 (42) died in Cromwell, Nottinghamshire.

On 02 Mar 1298 Ralph Cromwell 1269-1298 (29) died in Cromwell, Nottinghamshire.

Cropwell Butler, Nottinghamshire

Around 1441 Thomas Chaworth 1441-1485 was born to George Chaworth 1420-1466 (21) and Alice Annesley 1432- at Cropwell Butler, Nottinghamshire.

Cuckney, Nottinghamshire

After 25 Jul 1643 Robert Pierrepoint 1st Earl Kingston 1584-1643 was buried at Cuckney, Nottinghamshire.

On 23 Oct 1768 William Otter Bishop Chichester 1768-1840 was born at Cuckney, Nottinghamshire.

East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire

In 1220 Robert Babington 1220-1248 was born to John Babington 1170-1220 (50) at East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1313 Alice Boys 1313-1409 was born to Robert Boys -1311 and Christian Latimer at East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1333 John Babington 1333-1409 was born to John Babington 1300-1355 (33) and Alice Boys 1313-1409 (20) at East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1363 Arnold Babington 1363-1455 was born to John Babington 1333-1409 (30) and Benedicta Warde 1339-1382 (24) at East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1376 Thomas Babington of Dethick 1376-1464 was born to John Babington 1333-1409 (43) and Benedicta Warde 1339-1382 (37) at East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1409 Alice Boys 1313-1409 (96) died at East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

In 1409 John Babington 1333-1409 (76) died at East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

East Stoke, Nottinghamshire

Battle of Stoke Field

On 16 Jun 1487 a Lancastrian army defeated a Yorkist army at the Battle of Stoke Field; considered by many to be the last battle of the Wars of the Roses.
The Lancastrian army of Henry Tudor comprised:
John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (44)
Jasper Tudor 1st Duke Bedford 1431-1495 (55)
George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury, 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (19)
Henry Willoughby 1451-1528 (36)
John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 (45)
John Mordaunt 1455-1504 (31)
Richard Neville 2nd Baron Latimer Snape 1468-1530 (19)
William Norreys 1441-1507 (46)
Edward Norreys 1464-1487 (23) wounded
John Paston 1444-1504 (43)
George Stanley 9th Baron Strange Knockin, 5th Baron Mohun Dunster 1460-1504 (27)
Edward Woodville Lord Scales -1488
Thomas Lovell 1478-1524 (8), knighted.
Henry Marney 1st Baron Marney 1447-1523 (40).
The Yorksists John Pole 1st Earl Lincoln 1462-1487 (25),Thomas Fitzgerald 1458-1487 (29) and Martin Schwartz -1487 were killed. Lambert Simnel 1477- fought and was captured. Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (31) fought and escaped.

Edwinstowe, Nottinghamshire

On 09 Jan 1662 John Holles 1st Duke Newcastle upon Tyne 1662-1711 was born to Gilbert Holles 3rd Earl Clare 1633-1689 (28) and Grace Pierrepoint Countess Clare at Edwinstowe, Nottinghamshire.

On 17 Mar 1824 William Boothby 7th Baronet Boothby 1746-1824 (78) died at Edwinstowe, Nottinghamshire. His son William Boothby 8th Baronet Boothby 1782-1846 (41) succeeded as 8th Baronet Boothby of Broadlow Ash in Derbyshire.

Grove, Nottinghamshire

In 1480 Elizabeth Digby 1480-1520 was born to John Digby 1460-1533 (20) at Grove, Nottinghamshire.

In 1520 Elizabeth Digby 1480-1520 (40) died at Grove, Nottinghamshire.

Grove Hall, Grove, Nottinghamshire

Around 1439 Humphrey Hercye 1439-1511 was born at Grove Hall, Grove, Nottinghamshire.

On 10 Mar 1490 Joan Stanhope 1439-1490 (51) died at Grove Hall, Grove, Nottinghamshire.

On 09 Nov 1511 Humphrey Hercye 1439-1511 (72) died at Grove Hall, Grove, Nottinghamshire.

Harby, Nottinghamshire

Death of Eleanor of Castile

On 28 Nov 1290 Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (49) died at Harby, Nottinghamshire. Her viscera were buried at Lincoln Cathedral.

Eleanor Crosses

After 28 Nov 1290 Eleanor of Castile's body was taken from Harby, Nottinghamshire to Westminster Abbey. At each of the locations at which her body rested overnight Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (51) commissioned the building of an Eleanor Cross. Three remain. The best example being at Geddington, Northamptonshire.

Hickling, Nottinghamshire

Around 1521 Ralph Babington 1482-1521 (39) died at Hickling, Nottinghamshire.

Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire

In 1209 Michael Manvers 1209- was born at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1235 Annora Manvers 1235-1314 was born to Michael Manvers 1209- at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1298 Henry Pierrepoint 1298- was born to Robert Pierrepoint -1334 at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1300 Elizabeth Pierrepoint 1300- was born to Robert Pierrepoint -1334 at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1314 Annora Manvers 1235-1314 (79) died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1325 Edmund Pierrepoint 1325-1370 was born to Henry Pierrepoint 1298- at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1357 Edmund Pierrepoint 1357-1422 was born to Edmund Pierrepoint 1325-1370 (32) and Joane Monbocher at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1408 Henry Pierrepoint 1408-1457 was born to Henry Pierrepoint -1452 and Ellen Longford at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1422 Edmund Pierrepoint 1357-1422 (65) died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1455 Francis Pierrepoint 1455-1495 was born to Henry Pierrepoint 1408-1457 (47) and Thomasine Melton 1424-1458 (31) at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1458 Thomasine Melton 1424-1458 (34) died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1486 William Pierrepoint 1486-1517 was born to Francis Pierrepoint 1455-1495 (31) at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

On 09 Nov 1495 Francis Pierrepoint 1455-1495 (40) died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

On 09 Nov 1495 Francis Empson 1390-1495 died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

On 16 Jul 1510 George Pierrepoint 1510-1564 was born to William Pierrepoint 1486-1517 (24) and Joan Empson 1480-1510 (30) at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

In 1517 William Pierrepoint 1486-1517 (31) died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

On 21 May 1564 George Pierrepoint 1510-1564 (53) died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

On 08 Dec 1680 Henry Pierrepoint 1st Marquess Dorchester 1606-1680 (74) died. He was buried at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire. His great-nephew Robert Pierrepoint 3rd Earl Kingston 1660-1682 (20) succeeded as 3rd Earl Kingston upon Hull, 3rd Viscount Newark (1C 1627), 3rd Baron Pierrepoint Holme Pierrepoint.

On 17 Sep 1690 William Pierrepoint 4th Earl Kingston 1662-1690 (28) died at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire. His brother Evelyn Pierrepoint 1655-1726 (35) succeeded as 5th Earl Kingston upon Hull, 5th Viscount Newark (1C 1627), 5th Baron Pierrepoint Holme Pierrepoint. Mary Fielding Countess Kingston upon Hull 1668-1697 (22) by marriage Countess Kingston upon Hull.

