History of York

1060 Ealdred Appointed Archbishop of York

1066 Battle of Fulford

1069 Sveyn II's Raid on England

1072 Accord of Winchester

1190 Massacre of the Jews at York

1298 Edward I 43rd Parliament

1312 Gaveston's Escape from Newcastle

1322 Despencer War Executions

1328 Death of Edward II

1328 Marriage of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault

1405 Northern Rising

1453 Battle of Heworth Moor

1461 Battle of Towton

1465 George Neville's Enthronement as Archbishop of York

1469 Execution of the Neville Brothers

1483 Edward of Middleham created Prince of Wales

1489 Yorkshire Rebellion

1537 Bigod's Rebellion

1654 Battle of Marston Moor

1688 Glorious Revolution

Sveyn II's Raid on England

Flower of History by Matthew of Westminster Chapter 1 1066-1087 Two sons of Sweyn came into England to subdue it. 1069. Between the time of the two festivals of the blessed Virgin Mary, in the autumn, the two sons of Sweyn came with three hundred ships from Denmark into England, in order to subdue it in a hostile manner, and to take king William prisoner (41), or else expel him from England. But when their arrival was noised abroad, the counts, and barons, and nobles of the land went forth to meet them, being oppressed by the intolerable arrogance of the Normans ; and they made a treaty with them, and so joined the army of the Danes, in order to overthrow king William (41). But William (41), that most prudent king, when he saw the danger that threatened him, humbled himself to them, and checked the insolence of the Normans ; and having in this way recalled many of the English nobles to their allegiance, and having sagaciously made a treaty with them all, he took the city of York by storm, which was a great rendezvous of the Danes, and made himself master of every thing in it, and slew many thousand men there.

Normandy Arms

In 1069 Sweyn II King Denmark 1019-1076 (50) sent an army to England to attack William "Conqueror" I King England 1028-1087 (41) in support of Edgar "Aetheling" II King England 1051-1126 (18). Sveyn's (50) army captured York and were then bought off.

Normandy Arms

Massacre of the Jews at York

On 17 Mar 1190 at York the Jewish population sought protection from violence in Clifford's Tower, York Castle, York. The tower was besieged by the mob of crusaders preparing to leave on the Third Crusade. The Jewish men killed their wives and children, after which they set fire to the wooden keep. Those who did escape were murdered.

On 22 Apr 1279 Walter Giffard Archbishop of York 1225-1279 (54) died at York. He was buried at York Minster.

Giffard Arms

Around 1290 Ralph Dacre 1st Baron Dacre Gilsland 1290-1339 was born to William Dacre 1266-1318 (23) and Joan Gernet 1270-1324 (20) at York.

Dacre Arms

Edward I 43rd Parliament

In 1298 Simon Montagu 1st Baron Montagu 1250-1316 (48) attended Edward I 43rd Parliament at York.

Montagu Arms

Gaveston's Escape from Newcastle

On 04 May 1312 King Edward II of England (28) and Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (28) were at Newcastle on Tyne Castle, Newcastle on Tyne where they barely escaped a force led by Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (34), Henry Percy 1st Baron Percy 1273-1314 (39) and Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (38). Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (28) escaped to Scarborough, North Yorkshire, King Edward II of England (28) to York.

Plantagenet ArmsPercy ArmsClifford Arms

On Mar 1322 Alice Lacy Countess Leicester, Countess Lancaster, 5th Countess Salisbury, 4th Countess Lincoln 1281-1348 (40) was imprisoned at York.

Lacy Arms

Despencer War Executions

On 23 Mar 1322 at York ...
Roger Clifford 2nd Baron Clifford 1300-1322 (22) was hanged. His brother Robert Clifford 3rd Baron Clifford 1305-1344 (16) succeeded 3rd Baron Clifford.
John Mowbray 2nd Baron Mowbray 1286-1322 (35) was hanged. His son John Mowbray 3rd Baron Mowbray 1310-1361 (11) succeeded 3rd Baron Mowbray (1C 1283).

