Westminster

Execution of Three Lords

Death of Edward IV

1698 Burning of Whitehall Palace

Triple Wedding

Great Fire of London

1101 Christmas Court

1153 Treaty of Wallingford aka Winchester aka Westminster

1272 Death of Henry III

1290 Eleanor Crosses

1376 Death of the Black Prince

1397 Arrest and Execution of Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey, 11th Earl Arundel

1453 Birth of Edward of Westminster

1460 Richard of York claims the Kingdom of England

1467 Tournament Bastard of Burgundy

1472 Marriage of Richard Duke of Gloucester and Anne Neville

1478 Marriage of Richard Duke of York and Anne Mowbray

1483 Funeral of Edward IV

1484 Opening Parliament

1485 Queen Consort Anne Neville Dies

1490 Arthur Tudor created Prince of Wales

1499 Trial and Execution of Perkin Warbreck and Edward Earl of Warwick

1511 Tournament

1533 Marriage of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn

1536 Marriage of Henry VII and Jane Seymour

1540 May Day Jousting

1547 Death of Henry VIII

1553 Trial and Execution of Lady Jane Grey's Supporters

1558 Death of Mary I

1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

1603 James 1st Crowned

1603 Pre-Coronation Knights

1605 Gunpowder Plot

1605 Masque of Blackness

1608 Masque of Beauty

1608 Masque of The Hue and Cry After Cupid

1610 Tethy's Festival Masque

1612 Funeral of Prince Frederick

1613 Marriage of Elizabeth Stewart and Frederick V Elector Palatine

1630 Baptism of future Charles II

1649 Execution of Charles I

1649 Trial of Charles I

1660 Coronation Charles II

1661 Investiture of new Peers

1665 Battle of Lowestoft

1665 Great Plague of London

1666 Four Days' Battle

1668 Buckingham Shrewsbury Duel

1682 Murder of Tom of Ten Thousand Thynne

1683 Rye House Plot

1683 Marriage of Lady Anne and Prince George

1684 Frost Fair

1685 Death and Burial of Charles II

1685 Popish Plot

1688 Glorious Revolution

1688 Seven Bishops

1689 Coronation William III and Mary II

1694 Death of Queen Mary II

1698 Whitehall Palace Fire

1715 Battle of Preston

1752 Marriage of James Duke Hamilton and Elizabeth Gunning on the Day they Met

1840 Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

1858 Marriage of the future King Frederick III King Prussia and Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha

1876 New Years Appointments

Treaty of Wallingford aka Winchester aka Westminster

Around Aug 1153 Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (20) and Stephen I King England 1094-1154 (59) agreed the Treaty of Wallingford aka Winchester aka Westminster by which Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (20) would inherit the throne on the death of Stephen I King England 1094-1154 (59). The Treaty was ratified by Theobald of Bec Archbishop of Canterbury 1090-1161 (63) at Westminster in Christmas 1153.

Death of Henry III

On 16 Nov 1272 Henry III King England 1207-1272 (65) died at Westminster. His Son Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (33) succeeded I King England: Plantagenet Angevin. Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (31) by marriage Queen Consort England.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 12 Dec 1307 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To John de Brittania, earl of Richmond, [keeper] of Scotland. Order to restore to Aymer de Valencia (32), earl of Pembrok, his lands, etc., in the counties of Sellekyrk and Twedale and in the forest of Sellekyrk, which he has seized into the king's hands because the men and tenants of the same had late traitoroursly adhered to Robert de Brus (33), the king's enemy and rebel.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 24 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Canterbury. To the Sheriffs of London. Order to deliver John de la Dune, Roger de Hopton, Richard le Harpour, Roger de Soppewalle, Roger le Keu, Rober le Hunt, Thomas de Sydenham, Henry le Gardener, Thomas de la More, Philip Kemp, John le Wayt, and John le Wodeward, the men and servants of Adam de Kyngeshemede, in the King's prison of Newgate for a trespass committed by them upon the King's men at Westminster, from prison upon their finding sufficient mainpernors to have them before the King (23) or his Lieutenant in the quinzaine of the Purification of St Mary to stand to right concerning the said trespass. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 24 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To John Sampson (61), constable of the king's castle of Scardeburgh. Order to permit Henry Percy (34) and his consort and their household to dwell in the houses within the said castle, provided that the castle be safely guarded.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 09 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. To Alice, late wife of Roger Bigod, earl of Norfolk and Marshall of England. Order to meet the king at Dover on his return from France with his consort about Sunday next after the Feast of the Purification of St Mary. Witnessed by Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).
The like to:
Elizabeth, countess of Hereford and Essex (25).
Henry de Lancastre (27)
Robert de Monte Alto
Almaric de Sancto Amando[Ibid]
To R Archbishop of Canterbury (63). Order to attend the king's coronaion on Sunday next after the feast of St Valentine [14 Feb] at Westminster, to execute what pertains to his office.
To the sheriff of Surrey. Order to proclaim in market towns, etc., that no knight, esquire, or other shall, under pain of forfeiture, pressure to tourney or make jousts or bordices (torneare, justos seu burdseicas facere), or otherwise go armed at Croydon or elsewhere before the king's coronation.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 06 Mar 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To Thomas de la Hide, late steward of Cornwall and sheriff of the same. Order to deliver to Peter de Gavaston (24), knight, all the ferms, rents, and issues of the said County from Michaelmas last, and of the lands of the late Edmund earl of Cornwall, the king having granted to the said Peter the county of Cornwall, and all the lands of the said Edmund.
The like to John de Tresimple, for the ferms, etc., of the manor, etc.
The like to Walter de Gloucester, escheator this side of Trent, for the ferms, etc., of the manors.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 17 Mar 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To John Sampson (61), constable of the king's castle of Scardeburgh. Order to permit Henry Percy and his consort and their household to dwell in the houses within the said castle, provided that the castle be safely guarded.

On 04 Jul 1392 Thomas Stafford 3rd Earl Stafford 1368-1392 (24) died at Westminster. His Brother William Stafford 4th Earl Stafford 1375-1395 (16) succeeded Earl Stafford (1C 1351), 5th Baron Stafford (1C 1299).

Arrest and Execution of Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey, 11th Earl Arundel

On 21 Sep 1397 Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey, 11th Earl Arundel 1346-1397 (51) was tried at Westminster.
He (51) was beheaded at Tower Hill immediately thereafter. His Son Thomas Fitzalan 10th Earl Surrey, 12th Earl Arundel 1381-1415 (15) succeeded 10th Earl Surrey (1C 1088), 12th Earl Arundel (Sussex).

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 12 Mar 1461. Westminster. Commission to the king's kinsman Richard, earl of Warwick (33), to receive deserters from the party of Henry VI King England, II King France 1421-1471 (39) and to cause proclamations to be made to the effect, and to seize the possessions of all recusants. By K (18) by word of mouth.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 18 Mar 1461. Westminster. Grant, during the King's pleasure, to the King's kinsman Henry, viscount Bourchier (57), of the office of treasurer of the Exchequer in the same manner as Walter Hungerford, knight, late treasurer.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 21 Mar 1461. Westminster. Protection for two years for Edmund Grey of Ruthyn (44), knight, going beyond the seas, and his men, and possessions..

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 02 May 1461. Westminster. The like (Grant for life) to the king's (19) kinsman John Neville of Montagu (30), knight, from Easter last, of the king's mines in Decon and Cornwall in which gold and silver can be found or worked for, at a rent of 110l yearly, as the king's father used to pay, with power of demise the same for 10, 15 or 20 years, provided that after his death the holders pay a tithe of the pure silver or lead to the king or his farmer. By p.s.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 04 May 1461. Westminster. Grant for life to the king's (19) kinsman George (29), bishop of Exeter, from Easter last of the custody of the king's manor manor or lordship of Chiltern Langley, with mills, rents, vert and other profits, excepting 250 rabbits yearly for the king's hosehold, at a yearly rent of 50 marks 20d as formerly and 6s 8d besides; with acquittance of repairs and alloanc for any annuity granted out of the manor. By K (19).

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. On 05 Jun 1461. Westminster. Grant for life to Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury (43), of the custody of the lordship, manor and park of Langle by Maydeston, co Kent, rendering 5 marks yearly. By K (19).

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. On 10 Jun 1461. Westminster. Ratification for life of the estate of Master Robert Stillyngton (41), king's clerk as deacon of the king's free chapel of St Martin le Grand, London, archdeacon of Colchester in the cathedral of London and of Taunton in the cathedral of Wells, prebendary of Wetewang in the cathedral of York, Marther (possibly typo since 'Martha' unknown) in the cathedral of St Davids and the prebend which John Luca lately had in the king's free chapel of St Stephen within his palace of Wesminster, and person of the church of Aysshebury, in the diocese of Salisbury.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 21 Jul 1461. Westminster. The like to John Howard (36), king's knight, the office of the constableship and custody of Norwich Castle from Exeter lats, with the fees as in the times of Edward III and Richard II from the issues of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 25 Jul 1461. Westminster. Exemption for life of Geoffrey Boleyne (55), alderman of London, for his good service to the king's father, from being put on assizes, juries, inquisitions, attaints or recognisances and dfrom being made trier of them, taxer, collector, or assesor of customs, taxes, tallages, fifteenths, tenths or other subsidies, knight, major, sheriff, escheator, commissioner, constable, sheriff, bailiff or other officer or minister of the king against his will. By p.s.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 28 Jul 1461. Westminster. Appointment, during good behaviour, of John Howard (36), knight, as one of the king's carvers, receiving 40lyearly, viz 20l from the far of the town of Ipswich, co Suffolk, ad 20l from the issues of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. By p.s.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 26 Nov 1461. Westminster. The like (Grant for life) to Margaret, duchess of Somerset (51), of 166l 13s 4d yearly from Michaelmas, 39 Henry VI, from the king's petty custom in the port of London and the same at the same at the receipt of the Exchequer, in lieu of a grant and confirmation to her of the same sums in pdwer by latters atent dated 9 July, surrendered. By K (19).

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 02 Dec 1461. Westminster. Grant for life to the king's (19) kinsman John, earl of Worcester (34), of the office of the constable of the Tower of London, with the accustomed fees.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 03 Dec 1461. Westminster. Appointment of the king's (19) kinsman Richard, earl of Warwick (33), to execute the office of steward of England at the trial of Henry VI and other rebels who murdered the King's father Richard, duke of York, at Wakefield.

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 12 Dec 1461. Westminster. Grant for life to Richard Wydevill (56), lord of Ryvers, of the office of chief rider of the king's forest of Saucy. co Northampton, with all trees and profits, viz dry trees, dead trees, blown down, old hedges or copice-hedges, boughs fallen without date, cahettels, waifs, strays, pannage of swine, 'derefall wode', 'draenes' brushwood and brambles, [erquisites of courts, swainmote and other issues within the forest, from the time when he had he same by letters patent of Henry VI.

Around 1574 George Gower Painter 1540-1596 (34). Portrait of Charles Somerset 1587-1665. Armorial top left quarterly 1&4 Beaufort Arms with a yellow band top and bottom 2 Unknown Arms 3 Woodville Arms his great x 4 grandfather Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469.

Parliament Rolls.Edward IV Oct 1472.Second Roll. 06 Jun 1474. Westminster. Exemplification at the request of Richard Duke of Gloucester (21), of the tenour of an act (English) in the Parliament summoned at Westminster, 6 October, 12 Edward IV, and continued to 9 May, 14 Edward IV, ordaining that George Duke Clarence (24), and Isabel (22) his wife and Richard Duke of Gloucester, and Anne (17) his wife, daughters and heirs to Richard Nevyle, late Earl of Warwick, and daughters and heirs apparent to Anne Beauchamp (47), his wife should possess and enjoy as in the right of the said wives all possessions belonging to the said Countess as though she were naturally dead and that she should be barred and excluded therefrom, that they should make partition of the premises and the same partition should be good in law, that the said Dukes should enjoy for life all the possessions of their wives if they should outlive the latter, that the said George (24) and Isabel (22) should not make any alienation, grant, fine or recovery of any of the premises to the hurt of the said Richard (21) and Anne (17) or the latter to the hurt of the former, that if the said Richard and Anne be divorced and afterwards married this Act should hold good, that if they be divorced and he do his effectual diligence to be married to her and during her life be not wedded to any other woman he should enjoy as much of the premises as should appertain to her during his life, and that notwithstanding the restraint of alienation or recovery above specified the lordship, manor and wappentake of Chesterfield and Scarvesdale with the appurtenances and all the lands and tenements in Chesterfield and Scarvesdale sometime of Ales, late Countess of Salisbury, might be given to the King and his heirs in exchange for other lands and tenements, which shall however be subject of this Act..

Death of Edward IV

On 25 Mar 1483 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (40) returned to Westminster from Windsor. A few days later he became sufficiently unwell to add codicils to his will, and to have urged reconciliation between William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28); it isn't clear what the cause of the friction between the two men was although it appears well known that Hastings resented the Woodville family.

On 09 Apr 1483 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (40) died at Westminster. His Son Edward V King England 1470- (12) succeeded V King England: Plantagenet York. Those present included Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (46), William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28).

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 16 May 1483. Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's servant Henry duke of Buckingham (28), of the offices of chief justice and chamberlain in South and North Wales, constable of the castles and counties of Kermerdyn and Cardigan, the castles of Abrustwith, co Cardigan, and Denevour in South Wales, the castle and town of Tonebigh , co. Pembroke, the castle and lordship of Kylgarvan in South Wales, the castle and town of Llan Stepham in South Wales, the lordship of Wallewynscastell in South Wales, the lordship of Westhaverford in South Wales , constable, steward, and receiver of the castle, lordshiop and manor of Uske , the castle and lordship of Carlion , the castle, lordship and manor of Dynas, the castle and a moiety of the lordship of Ewyas Lacy, the castles, lordships and manors of Belth,Clifford, Radnore, Melenyth, Montgomery, Dynbigh, Elvell and Narberth, the castle, lordship and manors of Wygmore and Holt in the marches of Wales, and the lordship and manor of Bromfield in the same marches, steward and receiver of the lordships and manors of Norton, Knyghton, Raydor, Guerthrenyon, Comotoyder, Glasbury, Weryfreton, Cherbury, Terthic, Halcetur, Kadewyn, Newton, Kyry in the marches.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 20 May 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant to the king's kinsman Henry duke of Buckingham (28), of the supervision and power of array of the king's subjects in the counties of Salop, Hereford, Somerset, Dorset and Wilts. By p.s.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 20 May 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's servant William Hastings (52), knight, of the office of master and worker of the king's moneys and keeper of the exchange within the Tower of London, the realm of England and the town of Calais according to the form of certain indentures, receiving the accustomed fees. By p.s.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 30 Jun 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Commission to the king's kinsman John duke of Norfolk (58), to execute the office of steward of England at the king's coronation. By K.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 30 Jun 1483 William Catesby 1450-1485 was appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer. Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster Grant for life to William Catesby, esquire, of the office of Baron of the Exchequer, receiving the accustomed fees at the Exchequer or the receipt of the Exchequer, with all rights, profits and commodities. By p.s.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 15 Jul 1483 Henry Stafford 2nd Duke Buckingham 1454-1483 (28) was appointed Constable England. Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's kinsman Henry, duke of Buckingham (28), of divers specified offices and powers in North and South Wales and the marches.
The like to the same of the office of constable of England, with the accustomed fees. By p.s.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 25 Jul 1483. John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (58) was appointed Lord Admiral of all England Ireland and Aquitaine. Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's kinsman Henry (58), duke of Norfolk, of the office of admiral of England, Ireland and Aquitaine, with certain specified powers and the accustomed fees. By p.s.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 14 Aug 1483 Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (27) was appointed Chief Butler of England. Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's kinsman Francis Lovell (27), knight, viscount Lovel, the king's chamberlain, of the office of Chief Butler of England, void by the death of Anthony, late earl Rivers, receiving fees of 100l yearly from the customs and prises of wines and other issues of his office, with all other profits. By p.s.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. On 09 Mar 1484 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (31). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's servant Robert Brackenbury -1485 of the office of Constable Tower of London and 100l. yearly for his wages from the issues of the manors or lordships of Wrottell, Haveryng, Boyton, Hadlegh, Raylegh and Rocheford, co Essex, and Tunbrich, Penshurste, Middleton and Merdon and the hundred of Middleton, co Kent, with arrears from 17 July last, in lieu of a grant to him by letters patent of that date surrendered. By p.s.

1511 Tournament

In Feb 1511 Henry VIII (19) celebrated the birth of his son by holding a magnificent tournament at Westminster. The challengers included Henry VIII (19) who fought as Cuere Loyall, Henry Courtenay 1st Marquess Exeter 1496-1539 (15) as Bon Vouloir, Edward Neville 1471-1538 (40) as Joyeulx Penser, Thomas Knyvet 1485-1512 (26) as Valiant Desyr and Thomas Tyrrell -1551.
On Day 1 of the tournament the Answerers included: William Parr 1st Baron Parr Horton 1483-1547 (28), Henry Grey 4th Earl Kent 1495-1562 (16), Thomas Cheney 1485-1558 (26), Richard Blount and Robert Morton.
On Day 2 of the tournament the Answerers included: Richard Tempest of Bracewell 1480-1537 (31), Thomas Lucy, Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (22), Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (27), Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire, 1st Earl Ormonde 1477-1539 (34), Richard Grey, Leonard Grey 1st Viscount Grane 1479-1541 (32), Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (38), Edmund Howard 1478-1539 (33) and Henry Stafford 1st Earl Wiltshire 1479-1523 (32).

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (39). Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (44).

1540 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (43). Miniature portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (48).