Henry Pierrepoint -1463 was born to Henry Pierrepoint 1408-1457 and Thomasine Melton 1424-1458 at Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

Church of St Edmund, Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire

In 1370 Edmund Pierrepoint 1325-1370 (45) died at Gascony. He was buried at Church of St Edmund, Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

On 23 Sep 1773 Evelyn Pierrepoint 1711-1773 (62) died at Holme Pierrepoint Hall, Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire. He was buried at Church of St Edmund, Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

On 17 Jun 1816 Charles Pierrepoint 1st Earl Manvers 1737-1816 (78) died. He was buried at Church of St Edmund, Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire. His son Charles Herbert Pierrepoint 2nd Earl Manvers 1778-1860 (37) succeeded as 2nd Earl Manvers, 2nd Viscount Newark (2C 1796), 2nd Baron Pierrepoint Holme Pierrepoint. Mary Laetitia Eyre Countess Manvers 1784-1806 by marriage Countess Manvers.

On 10 Nov 1851 Henry Manvers Pierrepoint 1780-1851 (71) died. He was buried at Church of St Edmund, Holme Pierrepoint, Nottinghamshire.

Langar, Nottinghamshire

On 02 Sep 1609 Thomas Scrope 10th Baron Scrope Bolton 1567-1609 (42) died at Langar, Nottinghamshire. His son Emanuel Scrope 1st Earl Sunderland 1584-1630 (25) succeeded as 11th Baron Scrope Bolton.

On 27 May 1679 John Grobham Howe 1625-1679 was buried at Langar, Nottinghamshire.

St Andrew's Church, Langar, Nottinghamshire

On 03 Jul 1639 George Chaworth 1st Viscount Chaworth 1554-1639 (85) died at Bath, Somerset. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Langar, Nottinghamshire. His son John Chaworth 2nd Viscount Chaworth 1605-1644 (34) succeeded as 2nd Viscount Chaworth in County Armagh.

Laughton-en-le-Morthen, Nottinghamshire

Lindsey, Nottinghamshire

Mansfield, Nottinghamshire

15 Aug 1654. John Evelyn's Diary 1654 Aug. We passed next through Sherwood Forest, accounted the most extensive in England. Then, Paplewick, an incomparable vista with the pretty castle near it. Thence, we saw Newstead Abbey, belonging to the Lord Byron (48), situated much like Fontainebleau in France, capable of being made a noble seat, accommodated as it is with brave woods and streams; it has yet remaining the front of a glorious abbey church. Next, by Mansfield town; then Welbeck, the house of the Marquis of Newcastle (61), seated in a bottom in a park, and environed with woods, a noble yet melancholy seat. The palace is a handsome and stately building. Next to Worksop Abbey, almost demolished; the church has a double flat tower entire, and a pretty gate. The manor belongs to the Earl of Arundel (27), and has to it a fair house at the foot of a hill in a park that affords a delicate prospect. Tickel, a town and castle, has a very noble prospect. All these in Nottinghamshire.

Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire

On Dec 1542 Laurence Oliphant 3rd Lord Oliphant -1566 reached at Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1563 Jane Sacheverell 1563-1598 was born to Henry Sacheverell 1547-1580 (16) and Jane Ireton at Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire. Adjusted frmm 1554 to 1563 to be consistent with father's birth in 1547.

On 02 Jul 1643 Charles Cavendish 1620-1643 (23) received the Queen and escorted her to Oxford taking Burton-on-Trent on the way at Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire.

Battle of Gainsborough

On 28 Jul 1643 the Parliamentary arms commanded by Oliver Cromwell Lord Protector 1599-1658 (44) and the Royalist army commanded by Charles Cavendish 1620-1643 (23) fought at the Battle of Gainsborough at North Scarle, Lincolnshire.
Charles Cavendish 1620-1643 (23) was killed by James Berry -1691. He was buried at Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire.
On 04 Aug 1643 the Royalist Newdigate Poyntz 1608-1643 (34) died probably from wounds received at the battle.

14 Aug 1654. John Evelyn's Diary 1654 Aug. I took a journey into the Northern parts, riding through Oakham, a pretty town in Rutlandshire, famous for the tenure of the Barons (Ferrers), who hold it by taking off a shoe from every nobleman's horse that passes with his lord through the street, unless redeemed with a certain piece of money. In token of this, are several gilded shoes nailed up on the castle gate, which seems to have been large and fair. Hence, we went by Brook, a very sweet seat and park of the old Lady Camden's. Next, by Burleigh House, belonging to the Duke of Buckingham, and worthily reckoned among the noblest seats in England, situate on the brow of a hill, built à la moderne near a park walled in, and a fine wood at the descent.
Now we were come to Cottsmore, a pretty seat belonging to Mr. Heath, son of the late Lord Chief Justice of that name. Here, after dinner, parting with the company that conducted us thus far, I passed that evening by Belvoir Castle, built on a round mount at the point of a long ridge of hills, which affords a stately prospect, and is famous for its strenuous resistance in the late civil war.
Went by Newark-on-Trent, a brave town and garrison. Next, by Wharton House, belonging to the Lord Chaworth, a handsome seat; then by Home, a noble place belonging to the Marquis of Dorchester (48), and passed the famous river Trent, which divides the South from the North of England; and so lay that night at Nottingham.
This whole town and county seems to be but one entire rock, as it were, an exceedingly pleasant shire, full of gentry. Here, I observed divers to live in the rocks and caves, much after the manner as about Tours, in France. The church is well built on an eminence; there is a fair house of the Lord Clare's, another of Pierrepont's; an ample market place; large streets, full of crosses; the relics of an ancient castle, hollowed beneath which are many caverns, especially that of the Scots' King, and his work while there.
This place is remarkable for being the place where his Majesty first erected his standard at the beginning of our late unhappy differences. The prospects from this city toward the river and meadows are most delightful.

Elston, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire

Elston Hall, Elston, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire

On 12 Dec 1731 Eramus Darwin 1731-1802 was born in Elston Hall, Elston, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1780 Joseph Wright of Derby 1734-1797 (45). Portrait of Eramus Darwin 1731-1802 (48).

Before 29 Aug 1797 Joseph Wright of Derby 1734-1797 (62). Portrait of Eramus Darwin 1731-1802 (65).

Newark Castle, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire

Death of King John

On 19 Oct 1216 John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 (49) died at Newark Castle, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire. His son Henry III King England 1207-1272 (9) succeeded as III King England: Plantagenet Angevin.
John Monmouth 1182-1248 (34) was present.
On his deathbed, John appointed a council of thirteen executors to help Henry reclaim the kingdom and requested that his son be placed into the guardianship of William Marshal 1st Earl Pembroke 1146-1219 (70).
King John’s will is the earliest English royal will to survive in its original form. The document is quite small, roughly the size of a postcard and the seals of those who were present at the time would have been attached to it.Translation of the will taken from an article by Professor S.D. Church in the English Historical Review, June 2010:
I, John, by the grace of God king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, count of Anjou, hindered by grave infirmity and not being able at this time of my infirmity to itemize all my things so that I may make a testament, commit the arbitration and administration of my testament to the trust and to the legitimate administration of my faithful men whose names are written below, without whose counsel, even in good health, I would have by no means arranged my testament in their presence, so that what they will faithfully arrange and determine concerning my things as much as in making satisfaction to God and to holy Church for damages and injuries done to them as in sending succour to the land of Jerusalem and in providing support to my sons towards obtaining and defending their inheritance and in making reward to those who have served us faithfully and in making distribution to the poor and to religious houses for the salvation of my soul, be right and sure. I ask, furthermore, that whoever shall give them counsel and assistance in the arranging of my testament shall receive the grace and favour of God. Whoever shall infringe their arrangement and disposition, may he incur the curse and indignation of almighty God and the blessed Mary and all the saints.
In the first place, therefore, I desire that my body be buried in the church of St Mary and St Wulfstan at Worcester. I appoint, moreover, the following arbiters and administrators: the lord Guala, by the grace of God, cardinal-priest of the title of St Martin and legate of the apostolic see; the lord Peter bishop of Winchester; the lord Richard bishop of Chichester; the lord Silvester bishop of Worcester; Brother Aimery de St-Maur; William Marshal earl of Pembroke; Ranulf earl of Chester; William earl Ferrers; William Brewer; Walter de Lacy and John of Monmouth; Savaric de Mauléon; Falkes de Bréauté”.
The signatories were:
Guala Bicchieri (ca 1150 – 1227) Papal Legate
Peter des Roches (? – 1238), Bishop of Winchester
Richard le Poer (? – 1237), Bishop of Chichester
Sylvester of Worcester (? ����� 1218), Bishop of Worcester
Aimery de St-Maur (? - ?1219), Master of the English Templars
William Marshal 1st Earl Pembroke 1146-1219 (70)
Ranulf de Blondeville Gernon 6th Earl Chester, 1st Earl Lincoln 1170-1232 (46)
William Ferrers 4th Earl Derby 1168-1247 (48)
William Brewer (? - 1226), 1st Baron Brewer
Walter de Lacy (ca 1172–1241) Lord of Meath
John: (1182 – 1248) Lord of Monmouth
Savaric de Mauléon (? – 1236) Seneschal of Poitou from 1205
Falkes de Bréauté (? – 1226) Seneschal of Cardiff Castle.