Clifford ArmsMowbray Arms

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XV - How that king Robert de Bruce of Scotland defied king Edward. AFTER that sir John of Hainault (39) was departed from king Edward (14), he and the queen (32) his mother governed the realm by the counsel of the earl of Kent (25), uncle to the king, and by the counsel of sir Roger Mortimer (39), who had great lands in England to the sum of seven hundred pounds of rent yearly. And they both were banished and chased out of England with the queen (32), as ye have heard before. Also they used much after the counsel of sir Thomas Wake (30), and by the advice of other who were reputed for the most sagest of the realm. Howbeit there were some had envy thereat, the which never died in England, and also it reigneth and will reign in divers other countries. Thus passed forth the winter and the Lent season till Easter, and then the king (14) and the queen (32) and all the realm was in good peace all this season. Then so it fortuned that king Robert of Scotland (52), who had been right hardy and had suffered much travail against Englishmen, and oftentimes he had been chased and discomfited in the time of king Edward the first, grandfather to this young king Edward the third (14), he was as then become very old and ancient, and sick (as it was said) of the great evil and malady. When he knew the adventures that was fallen in England, how that the old king Edward the second (42) was taken and deposed down from his regaly and his crown, and certain of his counsellors beheaded and put to destruction, as ye have heard herebefore, then he bethought him that he would defy the young king Edward the third (14), because he was young and that the barons of the realm were not all of one accord, as it was said : therefore he [thought] the better to speed in his purpose to conquer part of England. And so about Easter in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. he sent his defiance to the young king Edward the third and to all the realm, sending them word how that he would enter into the realm of England and bren before him as he had done beforetime at such season as the discomfiture was at the castle of Stirling, whereas the Englishmen received great damage. When the king of England (14) and his council perceived that they were defied, they caused it to be known over all the realm, and commanded that all the nobles and all other should be ready apparelled every man after his estate, and that they should be by Ascension-day next after at the town of York, standing northward. The king sent much people before to keep the frontiers against Scotland, and sent a great ambassade to sir John of Hainault (39), praying him right affectuously that he would help to succour and to keep company with him in his voyage against the Scots, and that he world be with him at the Ascensionday next after at York, with such company as he might get of men of war in those parts. When sir John of Hainault lord of Beaumont (39) heard the king's (14) desire, he sent straight his letters and his messengers in every place whereas he thought to recover or attain to have any company of men of war, in Flanders, in Hainault, in Brabant, and in other places, desiring them that in their best apparel for the war they would meet him at Wissant, for to go over the sea with him into England. And all such as he sent unto came to him with a glad cheer, and divers other that heard thereof, in trust to attain to as much honour as they had that were with him in England before at the other voyage. So that by that time the said lord Beaumont (39) was come to Wissant, there was ready ships for him and his company, brought out of England. And so they took shipping and passed over the sea and arrived at Dover, and so then ceased not to ride till: they came within three days of Pentecost to the town of York, whereas the king (14) and the queen (32) his mother and all his lords were with great host tarrying the coming of sir John of Hainault (39), and had sent many before of their men of arms, archers and common people of the good towns and villages ; and as people resorted, they were caused to be lodged two or three leagues off, all about in the country. And on a day thither came sir John of Hainault (39) and his company, who were right welcome and well received both of the king (14), of the queen his mother, and of all other barons, and to them was delivered the suburbs of the city to lodge in. And to sir John of Hainault was delivered an abbey of white monks for him and his household. There came with him out of Hainault the lord of Enghien, who was called sir Gaultier, and sir Henry lord d'Antoing, and the lord of Fagnolle, and sir Fastres du Roeulx, sir Robert de Bailleul, and sir Guilliam de Bailleul his brother, and the lord of Havreth, chatelain of Mons, sir Allard de Briffeuil, sir Michael de Ligne, sir John de Montigny the younger and his brother, sir Sanses de Boussoit, the lord of Gommegnies, sir Perceval de Semeries, the lord of Beaurieu and the lord of Floyon. Also of the country of Flanders there was sir Hector of Vilain, sir John de Rhodes, sir Wu there was sir John le Belt and sir Henry his brother, sir Godfrey de la Chapelle, sir Hugh d'Ohey, sir John de Libyne, sir Lambert d'Oupey, and sir Gilbert de Herck: and out of Cambresis and Artois there were come certain knights of their own good wills to advance their bodies: so that sir John of Hainault had well in his company five hundred men of arms, well apparelled and richly mounted. And after the feast of Pentecost came thither sir Guilliam de Juliers (28), who was after duke of Juliers after the decease of his father, and sir Thierry of Heinsberg, who was after earl of Loos, and with them a right fair rout, and all to keep company with the gentle knight sir John of Hainault lord Beaumont.

Beaumont ArmsPlantagenet ArmsCapet ArmsMortimer ArmsWake Arms

In 1391 John Dunbar 4th Earl Moray -1391 was killed in a tournament at York from wounds received from Thomas Mowbray 4th Earl Norfolk, 2nd Earl Nottingham 1385-1405 (5). His son Thomas Dunbar 5th Earl Moray 1371-1422 (20) succeeded 5th Earl Moray (2C 1372).

Dunbar ArmsMowbray Arms

On 31 Jul 1392 Henry Scrope 1st Baron Scrope Masham 1312-1392 (79) died at York. His son Stephen Scrope 2nd Baron Scrope Masham 1345-1406 (47) succeeded 2nd Baron Scrope Masham.

Scrope Arms

Northern Rising

On 03 Jun 1405 Thomas Beaufort 1st Duke Exeter 1377-1426 (28) arrived at York. The King denied the accused trial by their peers. Thomas Fitzalan 10th Earl Surrey, 12th Earl Arundel 1381-1415 (23) and Thomas Beaufort 1st Duke Exeter 1377-1426 (28) sat in judgement of Richard Scrope Archbishop of York 1350-1405 (55) and Thomas Mowbray 4th Earl Norfolk, 2nd Earl Nottingham 1385-1405 (19). William Gascoigne Chief Justice 1350-1419 (55) refused to pronounce sentence on Richard Scrope Archbishop of York 1350-1405 (55) and Thomas Mowbray 4th Earl Norfolk, 2nd Earl Nottingham 1385-1405 (19) asserting their right to be tried by their peers.

Beaufort ArmsFitzalan ArmsScrope ArmsMowbray Arms

On 08 Jun 1405 before a great crowd at York ...
Richard Scrope Archbishop of York 1350-1405 (55) was beheaded. Possibly the only execution of an Archbishop that occurred in England.
Thomas Mowbray 4th Earl Norfolk, 2nd Earl Nottingham 1385-1405 (19) was beheaded. His brother John Mowbray 2nd Duke Norfolk 1392-1432 (13) succeeded 5th Earl Norfolk (3C 1312), 3rd Earl Nottingham (2C 1383), 8th Baron Mowbray (1C 1283), 9th Baron Segrave (2C 1295).

Scrope ArmsMowbray Arms

On 27 Apr 1458 John Darcy 1404-1458 (54) died at York.