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) wearing the Garter and Inter-twined Knots Collar with St George Pendant. Standing three-quarter length, richly dressed in velvet, fur and cloth-of-gold. Holbein has meticulously shown the varied texture of his cloth-of-gold double which is woven into a pomegranate pattern with a variety of different weaves including loops of gold thread. Similarly, he has carefully articulated the band of black satin running down Guildford’s arm against the richer black of the velvet of his sleeve. A lavish use of both shell-gold paint and gold leaf (which has been used to emulate the highlights of the gold thread in the material) emphasises the luxuriousness of the sitter’s dress and his high status. In his right-hand he holds the Comptroller of the Household Staff of Office.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Mary Wotton 1499-1535 (28) when she was thirty-two commissioned with that of her husband Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) possibly to celebrate their marriage. Hung with gold chains and embellished with pearls, Lady Guildford embodies worldly prosperity, and with her prayer book she is also the very image of propriety.

Around 1543 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (59).

Before 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire, 1st Earl Ormonde 1477-1539.

May Day Jousting

On 01 May 1540 a tournament was held at Westminster. Gregory Cromwell 1st Baron Cromwell Oakham 1520-1551 (20), Thomas Poynings 1st Baron Poynings 1512-1545 (28), Thomas Seymour 1st Baron Seymour Sudeley 1508-1549 (32), John Dudley 1st Duke Northumberland 1504-1553 (36), Richard Cromwell 1495-1544 (45) and George Carew 1503-1545 (36) were challengers.

On 12 Nov 1555 Stephen Gardiner Bishop Winchester 1483-1555 (72) died at Westminster.

On 13 Jul 1612 Edward Herbert 1561-1612 (50) died at Westminster.

On 25 Feb 1661 Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 was born illegitimately to Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) and Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (20) at Westminster.

On 29 Nov 1682 Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (62) died at Westminster. He was buried in the Crypt, Westminster Abbey.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

On 12 Nov 1684 Edward Vernon 1684-1757 was born to James Vernon 1646-1727 (38) in Westminster.

On 28 Aug 1731 Charles Boyle 4th Earl Cork 4th Earl Orrery 1674-1731 (57) died at Westminster. He was buried at Westminster Abbey. His Son John Boyle 5th Earl Cork 1707-1762 (24) succeeded 5th Earl Cork. Henrietta Hamilton Countess Cork by marriage Countess Cork.

Around 1747. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Westminster Abbey and Westminster Hall.

1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath. St Margaret's Church adjacent with the flag.

Around 1750. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster from near the Terrace of Somerset House In the distance the Banqueting House, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge.

Around 1801. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (62). Milkmaids in St James' Park with Westminster Abbey Beyond.

On 04 Mar 1750 Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 2nd Earl Radnor 1750-1828 was born to William Pleydell-Bouverie 1st Earl Radnor 1725-1776 (25) and Harriet Pleydell at Westminster.

On 10 Apr 1766 Lawrence Dundas 1st Marquess Zetland 1766-1839 was born to Thomas Dundas 1st Baron Dundas 1741-1820 (25) and Charlotte Fitzwilliam Countess Feversham 1746-1833 (19) in Westminster.

On 25 Apr 1769 Robert Brudenell 6th Earl Cardigan 1769-1837 was born to Robert Brudenell 1726-1768 and Anne Bisshop 1728-1803 (41) at Westminster.

On 08 Jan 1797 Arthur Chichester 1st Baron Templemore 1797-1837 was born to Spencer Stanley Chichester 1775-1819 (21) and Anne Harriet Stewart 1769-1850 (28) at Westminster.

On 16 Jul 1887 Alexander Dalton Cockburn 1846-1887 (41) died at Westminster.

On 11 Jul 1904 Daphne Vivian Marchioness Bath 1904-1997 was born to George Vivian 4th Baron Vivian 1878-1940 (26) at Westminster.

Bayswater

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915: Chapter VI: The Count Montemolin. The following announcement which appeared in the Morning Post caused, needless to say, something of a stir in Society. Some people thought I was a very fortunate girl to secure so great a parti, and others — who were jealous — prophesied disaster "through vaulting ambition which o'erleaps itself"
We are enabled to state that a marriage of more than common interest even from a political point of riew has been agreed upon between a fair countrywoman of our own and one of the Royal personages who have had occasion to seek refuge in Great Britain. The Count de Montemolin has offered his hand to Miss de Horsey, the accomplished daughter of Spencer de Horsey, Esq., and the marriage will shortly be solemnised in this country. It is understood that a negotiation has been opened by the Prince with the government of the Queen of Spain, which has consented to make an adequate provision for his Royal Highness and his bride, in consideration of the renunciation of the claims to the throne, of the male line of which the Count de Montemolin is the representative.
I was introduced to all my future husband's relations who were in England, and I was very charmed with the Archduchess Beatrix, and the Princess Beatrix of Modena, who had married the Count's younger brother, Don Juan. They lived in Bayswater at the time, and I remember going with my father to see her, and greatly admiring her lovely black-eyed baby boy, who in after-life was to be known as Don Carlos.
The Count's letter inviting me to visit his sister-in-law is interesting, as it shows how completely our engagement was sanctioned by his family.
Beloved of my soul, — I told Beatrice yesterday that you will go to-morrow at half-past two to see her. She told me that she would have much pleasure, but that probably the Duchess of Parma would be there, but that there would be no obstacle if you have no objection. In any case, answer me, because if by chance you do not wish to go to-morrow I should like to know it, so that in that case to have the pleasure of going to see you at your house, for I cannot endure to be so lone a time deprived of the pleasant sight of you, for this is my only consolation. Good-bye, beloved of my life and of my soul. Do not doubt for a single instant my constant love.
Carlos Luis Maria de Borbon.

1844. Federico de Madrazo y Kuntz 1815-1894. Portrait of Isabella II Queen Spain 1830-1904 (13).

Belgravia

On 11 Sep 1862 Cecilia Nina Cavendish-Bentinck 1862-1938 was born to Charles William Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck 1817-1865 (44) and Caroline Louisa Burnaby at Belgravia.

On 19 Jan 1912 David Charteris 12th Earl Wemyss 1912-2008 was born to Hugo Francis Charteris 1884-1916 (28) and Violet Catherine Manners 1888-1971 (24) at Belgravia.

Bridge Street

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915: Chapter IV: Presented at Court. After mamma's death I kept house for papa at 8 Upper Grosvenor Street. My brothers were rarely at home. William (17) was educated at Eton, and when he was sixteen years old the Duke of Wellington (73) gave him a commission in the Grenadier Guards. Later he went through the Crimean War, and he retired from the Army in 1883, on account of ill-health, with the rank of Lieutenant-General.
Algernon (16) entered the Navy in 1840 as a midshipman, and the same year took part in the operations on the coast of Syria. After the battle of Acre he received the Turkish medal and clasps : his promotion was rapid, and as Admiral, his flagship, the Shah, engaged the Huascar, which he forced to surrender to the Peruvian authorities.
Now that I was so much alone I occasionally found time hang heavy on my hands, and I welcomed any excitement as a break in the monotony, for of course our period of mourning prevented us entertaining or accepting invitations. One day my maid told me about a fortune-teller who had a wonderful gift for predicting the future. I was very much interested, and made up my mind to consult the oracle. My maid attempted to dissuade me, saying that the woman lived in Bridge Street, Westminster, which was not at all a nice neighbourhood. I have always had my own way and, disguised in a borrowed cloak, bonnet and thick veil, and accompanied by my protesting servant, I started off to Bridge Street late one November afternoon.
It was dusk when we reached Westminster and found Bridge Street, badly lighted and evil-smelling. We knocked at the door, stated whom we wished to see, and we were ushered through a dark passage into a dirty room reeking of tobacco.
The fortune-teller was a wrinkled old woman who was smoking a short clay pipe with evident enjoyment. When I told her what I had come for, she produced a greasy pack of cards, and after I had "crossed her pahn " she commenced to tell my future.
" Ah ! " said she at last, and she looked curiously, " my pretty young lady, fate holds a great deal in store for you. You will not marry for several years, but when you do it will be to a widower — a man in a high position. You will suffer much unkindness before you experience real happiness, you will obtain much and lose much, you will marry again after your husband's death, and you will live to a great age."
I was quite impressed by my "fortune," but I was a little disappointed, for like most girls I had my day-dreams of a young husband, and the prospect of a widower was thus rather depressing.
Strangely enough, the prediction came true, for Lord Cardigan (45) was a widower, and nearly all the men who proposed to me were widowers ! I was asked in marriage by Lord Sherborne (38), a widower with ten children ; by the Duke of Leeds (40), who was a widower with eleven children, and by Christopher Maunsell Talbot (39), once Father of the House of Commons, also a widower with four children. Prince Soltykoff, the Duke of St. Albans (41), Harry Howard, and Disraeli (38) were other widowers who proposed to me, so I suppose I must have had some unaccountable fascination for bereaved husbands.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

Cadogan House, Belgravia

Times Newspaper Deaths. 14 Feb 1873. DEATH OF LADY CADOGAN. We have to announce the death of the Countess Cadogan, which occurred on Tuesday at Cadogan House, Belgravia. The deceased, who had long been an invalid, was the third daughter of the late Hon. and Rev. Gerald V. Wesley D.D., and Lady Emily, eldest daughter of the first Earl Cadogan. She was born in February, 1812 [NOTE. Sources state 16 Jan 1808], and married July 13, 1836, her cousin, the present Lord Cadogan (60), then Viscount Chelsea. She leaves issue four eons and a daughter.

Eaton Place, Belgravia

On 16 Dec 1842 Mary Elizabeth Kitty Moreton Countess Desmond, Countess Denbigh 1798-1842 (44) died at Eaton Place, Belgravia.

See Eaton Square, Belgravia

Grosvenor Crescent, Belgravia

On 20 Feb 1845 Rosalind Frances Stanley Countess Carlisle 1845-1921 was born to Edward John Stanley 2nd Baron Stanley Alderley 1802-1869 (42) at Grosvenor Crescent, Belgravia.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915: Chapter IV: Presented at Court. The intimate history of Society is full of unsuspected tragedy, but when the veil is torn aside, the unhappiness of many a husband and wife becomes tragedy in real earnest, and the light-hearted butterflies who sip the sweets of the good things of this life are horrified at the idea of such things happening in their midst. The grim story I am about to relate concerned particular friends of mine, and it made a great impression upon me. Constance de Burgh (22) was one of my great friends, she was a very pretty, charming girl who married Lord Ward (34), who had always been considered a great parti by mothers with marriageable daughters.
Constance (22) was not in love with her husband (34) ; he had proposed and she was told she must accept him. A dutiful daughter of rather colourless character, Constance never dreamt of opposition, and so she became Lady Ward.
Marriage frequently means disillusion, and the Ward marriage was not a success.
William Ward (34) was a pleasant man, but he had extraordinary ideas of how to treat a wife, ideas which could only be tolerated by a tactful woman who could laugh at them, and forget all the unpleasantness they entailed. Poor Constance was not tactful, and not accommodating. Her husband worshipped the beautiful ; he had selected his wife partly on account of her beauty, and he treated her like some lovely slave he had bought. He had a strange, almost barbaric passion for precious stones, and he bought quantities of them and lavished them on his wife, who appeared at great entertainments literally ablaze with diamonds.
What pleased Lord Ward more than anything was to make Constance put on all her jewels for his special benefit when they were alone. He would admire her thus for hours, delighting in her lovely unclothed figure, and contrasting the sheen of her ropes of pearls with her delicate skin, as she sat on a black satin-covered couch.
These strange proceedings at first terrified and then disgusted Constance. She appealed to her father, but her parents decided that her husband's peculiarities came within the meaning of the marriage vows, and she was told she must submit to her husband's humours.
Fate then threw Constance (22) across Lord Dupplin's (24) path, with the result that the tragedy began.
I knew Blanche Dupplin (23) very well, and often when I was lunching with her she would tell me sorrowfully about her husband's (24) infatuation. "It is useless to expostulate," said Blanche; " Dupplin will not abandon the affair, and I don't know how it will end if William Ward (34) finds out his wife's (22) infidelity."
Matters came to a crisis at a fancy dress ball given by Lady Londonderry (22) at Holderness House, the chief feature being a quadrille danced by ladies representing famous European queens. I met the Wards there ; Constance looked delicate, and early in the evening she said she felt ill and must go home. She came over to where her husband and I were standing, and asked him whether he intended to accompany her.
" No, I shall stay," said Lord Ward (34), " I mean to have several dances with Miss de Horsey. Go home by all means if you are tired."
Constance was enceinte, so her absence excited no comment as she was far from strong. Her husband remained until nearly 3 a.m., when he departed for his house in Park Lane — it was daylight, and, as he approached the house, he suddenly noticed a man leaving it. Their eyes met ; it was Lord Dupplin (24), who turned and ran for his life down the street.
Lord Ward entered, and startled the sleepy footman by telling him to rouse the servants and bid them assemble in the hall. He then went upstairs to his wife's bedroom.
What passed between them was told by Constance to a friend ; her husband came to her bedside and accused her of committing adultery with Lord Dupplin (24). " Get up, madame," he continued, "my house is yours no longer; arrangements shall be made for your future, but henceforth you are no wife of mine."
Tears and entreaties were useless, and Constance was obliged to dress ; William Ward (34) then led her past the scandalised servants who were waiting downstairs, and — turned her out of doors.
The poor frightened girl managed to reach her parents' house in Grosvenor Crescent, and implored them to give her shelter, but they were as heartless as her husband, and told her they could not take her in. More dead than alive, she turned her steps to Conduit Street, where her singing-master lived, and this gentleman, full of compassion for his unfortunate pupil, allowed her to remain there until the next day, when she went to Ostend. From Ostend she went to Ems, where her child was prematurely born and the unhappy young mother died. Her husband brought her body to England, and once again Constance Ward (22) lay in her darkened bedroom.
On the evening of the day before her burial, Lord Colville came to see Lord Ward. They talked for some time and then the widower suddenly turned to his friend.
" Colville — you admired my wife ? " "Yes," replied Lord Colville, " I did." " Well, come and look your last on her," said Lord Ward, and lighting a candle he led the way upstairs.
The room was full of shadows, and the flickering light fell on the lovely face of the dead woman. Silently Lord Colville stood by her, and his heart ached when he thought of her fate. Ward was watching him attentively. "Still admiring my wife? Well, she was a pretty woman — but — you'd never credit she had such bad teeth." He put down the candle on a table as he spoke, and raised his wife's head from the pillow. With cold deliberation he wrenched the jaws apart. " I always told you she had bad teeth," he repeated, "look here, man." But Lord Colville had hurriedly left the room. He told me afterwards it was the most ghastly sight he had ever seen.

Grosvenor Gardens, Belgravia

13 Grosvenor Gardens, Grosvenor Gardens, Belgravia

On 11 Jun 1890 John Granville Cornwallis Eliot 6th Earl St Germans 1890- was born to Henry Cornwallis Eliot 5th Earl St Germans 1835-1911 (55) and Emily Harriet Labouchere 4th Countess St Germans 1844-1933 (45) at 13 Grosvenor Gardens, Grosvenor Gardens, Belgravia.

30 Grosvenor Gardens, Grosvenor Gardens, Belgravia

Times Newspaper Obituaries. 27 Jan 1916. The death of Lady Ulrica Thynne took place on Wednesday at 30, Grosvenor-gardens. She was the second daughter of the 12th Duke of Somerset and was born in 1833. She married, in 1858, Lord Henry Frederick Thynne, second son of the third Marquess of Bath, who was Treasurer of the Household to Queen Victoria and for over 25 years M.P. for South Wilts. There were four sons and two daughters of the marriage. The funeral will be at Findon, near Worthing, on Monday, at 1 o'clock.

Grosvenor Place, Belgravia

On 20 Jul 1828 George Pitt 2nd Baron Rivers 1751-1828 (76) died in Grosvenor Place, Belgravia. His Nephew Horace Pitt-Rivers 3rd Baron Rivers 1777-1831 (50) succeeded 3rd Baron Rivers (3C 1776) of Stratfield Saye in Hampshire.

Grosvenor Square, Belgravia

On 31 Dec 1738 Charles Cornwallis 1st Marquess Cornwallis 1738-1805 was born to Charles Cornwallis 1st Earl Cornwallis 1700-1762 (38) and Elizabeth Townshend Countess Cornwallis -1785 at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia.

On 12 Jul 1749 George Carpenter 2nd Baron Carpenter 1657-1749 (46) died at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Owlesbury. His Son George Carpenter 1st Earl Tyrconnel 1723-1762 (25) succeeded 3rd Baron Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary. Frances Clifton Countess Tyrconnel by marriage Baroness Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary.

On 17 Jan 1754 Catherine Tollemache -1754 died at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia.

On 25 Sep 1767 John Stuart 1767-1794 was born to John Stuart 1st Marquess Bute 1744-1814 (23) and Charlotte Jane Windsor Marchioness Bute 1746-1800 (21) at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia.

Before 20 Oct 1743 Michael Dahl 1659-1743. Portrait of Charlotte Jane Windsor Marchioness Bute 1746-1800.

On 16 Mar 1798 Henry Gough-Calthorpe 1st Baron Calthorpe 1749-1798 (49) died in Grosvenor Square, Belgravia.

On 19 Apr 1798 Elizabeth Spencer Baronetess Dashwood 1716-1798 (82) died at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia. Elizabeth Spencer Baronetess Dashwood 1716-1798 (82) was buried at Woodbridge.

In 1804 Anne Liddell Duchess Grafton 1737-1804 (67) died at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia.

