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1230-1259 Henry III

Death of Berengaria of Navarre

On 23 Dec 1230 Berengaria of Navarre Queen Consort England 1165-1230 (65) died. She the widow of Richard "Lionheart" I King England 1157-1199 who she had married in 1191 in Cyprus whilst he was on Crusade. She had been brought to Cyprus by his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks Queen Consort England 1122-1204 who was near seventy at the time. Their marriage started with his taking Jerusalem then being captured and held hostage for three years. There were no children of the marriage. She is believed to have never set foot in England. She didn't marry again.

Battle of Monmouth

On 25 Nov 1233 the Battle of Monmouth was fought between supporters of the King (26), commanded by Baldwin Guines III Count Guînes 1200-1244 (33), and rebels opposed to the influence of Poitevins and Lusignans; the King's step-father's (50) faction. The rebels were commanded by Richard Marshal 3rd Earl Pembroke 1191-1234 (42). Battle is somewhat of an over-statement. Richard Marshal 3rd Earl Pembroke 1191-1234 (42) and his men were riding to to reconnoitre the town. Baldwin Guines III Count Guînes 1200-1244 (33) and his forces, who were in the town, decided attack was the best form defence. Marshal's men appear to have suffered in retreat although Marshal escaped.
John Monmouth 1182-1248 (51) took control of Monmouth, Monmouthshire, South-East Wales following the battle.

Wedding of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence

On 14 Jan 1236 Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (13) was crowned Queen Consort England at Westminster Abbey.

Around 1747. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Westminster Abbey and Westminster Hall.

1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath. St Margaret's Church adjacent with the flag.

Around 1750. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster from near the Terrace of Somerset House, Strand In the distance the Banqueting House, Whitehall Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge.

Around 1801. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (62). Milkmaids in St James' Park, St James' with Westminster Abbey Beyond.

Chronica Majora: The ceremonies at the marriage of Henry the Third. 14 Jan 1236. There were assembled at the king's (28) nuptial festivities such a host of nobles of both sexes, such numbers of religious men, such crowds of the populace, and such a variety of actors, that London, with its capacious bosom, could scarcely contain them. The whole city was ornamented with flags and banners, chaplets and hangings, candles and lamps, and with wonderful devices and extraordinary representations, and all the roads were cleansed from mud and dirt, sticks, and everything offensive. The citizens, too, went out to meet the king (28) and queen, dressed out in their ornaments, and vied with each other in trying the speed of their horses. On the same day, when they left the city for Westminster, to perform the duties of butler to the king (which office belonged to them by right of old, at the coronation), they proceeded thither dressed in silk garments, with mantles worked in gold, and with costly changes of raiment, mounted on valuable horses, glittering with new bits and saddles, and riding in troops arranged in order. They carried with them three hundred and sixty gold and silver cups, preceded by the king's trumpeters and with horns sounding, so that such a wonderful novelty struck all who beheld it with astonishment. The archbishop of Canterbury (61), by the right especially belonging to him, performed the duty of crowning, with the usual solemnities, the bishop of London assisting him as a dean, the other bishops taking their stations according to their rank. In the same way all the abbats, at the head of whom, as was his right, was the abbat of St. Alban's (for as the Protomartyr of England, B. Alban, was the chief of all the martyrs of England, so also was his abbat the chief of all the abbats in rank and dignity), as the authentic privileges of that church set forth. The nobles, too, performed the duties, which, by ancient right and custom, pertained to them at the coronations of kings. In like manner some of the inhabitants of certain cities discharged certain duties which belonged to them by right of their ancestors. The earl of Chester (29) carried the sword of St. Edward, which was called " Curtein", before the king, as a sign that he was earl of the palace, and had by right the power of restraining the king if he should commit an error. The earl was attended by the constable of Chester (44), and kept the people away with a wand when they pressed forward in a disorderly way. The grand marshal of England, the earl of Pembroke (39), carried a wand before the king and cleared the way before him both, in the church and in the banquet-hall, and arranged the banquet and the guests at table. The Wardens of the Cinque Ports carried the pall over the king, supported by four spears, but the claim to this duty was not altogether undisputed. The earl of Leicester (28) supplied the king with water in basins to wash before his meal; the Earl Warrenne performed the duty of king's Cupbearer, supplying the place of the earl of Arundel, because the latter was a youth and not as yet made a belted knight. Master Michael Belet was butler ex officio; the earl of Hereford (32) performed the duties of marshal of the king's household, and William Beauchamp (51) held the station of almoner. The justiciary of the forests arranged the drinking cups on the table at the king's right hand, although he met with some opposition, which however fell to the ground. The citizens of London passed the wine about in all directions, in costly cups, and those of Winchester superintended the cooking of the feast; the rest, according to the ancient statutes, filled their separate stations, or made their claims to do so. And in order that the nuptial festivities might not be clouded by any disputes, saving the right of any one, many things were put up with for the time which they left for decision at a more favourable opportunity. The office of chancellor of England, and all the offices connected with the king, are ordained and assized in the Exchequer. Therefore the chancellor, the chamberlain, the marshal, and the constable, by right of their office, took their seats there, as also did the barons, according to the date of their creation, in the city of London, whereby they each knew his own place. The ceremony was splendid, with the gay dresses of the clergy and knights who were present. The abbat of Westminster sprinkled the holy water, and the treasurer, acting the part of sub-dean, carried the Paten. Why should I describe all those persons who reverently ministered in the church to God as was their duty? Why describe the abundance of meats and dishes on the table & the quantity of venison, the variety of fish, the joyous sounds of the glee-men, and the gaiety of the waiters? Whatever the world could afford to create pleasure and magniiicence was there brought together from every quarter.
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On 14 Jan 1236 Henry III King England 1207-1272 (28) and Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (13) were married at Canterbury Cathedral by Edmund Rich Archbishop Canterbury 1174-1240 (61).