Darcy Arms

Battle of Towton

On 29 Mar 1461 the Battle of Towton was a decisive victory for Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) bringing to an end the first war of the Wars of the Roses. Said to be the bloodiest battle on English soil 28000 were killed mainly during the rout that followed the battle.
The Yorkist army was commanded by Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) with John Mowbray 3rd Duke Norfolk 1415-1461 (45), Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter 1430-1475 (30), William Neville 1st Earl Kent 1405-1463 (56), William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (30) (knighted), Walter Blount 1st Baron Mountjoy 1416-1474 (45), Henry Bourchier 2nd Count Eu, 1st Earl Essex 1404-1483 (57), John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (23) and John Wenlock 1st Baron Wenlock 1400-1471 (61).
The Lancastrian army suffered significant casualties including Richard Percy 1426-1461 (35), Ralph Bigod 1410-1461 (50), John Bigod -1461, Robert Cromwell 1390-1461 (71), Ralph Dacre 1st Baron Dacre Gilsland 1412-1461 (49), Ralph Eure 1412-1461 (49), John Neville 1st Baron Neville Raby 1410-1461 (51), John Beaumont 1428-1461 (33), Thomas Dethick 1400-1461 (61), Everard Simon Digby -1461, William Plumpton -1461 and William Welles 1410-1461 (51) who were killed.
Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland 1421-1461 (39) was killed. His son Henry Percy 4th Earl of Northumberland 1449-1489 (12) succeeded 4th Earl of Northumberland (1C 1377). Maud Herbert Countess Northumberland 1458-1485 (3) by marriage Countess of Northumberland (1C 1377).
Lionel Welles 6th Baron Welles 1406-1461 (55) was killed. His son Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (33) succeeded 7th Baron Welles.
Those who fought for the Lancaster included William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme 1415-1464 (46), John Dudley 1st Baron Dudley 1400-1487 (60), William Norreys 1441-1507 (20), Thomas Grey 1st Baron Grey Richemont 1418-1461 (43), Robert Hungerford 3rd Baron Hungerford 1431-1464 (30), John Talbot 3rd Earl Shrewsbury, 3rd Earl Waterford 1448-1473 (12), Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (33), Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469 (56), James Butler 1st Earl Wiltshire, 5th Earl Ormonde 1420-1461 (40), John Butler 6th Earl Ormonde 1422-1476 (39), William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (22) and Thomas Tresham 1420-1471 (41). Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (41) were captured.
On 03 Apr 1461 Thomas Courtenay 14th Earl Devon 1432-1461 (29) was beheaded at York. His brother John Courtenay 15th Earl Devon 1435-1471 (26) succeeded 15th Earl Devon (2C Courtenay). Laura Bourchier Countess Devon 1440- by marriage Countess Devon (2C Courtenay).
Robert Dethick 1375-1461 (86) was killed.
John Heron of Ford Castle Northumberland 1416-1461 (45) was killed.
Thomas Grey 1st Baron Grey Richemont 1418-1461 (43) was executed.

York ArmsMowbray ArmsHoland ArmsNeville ArmsHastings ArmsBlount ArmsBourchier ArmsScrope ArmsPercy ArmsBigod ArmsCromwell ArmsDacre ArmsBeaumont ArmsDigby ArmsWelles ArmsHerbert ArmsDudley ArmsGrey ArmsHungerford ArmsTalbot ArmsWoodville ArmsButler ArmsCourtenay Arms

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 08 May 1461. York. Grant for life to William Herbert (38), knight, of the offices of office of chief justice and chamberlain of South Wales, steward of the commontes in the counties of Caermarthen and Cardigan, and chief forester in those counties (Carmarthenshire,Cardignshire).

Herbert Arms

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 08 May 1461. York. Commission to John Haryngton (47), esquire, John Kyrton, Thomas Banke and William Boleyn to arrest Thomas CLaymond, esquire, Robert Heryng, 'sowter' and John Hedale, carpenter, and bring them before the king (19) in Chancery.

Harrington ArmsBoleyn ArmsYork Arms

Execution of the Neville Brothers

On 29 Sep 1469 brothers Humphrey Neville of Brancepeth (30) and Charles Neville of Brancepeth were beheaded at York in the presence of Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (27) and Richard "Kingmaker" Neville 16th Earl Warwick, 6th Earl Salisbury 1428-1471 (41) bringing to an end the Neville-Neville fued that arose as a consequence of the senior line being dis-inherited.

Neville ArmsYork Arms

Yorkshire Rebellion

On 28 Apr 1489 Henry Percy 4th Earl of Northumberland 1449-1489 (40) was hanged at York by the rebels when attempting to collect the tax. On 28 Apr 1489 His son Henry Percy 5th Earl of Northumberland 1478-1527 (11) succeeded 5th Earl of Northumberland (1C 1377).
The King then sent an army of 8000 north led by Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (46). The rebels dispersed; their leader John à Chambre was hanged for treason. The rebels then chose John Percy 1459- as their leader. His leadership proved less than reliable; he eventually fled to the court of Margaret Duchess of Burgundy 1446-1503 (42) (sister of Edward IV and Richard III) who remained sympathetic to the Yorkist cause.

Percy ArmsHoward ArmsYork Arms

After 27 Jun 1503 Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 stayed at York.

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (35).

In 1528 John Constable 1528-1584 was born to John Constable 1510-1550 (18) at York.

Constable Arms

Bigod's Rebellion

On 12 Jul 1537 Robert Aske 1500-1537 (37) was hanged at York. William Lumley -1537 and Nicholas Tempest 1480-1537 (57) were hanged at Tyburn.

Lumley ArmsTempest Arms

In 1546 John Constable 1546-1592 was born to John Constable 1528-1584 (18) at York.

Constable Arms

In 1568 Thomas Howard 4th Duke Norfolk 1536-1572 (31) attended to hear evidence against Mary "Queen of Scots" Stewart I Queen Scotland 1542-1587 (25) at York.

Around 1576 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Mary "Queen of Scots" Stewart I Queen Scotland 1542-1587 (33).

In 1584 John Constable 1528-1584 (56) died at York.

Constable Arms

On 14 Dec 1595 Henry Hastings 3rd Earl Huntingdon 1535-1595 (60) died at York. His brother George Hastings 4th Earl Huntingdon 1540-1604 (55) succeeded 4th Earl Huntingdon (7C 1529), 6th Baron Hastings (2C 1430).

Hastings Arms

In Jun 1642 William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 (24) was with King Charles I (41) at York.

Around 1647. Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (28). Portrait of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 (29) although the painting says somewhat curiously 2nd Earl Devonshire.

Around 1763. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Northumberland House looking towards Strand. Note the Percy Lion; crest of the Duke Northumberland. And the statue of Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 which remains in situ on the corner of what is now the south-east corner of Trafalgar Square.