On 24 Feb 1811 James Brudenell 5th Earl Cardigan 1725-1811 (85) died at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia. His Nephew Robert Brudenell 6th Earl Cardigan 1769-1837 (41) succeeded 6th Earl Cardigan. Penelope Cooke Countess Cardigan 1770-1826 (41) by marriage Countess Cardigan.

On 10 Jun 1830 Edward Adolphus Seymour 12th Duke Somerset 1804-1885 (25) and Jane Georgiana Sheridan Duchess Somerset 1809-1884 (20) were married at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia.

28 Grosvenor Square, Belgravia

Times Newspaper Marriages. 05 Jan 1938. MR. J. NEVILL (23) AND MISS HARRISON (22)
The Duke (37) and Duchess of Gloucester (36) have sent a silver condiments set to Mr. John Nevill (23), Life Guards, elder son of Major (54) and Mrs. Guy Larnach-Nevill, of Uckfield House, and Miss Patricia Harrison (22), daughter of Major and the Hon. Mrs. J. F. Harrison, of Kings Walden Bury, Hitchin, whose marriage took place yesterday at St. Paul's, Knightsbridge. The Rev. G. S. Shackleford officiated, assisted by the Rev. E. C. Dunford. The bride (22), who was given away by her father, wore a gown of ivory-tinted panne velvet, embossed with sprays of silver flowers. The bodice was fashioned with a square neckline and long sleeves, slightly full at the shoulder, and the square train was lined with silver tissue. A headdress of silver-tipped doves' wings surmounted her long tulle veil, and she carried a spray of mixed white flowers. A retinue of six little girls and four pages folowed the bride. They were Penelope Harrison (sister of the bride), the Hon. Clare Beckett, Marye Pepys (niece of the bridegroom), Margaret Rosselli, Caroline Bury, Joanna Spencer, Hugh Lawson (cousin of the bride), David Myddelton (cousin of the bridegroom), Thomas Pilkington (nephew of the bride), and Charles Smith-Bingham. The pages wore replicas of the uniform of the Life Guards of the early nineteenth century, and the little girls wore long frocks of silver lame, the high-waisted bodices cut with short, puff sleeves, and square necks. They wore caps of silver lame, trimmed with white fur, and carried white fur muffs. Lord Roderic Pratt (22), Life Guards, was best man, and there was a guard of honour from the same regiment. The Hon. Mrs. J. F. Harrison afterwards held a reception at 28, Grosvenor Square, W1. The honeymoon wil be spent in Switzerland.

Lower Grosvenor Street, Belgravia

On 08 Apr 1794 Martha Harcourt Baroness Vernon Kinderton Chester 1715-1794 (78) died at Lower Grosvenor Street, Belgravia.

Before 1744 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman 1694-1744. Portrait of Martha Harcourt Baroness Vernon Kinderton Chester 1715-1794.

53 Lower Grosvenor Street, Lower Grosvenor Street, Belgravia

On 04 Aug 1859 Robert Windsor-Clive 1824-1859 (35) died at 53 Lower Grosvenor Street, Lower Grosvenor Street, Belgravia. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church, Bromfield, Ludlow.

Lowndes Square, Belgravia

On 14 Mar 1855 Claude Bowes-Lyon 14th Earl Strathmore and Kinghorne 1855-1944 was born to Claude Bowes-Lyon 13th Earl Strathmore and Kinghorne 1824-1904 (30) and Frances Dora Smith Countess Strathmore and Kinghorne 1832-1922 (22) at Lowndes Square, Belgravia.

35 Lowndes Square, Lowndes Square, Belgravia

On 08 Apr 1902 John Wodehouse 1st Earl Kimberley 1826-1902 (76) died at 35 Lowndes Square, Lowndes Square, Belgravia.

Victoria Station

Times Newspaper Court Circular. 02 Feb 1907.
Their Majesties the King (65) and Queen (62), attended by the Countess of Gosford (51), the Hon. Charlotte Knollys (72), Captain the Hon. Seymour Fortescue, R.N (50), and Major F. Ponsonby, left the Palace this morning for the British Embassy, Paris.
Her Royal Highness the Princess Victoria (38) accompanied Their Majesties to Calais, and proceeded to Christiania on a visit to Their Majesties the King (34) and Queen of Norway (37).
Lady Eva Dugdale and Colonel Sir Henry Knollys (Comptroller and Private Secretary to Her Majesty the Queen of Norway were in attendance upon Her Royal Highness. The King and Queen are travelling u the Duke and Duchess of Lancaster. The Countess of Gosford has succeeded Lady Alice Stanley as Lady in Waiting to Her Majesty.
The Prince of Wales (41), accompanied by Prince Edward of Wales (12), was present at Victoria Station, and took leave of the King (65) and Queen (62) on Their Majesties' departure for Paris. The Hon. Derek Keppel (43) was in attendance.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (4).

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Drawing of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 on his deathbed.

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (56).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Self-Portrait George V King United Kingdom 1865-1936 (45).

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (67). Coronation Portrait of George V King United Kingdom 1865-1936 (45).

Wilton Crescent, Belgravia

On 09 May 1838 George Coventry 9th Earl Coventry was born to George William Coventry 1808-1838 (29) at Wilton Crescent, Belgravia.

23 Wilton Crescent, Wilton Crescent, Belgravia

On 03 Mar 1880 George Pitt-Rivers 6th Baron Rivers 1814-1880 (65) died at 23 Wilton Crescent, Wilton Crescent, Belgravia.

Buckingham Palace Location

Mulberry Garden

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 May. 10 May 1654. My Lady Gerrard treated us at Mulberry Garden, now the only place of refreshment about the town for persons of the best quality to be exceedingly cheated at; Cromwell and his partisans having shut up and seized on Spring Garden, which, till now, had been the usual rendezvous for the ladies and gallants at this season.

Arlington House

Buckingham House

On 29 Sep 1766 Charlotte Hanover 1766-1828 was born illegitimately to George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (28) and Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (22) at Buckingham House.

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of Charlotte Hanover 1766-1828 (15).

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

On 02 Aug 1767 Edward Augustus Hanover 1st Duke Kent and Strathearn 1767-1820 was born to George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29) and Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23) at Buckingham House.

In 1787 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (59). Portrait of Edward Augustus Hanover 1st Duke Kent and Strathearn 1767-1820 (19).

On 05 Jun 1771 Ernest Augustus King Hanover 1771-1851 was born to George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (33) and Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (27) at Buckingham House.

On 27 Jan 1773 Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 was born to George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (34) and Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (28) at Buckingham House.

1817. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (39). Portrait of Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 (43).

Buckingham Palace

On 21 Aug 1765 William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 was born to George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (27) at Buckingham Palace.

Around 1830. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (76). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

1830. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (52). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

On 23 Nov 1791 Frederick Hanover Duke York 1763-1827 (28) and Frederica Charlotte Hohenzollern 1767-1820 (24) were married (he was her third-cousin) at Buckingham Palace.

1827. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (49). Portrait of Frederick Hanover Duke York 1763-1827 (63).

Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

11 Feb 1840. Tuesday. Supplement to the London Gazette.
St James's Palace. February 10, 1840.
THIS day the Marriage of the QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY (20) with Field Marshal His ROYAL HIGHNESS FRANCIS ALBERT AUGUSTUS CHARLES EMANUEL, DUKE OF SAXE, PRINCE OF SAXE COBOURG AND GOTHA, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter (20), was solemnized at the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.
Field Marshal His Royal Highness the Prince Albert (20), attended by his Suite, proceeded from Buckingham-Palace this day, about half past eleven o'clock, to St. James's-Palace, in the following order:
The first Carriage,
Conveying General Sir George Anson, G.C.B. (43); George Edward Anson, Esq (28); and Francis Seymour, Esq. (26); the Bridegroom's Gentlemen of Honour.
The second Carriage,
Conveying the Lord Chamberlain of the Household, the Earl of Uxbridge (42) (who afterwards returned to Buckingham-Palace, to attend in Her Majesty's Procession), and the Officers of the Suite of His Serene Highness the Reigning Duke of Saxe Cobourg and Gotha, and the Hereditary Prince of Saxe Cobourg and Gotha, viz. Count Kolowrath (62), Baron Alvensleben, and Baron De Lowenfels.
The third Carriage,
Conveying His Royal Highness the Prince Albert (20), His Serene Highness the Reigning Duke of Saxe Colourg and Gotha (56) (father), and the Hereditary Prince of Saxe Cobourg and Gotha (21) (elder brother).
Her Majesty (20), attended by Her Royal Household, accompanied by Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Kent (53), proceeded, at twelve o'clock, from Buckingham-Palace to St James's Palace, in the following order:
The first Carriage,
Conveying two Gentlemen Ushers, Charles Heneage, Esq. (33) and the Honourable Heneage Legge (51); Yeoman of the Yeomen of the Guard, Charles Hancock, Esq.,; and the Groom of the Robes, Captain Francis Seymour (51).
The second Carriage,
Conveying the Equerry in Waiting, Lord Alfred Paget (23); two Pages of Honour, Charles T. Wemyss, Esq. and Henry William John Byng (8), Esq. j and the Groom in Waiting, the Honourable George Keppel.
The third Carriage,
Conveying the Clerk Marshal, Colonel the Honourable H. E. G. Cavendish (50); the Vice-Chamberlain, the Earl of Belfast, G. C. H. (43); and the Comptroller of the Household, the Right Honourable George Stevens Byng (33).
The fourth Carriage,
Conveying the Woman of the Bedchamber in Waiting, Mrs. Brand (60); the Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard, the Earl of Ilchester (52); the Master of the Buck Hounds, Lord Kinaird; and the Treasurer of the Household, the Earl of Surrey (48).
The fifth Carriage,
Conyeying the Maid of Honour in Waiting, the Honourable Caroline Cocks; the Duchess of Kent's Lady in Waiting, Lady K Howard ; the Gold Stick, General Lord Hill, G. C.B., G. C. H.; and the Lord in Waiting, Viscount Torrington (27).
The sixth Carriage,
Conveying the Lady of the Bedchamber in Waiting, the Countess of Sandwich (27); the Master of the Horse, the Earl of Albemarle, G. C.H. (67); the Lord Steward, the Earl of Erroll, K.T. G.C.H. (38); and the Lord Chamberlain, the Earl of Uxbridge (42).
The seventh Carriage,
Conveying Her Most Excellent Majesty the QUEEN (20); Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Kent (53); and the Duchess of Sutherland, the Mistress of the Robes to Her Majesty (33).
The illustrious Personages, and others composing the Procession, then assembled in the Throneroom, and, having been called over by Garter Principal King of Arms, the Processions, moyed in the following order, to the Chapel Royal:
THE PROCESSION OF THE BRIDEGROOM
Drums and Trumpets.
Serjeant Trumpeter.
Master of the Ceremonies, Sir Robert Chester, Knt
Lancaster Herald, George Frederick Beltz, Esq. K.H (65), York Herald, Charles George Young, Esq (44).
The Bridegroom's Gentlemen of Honour, viz. Francis Seymour, Esq. (26) Gen. Sir George Anson, G.C B. (43) George Edward Anson, Esq. (28)
Vice-Chamberlain of Her Majesty's Household, The Earl of Belfast, G.C.H. (43), Lord Chamberlain of Her Majesty's Household, The Earl of Uxbridge.
Continues ...
THE QUEEN. Wearing the Collar of the Order of the Garter.
Her Majesty's Train borne by the following twelve unmarried Ladies, viz.
Lady Adelaide Paget (20), Lady Caroline Amelia Gordon-Lennox (20), Lady Sarah Frederica Caroline Villiers (18), Lady Elizabeth Anne Georgiana Dorothea Howard (23), Lady Frances Elizabeth Cowper (20), Lady Ida Harriet Augusta Hay (18), Lady Elizabeth West (21), Lady Catherine Lucy Wilhelmina Stanhope, Lady Mary Augusta Frederica Grimston (20), Lady Jane Harriet Bouverie (20), Lady Eleanora Caroline Paget (12), Lady Mary Charlotte Howard (18).
Assisted by the Groom of the Robes, Captain Francis Seymour (51).
Master of the Horse, The Earl of Albemarle, G.C.H. (67), Mistress of the Robes, The Duchess of Sutherland (33).
Ladies of the Bedchamber, The Marchioness of Normanby (41), The Duchess of Bedford (56), The Countess of Burlington (28), The Countess of Sandwich (27), The Lady Portman (30), The Dowager Lady Lyttleton (52), The Lady Barham (25).
Maids of Honour, The Hon. Amelia Murray, The Hon. Harriet Pitt, The Hon. Caroline Cocks, The Hon. Henrietta Anson, The Hon. Matilda Paget, The Hon. Harriet Lister, The Hon. Sarah Mary Cavendish.

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2B.
1 Devonshire House
2 Burlington House
3 Clarendon House
4 St James's Palace

1

2

3

4

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

10 Feb 1840. George Hayter 1792-1871 (47). Wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Hayter included portraits of fifty-six of those present at the occasion and sittings took place over the next year. The Queen (20) sat for him in March in her 'Bridal dress, veil, wreath & all', and Prince Albert (20) also posed for his portrait several times during the following months. Hayter's family too helped out with his son, Henry, modelling the Prince's costume, while his daughter Mary posed for the Queen's arm and wearing the veil. Victoria's aunt Queen Adelaide (47), however, was unwilling to co-operate and the artist had to refer to a miniature for her likeness. Hayter included himself in the painting, on the lower right, with his sketchbook and pencil.

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

1880.Henry Tanworth Wells Painter 1828-1903 (51). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (60) being informed she was Queen by Francis Nathaniel Conyngham 2nd Marquess Conyngham 1797-1876 and William Howley Archbishop of Canterbury 1766-1848.Death of King William IV Succession of Queen Victoria

10 Mar 1863. William Powell Frith 1819-1909 (44). Marriage of the future King Edward VII and Alexandra. The artist has depicted the moment when the Prince (21) is about to place the ring on the Princess' (18) finger. The two little boys dressed in tartan are Prince Leopold (9) and Prince Arthur (12), Queen Victoria's youngest sons. At the top right of the painting the Queen (43) herself looks down on the ceremony.

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26).

Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (53). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (39).

1835. George Hayter 1792-1871 (42). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (48).

Around 1857. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (51). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (70).

Around 1832. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (31). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (45).

Before 1868. Reuben Thomas William Sayers Painter 1815-1888. Portrait of Harriet Elizabeth Georgiana Howard Duchess Sutherland 1806-1868. An inscription on the back of this picture states that it was painted after a portrait by Sir Thomas Lawrence. However, the only portrait of the Duchess that has been recorded is a double portrait with her daughter Elizabeth (in the collection of the Duke of Sutherland). The picture is currently at Hardwick Hall.

On 01 May 1850 Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 was born to Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (30) and Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (30) at Buckingham Palace.

In 1908 John SINGER-SARGENT Painter 1856-1925 (51). Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (57).

On 07 Apr 1853 Leopold Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1st Duke Albany 1853-1884 was born to Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (33) and Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (33) at Buckingham Palace.

On 15 Oct 1874 Alfred Windsor 1874-1889 was born to Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (30) and Maria Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov 1853-1920 (20) at Buckingham Palace.

On 23 Jan 1874 Unknown Artist. The Wedding of Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (29) and Maria Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov 1853-1920 (20).

Around 1871. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (65). Portrait of Maria Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov 1853-1920 (17).

On 30 May 1902 Herbrand Arthur Sackville 11th Duke Bedford 1858-1940 (44) was invested 817th Knight of the Garter: Edward VII at Buckingham Palace.

On 06 Nov 1935 Henry Windsor 1st Duke Gloucester 1900-1974 (35) and Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott Duchess Gloucester 1901-2004 (33) were married at Buckingham Palace. Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott Duchess Gloucester 1901-2004 (33) by marriage Duchess Gloucester (5C 1928).

Lower Bow Room, Buckingham Palace

On 23 Nov 1874 Alfred Windsor 1874-1889 was christened at Lower Bow Room, Buckingham Palace.

Canon Row

On 19 Mar 1553 Richard Cecil 1495-1553 (58) died at Canon Row. He was buried at St Margaret's Church. Monument to Richard Cecil 1495-1553 (58) and his wife Jane Heckington in St Martin's Church, Stamford. Kneeling figures under an elaborate cornice. Attributed to Cornelius Cure -1607.

1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath. St Margaret's Church adjacent with the flag.

In 1572 Thomas Wharton 2nd Baron Wharton 1520-1572 (52) died at Canon Row. His Son Philip Wharton 3rd Baron Wharton 1555-1625 (17) succeeded 3rd Baron Wharton. Frances Clifford Baroness Wharton -1592 by marriage Baroness Wharton.

Consitution Hill

In Jul 1835 Edward Harbord 3rd Baron Suffield 1781-1835 (53) died at Vernon House, Park Place after a fall from his horse on Consitution Hill. His Son Edward Harbord 4th Baron Suffield 1813-1853 (22) succeeded 4th Baron Suffield, 5th Baronet Harbord.

See Covent Garden

Charing Cross

Eleanor Crosses

On 13 Dec 1290 Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 body rested at Charing Cross.

On 28 May 1626 Thomas Howard 1st Earl Suffolk 1561-1626 (64) died at Charing Cross. He was buried at Saffron Walden. His Son Theophilus Howard 2nd Earl Suffolk 1582-1640 (43) succeeded 2nd Earl Suffolk (4C 1603). Elizabeth Home Countess Suffolk by marriage Countess Suffolk (4C 1603).

In 1598 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Thomas Howard 1st Earl Suffolk 1561-1626 (36).

Around 1637 Francis Vernon 1637-1677 was born to Francis Vernon 1610- at Charing Cross.