Christening of Edward I

On 22 Jun 1239 Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 was christened at Westminster Abbey. Humphrey Bohun 2nd Earl Hereford, 1st Earl Essex 1204-1275 (35) as godfather.He was named after Edward "ConFessor" King England 1003-1066.

Around 1747. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View across the River Thames to Westminster Abbey and Westminster Hall.

1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath. St Margaret's Church adjacent with the flag.

Around 1750. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Westminster from near the Terrace of Somerset House, Strand In the distance the Banqueting House, Whitehall Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge.

Around 1801. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (62). Milkmaids in St James' Park, St James' with Westminster Abbey Beyond.

Synod of Worcester

In 1266 Walter Cantilupe Bishop Worcester 1191-1266 (74) convened the Synod of Worcester.

Henry VII King Germany Dies Conrad I Succeeds

On 12 Feb 1242 Henry VII King Germany 1211-1242 (31) died. His Brother Conrad Hohenstaufen King Germany 1228-1254 (13) succeeded King Germany.

Battle of Taillebourg

On 21 Jul 1242 the forces of Henry III King England 1207-1272 (34) and Hugh Lusignan XI Count Lusignan, VI Count La Marche, II Count Angoulême 1221-1250 (21) fought against the forces of at Louis IX King France 1214-1270 (28) and his brother Alphonse Capet Count Poitou, II Count Toulose 1220-1271 (21) at Taillebourg during the Battle of Taillebourg.The battle was a decisive victory for the French.Henry thereafter signed a five-year truce with the French.

First Council of Lyon

On 15 Jan 1245 Boniface Savoy Archbishop Canterbury 1217- was consecrated Archbishop Canterbury at Lyon by Pope Innocent IV during the First Council of Lyon.

Seventh Crusade

In 1247 William Longespée 1207-1250 (39) went on pilgrimage.

In 1248 Alexander Giffard -1262 took part during the Seventh Crusade.

In 1249 John Stewart -1249 was killed at Damietta during the Seventh Crusade.

On 24 Oct 1249 Alphonse Capet Count Poitou, II Count Toulose 1220-1271 (28) arrived at Damietta during the Seventh Crusade.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

Battle of Mansoura

On 08 Feb 1250 Alexander Giffard -1262 fought at the Battle of Mansoura.

On 07 Dec 1250 William Longespée 1207-1250 (42) died at Mansoura during the Battle of Mansoura.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

After 1262. St Mary's Church, Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the Giffard Arms on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms.

Wedding of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile

On 01 Nov 1254 Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (15) and Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (13) were married (he was her Second-Cousin Once-Removed) at Abbey of Santa Maria la Real de Huelgas. .

Battle of Bryn Derwin

In Jun 1255 Llewellyn "Last" Aberffraw 1233-1282 (22) defeated his brothers Owain "The Red" Aberffraw 1232-1282 (22) and Dafydd ap Gruffudd Aberffraw Prince Wales 1238-1283 (16) during the Battle of Bryn Derwin. Owain "The Red" Aberffraw 1232-1282 (22) and Dafydd ap Gruffudd Aberffraw Prince Wales 1238-1283 (16) were both imprisoned.