Battle of Marston Moor

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. 17 Aug 1654. Passed through Pontefract; therichard castle famous for many sieges both of late and ancient times, and the death of that unhappy King murdered in it, was now demolishing by the Rebels; it stands on a mount, and makes a goodly show at a distance. The Queen (44) has a house here, and there are many fair seats near it, especially Mr. Pierrepont's (48), built at the foot of a hill out of the castle ruins. We all alighted in the highway to drink at a crystal spring, which they call Robin Hood's Well; near it, is a stone chair, and an iron ladle to drink out of, chained to the seat. We rode to Tadcaster, at the side of which we have prospect of the Archbishop's Palace (which is a noble seat), and in sight of divers other gentlemen's fair houses. This tract is a goodly, fertile, well-watered, and wooded country, abounding with pasture and plenty of provisions.
To York, the second city of England, fairly walled, of a circular form, watered by the brave River Ouse, bearing vessels of considerable burden on it; over it is a stone bridge emulating that of London, and built on; the middle arch is larger than any I have seen in England, with a wharf of hewn stone, which makes the river appear very neat. But most remarkable and worth seeing is St. Peter's Cathedral, which of all the great churches in England had been best preserved from the fury of the sacrilegious, by composition with the Rebels when they took the city, during the many incursions of Scotch and others. It is a most entire magnificent piece of Gothic architecture. The screen before the choir is of stone carved with flowers, running work and statues of the old kings. Many of the. Monuments are very ancient. Here, as a great rarity in these days and at this time, they showed me a Bible and Common Prayer Book covered with crimson velvet, and richly embossed with silver gilt; also a service for the altar of gilt wrought plate, flagons, basin, ewer, plates, chalices, patins, etc., with a gorgeous covering for the altar and pulpit, carefully preserved in the vestry, in the hollow wall whereof rises a plentiful spring of excellent water. I got up to the tower, whence we had a prospect toward Durham, and could see Ripon, part of Lancashire, the famous and fatal Marston Moor, the Spas of Knaresborough, and all the environs of that admirable country. Sir —— Ingoldsby has here a large house, gardens, and tennis court; also the King (24)'s house and church near the castle, which was modernly fortified with a palisade and bastions. The streets are narrow and ill-paved, the shops like London.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Glorious Revolution

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 December. 02 Dec 1688. Dr. Tenison (52) preached at St. Martin's on Psalm xxxvi. 5, 6, 7, concerning Providence. I received the blessed Sacrament. Afterward, visited my Lord Godolphin (43), then going with the Marquis of Halifax (55) and Earl of Nottingham (41) as Commissioners to the Prince of Orange (38); he told me they had little power. Plymouth declared for the Prince (38). Bath, York, Hull, Bristol, and all the eminent nobility and persons of quality through England, declare for the Protestant religion and laws, and go to meet the Prince (38), who every day sets forth new Declarations against the Papists. The great favorites at Court, Priests and Jesuits, fly or abscond. Everything, till now concealed, flies abroad in public print, and is cried about the streets. Expectation of the Prince (38) coming to Oxford. The Prince of Wales and great treasure sent privily to Portsmouth, the Earl of Dover (52) being Governor. Address from the Fleet not grateful to his Majesty (55). The Papists in offices lay down their commissions, and fly. Universal consternation among them; it looks like a revolution..

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

In 1694 William Howard 3rd Baron Howard Escrick -1694 died at York. In 1694 His son Charles Howard 4th Baron Howard succeeded 4th Baron Howard of Escrick.

Howard Arms

In 1710 Richard Terrick Bishop 1710-1777 was born in York.

On 19 Dec 1726 Henry Willoughby 5th Baron Middleton 1726-1800 was born to Thomas Willoughby 1694-1742 (32) and Elizabeth Southby at York.

Willoughby Arms

In 1742 George Fox-Lane 1st Baron Bingley 1697-1763 (45) was elected MP York.

On 06 Jul 1755 John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826 was born in York.

In 1761 Robert Fox-Lane 1732-1768 (28) was elected MP York during the General Election.

In 1787 William Mordaunt Milner 3rd Baronet Milner 1754-1811 (32) was appointed Lord Mayor of York.

After 1798 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of William Mordaunt Milner 3rd Baronet Milner 1754-1811.

On 05 Dec 1820 Jane Lawley 1820-1900 was born to Paul Thompson 1st Baron Wenlock 1784-1852 (36) and Caroline Griffin Baroness Wenlock -1868 in York.

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Jane Lawley 1820-1900 (24).

On 05 Apr 1824 Julia Louisa Bosville Baroness Middleton 1824-1901 was born at York.

The River Ouse joins the Humber near Goole where the land is wide and flat and the course probably much changed over time. From there it meanders inland, being joined by the River Aire past Howden Minster, Howden then Cawood where the River Wharfe joins, to York.
Through York the canalised river, wide and deep and formidable. After York the River Nidd joins. Between York and Boroughbridge, before the River Swale joins, the River Ouse changes name for some unknown reason becoming the River Ure.
After Boroughbridge the River Ure passes Ripon then West Tanfield then Middleham.
Now in upland country the River Ure reaches the spectacular Aysgarth Falls then Hawes where numerous becks join at its source.

The River Swale joins the River Ouse between York and Boroughbridge following a meandering course through lower Swaledale before reaching Richmond, North Yorkshire where the castle is perched high above.

Bishopthorpe, York

On 10 Dec 1776 Robert Hay-Drummond Archbishop of York 1711-1776 (65) died at Bishopthorpe, York.

On 25 Nov 1891 Harvey Goodwin Bishop Carlisle 1818-1891 (73) died in Bishopthorpe, York whilst on a visit to William Maclagan, Archbishop of York. Monument in Carlisle Cathedral sculpted by Hamo Thornycroft Sculptor 1850-1925 (41).

Church of the Black Friars, York

On 22 Mar 1426 Richard Redman Master of the Horse 1350-1426 (76) died at Harewood Castle, Harewood, West Yorkshire. He was buried at Church of the Black Friars, York. Monument to Richard Redman Master of the Horse 1350-1426 (76) and Elizabeth Aldeburgh 1362-1417. Early Plate Bascinet and Gorget Period. Lancastrian Esses and Inter-twined Knots Collar. Horses Head Crest. Elaborate Crespine Headress.