In 1660 Adrian Scrope 1601-1660 (58) was hanged at Charing Cross.

Harp and Ball's

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Monday 03 May 1669. Up, and by coach to my Lord Brouncker’s (49), where Sir G. Carteret (59) did meet Sir J. Minnes (70) and me, to discourse upon Mr. Deering’s (43) business, who was directed, in the time of the war, to provide provisions at Hamburgh, by Sir G. Carteret’s (59) direction; and now G. Carteret (59) is afeard to own it, it being done without written order. But by our meeting we do all begin to recollect enough to preserve Mr. Deering (43), I think, which, poor silly man! I shall be glad of, it being too much he should suffer for endeavouring to serve us. Thence to St. James’s, where the Duke of York (35) was playing in the Pell Mell; and so he called me to him most part of the time that he played, which was an hour, and talked alone to me; and, among other things, tells me how the King (38) will not yet be got to name anybody in the room of Pen (48), but puts it off for three or four days; from whence he do collect that they are brewing something for the Navy, but what he knows not; but I perceive is vexed that things should go so, and he hath reason; for he told me that it is likely they will do in this as in other things — resolve first, and consider it and the fitness of it afterward. Thence to White Hall, and met with Creed, and I took him to the Harp and Balls, and there drank a cup of ale, he and I alone, and discoursed of matters; and I perceive by him that he makes no doubt but that all will turn to the old religion, for these people cannot hold things in their hands, nor prevent its coming to that; and by his discourse fits himself for it, and would have my Lord Sandwich (43) do so, too, and me. After a little talk with him, and particularly about the ruinous condition of Tangier, which I have a great mind to lay before the Duke of York (35), before it be too late, but dare not, because of his great kindness to Lord Middleton (61), we parted, and I homeward; but called at Povy’s (55), and there he stopped me to dinner, there being Mr. Williamson (35), the Lieutenant of the Tower, Mr. Childe (38), and several others. And after dinner, Povy (55) and I together to talk of Tangier; and he would have me move the Duke of York (35) in it, for it concerns him particularly, more than any, as being the head of us; and I do think to do it. Thence home, and at the office busy all the afternoon, and so to supper and to bed.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

Around 1650 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (31). Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672 (24).

Around 1662 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (43). Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672 (36) in his Garter Robes and Garter Collar.

Before 12 Dec 1676 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696. Portrait of John Middleton 1st Earl Middleton 1608-1674.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Thomas Povey 1614-1705.

Northumberland House

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2C.

Around 1763. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Northumberland House looking towards Strand. Note the Percy Lion; crest of the Duke Northumberland. And the statue of Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 which remains in situ on the corner of what is now the south-east corner of Trafalgar Square.

Around 1763. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Northumberland House looking towards Strand. Note the Percy Lion; crest of the Duke Northumberland. And the statue of Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 which remains in situ on the corner of what is now the south-east corner of Trafalgar Square.

St Martin's in the Fields

On 22 May 1574 Walter Hastings 1544-1616 (30) and Joyce Roper 1548-1619 (26) were married at St Martin's in the Fields.

Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

The Letter Books of Amias Paulet Keeper of Mary queen of Scots Published 1874 Marys Execution. Execution of Mary Queen of Scots.The inventory of the property of the Queen of Scots (44), alluded to in the foregoing letter, is printed in Prince Labanoff's collection, in which it occupies more than twenty pages. Poulet (54) compiled it by summoning Mary's servants before him, and requesting each of them to give him a written note of all that the Queen (44) had given them. A comparison of this inventory, made after Mary's death, with a former one, dated June 13, 1586, which Prince Labanoff found amongst M. de Chateauneuf's papers enables us to see that Mr. Froude has been led into a curious error respecting Mary Stuart's dress at the scaffold by the anonymous writer whose account he follows in preference to the narratives drawn up by responsible witnesses. It may seem to be of little importance, but as Mr. Froude has chosen to represent the last moments of Mary's life as "brilliant acting throughout," he should at least have been accurate in his details. He even goes so far as to say that she was deprived of the assistance of her chaplain for "fear of some religious melodrame." As to her dress, he says, "She (44) stood on the black scaffold with the black figures all around her, blood-red from head to foot. Her reasons for adopting so extraordinary a costume must be left to conjecture. It is only certain that it must have been carefully studied, and that the pictorial effect must have been appalling." And he quotes from the Vray Rapport the words, "Ainsy fut executee toute en rouge. [Translation: So was executed all in red.]"
The rouge was not " blood-red," but a dark red brown. Blackwood says that she wore, with a pourpoint or bodice of black satin, "une Juppe de vellours cramoisi brun," and the narrative called La Mort de la Royne d'Escosse says the same. There it is in the June inventory, "Une juppe de velloux cramoisy brun, bandee de passement noir, doublee de taffetas de couleur brune." In the inventory taken after her death it is wanting. As it happens, if she had wished to be "blood-red," she might have been so, for in the wardrobe there was "satin figure incarnat," " escarlate," and " satin incarnate." These figure both in the June and February inventories. When she was dressed "le plus proprement qu'elle put et mieux que de coutume," she said to her maids of honour, "Mes amies, je vous eusse laisse plustost cet accoustrement que celui d'hier, sinon qu'il faut que j'aille a la mort un peu honnorablement, et que j'aye quelque chose plus que le commun." "La tragedie finie," continues Blackwood, " les pauvres damoiselles, soigneuses de rhonneur de leur maistresse s'adresserent a Paulet son gardien, et le prierent que le bourreau ne touchast plus au corps de sa Majeste, et qu'il leur fust permis de la despouiller, apres que le monde seroit retire, afin qu'aucune indignite ne fust faitte au corps, promettant de luy rendre la despouille, et tout ce qu'il pourroit demander. Mais ce maudict et espou- ventable Cerbere les renvoya fort lourdement, leur commandant de sortir de la salle. Cependant le bourreau la dechausse, et la manie a sa discretion. Apres qu'il eust fait tout ce qu'il voulust, le corps fut porte en une chambre joignante celle de ces serviteurs, bien fermee de peur qu'ils n'y entrassent pour luy rendre leurs debvoirs. Ce qui augmenta grandement leur ennuy, ils la voyoient par le trou de la serrure demy couverte d'un morceau de drop de bure qu'on avoit arrache de la table du billard, dont nous avous parle cy dessus, et prioyent Dieu a la porte, dont Paulet (54) s'appercevant fist boucher le trou."
The executioner snatched from her hand the little gold cross that she took from her neck. "Sa Majeste osta hors de son col line croix d'or, qu'elle vouloit bailler a mie de ses filles, disant au maistre d'oeuvres, Mon amy, cecy n'est pas k vostre usage, laissez la a cette damoiselle elle vous baillera en Argent plus qu'elle ne vaut; il luy arracha d'entre les mains fort rudement, disant, C'est mon droit. C'eust este merveille qu'elle eust trouve courtoisie en un bourreau Anglois, qui ne I'avoit jamais sceu trouver entre les plus honestes du pais, sinon tant qu'ils en pouvoient tirer de profit." It was worthy of Poulet (54) to insist that, even though everything Mary wore was to be burnt and the headsman was to lose his perquisites lest he should sell them for relics, it was to be by his hands that they should be taken from the person of his victim.
Several narratives of the execution exist. The most complete, attributed to Bourgoin, is printed in Jebb. Sir H. Ellis and Robertson print the official report of the Commissioners. Then there is Chateauneuf's Report to Henry III., February 27, 1587, N.S., in Teulet, and a narrative drawn up for Burghley by R. W. (Richard Wigmore). Blackwood also furnishes an interesting and trustworthy description. The anonymous Vray Rapport will be found in Teulet. Mr. Froude appears to have selected it, partly because it was possible to expand the Realistic description of the dissevered head, and in particular the inevitable contraction of the features, into the gross and pitiless caricature which he permits himself of the poor wreck of humanity; partly too, because the Vray Rapport, in direct contradiction to the other accounts, supports his assertion that Mary was "dreadfully agitated" on receiving the message of death from the two Earls. To convey the impression that the writer was bodily present on that occasion, Mr. Froude introduces him as "evidently an eye-witness, one of the Queen of Scots' (44) own attendants, probably her surgeon." But the narrative shows us that the writer, whoever he was, could not have been one of Mary's attendants, nor even acquainted with them, for he designates the two ladies who assisted their mistress at the scaffold as "deux damoiselles, I'une Francoise nommee damoiselle Ramete, et l'autre Escossoise, qui avait nom Ersex." There were no such names in Mary's household. The two ladies were both Scottish, Jane Kennedy and Elspeth Curie, Gilbert Curle's sister. Mr. Froude says, "Barbara Mowbray bound her eyes with a handkerchief." It was Jane Kennedy who performed for her this last service.
Poulet's (54) inventory, amongst other things, contains the following entry : "Memorandum that the Priest claimeth as of the said late Queen's gift, a silver chalice with a cover, two silver cruets, four images, the one of our Lady in red coral, with divers other vestments and necessaries belonging to a Massing Priest." When the scaffold had been taken away, the Priest was allowed to leave his room and join the rest of the household. On the morning after the execution he said Mass for Mary's soul; but on the afternoon of that day Melville and Bourgoin were sent for by Poulet, who gave orders that the altar should be taken down, and demanded an oath that Mass should not be said again. Melville excused himself as he was a Protestant and not concerned; the physician stoutly refused. Poulet (54) sent for the Priest, and required the coffer in which the vestments were kept to be brought to him. Du Preau, who was evidently a timid man, took the oath that Poulet (54) insisted on, little thinking that he was pledging himself for six months. "II jura sur la bible de ne faire aucune office de religion, craignant d'estre resserre en prison."
The household of the late Queen (44) were not allowed to depart as soon as Poulet (54) expected. They were detained at Fotheringay, from motives of policy, till the 3rd of August, when the funeral of their mistress having been at last performed, they were set free. Some of them were taken to Peterborough to accompany the corpse and to be present at the funeral ceremonies on the 1st of August. Amongst them, in the order of the procession, it is surprising to find Mary's chaplain, "Monsieur du Preau, aumosnier, en long manteau, portant une croix d'Argent en main." The account of the funeral from which this is taken, written by one of the late Queen's (44) household, takes care to mention that when they reached the choir of Peterborough Minster, and the choristers began "a chanter a leur fagon en langage Anglois," they all, with the exception of Andrew Melville and Barbara Mowbray, left the church and walked in the cloisters till the service was finished. "Si les Anglois," he says, "et principalement le Roy des heraux . . . estoit en extreme cholere, d'autant estoient joieux et contents les Catholiques."
Poulet left for London, and as long as Mary's servants were detained at Fotheringay, he seems to have retained jurisdiction over them. It was to him, therefore, that Melville and Bourgoin applied in March for leave to sell their horses and to write into France respecting the bequests made to them by the Queen of Scots ; and to him that Darrell forwarded in June "the petition of the whole household and servants of the late Queen of Scotland remaining at Fotheringay," begging to be released from their prison and to be allowed to leave the country.
Poulet (54), as has already been said, was made Chancellor of the Garter in April, 1587, but he did not retain this preferment for a whole year. He continued in the Captaincy of Jersey up to his death, but he appears to have resided in and near London. In the British Museum are two letters from him of small importance. One, addressed to the Lord High Admiral, is dated, "From my poor lodging in Fleet Street, the 14th of January, 1587," about "right of tenths in Jersey, belonging to the Government." The other, "From my little lodge at Twickenham, the 24th of April, 1588," "on behalf of Berry," whose divorce was referred by the Justices of the Common Pleas to four Doctors of the Civil Law, of whom Mr. Doctor Caesar, Judge of the Admiralty, to whom the letter was written, was one.
His name also occurs in a letter, from Walsingham to Burghley, dated May 23, 1587, while Elizabeth still kept up the farce of Burghley's disgrace for despatching Mary Stuart's death-warrant. "Touching the Chancellorship of the Duchy, she told Sir Amias Poulet that in respect of her promise made unto me, she would not dispose of it otherwise. But yet hath he no power to deliver the seals unto me, though for that purpose the Attorney is commanded to attend him, who I suppose will be dismissed hence this day with- out any resolution." And on the 4th of January following, together with the other lords of the Council, he signed a letter addressed by the Privy Council to the Lord Admiral and to Lord Buckhurst, the Lieutenants of Sussex, against such Catholics as "most obstinately have refused to come to the church to prayers and divine service," requiring them to " cause the most obstinate and noted persons to be committed to such prisons as are fittest for their safe keeping : the rest that are of value, and not so obstinate, are to be referred to the custody of some -ecclesiastical persons and other gentlemen well affected, to remain at the charges of the recusant, to be restrained in such sort as they may be forthcoming, and kept from intelligence with one another." On the 26th of September, in the year in which this letter was written, 1588, Sir Amias Poulet died.
Poulet was buried in St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London.When that church was pulled down to be rebuilt, his remains, with the handsome. Monument erected over them, were Removed to the parish church of Hinton St. George. After various panegyrics in Latin, French, and English inscribed on his. Monument, a quatrain, expressive apparently of royal favour, pays the following tribute to the service rendered by him to the State as Keeper of the Queen of Scots: Never shall cease to spread wise Poulet's fame; These will speak, and men shall blush for shame: Without offence to speak what I do know, Great is the debt England to him doth owe.

On 28 Feb 1587 William Paulet 4th Marquess Winchester 1559-1629 (27) and Lucy Cecil Marchioness Winchester were married at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 16 Nov 1601 Henry Grey 8th Earl Kent 1583-1639 (18) and Elizabeth Talbot Countess Kent 1582-1651 (19) were married at St Martin's in the Fields. Elizabeth Talbot Countess Kent 1582-1651 (19) by marriage Countess Kent (8C 1465).

On 07 Jan 1619 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 was buried in St Martin's in the Fields. In his will he left twenty shillings to the poor of the parish, thirty between his two sisters, some goods to his maidservant, and all the rest of his effects to his son, Lawrence Hilliard, his sole executor.

On 08 Aug 1622 Anne Mayne -1622 died. She was buried at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 01 Aug 1624 Edward Dymoke 1558-1624 (66) died at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 24 Jun 1628 Joshua Marshall 1628-1678 was baptised in St Martin's in the Fields.

On or before 16 Apr 1637 Henry Killigrew 1637-1705 was born to Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (25) and Cecilia Crofts 1610-1638 (27). On 16 Apr 1637 Henry Killigrew 1637-1705 was baptised at St Martin's in the Fields.

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (22).

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (25) and (probably) William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (27).

On 27 May 1637 John Boteler 1st Baron Boteler Brantfield 1566-1637 (71) died at St Martin's in the Fields. He was buried at Higham Gobion. After 27 May 1637 His Son William Boteler 2nd Baron Boteler Brantfield -1647 succeeded 2nd Baron Boteler Brantfield.

On 24 Aug 1647 Nicholas Stone 1587-1647 (60) died in Long Acre. He was buried in St Martin's in the Fields.

On or before 10 Aug 1649 Endymion Porter 1587-1649 (62) died. He was buried on 10 Aug 1649 in St Martin's in the Fields.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of Endymion Porter 1587-1649 (55).

Around 1627 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (37). Portrait of Endymion Porter 1587-1649 (40).

On 01 Nov 1668 John Hervey 1st Earl Bristol 1665-1751 (3) and Isabella Carr -1693 were married in St Martin's in the Fields.

1738 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman 1694-1744 (44). Portrait of John Hervey 1st Earl Bristol 1665-1751 (72).

On 12 Apr 1678 Thomas Stanley 1625-1678 (53) died at Suffolk Street, Strand. He was buried at St Martin's in the Fields.

Around 1660 Gilbert Soest 1605-1681 (55). Probably Thomas Stanley 1625-1678 (35).

In 1680 Thomas Tenison Archbishop of Canterbury 1636-1715 (43) was presented by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (49) to St Martin's in the Fields.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 Mar. 30 Mar 1684. Easter day. The Bp. of Rochester [Dr. Turner] (46) preach'd before, the King (53) after which his Ma*, accompanied with three of his natural sonns, the Dukes of Northumberland (18), Richmond, and St. Alban's (13) (sons of Portsmouth (34), Cleaveland (43), and Nelly (34)), went up to the Altar ; ye three boyes entering before the King within the railes, at the right hand, and three Bishops on the left, viz. London (52) (who officiated), Durham (51), and Rochester (46), with the Sub-dean Dr. Holder. The King kneeling before the Altar, zaking his offering, the Bishop first receiv'd, and then his Ma* after which he retir'd to a canopied seate on the right hand. Note, there was perfume burnt before the Office began. I had receiv'd ye Sacrament at Whitehall early with the Lords and Household, ye Bp. of London officiating. Then went to St. Martin's, where Dr. Tenison (47) preach'd (recover'd from yc small-pox); then went againe to Whitehall as above. In the afternoone went to St. Martin's againe.

Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

In 1670 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (35). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (20).

In 1673 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (38). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (23).

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Around 1664 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (45). Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (23) and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child.

Around 1666 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (47). Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (25). One of the Windsor Beauties.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709.

Around 1690 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (57). Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (49).

Around1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710. Portrait of Nell Gwyn 1650-1687 (29).