In Jan 1589 William Cecil 2nd Earl Exeter 1566-1640 (23) and Elizabeth Manners 15th Baroness Ros Helmsley 1575-1591 (14) were married at Newark Castle, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire.

On May 1590 William Cecil 16th Baron Ros Helmsley 1590-1618 was born to William Cecil 2nd Earl Exeter 1566-1640 (24) and Elizabeth Manners 15th Baroness Ros Helmsley 1575-1591 (15) at Newark Castle, Newark on Trent, Nottinghamshire.

Newstead, Nottinghamshire

In 1577 John Byron 1577-1623 was born to John Byron 1556-1623 (21) at Newstead, Nottinghamshire.

In 1599 John Byron 1st Baron Byron 1599-1652 was born to John Byron 1577-1623 (22) at Newstead, Nottinghamshire.

On 28 Sep 1623 John Byron 1577-1623 (46) died at Newstead, Nottinghamshire.

Newstead Abbey, Newstead, Nottinghamshire

On 01 May 1236 William Dalbini -1236 died at Offington, Leicestershire. He was buried at Newstead Abbey, Newstead, Nottinghamshire.

15 Aug 1654. John Evelyn's Diary 1654 Aug. We passed next through Sherwood Forest, accounted the most extensive in England. Then, Paplewick, an incomparable vista with the pretty castle near it. Thence, we saw Newstead Abbey, belonging to the Lord Byron (48), situated much like Fontainebleau in France, capable of being made a noble seat, accommodated as it is with brave woods and streams; it has yet remaining the front of a glorious abbey church. Next, by Mansfield town; then Welbeck, the house of the Marquis of Newcastle (61), seated in a bottom in a park, and environed with woods, a noble yet melancholy seat. The palace is a handsome and stately building. Next to Worksop Abbey, almost demolished; the church has a double flat tower entire, and a pretty gate. The manor belongs to the Earl of Arundel (27), and has to it a fair house at the foot of a hill in a park that affords a delicate prospect. Tickel, a town and castle, has a very noble prospect. All these in Nottinghamshire.

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

10 Oct 1316. Letters of Royal And Illustrious Ladies of Great Britain Volume 1. Letter XXIII. Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (21) to her nephew John Plantagenet 1st Earl Cornwall 1316-1336.
Most dear and beloved nephew,
We have well understood what you have sent us word by your letters; and, as to our estate, we give you to know that we are even in great trouble of heart, but, considering the condition we are in, we were in good health of body at the setting forth of these letters, which our Lord ever grant to you. Dearest nephew, we pray you that you will leave off all excuses, and come to the king our son in the best manner you can, and as he commands you more fully by his letters. For you well know, dearest nephew, if you come not, considering the necessity that now exists, it will be greatly talked of, and will be a great dishonour to you. Wherefore make an effort to come at this time as hastily as you can, and you know well, dearest nephew, that we shall ever be ready to counsel you as well as we can in all things that shall be to your honour and profit. Most dear and beloved nephew, our Lord have you in his keeping. Given at Nottingham, the 10th day of October.

Edward Woodville puts to Sea

On 29 Apr 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30) arrived in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire. .

14 Aug 1654. John Evelyn's Diary 1654 Aug. I took a journey into the Northern parts, riding through Oakham, a pretty town in Rutlandshire, famous for the tenure of the Barons (Ferrers), who hold it by taking off a shoe from every nobleman's horse that passes with his lord through the street, unless redeemed with a certain piece of money. In token of this, are several gilded shoes nailed up on the castle gate, which seems to have been large and fair. Hence, we went by Brook, a very sweet seat and park of the old Lady Camden's. Next, by Burleigh House, belonging to the Duke of Buckingham, and worthily reckoned among the noblest seats in England, situate on the brow of a hill, built à la moderne near a park walled in, and a fine wood at the descent.
Now we were come to Cottsmore, a pretty seat belonging to Mr. Heath, son of the late Lord Chief Justice of that name. Here, after dinner, parting with the company that conducted us thus far, I passed that evening by Belvoir Castle, built on a round mount at the point of a long ridge of hills, which affords a stately prospect, and is famous for its strenuous resistance in the late civil war.
Went by Newark-on-Trent, a brave town and garrison. Next, by Wharton House, belonging to the Lord Chaworth, a handsome seat; then by Home, a noble place belonging to the Marquis of Dorchester (48), and passed the famous river Trent, which divides the South from the North of England; and so lay that night at Nottingham.
This whole town and county seems to be but one entire rock, as it were, an exceedingly pleasant shire, full of gentry. Here, I observed divers to live in the rocks and caves, much after the manner as about Tours, in France. The church is well built on an eminence; there is a fair house of the Lord Clare's, another of Pierrepont's; an ample market place; large streets, full of crosses; the relics of an ancient castle, hollowed beneath which are many caverns, especially that of the Scots' King, and his work while there.
This place is remarkable for being the place where his Majesty first erected his standard at the beginning of our late unhappy differences. The prospects from this city toward the river and meadows are most delightful.

Apsley Hall, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

On 28 Aug 1817 Henry Willoughby 8th Baron Middleton 1817-1877 was born to Henry Willoughby 1780-1849 (36) and Charlotte Eyre 1791-1845 (26) at Apsley Hall, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire.

Hoveringham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

St Michael's Church, Hoveringham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

On 08 Jul 1425 Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess Norfolk 1366-1425 (59) died at Wighill, Yorkshire.She was buried at St Michael's Church, Hoveringham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire.