Heworth Moor, York

Battle of Heworth Moor

On 24 May 1453 Thomas Neville 1430-1460 (22) and Maud Stanhope 4th Baroness Cromwell, Baroness Willoughby Eresby -1497 were married. Maud Stanhope 4th Baroness Cromwell, Baroness Willoughby Eresby -1497 was the niece and heiress of Ralph Cromwell 3rd Baron Cromwell 1403-1456 (50) meaning traditional Percy lands would become Neville lands. The Percy's, being the older family, especially Thomas Percy 1st Baron Egremont 1422-1460 (30), took umbrage.
John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 (22) was ambushed at Heworth Moor, York by Thomas Percy 1st Baron Egremont 1422-1460 (30) leading a force of 700 or more men when returning with his brother's wedding party from Tattershall Castle, Tattershall to Sheriff of Hutton. .

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

Fulford, York

Battle of Fulford

On 20 Sep 1066 Harald III King Norway 1015-1066 (51), with Tostig Godwinson Earl Northumbria 1026-1066 (40), defeated the brothers Eadwine Mercia -1071 and Morcar Mercia -1087 at the Battle of Fulford at Fulford, York.

St Deny's Church, York

After 29 Mar 1461 Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland 1421-1461 was buried at St Deny's Church, York.

Stonegate, York

On 13 Apr 1570 Guy Fawkes 1570-1606 was born in Stonegate, York.

The Pavement, York

On 22 Aug 1572 Thomas Percy 7th Earl of Northumberland 1528-1572 (44) was beheaded at The Pavement in York. His brother Henry Percy 8th Earl of Northumberland 1532-1585 (40) succeeded 8th Earl of Northumberland (1C 1377).

York Castle, York

On Feb 1294 Simon Constable 1243-1294 (51) died at York Castle, York.

Around 1387 Richard Hastings 1387-1436 was born to Ralph Hastings 1340-1398 (47) and Maud Sutton 1356-1400 (31) at York Castle, York.

In 1398 Ralph Hastings 1340-1398 (58) died at York Castle, York. He was buried at Sulby.

In 1433 Richard Hastings Baron Willoughby Eresby 1433-1503 was born to Leonard Hastings 1396-1455 (37) and Alice Camoys at York Castle, York.

On 10 Sep 1436 Richard Hastings 1387-1436 (49) died at York Castle, York.

After 17 Feb 1461 John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 was imprisoned at York Castle, York.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

Around 1466 Anne Hastings 1466- was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (27) at York Castle, York.

Around 1470 Katherine Hastings 1470- was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (31) at York Castle, York.

Around 1478 Isabel Hastings 1478- was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (39) at York Castle, York.

Around 1480 Elizabeth Hastings 1480- was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (41) at York Castle, York.

Around 1486 Emma Hastings 1486- was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (47) at York Castle, York.

Around 1488 Cecilia Hastings 1488- was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (49) at York Castle, York.

On 09 Jan 1499 Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (60) died at York Castle, York.

On 24 Oct 1745 Thomas Herring Archbishop of Canterbury 1693-1757 (52) in a speech at York Castle, York during the Jacobite Rebellion said:
"these Commotions in the North are but Part of a Great Plan concerted for our Ruin—They have begun under the Countenance, and will be supported by the Forces of France and Spain, our old and inveterate, (and late Experience calls upon me to add, our savage and blood-thirsty) Enemies—A Circumstance that should fire the Indignation of every honest Englishman. If these Designs should succeed, and Popery and Arbitrary Power come in upon us, under the Influence and Direction of these two Tyrannical and Corrupted Courts, I leave you to reflect, what would become of every Thing that is valuable to us! We are now bless'd with the mild Administration of a Just and Protestant King, who is of so strict an Adherence to the Laws of our Country, that not an Instance can be pointed out, during his whole reign, wherein he made the least Attempt upon the Liberty, or Property, or Religion, of a single Person. But if the Ambition and Pride of France and Spain, is to dictate to us, we must submit to a Man to govern us under their hated and accursed Influence, who brings his Religion from Rome, and Rules and Maxims of his Government from Paris and Madrid."
Horace Walpole 4th Earl Orford 1717-1797 (28) said this speech "had as much true spirit, honesty and bravery in it as ever was penned by an historian for an ancient hero".

Clifford's Tower, York Castle, York

Massacre of the Jews at York

On 17 Mar 1190 at York the Jewish population sought protection from violence in Clifford's Tower, York Castle, York. The tower was besieged by the mob of crusaders preparing to leave on the Third Crusade. The Jewish men killed their wives and children, after which they set fire to the wooden keep. Those who did escape were murdered.

York Minster

In 678 Bosa of York Bishop -705 was appointed Bishop of York.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 8. How, when Archbishop Theodore died, Bertwald succeeded him as archbishop, and, among many others whom he ordained, he made the learned Tobias bishop of the church of Rochester. [690 a.d.]
The year after that in which Caedwalla (31) died at Rome, that is, 690 after the Incarnation of our Lord, Archbishop Theodore, of blessed memory, departed this life, being old and full of days, for he was eighty-eight years of age; which number of years he had been wont long before to foretell to his friends that he should live, the same having been revealed to him in a dream. He held the bishopric twenty-two years, and was buried in St. Peter's church, where all the bodies of the bishops of Canterbury are buried. Of whom, as well as of his fellows of the same degree, it may rightly and truly be said, that their bodies are buried in peace, and their names shall live to all generations. For to say all in few words, the English Churches gained more spiritual increase while he was archbishop, than ever before. His character, life, age, and death, are plainly and manifestly described to all that resort thither, by the epitaph on his tomb, in thirty-four heroic verses. The first whereof are these:
"Here in the tomb rests the body of the holy prelate, called now in the Greek tongue Theodore. Chief pontiff, blest high priest, pure doctrine he set forth to his disciples."
The last are as follow:
"For September had reached its nineteenth day, when his spirit went forth from the prison-bars of the flesh. Mounting in bliss to the gracious fellowship of the new life, he was united to the angelic citizens in the heights of Heaven."
Bertwald succeeded Theodore in the archbishopric, being abbot of the monastery called Racuulfe, which stands at the northern mouth of the river Genlade. He was a man learned in the Scriptures, and perfectly instructed in ecclesiastical and monastic teaching, yet in no wise to be compared to his predecessor. He was chosen bishop in the year of our Lord 692, on the first day of July, when Wictred (23) and Suaebhard were kings in Kent; but he was ordained the next year, on Sunday the 29th of June, by Godwin, metropolitan bishop of Gaul, and was enthroned on Sunday the 31st of August. Among the many bishops whom he ordained was Tobias, a man instructed in the Latin, Greek, and Saxon tongues, and otherwise of manifold learning, whom he consecrated in the stead of Gedmund, bishop of the Church of Rochester, who had died.