Before 14 Nov 1687 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710. Portrait of Nell Gwyn 1650-1687.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Jul. 15 Jul 1685. I went to see Dr. Tenison's (48) Library [in St. Martin's.].
Monmouth (36) was this day brought to London and examin'd before the King (51), to whom he made greate submission, acknowledg'd his seduction by Ferguson the Scot (48), whom he nam'd ye bloudy villain. He was sent to ye Tower, had an interview with his late Dutchesse (34), whom he receiv'd coldly, having liv'd dishonestly with ye Lady Henrietta Wentworth (24) for two yeares. He obstinately asserted his conversation with that debauch'd woman to be no in, whereupon, seeing he could not be persuaded to his last breath, the divines who were sent to assist him thought not fit to administer the Holy Communion to him. For ye rest of his faults he proFess'd greate sorrow, and so died without any apparent feare; he would not make use of a cap or other circumstance, but lying downe, bid the fellow do his office better than to the late Lord Russell, and gave him gold; but the wretch made five chopps before he had his head off; wch so incens'd the people, that had he not been guarded and got away, they would have torn him to pieces. The Duke (36) made no speech on the scaffold (wch was on Tower Hill) but gave a paper containing not above 5 or 6 lines, for the King (51), in which he disclaims all title to ye Crown, acknowledges that the late King, his father, had indeede told him he was but his base sonn, and so desir'd his Ma* to be kind to his wife and children. This relation I had from Dr. Tenison (Rector of St. Martin's) (48), who, with the Bishops of Ely (47) and Bath and Wells (48), were sent to him by his Ma*, and were at the execution.
Thus ended this quondam Duke, darling of his father and ye ladies, being extreamly handsome and adroit; an excellent souldier and dancer, a favourite of the people, of an easy nature, debauch'd by lust, seduc'd by crafty knaves who would have set him up only to make a property, and took the opportunity of the King being of another religion, to ga ther a party of discontented men. He fail'd, and perish'd. He was a lovely person, had a virtuous and excellent lady that brought him greate riches, and a second dukedom in Scotland. He was Master of the Horse, General of the King his father's Army, Gentleman of the Bedchamber, Knight of the Garter, Chancellor of Cambridge, in a word had accumulations without end. See what ambition and want of principles brought him to! He was beheaded on Tuesday 14th July. His mother, whose name was Barlow, daughter of some very meane creatures, was a beautiful strumpet, whom I had often seene at Paris; she died miserably without any thing to bury her; yet this Perkin had ben made to believe that the King had married her; a monstrous and ridiculous forgerie; and to satisfy the world of the iniquity of the report, the King his father (If his father he really was, for he most resembl'd one Sidney, who was familiar with his mother) publickly and most solemnly renounc'd it, to be so enter'd in the Council Booke some yeares since, with all ye Privy Councellors at testation.
Ross, tutor to the Duke of Monmouth, proposed to Bishop Cozens to sign a certificate of the King's marriage to Mrs. Barlow, though her own name was Walters: this the Bishop refused. She was born of a gentleman's family in Wales, but having little means and less grace, came to London to make her fortune. Algernon Sidney, then a Colonel in Cromwell's army, had agreed to give her 50 broad pieces (as he told the Duke of York) but being ordered hastily away with his regiment, he missed his bargain. She went into Holland, where she fell into the hands of his brother Colonel Robert Sidney, who kept her for some time, till the King hearing of her, got her from him. On which the Colonel was heard to say, Let who will have her she is already sped and after being with the King she was so soon with child that the world had no cause to doubt whose child it was, and the rather that when he grew to be a man, he very much resembled the Colonel both in stature and countenance, even to a wort on his face. However the King owned the child. In the King's absence she behaved so loosely, that on his return from his escape at Worcester, he would have no further commerce with her, and she became a common prostitute at Paris. Life of King James II. Vol I.
Had it not pleas'd God to dissipate this attempt in ye beginning, there would in all appearance have gather'd an irresistable force which would have desperately proceeded to ye ruine of ye Church and Govern ment, so general was the discontent and expectation of the opportunity. For my owne part I look'd upon this deliverance as most signal. Such an Inundation of phanatics and men of impious principles must needs have caus'd universal disorder, cruelty, injustice, rapine, sacrilege, and confusion, an unavoidable civil war and misery without end. Blessed be God the knot was happily broken, and a faire prospect of tranquil lity for the future if we reforme, be thankful!, and make a right use of this mercy.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 Nov. 05 Nov 1686. I went to St. Martin's in the morning, where Dr. Birch preached very boldly against the Papists, from John xvi. 2. In the afternoon I heard Dr. Tillotson (56) in Lincoln's Inn chapel, on the same text, but more cautiously.

In 1734 William Hogarth 1697-1764 (36). Titled "Edwards Hamilton family on a Terrace" the subjects are Anne Hamilton 1709-1748 (24) and Mary Edwards 1704-1743 (30) and their child Gerard Edwardes of Welham Grove 1734-1773. In her left hand she holds Addison’s Spectator No.580 that describes the need to fill the mind with an awareness of the Divine Being. The books on the table beside her include poetry or sermons of Edward Young, the works of Swift, Pope’s translation of the Iliad, and the devotional writings of Damuel Bowens and Archbishop Tillotson.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 Mar. 20 Mar 1687. The Bishop of Bath and Wells (49) (Dr. Ken) preached at St. Martin's to a crowd of people not to be expressed, nor the wonderful eloquence of this admirable preacher; the text was Matt. xxvi. 36 to verse 40, describing the bitterness of our Blessed Savior's agony, the ardor of his love, the infinite obligations we have to imitate his patience and resignation; the means by watching against temptations, and over ourselves with fervent prayer to attain it, and the exceeding reward in the end. Upon all which he made most pathetical discourses. The Communion followed, at which I was participant. I afterward dined at Dr. Tenison's (50) with the Bishop and that young, most learned, pious, and excellent preacher, Mr. Wake (30). In the afternoon, I went to hear Mr. Wake (30) at the newly built church of St. Anne, on Mark viii. 34, upon the subject of taking up the cross, and strenuously behaving ourselves in time of persecution, as this now threatened to be.
His Majesty again prorogued the Parliament, foreseeing it would not remit the laws against Papists, by the extraordinary zeal and bravery of its members, and the free renunciation of the great officers both in Court and state, who would not be prevailed with for any temporal concern.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 Mar. 25 Mar 1687 Good Friday. Dr. Tenison (50) preached at St. Martin's on 1 Peter ii. 24. During the service, a man came into near the middle of the church, with his sword drawn, with several others in that posture; in this jealous time it put the congregation into great confusion, but it appeared to be one who fled for sanctuary, being pursued by bailiffs.

Seven Bishops

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 Oct. 07 Oct 1688. Dr. Tenison (52) preached at St. Martin's on 2 Tim. iii. 16, showing the Scriptures to be our only rule of faith, and its perfection above all traditions. After which, near 1,000 devout persons partook of the Communion. The sermon was chiefly occasioned by a Jesuit, who in the Masshouse on the Sunday before had disparaged the Scripture and railed at our translation, which some present contradicting, they pulled him out of the pulpit, and treated him very coarsely, insomuch that it was like to create a great disturbance in the city.
Hourly expectation of the Prince of Orange's (37) invasion heightened to that degree, that his Majesty (54) thought fit to abrogate the Commission for the dispensing Power (but retaining his own right still to dispense with all laws) and restore the ejected Fellows of Magdalen College, Oxford. In the meantime, he called over 5,000 Irish, and 4,000 Scots, and continued to remove Protestants and put in Papists at Portsmouth and other places of trust, and retained the Jesuits about him, increasing the universal discontent. It brought people to so desperate a pass, that they seemed passionately to long for and desire the landing of that Prince (37), whom they looked on to be their deliverer from Popish tyranny, praying incessantly for an east wind, which was said to be the only hindrance of his expedition with a numerous army ready to make a descent. To such a strange temper, and unheard of in former times, was this poor nation reduced, and of which I was an eyewitness. The apprehension was (and with reason) that his Majesty's (54) forces would neither at land nor sea oppose them with that vigor requisite to repel invaders.
The late imprisoned Bishops were now called to reconcile matters, and the Jesuits hard at work to foment confusion among the Protestants by their usual tricks. A letter was sent to the Archbishop of Canterbury (71), informing him, from good hands, of what was contriving by them. A paper of what the Bishops advised his Majesty was published. The Bishops were enjoined to prepare a form of prayer against the feared invasion. A pardon published. Soldiers and mariners daily pressed.
NOTE. The Letter was written by John Evelyn ...
My Lord, The honor and reputation which your Grace's piety, prudence, and signal courage, have justly merited and obtained, not only from the sons of the Church of England, but even universally from those Protestants among us who are Dissenters from her discipline; God Almighty's Providence and blessing upon your Grace's vigilancy and extraordinary endeavors will not suffer to be diminished in this conjuncture. The conversation I now and then have with some in place who have the opportunity of knowing what is doing in the most secret recesses and cabals of our Church's adversaries, obliges me to acquaint you, that the calling of your Grace and the rest of the Lords Bishops to Court, and what has there of late been required of you, is only to create a jealousy and suspicion among well-meaning people of such compliances, as it is certain they have no cause to apprehend. The plan of this and of all that which is to follow of seeming favor thence, is wholly drawn by the Jesuits, who are at this time more than ever busy to make divisions among us, all other arts and mechanisms having hitherto failed them. They have, with other things contrived that your Lordships the Bishops should give his Majesty advice separately, without calling any of the rest of the Peers, which, though maliciously suggested, spreads generally about the town. I do not at all question but your Grace will speedily prevent the operation of this venom, and that you will think it highly necessary so to do, that your Grace is also enjoined to compose a form of prayer, wherein the Prince of Orange is expressly to be named the Invader: of this I presume not to say anything; but for as much as in all the Declarations, etc., which have hitherto been published in pretended favor of the Church of England, there is not once the least mention of the Reformed or Protestant Religion, but only of the Church of England as by Law Established, which Church the Papists tell us is the Church of Rome, which is (say they) the Catholic Church of England—that only is established by Law; the Church of England in the Reformed sense so established, is but by an usurped authority. The antiquity of THAT would by these words be explained, and utterly defeat this false and subdolous construction, and take off all exceptions whatsoever; if, in all extraordinary offices, upon these occasions, the words Reformed and Protestant were added to that of the Church of England by Law established. And whosoever threatens to invade or come against us, to the prejudice of that Church, in God's name, be they Dutch or Irish, let us heartily pray and fight against them. My Lord, this is, I confess, a bold, but honest period; and, though I am well assured that your Grace is perfectly acquainted with all this before, and therefore may blame my impertinence, as that does αλλοτριοεπισκοπειν; yet I am confident you will not reprove the zeal of one who most humbly begs your Grace's pardon, with your blessing. Lond., 10 Oct 1688.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

Glorious Revolution

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 Dec. 02 Dec 1688. Dr. Tenison (52) preached at St. Martin's on Psalm xxxvi. 5, 6, 7, concerning Providence. I received the blessed Sacrament. Afterward, visited my Lord Godolphin (43), then going with the Marquis of Halifax (55) and Earl of Nottingham (41) as Commissioners to the Prince of Orange (38); he told me they had little power. Plymouth declared for the Prince (38). Bath, York, Hull, Bristol, and all the eminent nobility and persons of quality through England, declare for the Protestant religion and laws, and go to meet the Prince (38), who every day sets forth new Declarations against the Papists. The great favorites at Court, Priests and Jesuits, fly or abscond. Everything, till now concealed, flies abroad in public print, and is cried about the streets. Expectation of the Prince (38) coming to Oxford. The Prince of Wales and great treasure sent privily to Portsmouth, the Earl of Dover (52) being Governor. Address from the Fleet not grateful to his Majesty (55). The Papists in offices lay down their commissions, and fly. Universal consternation among them; it looks like a revolution..

John Evelyn's Diary 1690 Feb. 16 Feb 1690. The Duchess of Monmouth's (39) chaplain preached at St. Martin's an excellent discourse exhorting to peace and sanctity, it being now the time of very great division and dissension in the nation; first, among the Churchmen, of whom the moderate and sober part were for a speedy reformation of divers things, which it was thought might be made in our Liturgy, for the inviting of Dissenters; others more stiff and rigid, were for no condescension at all. Books and pamphlets were published every day pro and con; the Convocation were forced for the present to suspend any further progress. There was fierce and great carousing about being elected in the new Parliament. The King (39) persists in his intention of going in person for Ireland, whither the French are sending supplies to King James (56), and we, the Danish horse to Schomberg (74).

John Evelyn's Diary 1691 Jul. 18 Jul 1691. To London to hear Mr. Stringfellow preach his first sermon in the newly erected Church of Trinity, in Conduit Street; to which I did recommend him to Dr. Tenison (54) for the constant preacher and lecturer. This Church, formerly built of timber on Hounslow-Heath by King James (57) for the mass priests, being begged by Dr. Tenison (54), rector of St. Martin's, was set up by that public-minded, charitable, and pious man near my son's dwelling in Dover Street, chiefly at the charge of the Doctor (54). I know him to be an excellent preacher and a fit person. This Church, though erected in St. Martin's, which is the Doctor's parish, he was not only content, but was the sole industrious mover, that it should be made a separate parish, in regard of the neighborhood having become so populous. Wherefore to countenance and introduce the new minister, and take possession of a gallery designed for my son's family, I went to London, where, [NOTE. Text runs out?].

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 Jan. 06 Jan 1692. At the funeral of Mr. Boyle, at St. Martin's, Dr. Burnet (48), Bishop of Salisbury, preached on Eccles. ii. 26. He concluded with an eulogy due to the deceased, who made God and religion the scope of all his excellent talents in the knowledge of nature, and who had arrived to so high a degree in it, accompanied with such zeal and extraordinary piety, which he showed in the whole course of his life, particularly in his exemplary charity on all occasions,—that he gave £1,000 yearly to the distressed refugees of France and Ireland; was at the charge of translating the Scriptures into the Irish and Indian tongues, and was now promoting a Turkish translation, as he had formerly done of Grotius "on the Truth of the Christian Religion" into Arabic, which he caused to be dispersed in the eastern countries; that he had settled a fund for preachers who should preach expressly against Atheists, Libertines, Socinians, and Jews; that he had in his will given £8,000 to charitable uses; but that his private charities were extraordinary. He dilated on his learning in Hebrew and Greek, his reading of the fathers, and solid knowledge in theology, once deliberating about taking Holy Orders, and that at the time of restoration of King Charles II., when he might have made a great figure in the nation as to secular honor and titles, his fear of not being able to discharge so weighty a duty as the first, made him decline that, and his humility the other. He spoke of his civility to strangers, the great good which he did by his experience in medicine and chemistry, and to what noble ends he applied himself to his darling studies; the works, both pious and useful, which he published; the exact life he led, and the happy end he made. Something was touched of his sister, the Lady Ranelagh, who died but a few days before him. And truly all this was but his due, without any grain of flattery.
This week a most execrable murder was committed on Dr. Clench, father of that extraordinary learned child whom I have before noticed. Under pretense of carrying him in a coach to see a patient, they strangled him in it; and, sending away the coachman under some pretense, they left his dead body in the coach, and escaped in the dusk of the evening.

In 1689. John Riley 1646-1691 (43). Portrait of Robert Boyle Scientist 1627-1691 (62).

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler 1634-1687. Portrait of Gilbert Burnet Bishop Salisbury 1643-1715.

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 Feb. 13 Feb 1692. Mr. Boyle having made me one of the trustees for his charitable bequests, I went to a meeting of the Bishop of Lincoln (55), Sir Rob.... wood, and serjeant, Rotheram, to settle that clause in the will which related to charitable uses, and especially the appointing and electing a minister to preach one sermon the first Sunday in the month, during the four summer months, expressly against Atheists, Deists, Libertines, Jews, etc., without descending to any other controversy whatever, for which £50 per annum is to be paid quarterly to the preacher; and, at the end of three years, to proceed to a new election of some other able divine, or to continue the same, as the trustees should judge convenient. We made choice of one Mr. Bentley, chaplain to the Bishop of Worcester (Dr. Stillingfleet) (56). The first sermon was appointed for the first Sunday in March, at St. Martin's; the second Sunday in April, at Bow Church, and so alternately.

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 Nov. 20 Nov 1692. Dr. Lancaster, the new Vicar of St. Martin's, preached.
A signal robbery in Hertfordshire of the tax money bringing out of the north toward London. They were set upon by several desperate persons, who dismounted and stopped all travelers on the road, and guarding them in a field, when the exploit was done, and the treasure taken, they killed all the horses of those whom they stayed, to hinder pursuit, being sixteen horses. They then dismissed those that they had dismounted.

John Evelyn's Diary 1694 Mar. 25 Mar 1694. Mr. Goode, minister of St. Martin's, preached; he was likewise put in by the Queen (31), on the issue of her process with the Bishop of London (62).

Around 1676 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (57). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England, Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (13).

Around 1686 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (30). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England, Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (23).

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 14 Jan 1700. Dr. Lancaster, Vicar of St. Martin's, dismissed Mr. Stringfellow, who had been made the first preacher at our chapel by the Bishop of Lincoln (63), while he held St. Martin's by dispensation, and put in one Mr. Sandys, much against the inclination of those who frequented the chapel. The Scotch book about Darien was burned by the hangman by vote of Parliament.

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 18 Feb 1700. Mild and calm season, with gentle frost, and little mizzling rain. The Vicar of St. Martin's frequently preached at Trinity chapel in the afternoon.

On 06 Jun 1702 James Long 4th Baronet 1682-1729 (20) and Henrietta Greville Baronetess Long 1683-1765 (18) were married St Martin's in the Fields. Henrietta Greville Baronetess Long 1683-1765 (18) by marriage Lady Long of Westminster in London.

On 16 Jun 1702 William Anne Keppel 2nd Earl Albermarle 1702-1754 was baptised with Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 (37) as godparent at St Martin's in the Fields.

In 1745 Thomas Hudson 1701-1779 (44). Portrait of William Anne Keppel 2nd Earl Albermarle 1702-1754 (42).

In 1703 John Closterman 1660-1711 (43). Portrait of Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 (37).

Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman 1660-1711. Possibly school of. Portrait of Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.

In 1686 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (30). Portrait of Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 (20).

Around 1705. Michael Dahl 1659-1743 (46). Portrait of Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 (39).

In 1705 Robert Long 5th Baronet Long 1705-1767 was born to James Long 4th Baronet 1682-1729 (23) and Henrietta Greville Baronetess Long 1683-1765 (21). He was baptised at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 16 Mar 1705 John Sheffield 1st Duke Buckingham and Normandby 1648-1721 (56) and Catherine Darnley Duchess Buckingham and Normandby 1680-1743 (25) were married at St Martin's in the Fields. Catherine Darnley Duchess Buckingham and Normandby 1680-1743 (25) by marriage Duchess Buckingham and Normandby (4C 1822).

On 15 May 1707 George Brudenell 3rd Earl Cardigan 1685-1732 (21) and Elizabeth Bruce 3rd Countess Cardigan 1689-1745 (18) were married at St Martin's in the Fields. Elizabeth Bruce 3rd Countess Cardigan 1689-1745 (18) by marriage 3rd Countess Cardigan.

In 1711 Edward Hungerford 1632-1711 (78) died. He was buried at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 15 Dec 1711 George Grenville 1st Baron Lansdowne 1666-1735 (45) and Mary Villiers Baroness Lansdowne -1736 were married at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 11 Mar 1716 George Carteret 1716-1763 was baptised at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 05 Apr 1716 Georgiana Caroline Carteret 1716-1780 was baptised at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 01 May 1718 Frances Carteret Marchioness Teviotdale 1718- was baptised at St Martin's in the Fields.

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2C.

On 05 Dec 1761 Dorothea Bland 1761-1816 was baptised at St Martin's in the Fields.

Around 1788 John Hoppner 1758-1810 (29). Portrait of Dorothea Bland 1761-1816 (26) playing the character 'Viola' in Twelth Night.

In 1791 John Hoppner 1758-1810 (32). Portrait of Dorothea Bland 1761-1816 (29) as Hypolita.

On 11 Jan 1762 Louis-Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762 (59) died. He was buried in St Martin's in the Fields.

In 1765 Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (26) and Elizabeth Shewell were married at St Martin's in the Fields.

Around 1773. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (34). Portrait of the artist's wife Elizabeth Shewell and their son Raphael.

1805. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (66). Portrait of the artist's wife Elizabeth Shewell and their son Benjamin West III.

Around 12 Feb 1771 Charlotte Sophia Leveson-Gower 6th Duchess Beaufort 1771-1854 was baptised at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 12 Jul 1778 Anthony Hamilton Archdeacon 1778-1851 was born to Anthony Hamilton Archdeacon 1739-1812 (39) and Anne Terrick in St Martin's in the Fields.

On 19 May 1810 James Murray 1st Baron Goldolphin Helston 1782-1837 (27) and Emily Frances Percy Baroness Goldolphin Helston 1788-1844 (22) were married at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 05 Sep 1835 Charles Canning 1st Earl Canning 1812-1862 (22) and Charlotte Stuart Countess Canning 1817-1861 (18) were married at St Martin's in the Fields.

On 20 Jul 1921 Wentworth Henry Canning Beaumont 2nd Viscount Allendale 1890-1956 (30) and Violet Lucy Emily Seely Viscountess Allendale were married at St Martin's in the Fields.

See St Martin's Lane

Suffolk House

On 03 Jun 1640 Theophilus Howard 2nd Earl Suffolk 1582-1640 (57) died at Suffolk House. On 03 Jun 1640 His Son James Howard 3rd Earl Suffolk 1606-1688 (34) succeeded 3rd Earl Suffolk (4C 1603).

Before 1744 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman 1694-1744. Portrait of James Howard 3rd Earl Suffolk 1606-1688.

The News House

Patent Rolls.Edward IV.1461. 07 May 1461. Middleham Castle, Middleham. The like (Grant for life) to the said earl (33) of the office of master of the king's mews and falcons and a messuage called 'le Mewehous' at Charryng by Westminster, co Middlesex, with all houses and other profits pertaining to the same, in the same manner as John, duke of Bedford, deceased; and appointment of him to take th eking's right prises of falcons, goshawks, sakers, sakrets, lanners, lannerets and ger-falcons sold within the realm, paying the accustomed price viz 20s for each tercel of goshawk, saker, lanner or lanneret. By other latters patent.

Trafalgar Square

Around 1763. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Northumberland House looking towards Strand. Note the Percy Lion; crest of the Duke Northumberland. And the statue of Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 which remains in situ on the corner of what is now the south-east corner of Trafalgar Square.

Around 1763. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Northumberland House looking towards Strand. Note the Percy Lion; crest of the Duke Northumberland. And the statue of Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 which remains in situ on the corner of what is now the south-east corner of Trafalgar Square.

Downing Street

10 Downing Street, Downing Street

On 24 Oct 1827 George Frederick Samuel Robinson 1st Marquess Ripon 1827-1909 was born to Frederick John Robinson 1st Earl Ripon 1782-1859 (44) at 10 Downing Street, Downing Street.

Thomas Knyvet's Townhouse, 10 Downing Street, Downing Street

Thomas Knyvet 1st Baron Knyvet 1545-1622 resided at Thomas Knyvet's Townhouse, 10 Downing Street, Downing Street.

Ax Yard

Rump (Purged) Parliament

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 Jan. 01 Jan 1660. Sunday. Blessed be God, at the end of the last year I was in very good health, without any sense of my old pain, but upon taking of cold.
I lived in Axe Yard having my wife (19), and servant Jane, and no more in family than us three.
My wife (19) … gave me hopes of her being with child, but on the last day of the year … [the hope was belied.] The condition of the State was thus; viz. the Rump, after being disturbed by my Lord Lambert (40), was lately returned to sit again. The officers of the Army all forced to yield. Lawson (45) lies still in the river, and Monk (51) is with his army in Scotland. Only my Lord Lambert (40) is not yet come into the Parliament, nor is it expected that he will without being forced to it.
The new Common Council of the City do speak very high; and had sent to Monk (51) their sword-bearer, to acquaint him with their desires for a free and full Parliament, which is at present the desires, and the hopes, and expectation of all. Twenty-two of the old secluded members having been at the House-door the last week to demand entrance, but it was denied them; and it is believed that they nor the people will be satisfied till the House be filled.
My own private condition very handsome, and esteemed rich, but indeed very poor; besides my goods of my house, and my office, which at present is somewhat uncertain. Mr. Downing (35) master of my office.
(Lord’s Day) This morning (we living lately in the garret) I rose, put on my suit with great skirts, having not lately worn any other, clothes but them.
Went to Mr. Gunning’s (46) chapel at Exeter House, where he made a very good sermon upon these words: — "That in the fulness of time God sent his Son, made of a woman," &c.; showing, that, by "made under the law," is meant his circumcision, which is solemnized this day.
Dined at home in the garret, where my wife (19) dressed the remains of a turkey, and in the doing of it she burned her hand.
I staid at home all the afternoon, looking over my accounts.
Then went with my wife (19) to my father’s, and in going observed the great posts which the City have set up at the Conduit in Fleet-street.
Supt at my, father’s, where in came Mrs. The. Turner and Madam Morrice, and supt with us. After that my wife (19) and I went home with them, and so to our own home.

Around 1652. Robert Walker 1599-1658 (53). Portrait of General John Lambert 1619-1684 (32).

Around 1665 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Admiral John Lawson 1615-1665 (50). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes.

Before 1684. Circle of Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641. Portrait of Peter Gunning Bishop 1614-1684.

Duke Street

On 03 Jul 1750 Richard Griffin 2nd Baron Braybrook 1750-1825 was born to Richard Neville Aldworth Neville Griffin 1717-1793 (32) at Duke Street.

Before 15 Nov 1802 George Romney 1734-1802. Portrait of Richard Griffin 2nd Baron Braybrook 1750-1825.

Fitzrovia

Middlesex Hospital, Fitzrovia

Mortimer Street, Fitzrovia

9 Mortimer Street, Mortimer Street, Fitzrovia

In 1770 Joseph Nollekens 1737-1823 (32) set up as a maker of busts and. Monuments in 9 Mortimer Street, Fitzrovia.

Great Cumberland Street

Times Newspaper Deaths. 13 Feb 1867. DEATH OF LORD FEVERSHAM. We regret to announce the death, after a short illness, of Lord Feversham, which occurred on Monday night at his residence in Great Cumberland Street. The late William Duncombe Baron Feversham, of Dancombe Park, County York, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, was son of Charles first Lord by his marriage with Lady Charlotte Legge, only daughter of William, second Earl of Dartmouth. He was born on the 14th of January, 1798, so that he was in his 69th year. The deceased nobleman was educted at Eton, and afterwards proceeded to Christ Church, Oxford. He married l8th of December, 1823, Lady Louisa Stewart (63), third daugtter of George, eighth Earl of Galloway, by whom,who survives his Lordship, he leaves issue the Hon. Wiliam E. Duncombe (38), M.P., and Captain the Hon. Cecil Duncombe, of the 1st Life Guards, and three daughters, the Hon Jane, married l1th of April, 1849, to the Hon. Laurence Parsons; the Hon. Gertrude (39), married 27th of November 1&19, to Mr. Francis Horatio Fitzroy (43); and the Hon. Helen, married 18th of July, 1855, to Mr. William Becket Denison. Previously to his accession to tbe peerage on the death of his father in July, 1841, he repreeented Yorkshire in the House of Cormmons from 1826 to 1830. At the general election in 1831 he was unsuceessful candidatu for the coenty, but was returned for the North Riding in the following year, which he continued to represent till 18S1. He voted against the Reforzn Bill of 1832, and was uniformly in favour of agricultural protection. He took great interest in agricultural pursuit, And was a distinguished member of the Royal Agricultural Society, of which he was one of the trustees The deceased noblemna is succeded by his eldest son, the Hon. Wiliam Ernest Duncombe (38), above me6tioned, who was born January 28 1829, and married, August 7, 1851, Mabel Violet, second daughter of the late Right Hon. Sir James Graham, of Netherby. He was M.P. for East Retford from February, 1852, to 1857 and elected for the North Riding of Yorkshire inI 1859, anA was also returned at the last general election After a sharp contest, being second on the poll. He is Captain of the Yorkshire Yeomianry (Hussars) Cavalry, and Lientenent Colonel of the 2d North Riding like his deceased father, he is a supporter of Lord Derby, but in favour of such a measure of Parliamentary Reforms would give no undue preponderance to any one class, but would ensure to a fair distribution of political privileges.

Around 1754 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787 (45). Portrait of William Legge 2nd Earl Dartmouth 1731-1801 (22).

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Eton College with the new Eton College Chapel, Eton College visible in white stone and the original Tudor buildings in red brick.

Green Park

On 07 May 1771 Edward Ligonier 1st Earl Ligonier 1740-1782 (31) duelled at Green Park with Vittorio Amadeo, Count Alfieri, with whom his wife was possibly conducting an affair.

King Edward VII's Hospital

On 09 Feb 2002 Princess Margaret 1930-2002 (71) died at King Edward VII's Hospital. He was buried at King George VI Memorial Chapel, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

Leicester Square

On 15 Nov 1698 Henriette-Louise Jeffreys Countess Pomfret 1698-1761 was born to John Jeffreys 2nd Baron Jeffreys 1673-1703 (25) and Charlotte Herbert Viscountess Windsor 1676-1733 (22) at Leicester Square.

In 1699 Edward Rich 6th Earl Warwick 1673-1710 (26) and Charles Mohun 4th Baron Mohun Okehampton 1675-1712 (24) were tried for the murder of Richard Coote following a duel on Leicester Square and found guilty of manslaughter. He escaped punishment by pleading privilege of peerage. He and Mohun had killed Coote in a duel and it was common for a seventeenth-century jury in such cases to take a lenient view of such matters.

Leicester Fields, Leicester Square

On 12 Apr 1696 Henry Bourchier Fane -1696 was killed in a duel with Elizeus Burges at Leicester Fields, Leicester Square.

Leicester House, Leicester Square

On 07 Nov 1745 Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 was born to Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751 (38) and Augusta Saxe-Coburg-Altenburg 1719-1772 (25) at Leicester House, Leicester Square.

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 (8).

Around 1784 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (56). Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 (38) and Anne Luttrell Duchess Cumberland and Strathearn 1743-1808 (40).

In 1777 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (49). Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 (31).

In 1777 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (49). Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 (31).

In 1750 Thomas Hudson 1701-1779 (49). Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751 (42).

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.

Around 1750 Thomas Hudson 1701-1779 (49) (attributed). Portrait of Augusta Saxe-Coburg-Altenburg 1719-1772 (30).

On 30 Nov 1745 Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 was christened at Leicester House, Leicester Square.

On 31 Mar 1751 Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751 (44) died at Leicester House, Leicester Square.

Odeon Cinema, Leicester Square

London Premiere of Lawrence of Arabia

On 10 Dec 1962 Lawrence of Arabia received its premiere in London at the Odeon Cinema, Leicester Square. The event was attended by Philip Mountbatten Duke Edinburgh 1921- and Elizabeth II Queen United Kingdom 1926-. Peter O'Toole, Omar Sharif, David Lean Director), Sam Spiegel (Producer) and Freddie Young (cameraman) attended. In the audience were Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Attenborough, his wife and son. Noël Coward attended the after-party.

Long Acre

On 19 May 1676 John Greenhill 1644-1676 (32) died. He had been returning home somewhat less than sober from an evening in the Vine Tavern when he fell into a ditch in Long Acre. He was carried to his lodgings in Lincoln's Inn Fields but didn't recover. He was buried in St Giles in the Fields.

Mall

Clarence House, Mall

On 21 Dec 1919 Alexander Ramsay 1919-2000 was born to Alexander Ramsay 1881-1972 (38) and Victoria Patricia "Patsy" Windsor 1886-1974 (33) at Clarence House, Mall.

See Marylebone

See Mayfair

Oxford Street

240 Oxford Street

Around 1861 to 1881 James Currie Sculptor 1836-1891 (45) lived at 240 Oxford Street.

Wells Street, Oxford Street

Piccadilly

On 17 Dec 1846 Thomas Grenville 1755-1846 (90) died at Piccadilly.

Arlington Place

William Robert Fitzgerald 2nd Duke Leinster -1804 was born to James Fitzgerald 1st Duke Leinster 1722-1773 and Emilia Mary Lennox Duchess Leinster 1731-1814 at Arlington Place.

Bath House

On 30 May 1805 William Pulteney 1729-1805 (75) died intestate in Bath House.

On 18 Jul 1889 Alexander Hugh Baring 4th Baron Ashburton 1835-1889 (54) died at Bath House. His Son Francis Denzil Edward Baring 5th Baron Ashburton 1866-1938 (22) succeeded 5th Baron Ashburton of Ashburton in Devon.

Burlington Estate

Old Burlington Street, Burlington Estate

On 05 Jun 1800 Henry Bridgeman 1st Baron Bradford 1725-1800 (74) died at Old Burlington Street, Burlington Estate.

Burlington House

On 10 Apr 1670 Edward Montagu 3rd Earl Sandwich 1670-1729 was born to Edward Montagu 2nd Earl Sandwich 1648-1688 (22) and Mary Anne Boyle Countess Sandwich -1671 at Burlington House.

Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman 1660-1711. Portrait of Edward Montagu 3rd Earl Sandwich 1670-1729.

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2B.

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2B.
1 Devonshire House
2 Burlington House
3 Clarendon House
4 St James's Palace

1

2

3

4

Cholmondeley House

On 28 Feb 1799 Charles Arbuthnot 1767-1850 (31) and Marcia Clapcote-Lisle 1774-1806 (24) were married at Cholmondeley House.

On 28 Feb 1825 William Cholmondeley 3rd Marquess Cholmondeley 1800-1884 (24) and Marcia Emma Georgiana Arbuthnot Marchioness Cholmondeley 1804-1878 (21) were married at Cholmondeley House.

Clarendon House

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 Nov. 28 Nov 1666. Went to see Clarendon House, now almost finished, a goodly pile to see, but had many defects as to the architecture, yet placed most gracefully. After this, I waited on the Lord Chancellor (57), who was now at Berkshire House, since the burning of London.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes.

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 Nov. 20 Dec 1668. I dined with my Lord Cornbury, at Clarendon House, now bravely furnished, especially with the pictures of most of our ancient and modern wits, poets, philosophers, famous and learned Englishmen; which collection of the Chancellor's I much commended, and gave his Lordship a catalogue of more to be added.

Around 1680. Engraving by William Skillman of Johannes Spilberg 1619-1690 (60) painting of Clarendon House.