Nottingham Castle, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

Battle of Boroughbridge

On 16 Mar 1322 the rebel army led by Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (44) attempted to cross the bridge over the River Ure (between Ripon and York) at Boroughbridge, Yorkshire.Their path was blocked by forces loyal to the King led by Andrew Harclay 1st Earl Carlisle 1270-1323 (52). . Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46), Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (34), John Botetort 1st Baron Botetort 1265-1324 (57) and John Maltravers 1st Baron Maltravers 1290-1365 (32) fought for the rebels. Roger Clifford 2nd Baron Clifford 1300-1322 (22), Nicholas Longford 1288-1356 (34), Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (44), John Mowbray 2nd Baron Mowbray 1286-1322 (35) were captured. Warin Lisle 1271-1322 (51) was hanged after the battle..
Following the battle Hugh Audley 1st Earl Gloucester 1291-1347 (31) and his wife Margaret Clare Countess Gloucester -1342 were both imprisoned.He in Nottingham Castle, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire and she in Sempringham Priory, Sempringham, Lincolnshire.
John Clinton 2nd Baron Clinton 1300-1335 (22), Ralph Greystoke 1st Baron Greystoke 1299-1323 (22), William Latimer 2nd Baron Latimer Corby 1276-1327 (46), Robert Lisle 1st Baron Lisle 1288-1344 (34), Domhnall Mar II Earl Mar 1293- and Peter Saltmarsh 1280-1338 (42) fought for the King.
Adam Everingham 1st Baron Laxton 1279-1341 (43) was captured.
Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (46) was killed. His son John Bohun 5th Earl Hereford, 4th Earl Essex 1307-1336 (15) succeeded as 5th Earl Hereford (6C 1199), 4th Earl Essex (3C 1239).

Edward III arrests Roger Mortimer

On 19 Oct 1330 John Neville 1299-1335 (30), William Eland, William Bohun 1st Earl Northampton 1309-1361 (20), William Clinton 1st Earl Huntingdon 1304-1354 (26) and William Montagu 1st Earl Salisbury 1301-1349 (29), friends of King Edward III England (17) secretly entered Nottingham Castle, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire through tunnels, met with King Edward III England (17), and arrested Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (43) and his son Geoffrey Mortimer 1309-1372 (21) in the presence of Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (35).

Gruffudd ab Owain Glyndŵr Mathrafal 1375-1412 was imprisoned at Nottingham Castle, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire.

Ollerton, Nottinghamshire

Cotham, Ollerton, Nottinghamshire

Around 1425 Anna Leeke 1425-1468 was born to Simon Leeke 1345-1428 (80) in Cotham, Ollerton, Nottinghamshire.

Before 1486 John Markham 1485-1551 was born at Cotham, Ollerton, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1500 John Markham 1500-1558 was born to John Markham 1472-1536 (28) and Alice Skipwith 1461-1552 (39) at Cotham, Ollerton, Nottinghamshire.

In 1536 John Markham 1472-1536 (64) died at Cotham, Ollerton, Nottinghamshire.

Around Jun 1551 John Markham 1485-1551 (65) died at Cotham, Ollerton, Nottinghamshire. He was was buried at Cotham, Ollerton, Nottinghamshire.

Prochester, Nottinghamshire

Around 1275 Ada Tiptoft 1275-1323 was born to Robert Tiptoft 1247-1298 (28) and Eva Chaworth 1252-1300 (23) at Prochester, Nottinghamshire.

Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire

Around 1442 Isabel Babington 1442-1507 was born to John Babington 1423-1485 (19) and Isabel Bradbourne 1427-1486 (15) at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

Around 18 Mar 1486 Isabel Bradbourne 1427-1486 (59) died at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

In 1506 Ralph Sacheverell 1506-1539 was born to Richard Sacheverell 1467-1534 (39) and Mary Hungerford Baroness Hastings, 4th Baroness Hungerford 1466-1553 (40) at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

In 1508 Maria Sacheverell 1508-1562 was born to Henry Sacheverell 1475-1558 (33) and Elizabeth Montgomery 1476- at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

In 1526 Henry Sacheverell 1526-1558 was born to Ralph Sacheverell 1506-1539 (20) and Cecilia Durance 1508-1538 (18) at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

On 14 Aug 1539 Ralph Sacheverell 1506-1539 (33) died at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire. He was buried at Holy Trinity Church, Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

In 1547 Henry Sacheverell 1547-1580 was born to Henry Sacheverell 1526-1558 (21) and Lucie Pole 1528-1554 (19) at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

On 29 Jul 1558 Henry Sacheverell 1526-1558 (32) died at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire. He was buried at Holy Trinity Church, Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

On 20 May 1562 Maria Sacheverell 1508-1562 (54) died at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

In 1570 Lucie Boughton 1570-1625 was born at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

In 1580 Henry Sacheverell 1547-1580 (33) died at Ratcliffe on Soar, Nottinghamshire.

Rempston, Nottinghamshire

Thomas Rempston -1406 was born at Rempston, Nottinghamshire.

Retford, Nottinghamshire

Markham Moor, Retford, Nottinghamshire

Rufford, Nottinghamshire

Rufford Abbey, Rufford, Nottinghamshire

In 1148 Gilbert Gaunt 1st Earl Lincoln 1126-1156 (22) founded Rufford Abbey, Rufford, Nottinghamshire.

Sherwood, Nottinghamshire

Papplewick Moor, Sherwood, Nottinghamshire

On 21 Jul 1457 Henry Pierrepoint 1408-1457 (49) was murdered at Papplewick Moor, Sherwood, Nottinghamshire.

15 Aug 1654. John Evelyn's Diary 1654 Aug. We passed next through Sherwood Forest, accounted the most extensive in England. Then, Paplewick, an incomparable vista with the pretty castle near it. Thence, we saw Newstead Abbey, belonging to the Lord Byron (48), situated much like Fontainebleau in France, capable of being made a noble seat, accommodated as it is with brave woods and streams; it has yet remaining the front of a glorious abbey church. Next, by Mansfield town; then Welbeck, the house of the Marquis of Newcastle (61), seated in a bottom in a park, and environed with woods, a noble yet melancholy seat. The palace is a handsome and stately building. Next to Worksop Abbey, almost demolished; the church has a double flat tower entire, and a pretty gate. The manor belongs to the Earl of Arundel (27), and has to it a fair house at the foot of a hill in a park that affords a delicate prospect. Tickel, a town and castle, has a very noble prospect. All these in Nottinghamshire.

Teversall, Nottinghamshire

Tithby, Nottinghamshire

In 1485 Thomas Chaworth 1441-1485 (44) died at Tithby, Nottinghamshire.

Wiverton Hall, Tithby, Nottinghamshire

Around 1331 Joan Pole 1331-1348 was born to William Pole 1302-1366 (29) and Katherine Norwich 1306-1381 (25) at Wiverton Hall, Tithby, Nottinghamshire.

On 28 May 1348 Joan Pole 1331-1348 (17) died at Wiverton Hall, Tithby, Nottinghamshire.

Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire

15 Aug 1654. John Evelyn's Diary 1654 Aug. We passed next through Sherwood Forest, accounted the most extensive in England. Then, Paplewick, an incomparable vista with the pretty castle near it. Thence, we saw Newstead Abbey, belonging to the Lord Byron (48), situated much like Fontainebleau in France, capable of being made a noble seat, accommodated as it is with brave woods and streams; it has yet remaining the front of a glorious abbey church. Next, by Mansfield town; then Welbeck, the house of the Marquis of Newcastle (61), seated in a bottom in a park, and environed with woods, a noble yet melancholy seat. The palace is a handsome and stately building. Next to Worksop Abbey, almost demolished; the church has a double flat tower entire, and a pretty gate. The manor belongs to the Earl of Arundel (27), and has to it a fair house at the foot of a hill in a park that affords a delicate prospect. Tickel, a town and castle, has a very noble prospect. All these in Nottinghamshire.