On 01 Jul 692 Berhtwald Archbishop -731 was elected Archbishop of York.

On 31 Aug 693 Berhtwald Archbishop -731 was enthroned Archbishop of York.

In 705 John of Beverley Bishop -721 was consecrated Archbishop of York.

Ealdred Appointed Archbishop of York

On 25 Dec 1060 Ealdred Archbishop of York -1069 was appointed Archbishop of York.

Accord of Winchester

In 1072 the Accord of Winchester established the primacy of the Archbishop of Canterbury over the Archbishop of York. It was signed by ...
William "Conqueror" I King England 1028-1087 (44) and Matilda Flanders Queen Consort England 1031-1083 (41)
Stigand Archbishop of Canterbury -1072
Ealdred Archbishop of York -1069 who signed "I concede" whereas other signatories signed "I subscribe"
Wulfstan Bishop Worcester 1008-1095 (64)
Herfast Bishop Chancellor -1084.

In 1191 Geoffrey Plantagenet Archbishop of York 1152-1212 (39) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 10 Nov 1215 Walter Grey Archbishop of York 1216-1255 was elected Archbishop of York.

On 26 Dec 1251 Alexander III King Scotland 1241-1286 (10) and Margaret Plantagenet 1240-1275 (11) were married at York Minster.

On 15 Oct 1266 Walter Giffard Archbishop of York 1225-1279 (41) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 01 Nov 1266 Walter Giffard Archbishop of York 1225-1279 (41) was enthroned as Archbishop of York.

On 22 Apr 1279 Walter Giffard Archbishop of York 1225-1279 (54) died at York. He was buried at York Minster.

On 09 Jan 1284 Antony Bek Bishop of Durham 1245-1311 (39) was consecrated Bishop of Durham at which time he also had the remains of Saint William of York moved to a new shrine in York Minster.

On 29 Oct 1285 John le Romeyn Archbishop of York 1230-1296 (55) was elected Archbishop of York.

On 10 Feb 1286 John le Romeyn Archbishop of York 1230-1296 (56) was consecrated Archbishop of York by Latino Malabranca Orsini Cardinal -1294 in Rome.

On 09 Jun 1286 Latino Malabranca Orsini Cardinal -1294 was enthroned Archbishop of York.

In Jan 1315 William Melton Archbishop of York 1275-1340 (40) was elected Archbishop of York.

In Sep 1317 William Melton Archbishop of York 1275-1340 (42) was consecrated Archbishop of York at Avignon.

Death of Edward II

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XIX - How king Edward was married to my lady Philippa of Hainault. Jun 1328. IT was not long after but that the king (15) and the queen (33) his mother, the earl of Kent (26) his uncle, the earl of Lancaster (47), sir Roger Mortimer (40) and all the barons of England, and by the advice of the king's council, they sent a bishop' and two knights bannerets, with two notable clerks, to sir John of Hainault (40), praying him to be a mean that their lord the young king of England might have in marriage one of the earl's (42) daughters of Hainault, his brother (42), named Philippa (13) ; for the king and all the nobles of the realm had rather have her than any other lady, for the love of him. Sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont feasted and honoured greatly these ambassadors, and brought them to Valenciennes to the earl his brother, who honourably received them and made them such cheer, that it were over long here to rehearse. And when they had skewed the content of their message, the earl (42) said, 'Sirs, I thank greatly the king (15) your prince and the queen (33) his mother and all other lords of England, sith they have sent such sufficient personages as ye be to do me such honour as to treat for the marriage ; to the which request I am well agreed, if our holy father the pope will consent thereto'-. with the which answer these ambassadors were right well content. Then they sent two knights and two clerks incontinent to the pope, to Avignon, to purchase a dispensation for this marriage to be had ; for without the pope's licence they might not marry, for [by] the lineage of France they were so near of kin as at the third degree, for the two mothers [Note. Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (33) and Joan Valois Count Zeeland, Count Holland, Count Avesnes, Count Hainault 1294-1342 (34)] were cousin-germans issued of two brethren. And when these ambassadors were come to the pope, and their requests and considerations well heard, our holy father the pope with all the whole college consented to this marriage, and so feasted them. And then they departed and came again to Valenciennes with their bulls. Then this marriage was concluded and affirmed on both parties. Then was there devised and purveyed for their apparel and for all things honourable that belonged to such a lady, who should be queen of England: and there this princess was married by a sufficient procuration brought from the king of England ; and after all feasts and triumphs done, then this young queen entered into the sea at Wissant, and arrived with all her company at Dover. And sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont, her uncle, did conduct her to the city of London, where there was made great feast, and many nobles of England, ... queen was crowned. And there was also great jousts, tourneys, dancing, carolling and great feasts every day, the which endured the, space of three weeks. The English chronicle saith this marriage and coronation of the queen was done at York with much honour, the Sunday in the even of the Conversion of Saint Paul, in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. In the which chronicle is shewed many other things of the ruling of the realm, and of the death of king Edward of Caernarvon, and divers other debates that were within the realm, as in the same chronicle more plainly it appeareth : the which the author of this book speaketh no word of, because peradventure he knew it not ; for it was hard for a stranger to know all things. But according to his writing this young queen Philippa (13) abode still in England with a small company of any persons of her own country, saving one who was named Watelet of Manny (18), who abode still with the queen and was, her carver, and after did so many great prowesses in divers places, that it were hard to make mention of them all.

Marriage of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault

On 24 Jan 1328 King Edward III England (15) and Philippa of Hainault (13) were married (he was her second-cousin) at York Minster. She (13) by marriage Queen Consort England.