Around 1680. Engraving by William Skillman of Johannes Spilberg 1619-1690 (60) painting of Clarendon House.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 Jun. 19 Jun 1683. I returned to town in a coach with the Earl of Clarendon, when passing by the glorious palace of his father, built but a few years before, which they were now demolishing, being sold to certain undertakers, I turned my head the contrary way till the coach had gone past it, lest I might minister occasion of speaking of it; which must needs have grieved him, that in so short a time their pomp was fallen.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 Sep. 18 Sep 1683. I went to London to visit the Duchess of Grafton (28), now great with child, a most virtuous and beautiful lady. Dining with her at my Lord Chamberlain's, met my Lord of St. Alban's (78), now grown so blind, that he could not see to take his meat. He has lived a most easy life, in plenty even abroad, while his Majesty was a sufferer; he has lost immense sums at play, which yet, at about eighty years old, he continues, having one that sits by him to name the spots on the cards. He ate and drank with extraordinary appetite. He is a prudent old courtier, and much enriched since his Majesty's return.
After dinner, I walked to survey the sad demolition of Clarendon House, that costly and only sumptuous palace of the late Lord Chancellor Hyde, where I have often been so cheerful with him, and sometimes so sad: happening to make him a visit but the day before he fled from the angry Parliament, accusing him of maladministration, and being envious at his grandeur, who from a private lawyer came to be father-in-law to the Duke of York (49), and as some would suggest, designing his Majesty's marriage with the Infanta of Portugal (44), not apt to breed. To this they imputed much of our unhappiness; and that he, being sole minister and favorite at his Majesty's restoration, neglected to gratify the King's suffering party, preferring those who were the cause of our troubles. But perhaps as many of these things were injuriously laid to his charge, so he kept the government far steadier than it has proved since. I could name some who I think contributed greatly to his ruin,—the buffoons and the MISSIS, to whom he was an eye-sore. It is true he was of a jolly temper, after the old English fashion; but France had now the ascendant, and we were become quite another nation. The Chancellor gone, and dying in exile, the Earl his successor sold that which cost £50,000 building, to the young Duke of Albemarle (30) for £25,000, to pay debts which how contracted remains yet a mystery, his son (30) being no way a prodigal. Some imagine the Duchess his daughter (29) [Note. Daughter-in-law?] had been chargeable to him. However it were, this stately palace is decreed to ruin, to support the prodigious waste the Duke of Albemarle (30) had made of his estate, since the old man died. He sold it to the highest bidder, and it fell to certain rich bankers and mechanics, who gave for it and the ground about it, £35,000; they design a new town, as it were, and a most magnificent piazza [square]. It is said they have already materials toward it with what they sold of the house alone, more worth than what they paid for it. See the vicissitudes of earthly things! I was astonished at this demolition, nor less at the little army of laborers and artificers leveling the ground, laying foundations, and contriving great buildings at an expense of £200,000, if they perfect their design.

In 1686 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (30). Portrait of Isabella Bennet Duchess Grafton 1655-1723 (30).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2B.

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2B.
1 Devonshire House
2 Burlington House
3 Clarendon House
4 St James's Palace

1

2

3

4

See Devonshire House

Dover Street

John Evelyn's Diary 1691 Jul. 18 Jul 1691. To London to hear Mr. Stringfellow preach his first sermon in the newly erected Church of Trinity, in Conduit Street; to which I did recommend him to Dr. Tenison (54) for the constant preacher and lecturer. This Church, formerly built of timber on Hounslow-Heath by King James (57) for the mass priests, being begged by Dr. Tenison (54), rector of St. Martin's, was set up by that public-minded, charitable, and pious man near my son's dwelling in Dover Street, chiefly at the charge of the Doctor (54). I know him to be an excellent preacher and a fit person. This Church, though erected in St. Martin's, which is the Doctor's parish, he was not only content, but was the sole industrious mover, that it should be made a separate parish, in regard of the neighborhood having become so populous. Wherefore to countenance and introduce the new minister, and take possession of a gallery designed for my son's family, I went to London, where, [NOTE. Text runs out?].

John Evelyn's Diary 1699. 28 Jun 1699. Finding my occasions called me so often to London, I took the remainder of the lease my son had in a house in Dover Street, to which I now removed, not taking my goods from Wotton.

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 24 May 1700. I went from Dover street to Wotton, for the rest of the summer, and removed thither the rest of my goods from Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1703. 07 Dec 1703. I removed to Dover Street, where I found all well; but houses, trees, garden, etc., at Sayes Court, suffered very much.

On 19 Jun 1808 Montagu Bertie 6th Earl Abingdon 1808-1884 was born to Montagu Bertie 5th Earl Abingdon 1784-1854 (24) at Dover Street.

On 07 Jun 1813 George Ashburnham 1785-1813 (27) died at Dover Street.

On 03 Feb 1825 James Erskine 1772-1825 (52) died at Dover Street.

On 17 Jul 1835 Edward Adolphus Ferdinand Seymour 1835-1869 was born to Edward Adolphus Seymour 12th Duke Somerset 1804-1885 (30) and Jane Georgiana Sheridan Duchess Somerset 1809-1884 (25) at Dover Street.

On 02 Jul 1856 Jemima Cornwallis 4th Countess St Germans 1803-1856 (52) died at Dover Street.

Gloucester House

On 24 Jun 1774 Caroline Hanover 1774-1775 was born to William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (30) and Maria Walpole Duchess Gloucester and Edinburgh 1736-1807 (37) at Gloucester House.

In 1775 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788 (47). Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (31).

In 1780 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (56). Known as The Ladies Waldegrave. From left to right three sisters: Charlotte Maria Waldegrave Duchess Grafton 1761-1808 (18), Elizabeth Laura Waldegrave Countess Waldegrave 1760-1816 (19) and Anne Horatia Waldegrave 1762-1801 (18). Believed to have been commissioned by their mother (43) in the hope of attracting suitors since at the time of the painting all three were unmarried. All three did subsequently marry.

On 17 Mar 1904 Prince George Hanover 2nd Duke Cambridge 1819-1904 (84) died at Gloucester House.

Portugal Street

On 28 Jul 1791 Emma Sophie Edgecumbe Countess Brownlow 1791-1872 was born to Richard Edgecumbe 2nd Earl Mount Edgcumbe 1764-1839 (26) and Sophia Hobart Countess Mount Edgcumbe 1768-1806 (23) in Portugal Street.

On 22 Oct 1792 Caroline Anne Edgecumbe 1792-1894 was born to Richard Edgecumbe 2nd Earl Mount Edgcumbe 1764-1839 (28) and Sophia Hobart Countess Mount Edgcumbe 1768-1806 (24) in Portugal Street.

Dorset Garden Theatre, Portugal Street

In 1675 Thomas Betterton produced Otway's (22) first play Alcibades at the Dorset Garden Theatre.

Before 16 Apr 1685. John Riley 1646-1691. Portrait of Thomas Otway 1652-1685.

Regent Street

Great Castle Street, Regent Street

1 Great Castle Street, Great Castle Street, Regent Street

On 04 Feb 1858 Thomas Campbell 1790-1858 (68) died in 1 Great Castle Street, Westminster.

Stratton Street

On 25 Aug 1804 Henry Pelham 3rd Earl Chichester 1804-1886 was born to Thomas Pelham 2nd Earl Chichester 1756-1826 (48) and Mary Henrietta Juliana Osborne Countess Chichester 1776-1862 (27) at Stratton Street.

On 10 Apr 1874 Ulick Burgh 1st Marquess Clanricarde 1802-1874 (71) died at Stratton Street. On 10 Apr 1874 His Son Hubert George Burgh 2nd Marquess Clanricarde 1832-1916 (41) succeeded 2nd Marquess Clarincade (2C 1825).

Pimlico

Around 1970 Edward Fitzgerald 7th Duke Leinster 1892-1976 (77) lived in a small bedsit in Pimlico as a result of being unble to pay his gambling debts.

Eaton Place, Pimlico

On 09 May 1858 Mary Whitbread 1770-1858 (88) died at Eaton Place, Pimlico.

Eccleston Street, Pimlico

On 25 Nov 1841 Francis Leggatt Chantrey Sculptor 1781-1841 (60) died at his home in Eccleston Street, Pimlico.

Grosvenor Hotel, Pimlico

On 21 Feb 1874 John Greenwood 1821-1874 (53) died at Grosvenor Hotel, Pimlico.

Portman Square

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915: Chapter VII: My Marriage. On September 28, 1858, my marriage took place at the Military Chapel, Gibraltar, and I was the first Countess of Cardigan to be married on foreign soil, I wore a white silk gown draped with a blue scarf, and a large hat adorned with many feathers ; Lord Cardigan's (60) friends, Stuart Paget, Mrs, Paget and the Misses Paget, were present, and we gave a ball on the yacht in the evening. We spent a very gay week at Gibraltar, and then left for Cadiz, touching at Malacca and Alicante ; then we took rail to Madrid, where we arrived on October 16 in time to witness a review of 30,000 troops on Queen Isabella's (27) birthday. After a short stay at Madrid we rejoined the Airedale at Barcelona, and went 500 miles by sea to Leghorn. We experienced bad weather and many storms, and every one on board was ill except myself. The cook was a great sufferer, and his absence was naturally felt by those who were able to look at food without aversion.
From Leghorn we went to Elba, when I saw the place Napoleon embarked from after the "hundred days." We left the Airedaie at Civiti Vecchia and started for Rome in our travelling-carriage with six horses, escorted by some of the Papal Guard sent by the Pope to protect us. I met many of my friends in the Eternal City ; I saw everything worth seeing during my delightful sojourn there, and before we left Lord Cardigan and I were blessed by the Pope at an audience we had with his Holiness. As I wished to go to Genoa by sea, we returned to Civita Vecchia and set out in the yacht for Genoa, where we landed ; we went from there to Turin, and on by rail by the Mont Cenis route to Paris.
Paris was then a city of delight, revelling in the palmy days of the Second Empire, and I greatly enjoyed my visit there. One night I went to the Opera with Cardigan and we saw Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Trelawney in a box. Mrs. Trelawney was the famous Miss Howard, once the English mistress of Louis Napoleon (50), who paid her £250,000 when he renounced her to marry Eugenie de Montijo (32). Mrs. Trelawney annoyed the Emperor (50) and Empress (32) as much as she dared by sitting opposite the Royal box at the Opera, and driving almost immediately behind the Empress's (32) carriage in the Bois de Boulogne. She was a very fat woman, and her embonpoint increased to such an extent that the doors of her carriage had to be enlarged to allow her to get in and out with comfort.
Clarence Trelawney was a friend of mine, and the poor fellow came to a sad end. After his wife's death he married an American lady, but unfortunately he got into debt. He appealed to his relations, who were very wealthy but apparently equally mean, for they refused to lend him the £400 he asked for, and driven desperate by worry he blew out his brains.
From Paris we came to London and stayed at Lord Cardigan's town-house in Portman Square ; then we went to Deene on December 14, where we met with a royal reception, six hundred tenants on horseback escorting our carriage from the station to the house.

1844. Federico de Madrazo y Kuntz 1815-1894. Portrait of Isabella II Queen Spain 1830-1904 (13).

In 1850. Henriette Jacotte Cappelaere Painter. Portrait of Harriet Howard 1823-1865.

In 1855. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (49). The Louis Napoléon Bonaparte Emperor France 1808-1873 (46).

Around 1854. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (48). Portrait of Empress Eugénie of France 1826-1920 (27).

Around 1855. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (49). The Empress Eugénie of France 1826-1920 (28) surrounded by her Ladies in Waiting.

In 1853. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873 (47). Portrait of Empress Eugénie of France 1826-1920 (26).

On 22 Feb 1865 Amy Courtenay 1865-1948 was born to Henry Reginald Courtenay 1836-1898 (29) in Portman Square.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915: Chapter VII: My Marriage. Lord Cardigan's father, the sixth Earl, was a splendid-looking man, and his seven daughters were lovely girls and great heiresses. They all married men of title, and each received a dowry of £100,000 on her wedding day.
When the old Earl was lying dangerously ill at his house in Portman Square, he asked the doctor to tell him whether there was any chance of his recovery. " You are to tell me the truth," he insisted. The doctor was silent. " I see by your manner that you can hold out no hope," said the Earl; "well, death has no terrors for me — but tell me, how long have I to live ? " There was a pause, and at last the doctor stammered, "Two or three days, your Lordship ! "
The Earl sat up, and rang the bell placed on the table by his bedside. A servant answered the summons. "Order my carriage," said the dying man.
"Good gracious, my Lord!" exclaimed the terrified doctor, "your Lordship cannot realise what you have said."
" I do realise it," the Earl calmly answered, " but if I am going to die, I will die at Deene and not here." Remonstrance was useless : Lord Cardigan was carried to his carriage and taken to Deene, where he died a few days afterwards.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915: Chapter VII: My Marriage. Our marriage was a veritable romance ; we enjoyed all the good things life could give us, but in his own happiness Cardigan never failed to extend a helping hand to the less fortunate, and among our tenantry the name of the Earl of Cardigan is even now a synonym for all that is generous and kind.
We entertained a great deal both at Deene and Portman Square, and for the first three years of our married life Lord Cardigan never allowed any one but himself to take me in to dinner. I had to persuade him at last to give up this very flattering habit, and so he did not monopolise me quite so much in future.

Montagu House (Number 22), Portman Square

On 23 Nov 1762 Matthew Robinson-Montagu 4th Baron Rokeby 1762-1831 was born to Morris Robinson-Montagu 1714-1777 (48) at Montagu House (Number 22), Portman Square.

Seymour Street, Portman Square

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915: Chapter XI: Newmarket and Melton. The modern woman, who has her own particular club, may be interested in hearing about a certain "Parrot Club" which existed in the 'fifties. It had the smallest membership of any club, I should imagine, and its short history was in some ways an amusing one. Three ladies — Mrs. D— W , Lady P , and Lady K , had become rather tired of their husbands, and transferred their affections to three charming lovers, Lord Strathmore, Captain Vivian, and another gen- tleman whose name I forget.
As married lovers' meetings generally lead to the Divorce Court, one of the sextette hit upon the idea of renting a furnished house which would be a safe place for assignations. A house in Seymour Street, Portman Square, was therefore taken, and it was afterwards, for some unknown reason, called "The Parrot Club."
The arrangement answered splendidly for a time, as the ladies were all friends and their husbands never suspected them. Hence, each cheerfully believed that his wife's long absences from home were accounted for by shopping or theatre parties with one or other of her two friends.
The course of true love ran with great smoothness at Seymour Street until Lady K , who liked variety, commenced to change her lovers with such alarming rapidity that the other two members were obliged to ask her to resign.
Captain Vivian and Lord Strathmore still enjoyed Mrs. D W 's and Lady P 's society, but unfortunately the unexpected happened which terminated the club's existence. One morning Captain Vivian, who was smoking an after-breakfast cigar and possibly thinkinor of his next visit to the delightful "Parrot Club," was told by his man that Mrs. D W 's maid had called with a letter from her mistress.
" I'll see her at once," said the Captain ; the maid was shown in, and with a smile which betrayed intimate knowledge and infinite dis- cretion, she handed him a delicate little note. Directly John Vivian broke the seal and glanced at the contents, his face changed, and no wonder, for this is what he read :
" My dear Strathmore, — Come to Seymour Street at 3. I'll be all alone."
Now, as the name Vivian bears no resemblance to that of Strathmore, there was only one possible interpretation of the matter, and the furious lover turned to the trembling maid and said fiercely :
"Your mistress gave you two letters to deliver ; this is Lord Strathmore's. Where's mine?" In vain the girl protested that she had no other, but Vivian made her give up the note directed to him. He opened it and, alas for the duplicity of women, this is what it contained :
" Dear old Johnny, — Don't come to Seymour Street to-day, because I am spending the day with my mother-in-law."
It is almost superfluous to add that the house in Seymour Street was soon " To Let," and that a crestfallen lady's-maid was looking for another situation.

Regent's Park

On 08 Dec 1933 Blanche Adeliza Fitzroy 1839-1933 (94) died in Regent's Park.

Soho

John Evelyn's Diary 1689 Nov. 27 Nov 1689. I went to London with my family, to winter at Soho, in the great square.

On 25 Mar 1826 Shute Barrington Bishop Llandaff, Bishop Salisbury, Bishop of Durham 1734-1826 (91) died in Soho. He was buried in St John the Baptist's Church, Mongewell Park, Wallingford.

In 1817. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830 (47). Portrait of Shute Barrington Bishop Llandaff, Bishop Salisbury, Bishop of Durham 1734-1826 (82).

Beak Street, Soho

In 1725. Michael Dahl 1659-1743 (66) was living in Beak Street, Soho.

Carnarby Street, Soho

Dean Street, Soho

28 Dean Street, Dean Street, Soho

On 11 Aug 1737 Joseph Nollekens 1737-1823 was born in 28 Dean Street, Dean Street, Soho.

Golden Square, Soho

John Evelyn's Diary 1693 Feb. 19 Feb 1693. The Bishop of Lincoln (56) preached in the afternoon at the Tabernacle near Golden Square, set up by him. Proposals of a marriage between Mr. Draper and my daughter Susanna (24). Hitherto an exceedingly warm winter, such as has seldom been known, and portending an unprosperous spring as to the fruits of the earth; our climate requires more cold and winterly weather. The dreadful and astonishing earthquake swallowing up Catania, and other famous and ancient cities, with more than 100,000 persons in Sicily, on 11th January last, came now to be reported among us.

John Evelyn's Diary 1693 Dec. 03 Dec 1693. Mr. Bentley preached at the Tabernacle, near Golden Square. I gave my voice for him to proceed on his former subject the following year in Mr. Boyle's lecture, in which he had been interrupted by the importunity of Sir J. Rotheram that the Bishop of Chichester (59) might be chosen the year before, to the great dissatisfaction of the Bishop of Lincoln (57) and myself. We chose Mr. Bentley again. The Duchess of Grafton's (38) appeal to the House of Lords for the Prothonotary's place given to the late Duke and to her son by King Charles II, now challenged by the Lord Chief Justice. The judges were severely reproved on something they said.

6 Golden Square, Golden Square, Soho

On 14 May 1750 William Windham 1750-1810 was born to William Windham 1717-1761 (33) at 6 Golden Square, Golden Square, Soho.

Tabernacle

John Evelyn's Diary 1693 Feb. 19 Feb 1693. The Bishop of Lincoln (56) preached in the afternoon at the Tabernacle near Golden Square, set up by him. Proposals of a marriage between Mr. Draper and my daughter Susanna (24). Hitherto an exceedingly warm winter, such as has seldom been known, and portending an unprosperous spring as to the fruits of the earth; our climate requires more cold and winterly weather. The dreadful and astonishing earthquake swallowing up Catania, and other famous and ancient cities, with more than 100,000 persons in Sicily, on 11th January last, came now to be reported among us.