On 25 Dec 1676 William Cavendish 1st Duke Newcastle upon Tyne 1592-1676 (84) died at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire. He was buried at Westminster Abbey. His son Henry Cavendish 2nd Duke Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1691 (46) succeeded as 2nd Duke Newcastle upon Tyne (1C 1665). Frances Pierrepoint Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1695 (46) by marriage Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne (1C 1665).

On 26 Jul 1691 Henry Cavendish 2nd Duke Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1691 (61) died at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire. Duke Newcastle upon Tyne (1C 1665) became extinct. On 23 Sep 1695 Frances Pierrepoint Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1695 (60) died. In 1728 J Bird sculpted the Monument to Henry Cavendish 2nd Duke Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1691 (61), Frances Pierrepoint Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1695 (60) and their daughter Margaret Cavendish Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne 1661-1716 (29), Charles Cavendish 1626-1659 and Charles Cavendish -1671 in the Church of St Mary and St Laurence, Bolsover, Derbyshire.

On 27 Jun 1735 Elizabeth Bentinck Marchioness Bath 1735-1825 was born to William Bentinck 2nd Duke Portland 1709-1762 (26) and Margaret Cavendish Harley 2nd Duchess Portland 1715-1785 (20) at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire.

On 08 Feb 1737 Henrietta Bentinck Countess Stamford, Countess Warrington 1737-1827 was born to William Bentinck 2nd Duke Portland 1709-1762 (27) and Margaret Cavendish Harley 2nd Duchess Portland 1715-1785 (21) at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire.

On 14 Apr 1738 William Cavendish-Bentinck 3rd Duke Portland 1738-1809 was born to William Bentinck 2nd Duke Portland 1709-1762 (29) and Margaret Cavendish Harley 2nd Duchess Portland 1715-1785 (23) at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire.

On 26 Jul 1739 Margaret Cavendish-Bentinck 1739-1756 was born to William Bentinck 2nd Duke Portland 1709-1762 (30) and Margaret Cavendish Harley 2nd Duchess Portland 1715-1785 (24) at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire.

On 09 Apr 1741 Frances Cavendish-Bentinck 1741-1743 was born to William Bentinck 2nd Duke Portland 1709-1762 (32) and Margaret Cavendish Harley 2nd Duchess Portland 1715-1785 (26) at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire.

On 03 Mar 1744 Edward Charles Cavendish-Bentinck 1744-1819 was born to William Bentinck 2nd Duke Portland 1709-1762 (35) and Margaret Cavendish Harley 2nd Duchess Portland 1715-1785 (29) at Welbeck Abbey, Nottinghamshire.