Before 03 Mar 1337 William Plantagenet 1337-1337 died. He was buried at York Minster.

On 02 May 1340 William Zouche Archbishop of York -1352 was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 19 Jul 1352 William Zouche Archbishop of York -1352 died at Cawood, Selby, North Yorkshire. He was buried at York Minster.

In Nov 1373 Alexander Neville Archbishop of York 1341-1392 (32) was elected Archbishop of York.

On 14 Apr 1374 Alexander Neville Archbishop of York 1341-1392 (33) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 18 Dec 1374 Alexander Neville Archbishop of York 1341-1392 (33) was consecrated as Archbishop of York at York Minster.

On 03 Apr 1388 Thomas Fitzalan Archbishop of York, Archbishop of Canterbury 1353-1414 (35) was appointed Archbishop of York.

Around May 1398 Richard Scrope Archbishop of York 1350-1405 (48) was appointed Archbishop of York.

After 08 Jun 1405 Richard Scrope Archbishop of York 1350-1405 was buried at York Minster.

On 18 Sep 1452 John Scrope 1422-1452 (30) died. He was buried at York Minster.

In 1464 William Booth Archbishop of York 1388-1464 was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 15 Mar 1465 George Neville Archbishop of York 1432-1476 (33) was appointed Archbishop of York.

George Neville's Enthronement as Archbishop of York

On 06 Sep 1465 George Neville Archbishop of York 1432-1476 (33) was enthroned as Archbishop of York at Cawood Castle, Cawood, North Yorkshire. Isabel Neville 1451-1476 (14), Anne Neville Queen Consort England 1456-1485 (9) and Richard III King England 1452-1485 (12) were present. .

In 1480 Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 (56) was appointed Archbishop of York.

Edward of Middleham created Prince of Wales

On 08 Sep 1483 Edward York Prince Wales 1473-1484 (9) was created Prince Wales, Earl Chester (6C 1483) at York Minster. His parents Richard III (30) and Anne Neville (27) attended as did Edward Stafford 2nd Earl Wiltshire 1470-1499 (13). Edward "Last Plantagenet" York 17th Earl Warwick 1475-1499 (8) and John York 1471-1499 (11) were knighted.

In 1488 Christopher Urswick 1448-1522 (40) was appointed Dean York.

On 18 Jan 1501 Thomas Savage Archbishop of York 1449-1507 (52) was appointed Archbishop of York.

In 1506 Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 was buried at York Minster.

In 1531 Edward Lee Archbishop of York 1482-1544 (49) was appointed Archbishop of York.

In 1555 Nicholas Heath Archbishop of York 1501-1578 (54) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 27 Jan 1561 Thomas Young Archbishop of York 1507-1568 (54) was elected Archbishop of York.

After 26 Jun 1568 Thomas Young Archbishop of York 1507-1568 was buried in the Choir of York Minster.

In 1570 Edmund Grindal Archbishop of York 1519-1583 (51) was consecrated Archbishop of York.

In 1576 Edwin Sandys Archbishop of York 1519-1588 (57) was consecrated Archbishop of York.

In 1640 John Williams Archbishop of York 1582-1650 (57) was appointed Archbishop of York.

Battle of Marston Moor

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. 17 Aug 1654. Passed through Pontefract; therichard castle famous for many sieges both of late and ancient times, and the death of that unhappy King murdered in it, was now demolishing by the Rebels; it stands on a mount, and makes a goodly show at a distance. The Queen (44) has a house here, and there are many fair seats near it, especially Mr. Pierrepont's (48), built at the foot of a hill out of the castle ruins. We all alighted in the highway to drink at a crystal spring, which they call Robin Hood's Well; near it, is a stone chair, and an iron ladle to drink out of, chained to the seat. We rode to Tadcaster, at the side of which we have prospect of the Archbishop's Palace (which is a noble seat), and in sight of divers other gentlemen's fair houses. This tract is a goodly, fertile, well-watered, and wooded country, abounding with pasture and plenty of provisions.
To York, the second city of England, fairly walled, of a circular form, watered by the brave River Ouse, bearing vessels of considerable burden on it; over it is a stone bridge emulating that of London, and built on; the middle arch is larger than any I have seen in England, with a wharf of hewn stone, which makes the river appear very neat. But most remarkable and worth seeing is St. Peter's Cathedral, which of all the great churches in England had been best preserved from the fury of the sacrilegious, by composition with the Rebels when they took the city, during the many incursions of Scotch and others. It is a most entire magnificent piece of Gothic architecture. The screen before the choir is of stone carved with flowers, running work and statues of the old kings. Many of the. Monuments are very ancient. Here, as a great rarity in these days and at this time, they showed me a Bible and Common Prayer Book covered with crimson velvet, and richly embossed with silver gilt; also a service for the altar of gilt wrought plate, flagons, basin, ewer, plates, chalices, patins, etc., with a gorgeous covering for the altar and pulpit, carefully preserved in the vestry, in the hollow wall whereof rises a plentiful spring of excellent water. I got up to the tower, whence we had a prospect toward Durham, and could see Ripon, part of Lancashire, the famous and fatal Marston Moor, the Spas of Knaresborough, and all the environs of that admirable country. Sir —— Ingoldsby has here a large house, gardens, and tennis court; also the King (24)'s house and church near the castle, which was modernly fortified with a palisade and bastions. The streets are narrow and ill-paved, the shops like London.

On 28 Apr 1664 Richard Sterne Archbishop of York 1596-1683 (68) was elected Archbishop of York.

In 1683 John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686 (58) was appointed Archbishop of York.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 August. 19 Aug 1683. I went to Bromley to visit our Bishop (58), and excellent neighbor, and to congratulate his now being made Archbishop of York. On the 28th, he came to take his leave of us, now preparing for his journey and residence in his province.

On 24 Feb 1685 Charles Howard 1st Earl Carlisle 1629-1685 (56) died. He was buried at York Minster. His son Edward Howard 2nd Earl Carlisle 1646-1692 (38) succeeded 2nd Earl Carlisle (3C 1661). Elizabeth Uvedale Countess Carlisle -1696 by marriage Countess Carlisle (3C 1661).