John Evelyn's Diary 1693 Dec. 03 Dec 1693. Mr. Bentley preached at the Tabernacle, near Golden Square. I gave my voice for him to proceed on his former subject the following year in Mr. Boyle's lecture, in which he had been interrupted by the importunity of Sir J. Rotheram that the Bishop of Chichester (59) might be chosen the year before, to the great dissatisfaction of the Bishop of Lincoln (57) and myself. We chose Mr. Bentley again. The Duchess of Grafton's (38) appeal to the House of Lords for the Prothonotary's place given to the late Duke and to her son by King Charles II, now challenged by the Lord Chief Justice. The judges were severely reproved on something they said.

John Evelyn's Diary 1694 Apr. 01 Apr 1694. Dr. Sharp (49), Archbishop of York, preached in the afternoon at the Tabernacle, by Soho.

Soho Square, Soho

On 13 Jun 1723 Richard Newport 2nd Earl Bradford 1644-1723 (78) died at Soho Square, Soho. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Wroxeter. His Son Henry Newport 3rd Earl Bradford 1683-1734 (40) succeeded 3rd Earl Bradford (1C 1694), 3rd Viscount Newport of Bradford in Shropshire.

On 28 Apr 1732 Thomas Parker 1st Earl Macclesfield 1666-1732 (65) died at Soho Square, Soho. His Son George Parker 2nd Earl Macclesfield 1696-1764 (36) succeeded 2nd Earl Macclesfield (2C 1721).

In 1754 Thomas Hudson 1701-1779 (53). Portrait of George Parker 2nd Earl Macclesfield 1696-1764 (58).

22 Soho Square, Soho Square, Soho

On 01 Oct 1760 William Beckford 1760-1844 was born to William Beckford 1709-1770 (50) and Maria Hamilton 1725-1798 (35) at 22 Soho Square, Soho Square, Soho.

St Anne's Church, Soho

John Evelyn's Diary 1690 Jan. 12 Jan 1690. There was read at St. Ann's Church an exhortatory letter to the clergy of London from the Bishop, together with a Brief for relieving the distressed Protestants, and Vaudois, who fled from the persecution of the French and Duke of Savoy, to the Protestant Cantons of Switzerland.
The Parliament was unexpectedly prorogued to 2d of April to the discontent and surprise of many members who, being exceedingly averse to the settling of anything, proceeding with animosities, multiplying exceptions against those whom they pronounced obnoxious, and producing as universal a discontent against King William (39) and themselves, as there was before against King James (56). The new King (39) resolved on an expedition into Ireland in person. About 150 of the members who were of the more royal party, meeting at a feast at the Apollo Tavern near St. Dunstan's, sent some of their company to the King (39), to assure him of their service; he returned his thanks, advising them to repair to their several counties and preserve the peace during his absence, and assuring them that he would be steady to his resolution of defending the Laws and Religion established. The great Lord suspected to have counselled this prorogation, universally denied it. However, it was believed the chief adviser was the Marquis of Carmarthen (57), who now seemed to be most in favor.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

On 12 Jul 1716 James Barry 4th Earl Barrymore 1667-1748 (49) and Anne Chichester Countess Barrymore were married at St Anne's Church, Soho. Anne Chichester Countess Barrymore by marriage Countess Barrymore.

On 16 Mar 1725 (possibly 1724) Edward Harley 3rd Earl Oxford and Earl Mortimer 1699-1755 (26) and Martha Morgan Countess Oxford and Countess Mortimer 1699-1744 (26) were married at St Anne's Church, Soho.

St Clement Danes

On or before 17 Sep 1581 John Warner Bishop 1581-1666 was born. He was baptised at St Clement Danes on 17 Sep 1586.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 Oct. 28 Oct 1684. I carried Lord Clarendon thro' the Citty, amidst all the squibbs and Bacchanalia of the Lord Maior's shew, to ye Royal Society [at Gresham Coll.] where he was propos'd a member; and then treated him at dinner.
I went to St. Clement's, that pretty built and contriv'd church, where a young divine gave us an eloquent Sermon on 1 Cor. 6. 20 inciting to gratitude and glorifying God for the fabriq of our bodys & the dignitie of our nature.

On 16 Apr 1685 Thomas Otway 1652-1685 was buried at St Clement Danes.

Before 16 Apr 1685. John Riley 1646-1691. Portrait of Thomas Otway 1652-1685.

Edward Grey -1516 was buried at St Clement Danes.

Edward Grey was buried at St Clement Danes.

Arundel House

On 25 Feb 1603 Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 (53) died at Arundel House. She was buried in Chelsea Old Church on 25 Apr 1603.

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 May. On the 24th, I returned to Wotton; and, on the 28th of June, I went to London with my sister Jane, and the day after sat to one Vanderborcht for my picture in oil, at Arundel-house, whose servant that excellent painter was, brought out of Germany when the Earl returned from Vienna (whither he was sent Ambassador-extraordinary, with great pomp and charge, though without any effect, through the artifice of the Jesuited Spaniard, who governed all in that conjuncture). With Vanderborcht, the painter, he brought over Winceslaus Hollar, the sculptor, who engraved not only this unhappy Deputy's trial in Westminster Hall, but his decapitation; as he did several other historical things, then relating to the accidents happening during the Rebellion in England, with great skill, besides many cities, towns, and landscapes, not only of this nation, but of foreign parts, and divers portraits of famous persons then in being; and things designed from the best pieces of the rare paintings and masters of which the Earl of Arundel was possessor, purchased and collected in his travels with incredible expense; so as, though Hollar's were but etched in aqua-fortis, I account the collection to be the most authentic and useful extant. Hollar was the son of a gentleman near Prague, in Bohemia, and my very good friend, perverted at last by the Jesuits at Antwerp to change his religion; a very honest, simple, well-meaning man, who at last came over again into England, where he died. We have the whole history of the king^s reign, from his trial in Westminster-hall and before, to the restoration of King Charles II., represented in several sculptures, with that also of Archbishop Laud (67), by this indefatigable artist, besides innumerable sculptures in the works of Dugdale, Ashmole, and other historical and useful works. I am the more particular upon this for the fruit of that collection, which I wish I had entire.

In 1631 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (41). Portrait of William Laud Archbishop of Canterbury 1573-1645 (57).

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of William Laud Archbishop of Canterbury 1573-1645 (62). Wearing a black Chimere over his white Rochet.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 Jan. 09 Jan 1667. To the Royal Society, which since the sad conflagration were invited by Mr. Howard to sit at Arundel-House in the Strand, who at my instigation likewise bestowed on the Society that noble library which his grandfather especially, and his ancestors had collected. This gentleman had so little inclination to books, that it was the preservation of them from embezzlement.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 May. 08 May 1667. Made up accounts with our Receiver, which amounted to £33,936 1s. 4d. Dined at Lord Cornbury's (5), with Don Francisco de Melos, Portugal Ambassador, and kindred to the Queen (28): Of the party were Mr. Henry Jermyn (62) and Sir Henry Capel (29). Afterward I went to Arundel House, to salute Mr. Howard's sons, newly returned out of France.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 Sep. 19 Sep 1667. To London, with Mr. Henry Howard (39), of Norfolk, of whom I obtained the gift of his Arundelian marbles, those celebrated and famous inscriptions, Greek and Latin, gathered with so much cost and industry from Greece, by his illustrious grandfather, the magnificent Earl of Arundel, my noble friend while he lived. When I saw these precious. Monuments miserably neglected, and scattered up and down about the garden, and other parts of Arundel House, and how exceedingly the corrosive air of London impaired them, I procured him to bestow them on the University of Oxford. This he was pleased to grant me; and now gave me the key of the gallery, with leave to mark all those stones, urns, altars, etc., and whatever I found had inscriptions on them, that were not statues. This I did; and getting them removed and piled together, with those which were incrusted in the garden walls, I sent immediately letters to the Vice-Chancellor of what I had procured, and that if they esteemed it a service to the University (of which I had been a member), they should take order for their transportation.
This done 21st, I accompanied Mr. Howard (39) to his villa at Albury, where I designed for him the plot of his canal and garden, with a crypt through the hill.

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 Jan. 24 Jan 1668. We went to stake out ground for building a college for the Royal Society at Arundel-House, but did not finish it, which we shall repent of.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 Nov. 16 Nov 1686. I went with part of my family to pass the melancholy winter in London at my son's house in Arundel Buildings.

Arundel-stairs, Arundel House

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 Oct. 11th. From Dover, I that night rode post to Canterbury. Here I visited the cathedral, then in great splendour, those famous windows being entire, since demolished by the fanatics. The next morning, by Sittingboume, I came to Rochester, and thence to Gravesend, where a light-horseman (as they call it) taking us in, we spent our tide as far as Greenwich. From hence, after we had a little refreshed ourselves at the College, (for by reason of the contagion then in London we balked the inns,) we came to London landing at Arundel-stairs. Here I took leave of his Lordship (55), and retired to my lodgings in the Middle Temple, being about two in the morning, the 14th of October.

In 1618 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (28). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel, 4th Earl Surrey, 1st Earl Norfolk 1586-1646 (31).

In 1630 Daniel Mijtens 1590-1648 (40). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel, 4th Earl Surrey, 1st Earl Norfolk 1586-1646 (43) and wearing his Garter Collar.

Around 1629 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640 (51). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel, 4th Earl Surrey, 1st Earl Norfolk 1586-1646 (42).

Clement's Inn, St Clement Danes

After 1565 Thomas Harries 1st Baronet Tong Castle 1550-1628 educated at Clement's Inn, St Clement Danes.

St George's Terrace

67 St George's Terrace, St George's Terrace

On 16 May 1860 Anne Isabella Noel Baroness Byron, 15th Baroness Despencer, 11th Baroness Wentworth 1792-1860 (67) died at 67 St George's Terrace, St George's Terrace.

Church of St Gile's in the Fields

1715 Battle of Preston

The 1715 Battle of Preston was the final action of the 1715 Jacobite Rebellion. It commenced on 09 Nov 1715 when Jacobite cavalry entered Preston. Royalist troops arrived in number over the next few days surrounding Preston forcing the Jaocbite surrender. 1463 were taken prisoner of which 463 were English. The Scottish prisoners included:
George Seton 5th Earl of Winton 1678-1749. The only prisoner to plead not guilty, sentenced to death, escaped from the Tower of London on 04 Aug 1716 around nine in the evening. Travelled to France then to Rome.
On 24 Feb 1716 William Gordon 6th Viscount Kenmure 1672-1716 was beheaded on Tower Hill.
William Maxwell 5th Earl Nithsale 1676-1744. On 09 Feb 1716 he was sentenced to be executed on 24 Feb 1716. The night before his wife (35) effected his escape from the Tower of London by exchanging his clothes with those of her maid. They travelled to Paris then to Rome where the court of James "Old Pretender" Stewart 1688-1766 (26) was.
James Radclyffe 3rd Earl Derwentwater 1689-1716 (25) was imprisoned in the Tower of London. He was examined by the Privy Council on 10 Jan 1716 and impeached on 19 Jan 1716. He pleaded guilty in the expectation of clemency. He was attainted and condemned to death. Attempts were made to procure his pardon. His wife Anna Maria Webb Countess Derwentwater 1692-1723 (23), her sister Mary Webb Countess Waldegrave 1695-1719 (20) [Note. Assumed to be her sister Mary], their aunt Anne Brudenell Duchess Richmond 1671-1722 (44), Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 appealed to George I King Great Britain and Ireland 1660-1727 (54) in person without success. On 24 Feb 1716 James Radclyffe 3rd Earl Derwentwater 1689-1716 (25) was beheaded on Tower Hill.
William Murray 2nd Lord Nairne 1665-1726 was tried on 09 Feb 1716 for treason, found guilty, attainted, and condemned to death. He survived long enough to benefit from the Indemnity Act of 1717.
On 14 May 1716 Henry Oxburgh -1716 was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. He was buried at Church of St Gile's in the Fields. His head was spiked on Temple Bar.
The trials and sentences were overseen by the Lord High Steward William Cowper 1st Earl Cowper 1665-1723 (50) for which he subsequently received his Earldom.

Around 1664 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (45). Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (23) and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child.

Around 1666 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (47). Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (25). One of the Windsor Beauties.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709.

Around 1690 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (57). Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (49).

Before 1727. Michael Dahl 1659-1743. Portrait of George I King Great Britain and Ireland 1660-1727.

Before 1723 Johnathan "The Elder" Richardson 1667-1745. Portrait of William Cowper 1st Earl Cowper 1665-1723.

See St James's

St John's Wood

Circus Road, St John's Wood

52 Circus Road, Circus Road, St John's Wood

See St Margaret's Church

St Martin's Lane

In 1666 Carew Raleigh 1605-1666 (61) died at his home in St Martin's Lane. He was buried in St Margaret's Church.

1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath. St Margaret's Church adjacent with the flag.

See Strand

Tothill Street

Before 28 Dec 1708 Thomas Culpepper 1637-1708 died at Tothill Street. On 28 Dec 1708 Thomas Culpepper 1637-1708 was buried at St Margaret's Church.

1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath. St Margaret's Church adjacent with the flag.

Westminster Bridge

In 1746 John Rocque Mapmaker 1704-1762 (42). Map of London Part 2C.

Around 1746. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. The City of Westminster from River Thames near the York Water Gate with Westminster Bridge under construction.

Around 1746. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. The City of Westminster from River Thames near the York Water Gate with Westminster Bridge under construction.

Around 1747. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Bridge, with the Lord Mayor's Procession on the Thames.

Around 1747. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Bridge, with the Lord Mayor's Procession on the Thames.

Around 1750. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster from near the Terrace of Somerset House In the distance the Banqueting House, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge.

Around 1750. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster from near the Terrace of Somerset House In the distance the Banqueting House, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge.

See Westminster Palace

Westminster School

Around 1612 John Glynne 1602-1666 (10) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1625 Henry "Younger" Vane 1613-1662 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1658 Gilbert Soest 1605-1681 (53). Portrait of Henry "Younger" Vane 1613-1662 (44).

Around 1628 Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 (10) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1676 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (57). Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 (58) wearing his Garter Robes.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685.

Around 1661 Heneage Finch 1st Earl Aylesford 1649-1719 (12) educated at Westminster School.

After 1661 Orlando Bridgeman 1st Baronet Bridgeman 1649-1701 educated at Westminster School.

Around 1671 John Brownlow 3rd Baronet Brownlow 1659-1697 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1677 James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 (3) educated at Westminster School.

Before 1690. John Riley 1646-1691. Portrait of Mary Lake 1668-1712. Frequently described as 'Mary Lake Duchess of Chandos' Mary died two years before her husband James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 was created Duke on 19 Oct 1714.

Around 1682 William Legge 1st Earl Dartmouth 1672-1750 (9) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1695 Henry Newport 3rd Earl Bradford 1683-1734 (12) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1721 John Mordaunt 1709-1767 (12) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1721 William Courtenay 6th Earl Devon 1709-1762 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1723 James Waldegrave 2nd Earl Waldegrave 1715-1763 (7) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1725 Thomas Osborne 4th Duke Leeds 1713-1789 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1725 James "Wicked Earl" Cecil 1713-1780 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1726 Henry Reginald Courtenay 1714-1763 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1726 John Tylney 2nd Earl Tylney 1712-1784 (13) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1735 John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1737 William Keppel 1727-1782 (9) educated at Westminster School.

In 1743 Frederick Keppel Bishop Exeter 1728-1777 (14) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1747 Augustus Henry Fitzroy 3rd Duke Grafton 1735-1811 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1762 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787 (53). Portrait of Augustus Henry Fitzroy 3rd Duke Grafton 1735-1811 (26).

Around 1748 Edward Southwell 20th Baron Clifford 1738-1777 (9) educated at Westminster School.

In 1755 Reginald Courtenay Bishop Bristol, Bishop Exeter 1741-1803 (13) admitted at Westminster School.

Around 1763 Francis Osborne 5th Duke Leeds 1751-1799 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1769 Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (30). Portrait of Francis Osborne 5th Duke Leeds 1751-1799 (17).

In 1764 Thomas Egerton 1st Earl Wilton 1749-1814 (14) educated at Westminster School.

In 1765 Percy Charles Wyndham 1757-1833 (7) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1767 William Lowther 1st Earl Lonsdale 1757-1844 (9) educated at Westminster School.

In 1767 Charles William Wyndham 1760-1828 (6) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1768 Thomas Pelham 2nd Earl Chichester 1756-1826 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1774 Henry Charles Somerset 6th Duke Beaufort 1766-1835 (7) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1775 George Talbot-Rice 3rd Baron Dynevor 1765-1852 (9) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1777 Francis Russell 5th Duke Bedford 1765-1802 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1777 Robert Grosvenor 1st Marquess Westminster 1767-1845 (9) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1789 William Courtenay 10th Earl Devon 1777-1859 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1797 Spencer Rodney 5th Baron Rodney 1785-1846 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1800 Francis Russell 7th Duke Bedford 1788-1861 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1828 Henry Lowther 3rd Earl Lonsdale 1818-1876 (9) educated at Westminster School.

Heneage Finch 1st Earl Nottingham 1621-1682 educated at Westminster School.

In 1666 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (47). Portrait of Heneage Finch 1st Earl Nottingham 1621-1682 (44).

Harry Grey 4th Earl Stamford 1715-1768 educated at Westminster School.

See Whitehall Palace