21 Apr 1899. Times Newspaper Marriages. Marriage of Lord Crewe and Lady Peggy Primrose.
The marriage of Lady Margaret (Peggy) Primrose (18), younger daughter of the Earl of Rosebery (51), with the Earl of Crews (41), which took place at Westminster Abbey yesterday, was remarkable, not only as a brilliant spectacle, bat also on account of the extraordinary degree of public interest which the event evoked, and the testimony thus afforded to the popularity of the late Prime Minister. It was an ideal day for a wedding, the sun shining brilliantly. Parliament Square and the approaches to the Abbey early in the day presented a gay and animated spectacle. An hour or more before the time announced for the opening of the Abbey doors, and a couple of hours before the bridal party were expected, people began to collect in the Abbey precincts, and in a short time great crowds were stretching right away to the railings of the Houses of Parliament. As time wore on and the vast concourse grew into extraordinary dimensions the police on duty had the utmost difficulty in regulating the living mass. Taffic became congested, and the constables in some cases were swept off their feet by the surging and panting multitude, but everywhere the best of good humour seemed to prevail in the streets.
Meanwhile the interior of the Abbey was also the centre of much life and movement. The wedding was fixed for 1:30, aud the doors, at each of which a long queue of ticket-holders and others had long been patiently waiting, were opened three-quarters of an hour earlier. Immediately the throngs, in which the bright costumes of the ladies were conspicuous, wwept into the Abbey. None-ticket holders were admitted by the north door only. This entrance was literally besieged, and a quarter of an hour after it was opened it had to be closed, for in that brief space the northern transept-the porLion of the Abbey allotted to the general public-had become so densely packed that it would not hold another spectator. Those privileged visitors who held permits either for tue nave or the south transept seemed none the less eager to secure advantageous places, for every one came early. Many of the ladies stood upon the seats in their eagerness to obtain a good view. As the guests arrived Sir Frederick Bridge played an appropriate selection of music upon the grand organ.
The rare spectacle of floral decorations in the Abbey attracted general attention. At each end of the alter rails there was a towering palm with a collection of Lilium Harrisii and marguerites grouped at the base, while blooms of Liliam Harrisii also adorned the altar itself. Specimen palms with foliage and flowering plants were placed against the organ screen facing the western entrance, by which the bridal party were shortly to enter.
The arrival of the specially invited guests also proved a source of much interest. These privileged persons, numbering some 500 or 600, friends of the contracting parties and including men distinguished in politics, diplomacy, literature, and art, were escorted to seats in the choir and under the lantern. The Earl of Crewe (41), with his best man, the Earl of Chesterfield (45), arrived about ten minutes past 1. Each of them wore a marguerite in his buttonhole. They joined the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire under the lantern. The Prince of Wales (4) arrived about 25 minutes past 1. His Royal Highness, attended by the Hon. Seymour Fortescue (43), was received by Lord Rosebery's sons, Lord Dalmeny (17) and the Hon. Neil Primrose (16), by whom he was conducted to the Jerusalem Chamber. The Duke of Cambridge (80), who quickly followed, attended by Colonel FitzgGeorge, was met at the same door by the Hon. Neil Primrose, under whose escort he joined the Prince of Wales, after which their Royal Highnesses went to the choir and took the seats which had been specially reserved for then.
Among the others present were: The Duchess of Buckingham and Chandos, the Marquis and Marchioness of Breadalbane, the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Mr. Balfour M.P., the Duke (52) and Duchess (46) of Somerset, the Marquis of Lansdowne (54), Mr. Asquith, M.P., and Mrs. Asquith, the Austrian Ambassador, the Earl and Countess of Harewood, the Duchess of Cleveland. the Earl of Kirnberley and Lady Constance Wodehouse, Lady Jeune and Miles Stanley, the Marquis of Dufferin, Sir R. Campbell-Bannerman, M.P., and Lady Campbell-Bauneiman, Mr. Bryce, M.P., and Mrs. Biyce, Mr. J. B Balfour, H.P., and Mrs. Balfour, Mir. H Gladstone, the Earl aud Countess of Corck, the Lord Chief Justice (Lord Russell of Killoren) and the Hon. Mliss Russell, Sir H. Fowler, f.P., and Lady Fowler, Earl and Courntess Dc Grey, Mr. Munro-Fergrsca, M.P., and Lady Helen Munro-Ferguison, Sir Henry Irving, ir. Morley, M.P., S,r John and lady Puleston, the Marquig and Marehioness of Ripon, Lord and Lady Recay, Lord and Lady Rothschild, and all the Londoa representatives of the Rothschild family, Sir Charles aild Lady Tennant, Lord Wandsworth. Lord and Lady Wenlock, Lord Leconfdeld, the Earl of Verulamn, Mr. aud Mrs. George Alexander idiss Mundella, Sir E. Sassoon, H.P., General and Mrs. Wauchope, Sir E. Lawson, Mr. Harmswortl, Sir Lewis Morris. Lord James of Hereford and Miss James the Hon. P. Stanhope, H.P., and Countess Tolstoy, the Earl and Countess of Aberdeen, Mr. Shaw Lefevre, Sir Charles Dalry,uiple MP. Mr. Sydney Buxton, M.P. ,hr. George Russell, Tr. G. E. Buckle, Georgina, Countess A! Dudley, Sir Humphrey and Lady De Trafford, Sir Edgar and Lady Helen Vincent, Sir John Lubbock, hLP., and Lady Lubbock, Lord Hamilton of Dalzell' Sir Henry Primrose, Lord and Lady St. Oswald, Eara and Countess Stanbope, Mr. Rochfort Maguire. M.P., and Mrs. Maguire, Lady Emily Peel, Loid E. Pitzmaurice. HI.P., Earl and Countess Carrington, Lord and Lady Bnrgheiere, Loud and Lady Battersea, Lord and Lady Henry Bentnek, Lord and Lady Poltimure, the Earl of Essex, and Viscount Curzon, .p., and Viscountess Ctu-zon.
By the time that the whole of the company bad assembled the transepts and choir were densely packed. The attendants had the greatest difficulty in keeping many of the spectators within the specified bounds, and owing to the crushing and crowding several ladies fainted. At half-past 1 Lord Rosebery arrived with the bride at the western entrance, having had a very heartv reception as they passed through the streets. This cordial greeting was repeated again and again as Lord wRosebery handed his daughter out of the carriage. She appeared relf-possessed and smiled upon those around her. Lady Peggy Primirose was attired in a dress of white satin of the new shape, with a very long train (not separate from the dress as in the old style). It was profusely embroidered with clusters of diamonds designed as primroses. The front of the skirt opened over a petticoat of exquisite point d'Alengon laco, which was formerly tn the possession of Marie Antoinette, and was a present from the bride's aunt, Miss Lucy Cohen. The bodice was embroidered and trimmed with similar lace aud its sleeves were of transparent mausselijt I soic. The veil was of tulle, and in nlace of the nsual coronet of orange blossom the bride wore a smart Louis XVI bow of real orange flowers. Jewelry was scarcely at all employed. Lady Peggy carried a magnificent bouquet composed mainly of orchids, white roses, lilies, and marguerites.
The bride (18) was received at the door of the Abbey by her ten bridesmaids. They were Lady Sybil Primrose (20), elder sister of the bride; the Ladies Annabel (18), Celia (15), and Cynthia (14) (Crewe-Milnes, daughters of the bridegroom; the Hon. Maud and the Hon. Margaret Wyndham, daughters of Lord Leaconfield; the Hon. Evelina Rothschild, daughter of Lord Rothschild; Miss Louise Wirsch; Lady Juliet Lowther (18), daughter of the late Earl of Lonsdale and Countess de Grey; and Miss Muriel White, daughter of Mr. Blenry White, of the United States Embassy. They were all dressed alike, in white embroidered moseline de rois over white silk. The skirts were made with shaped flounces with cream lace insertion, and upon the bodices were fichns edged with lace. The sashes were of primrose chiffon, and the hats of primrose tulle with white ostrich feathers, one side being turned up with Baroness de Rothschild roses. The bouquets were of the same roses, tied with long tLreamers of the primrose chiffon. Each of the bridesmaids wore a gold curb bracelet with the initials of the bride and bridegroom in enamel, the gifts of the bridegroom.
The formation of the bridal proession was a very picturesque feature of the ceremonial. Schubert's " Grand March " was played, and the ,vast congregation rose to their feet as the choir advanced, followed along the nave by the clergy, after whom caine the bride leaning upon the arm of her father, who wore a bunch of primroses in his coat, and attended by her bridesmaids. All eyes were naturally turned to the bride, but she did not lose her composare during the long and trying walk up the nave to the choir.
As the procession approached the choir, Lord Crewe who with his best man had been standing a few yards from the Prince of Wales advanced to meet the bride, and the party ha1ted at a point between the choir and the lantern, where the first part of the wedding service was taken, in full view of the choir stalls, where the principal guests were seated. The hymn " O perfect Love" having been sung, the marriage service began. The officiating clergy were the Rev. Dr. Butler (Master of Tririty), the Dean of Westminster, Canon Blackburne, vicar of Crewe-green, Crewe, Canon Armitage Robinson, and the Precentor of Westminster. Dr. Butler, who took the principal part of the service, read the words in a very impressive manner. The bride made the responses in a perfectly audible voice. Upon the conclusion of the first part of the ceremony the procession of the clergy and the bride and bridegroom, followed by the bridesmaids, moved towards the east. They passed, while the psalm was sung to a chant by Beethoven, through the sacrarrum to the altar, where the concluding portion of the service was said by the Dean and other clergy. Next came the hymn " Now thank we all otr God," after which the blessing was pronounced and the service was brought to a close, to the actompaniment of a merry peal from the bells of St. Margaret's Church. As the procession moved down the Abbey to the Jerusalem Chamber to sign the register Mendelssohn's " Wedding March " was played, and the great majority of the congreation prepared to take their departure. 'ihs Prince of Wales and the Duke of Cambridge were among those who accompanied the bridal party and their relatives to the Jerusalem Chamber and appended their names to the register. Lord and Lady Crewe, with their friends, left the Abbey amid a renewal of those enthusiastic demonstrations which had marked Lady Peggy Primrose's arrival as a bride. A reception and luncheon was given at Lord Rosebery's town house attended by the Prince of Wales; the Duke of Cambridge, and about 600 other guests, most of whom had attended the ceremony in theAbbey. Later in the day the Earl and Countess of Crewe left town for Welbeek Abbey,'placed at their disposal by the Duke and Duchess of Portland for the early part of the honeymoon. The bride wore a travelling dress of green cloth, the skirt being stitched with gold, the bodice and sleeves being embroidered in natural colour silk and gold with primroses She vwore a large wzhite hat w,ith feathers to match. THE WEDDING PRES IU& After the departure of the bride and bride-groom the numerous wedding presents displayed at Lord Rosebery's house were inspected with much interest by those of the guests who had not previously seen them.
Soon after 7 o'clock last evening the train conveying Lord and Lady Crewe arrived at Worksop Station. The platform was thronged with people, who gave a most cordial, though quiet, reception to the newly-married pair. On their arrival at Welbeck Abbey the visitors were received with every honour, and a bouquet was presented to Lady Crewe. The employes on the estate of Dalmeny dined together last night in celebration of the marriage of Lady Peggy Primrose. Mr. Drysdale, the chamberlain, presided over a company of about 300. After dinner there was a dance, and a display of fireworks was given in the grounds. The burgh of Queensferry, which adjoins Lord Rosebery's Dalmeny estate, was decorated yesterday in honour of the wedding. A banquet was held in the council chambers, at which the health of the bride and bridegroom was honoured, and a congratulatory telegram forwarded to Lady Crewe.

West Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire

On 14 Sep 1520 Humphrey Hercye 1490-1520 (30) died at West Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire.

Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire

Around 1175 Hugh Willoughby 1175- was born at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1240 William Willoughby 1240-1300 was born to Robert Willoughby 1217-1257 (23) and Alice or Margaret Orreby 1217-1245 (23) at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1261 Richard Bugge 1261-1325 was born at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

Around 1290 Richard Willoughby 1290-1362 was born to Richard Bugge 1261-1325 (29) at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

In 1323 John Willoughby 3rd Baron Willoughby Eresby 1323-1372 was born to John Willoughby 2nd Baron Willoughby Eresby 1303-1349 (19) and Joan Roscelyn Baroness Willoughby Eresby, Baroness Latimer (15) at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

In 1325 Richard Bugge 1261-1325 (64) died at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

On 18 Oct 1333 Margaret Deincourt Baroness Willoughby Eresby 1270-1333 (63) died at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

In 1416 Isabel Annesley 1366-1416 (50) died at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

On 30 May 1465 Robert Willoughby 1410-1465 (55) died at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire. He was buried at Campsey Nunnery, Campsey, Suffolk.

Around 1548 Elizabeth Lyttelton 1548-1594 was born to John Lyttelton 1519-1590 (28) at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

Battle of Willoughby Field

On 05 Jul 1648 Michael Stanhope 1624-1648 (24) was killed at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire during the Battle of Willoughby Field.

After 05 Jul 1648 Michael Stanhope 1624-1648 was buried at Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire.

See St Mary & All Saints Church, Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire

Worksop, Nottinghamshire

In 1276 Eleanor Furnival Baroness Mauley 1276-1335 was born to Thomas Furnival 1st Baron Furnivall 1260-1332 (16) and Joan Despencer Baroness Furnivall 1258-1322 (18) at Worksop, Nottinghamshire.

In 1603 Walter Cope 1553-1614 (50) was knighted at Worksop, Nottinghamshire.

21 Apr 1899. Times Newspaper Marriages. Marriage of Lord Crewe and Lady Peggy Primrose.
The marriage of Lady Margaret (Peggy) Primrose (18), younger daughter of the Earl of Rosebery (51), with the Earl of Crews (41), which took place at Westminster Abbey yesterday, was remarkable, not only as a brilliant spectacle, bat also on account of the extraordinary degree of public interest which the event evoked, and the testimony thus afforded to the popularity of the late Prime Minister. It was an ideal day for a wedding, the sun shining brilliantly. Parliament Square and the approaches to the Abbey early in the day presented a gay and animated spectacle. An hour or more before the time announced for the opening of the Abbey doors, and a couple of hours before the bridal party were expected, people began to collect in the Abbey precincts, and in a short time great crowds were stretching right away to the railings of the Houses of Parliament. As time wore on and the vast concourse grew into extraordinary dimensions the police on duty had the utmost difficulty in regulating the living mass. Taffic became congested, and the constables in some cases were swept off their feet by the surging and panting multitude, but everywhere the best of good humour seemed to prevail in the streets.
Meanwhile the interior of the Abbey was also the centre of much life and movement. The wedding was fixed for 1:30, aud the doors, at each of which a long queue of ticket-holders and others had long been patiently waiting, were opened three-quarters of an hour earlier. Immediately the throngs, in which the bright costumes of the ladies were conspicuous, wwept into the Abbey. None-ticket holders were admitted by the north door only. This entrance was literally besieged, and a quarter of an hour after it was opened it had to be closed, for in that brief space the northern transept-the porLion of the Abbey allotted to the general public-had become so densely packed that it would not hold another spectator. Those privileged visitors who held permits either for tue nave or the south transept seemed none the less eager to secure advantageous places, for every one came early. Many of the ladies stood upon the seats in their eagerness to obtain a good view. As the guests arrived Sir Frederick Bridge played an appropriate selection of music upon the grand organ.
The rare spectacle of floral decorations in the Abbey attracted general attention. At each end of the alter rails there was a towering palm with a collection of Lilium Harrisii and marguerites grouped at the base, while blooms of Liliam Harrisii also adorned the altar itself. Specimen palms with foliage and flowering plants were placed against the organ screen facing the western entrance, by which the bridal party were shortly to enter.
The arrival of the specially invited guests also proved a source of much interest. These privileged persons, numbering some 500 or 600, friends of the contracting parties and including men distinguished in politics, diplomacy, literature, and art, were escorted to seats in the choir and under the lantern. The Earl of Crewe (41), with his best man, the Earl of Chesterfield (45), arrived about ten minutes past 1. Each of them wore a marguerite in his buttonhole. They joined the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire under the lantern. The Prince of Wales (4) arrived about 25 minutes past 1. His Royal Highness, attended by the Hon. Seymour Fortescue (43), was received by Lord Rosebery's sons, Lord Dalmeny (17) and the Hon. Neil Primrose (16), by whom he was conducted to the Jerusalem Chamber. The Duke of Cambridge (80), who quickly followed, attended by Colonel FitzgGeorge, was met at the same door by the Hon. Neil Primrose, under whose escort he joined the Prince of Wales, after which their Royal Highnesses went to the choir and took the seats which had been specially reserved for then.
Among the others present were: The Duchess of Buckingham and Chandos, the Marquis and Marchioness of Breadalbane, the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch. Mr. Balfour M.P., the Duke (52) and Duchess (46) of Somerset, the Marquis of Lansdowne (54), Mr. Asquith, M.P., and Mrs. Asquith, the Austrian Ambassador, the Earl and Countess of Harewood, the Duchess of Cleveland. the Earl of Kirnberley and Lady Constance Wodehouse, Lady Jeune and Miles Stanley, the Marquis of Dufferin, Sir R. Campbell-Bannerman, M.P., and Lady Campbell-Bauneiman, Mr. Bryce, M.P., and Mrs. Biyce, Mr. J. B Balfour, H.P., and Mrs. Balfour, Mir. H Gladstone, the Earl aud Countess of Corck, the Lord Chief Justice (Lord Russell of Killoren) and the Hon. Mliss Russell, Sir H. Fowler, f.P., and Lady Fowler, Earl and Courntess Dc Grey, Mr. Munro-Fergrsca, M.P., and Lady Helen Munro-Ferguison, Sir Henry Irving, ir. Morley, M.P., S,r John and lady Puleston, the Marquig and Marehioness of Ripon, Lord and Lady Recay, Lord and Lady Rothschild, and all the Londoa representatives of the Rothschild family, Sir Charles aild Lady Tennant, Lord Wandsworth. Lord and Lady Wenlock, Lord Leconfdeld, the Earl of Verulamn, Mr. aud Mrs. George Alexander idiss Mundella, Sir E. Sassoon, H.P., General and Mrs. Wauchope, Sir E. Lawson, Mr. Harmswortl, Sir Lewis Morris. Lord James of Hereford and Miss James the Hon. P. Stanhope, H.P., and Countess Tolstoy, the Earl and Countess of Aberdeen, Mr. Shaw Lefevre, Sir Charles Dalry,uiple MP. Mr. Sydney Buxton, M.P. ,hr. George Russell, Tr. G. E. Buckle, Georgina, Countess A! Dudley, Sir Humphrey and Lady De Trafford, Sir Edgar and Lady Helen Vincent, Sir John Lubbock, hLP., and Lady Lubbock, Lord Hamilton of Dalzell' Sir Henry Primrose, Lord and Lady St. Oswald, Eara and Countess Stanbope, Mr. Rochfort Maguire. M.P., and Mrs. Maguire, Lady Emily Peel, Loid E. Pitzmaurice. HI.P., Earl and Countess Carrington, Lord and Lady Bnrgheiere, Loud and Lady Battersea, Lord and Lady Henry Bentnek, Lord and Lady Poltimure, the Earl of Essex, and Viscount Curzon, .p., and Viscountess Ctu-zon.
By the time that the whole of the company bad assembled the transepts and choir were densely packed. The attendants had the greatest difficulty in keeping many of the spectators within the specified bounds, and owing to the crushing and crowding several ladies fainted. At half-past 1 Lord Rosebery arrived with the bride at the western entrance, having had a very heartv reception as they passed through the streets. This cordial greeting was repeated again and again as Lord wRosebery handed his daughter out of the carriage. She appeared relf-possessed and smiled upon those around her. Lady Peggy Primirose was attired in a dress of white satin of the new shape, with a very long train (not separate from the dress as in the old style). It was profusely embroidered with clusters of diamonds designed as primroses. The front of the skirt opened over a petticoat of exquisite point d'Alengon laco, which was formerly tn the possession of Marie Antoinette, and was a present from the bride's aunt, Miss Lucy Cohen. The bodice was embroidered and trimmed with similar lace aud its sleeves were of transparent mausselijt I soic. The veil was of tulle, and in nlace of the nsual coronet of orange blossom the bride wore a smart Louis XVI bow of real orange flowers. Jewelry was scarcely at all employed. Lady Peggy carried a magnificent bouquet composed mainly of orchids, white roses, lilies, and marguerites.
The bride (18) was received at the door of the Abbey by her ten bridesmaids. They were Lady Sybil Primrose (20), elder sister of the bride; the Ladies Annabel (18), Celia (15), and Cynthia (14) (Crewe-Milnes, daughters of the bridegroom; the Hon. Maud and the Hon. Margaret Wyndham, daughters of Lord Leaconfield; the Hon. Evelina Rothschild, daughter of Lord Rothschild; Miss Louise Wirsch; Lady Juliet Lowther (18), daughter of the late Earl of Lonsdale and Countess de Grey; and Miss Muriel White, daughter of Mr. Blenry White, of the United States Embassy. They were all dressed alike, in white embroidered moseline de rois over white silk. The skirts were made with shaped flounces with cream lace insertion, and upon the bodices were fichns edged with lace. The sashes were of primrose chiffon, and the hats of primrose tulle with white ostrich feathers, one side being turned up with Baroness de Rothschild roses. The bouquets were of the same roses, tied with long tLreamers of the primrose chiffon. Each of the bridesmaids wore a gold curb bracelet with the initials of the bride and bridegroom in enamel, the gifts of the bridegroom.
The formation of the bridal proession was a very picturesque feature of the ceremonial. Schubert's " Grand March " was played, and the ,vast congregation rose to their feet as the choir advanced, followed along the nave by the clergy, after whom caine the bride leaning upon the arm of her father, who wore a bunch of primroses in his coat, and attended by her bridesmaids. All eyes were naturally turned to the bride, but she did not lose her composare during the long and trying walk up the nave to the choir.
As the procession approached the choir, Lord Crewe who with his best man had been standing a few yards from the Prince of Wales advanced to meet the bride, and the party ha1ted at a point between the choir and the lantern, where the first part of the wedding service was taken, in full view of the choir stalls, where the principal guests were seated. The hymn " O perfect Love" having been sung, the marriage service began. The officiating clergy were the Rev. Dr. Butler (Master of Tririty), the Dean of Westminster, Canon Blackburne, vicar of Crewe-green, Crewe, Canon Armitage Robinson, and the Precentor of Westminster. Dr. Butler, who took the principal part of the service, read the words in a very impressive manner. The bride made the responses in a perfectly audible voice. Upon the conclusion of the first part of the ceremony the procession of the clergy and the bride and bridegroom, followed by the bridesmaids, moved towards the east. They passed, while the psalm was sung to a chant by Beethoven, through the sacrarrum to the altar, where the concluding portion of the service was said by the Dean and other clergy. Next came the hymn " Now thank we all otr God," after which the blessing was pronounced and the service was brought to a close, to the actompaniment of a merry peal from the bells of St. Margaret's Church. As the procession moved down the Abbey to the Jerusalem Chamber to sign the register Mendelssohn's " Wedding March " was played, and the great majority of the congreation prepared to take their departure. 'ihs Prince of Wales and the Duke of Cambridge were among those who accompanied the bridal party and their relatives to the Jerusalem Chamber and appended their names to the register. Lord and Lady Crewe, with their friends, left the Abbey amid a renewal of those enthusiastic demonstrations which had marked Lady Peggy Primrose's arrival as a bride. A reception and luncheon was given at Lord Rosebery's town house attended by the Prince of Wales; the Duke of Cambridge, and about 600 other guests, most of whom had attended the ceremony in theAbbey. Later in the day the Earl and Countess of Crewe left town for Welbeek Abbey,'placed at their disposal by the Duke and Duchess of Portland for the early part of the honeymoon. The bride wore a travelling dress of green cloth, the skirt being stitched with gold, the bodice and sleeves being embroidered in natural colour silk and gold with primroses She vwore a large wzhite hat w,ith feathers to match. THE WEDDING PRES IU& After the departure of the bride and bride-groom the numerous wedding presents displayed at Lord Rosebery's house were inspected with much interest by those of the guests who had not previously seen them.
Soon after 7 o'clock last evening the train conveying Lord and Lady Crewe arrived at Worksop Station. The platform was thronged with people, who gave a most cordial, though quiet, reception to the newly-married pair. On their arrival at Welbeck Abbey the visitors were received with every honour, and a bouquet was presented to Lady Crewe. The employes on the estate of Dalmeny dined together last night in celebration of the marriage of Lady Peggy Primrose. Mr. Drysdale, the chamberlain, presided over a company of about 300. After dinner there was a dance, and a display of fireworks was given in the grounds. The burgh of Queensferry, which adjoins Lord Rosebery's Dalmeny estate, was decorated yesterday in honour of the wedding. A banquet was held in the council chambers, at which the health of the bride and bridegroom was honoured, and a congratulatory telegram forwarded to Lady Crewe.