On 27 Dec 1685 Henriette Stanley Countess Strafford 1630-1685 (55) died. She was buried at York Minster.

In 1688 Thomas Lamplugh Archbishop 1615-1691 (73) was translated Archbishop of York.

In 1691 John Sharp Archbishop 1645-1714 (45) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 16 Oct 1695 William Wentworth 2nd Earl Strafford 1626-1695 (69) died. He was buried at York Minster.

In 1697 Thomas Gale Scholar 1635-1702 (62) was appointed Dean York.

On 06 Oct 1723 Thomas Watson 1665-1723 (58) died. He was buried in York Minster.

On 21 Apr 1743 Thomas Herring Archbishop of Canterbury 1693-1757 (50) was translated to Archbishop of York.

In 1757 George Gilbert Archbishop of York 1693-1761 (63) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 03 Oct 1761 Robert Hay-Drummond Archbishop of York 1711-1776 (49) was elected at Archbishop of York.

In 1776 Richard Terrick Bishop 1710-1777 (66) refused the Archbishop of York on the grounds of ill health.

On 26 Nov 1807 Edward Venables-Vernon-Harcourt Archbishop of York 1757-1847 (50) was nominated Archbishop of York.

In 1858 Augustus Duncombe 1814-1880 (43) was appointed Dean York.

In 1860 Charles Longley Archbishop 1794-1868 (65) was appointed Archbishop of York.

In 1880 Arthur Purey-Cust Archdeacon Buckingham 1828-1916 (51) was appointed Dean York.

Times Newspaper Obituaries. 24 Dec 1959. From Our Correspondent STAMFORD BRIDGE, Dec. 23. The Earl of Halifax died to-night at his home at Garrowby, near York. He was 78 and had been suffering from a chest complaint. Lord (53) and Lady Feversham (49), Lord (47) and Lady Irwin (43), Lady Clarissa Duncombe, and Lady Bingley were at Garrowby when he died. Lady Feversham (49) said he had suffered from poor breathing for some time and that had been aggravated by a chest infection. Last July Lord Halifax broke his hip when walking in his garden and was flown to London for an operation at University College Hospital. He made a remarkable recovery from the accident. In September he and Lady Halifax celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. The funeral will be in private. A memorial service and requiem will be held in York Minster next Monday at 11 a.m. The date of a service in London is to be announced later. Obituary on page 8. MR. SELWYN LLOYD'S TRIBUTE Mr. Selwyn Lloyd, Foreign Secretary, in a tribute to Lord Halifax last night, said: "He held high office, as Viceroy of India, Foreign Secretary, and finally as Ambassador to Washington. He adorned each of these offices with his integrity, his idealism, and his ability. He was a great public servant. He will be deeply mourned." WASHINGTON, Dec. 23. Mr. Douglas Dillon, the acting Secretary of State, to-night issued this statement: "The many Americans who knew Lord Halifax deeply regret his passing. He was ever a staunch friend of this country and during his years of public life contributed greatly to the strengthening of Anglo-American relations. He is particularly remembered for his dedicated service to the cause of humanity during the crucial war years as British Ambassador in Washington." Reuter.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 3. The same Berthun told another miracle concerning the said bishop. When the most reverend Wilfrid, after a long banishment, was admitted to the bishopric of the church of Hagustald, and the aforesaid John, upon the death of Bosa, a man of great sanctity and humility, was, in his place, appointed bishop of York, he himself came, once upon a time, to the monastery of nuns, at the place called Wetadun, where the Abbess Heriburg then presided. "When we were come thither," said he, "and had been received with great and universal joy, the abbess told us, that one of the nuns, who was her own daughter after the flesh, laboured under a grievous sickness, for she had been lately let blood in the arm, and whilst she was under treatment, was seized with an attack of sudden pain, which speedily increased, while the wounded arm became worse, and so much swollen, that it could scarce be compassed with both hands; and she lay in bed like to die through excess of pain. Wherefore the abbess entreated the bishop that he would vouchsafe to go in and give her his blessing; for she believed that she would soon be better if he blessed her or laid his hands upon her. He asked when the maiden had been let blood, and being told that it was on the fourth day of the moon, said, ‘You did very indiscreetly and unskilfully to let blood on the fourth day of the moon; for I remember that Archbishop Theodore, of blessed memory, said, that blood-letting at that time was very dangerous, when the light of the moon is waxing and the tide of the ocean is rising. And what can I do for the maiden if she is like to die? "
But the abbess still earnestly entreated for her daughter, whom she dearly loved, and designed to make abbess in her stead, and at last prevailed with him to go in and visit the sick maiden. Wherefore he went in, taking me with him to the maid, who lay, as I said, in sore anguish, and her arm swelling so greatly that it could not be bent at all at the elbow; and he stood and said a prayer over her, and having given his blessing, went out. Afterwards, as we were sitting at table, at the usual hour, some one came in and called me out, saying, ‘Quoenburg’ (that was the maid's name) ‘desires that you should immediately go back to her.’ This I did, and entering the chamber, I found her of more cheerful countenance, and like one in good health. And while I was sitting beside her, she said, ‘Shall we call for something to drink?’—‘Yes,’ said I, ‘and right glad am I, if you can.’ When the cup was brought, and we had both drunk, she said, ‘As soon as the bishop had said the prayer for me and given me his blessing and had gone out, I immediately began to mend; and though I have not yet recovered my former strength, yet all the pain is quite gone both from my arm, where it was most burning, and from all my body, as if the bishop had carried it away with him; notwithstanding the swelling of the arm still seems to remain.’ But when we departed thence, the cure of the pain in her limbs was followed by the assuaging of the grievous swelling; and the maiden being thus delivered from pains and death, returned praise to our Lord and Saviour, in company with His other servants who were there.

Amaury Montfort 1242-1300 was appointed Canon York.

In 691 Bosa of York Bishop -705 was appointed Bishop of York.

Chapter House, York Minster