Osberton, Worksop, Nottinghamshire

In 1869 George Savile Foljambe 1800-1869 (68) died at Osberton, Worksop, Nottinghamshire.

Osberton Hall, Osberton, Worksop, Nottinghamshire

On 07 Nov 1846 Cecil George Savile Foljambe 1st Earl Liverpool 1846-1907 was born to George Savile Foljambe 1800-1869 (46) and Selina Jenkinson at Osberton Hall, Osberton, Worksop, Nottinghamshire.

Worksop Priory, Worksop, Nottinghamshire

On 14 Mar 1406 Thomas Neville 5th Baron Furnivall 1362-1406 (44) died at Worksop Priory, Worksop, Nottinghamshire. His daughter Maud Neville Countess Shrewsbury, Countess Waterford 1392-1423 (13) succeeded as 6th Baron Furnivall (1C 1295).

15 Aug 1654. John Evelyn's Diary 1654 Aug. We passed next through Sherwood Forest, accounted the most extensive in England. Then, Paplewick, an incomparable vista with the pretty castle near it. Thence, we saw Newstead Abbey, belonging to the Lord Byron (48), situated much like Fontainebleau in France, capable of being made a noble seat, accommodated as it is with brave woods and streams; it has yet remaining the front of a glorious abbey church. Next, by Mansfield town; then Welbeck, the house of the Marquis of Newcastle (61), seated in a bottom in a park, and environed with woods, a noble yet melancholy seat. The palace is a handsome and stately building. Next to Worksop Abbey, almost demolished; the church has a double flat tower entire, and a pretty gate. The manor belongs to the Earl of Arundel (27), and has to it a fair house at the foot of a hill in a park that affords a delicate prospect. Tickel, a town and castle, has a very noble prospect. All these in Nottinghamshire.