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Biography of James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685

CONTENT

1685 Battle of Sedgemoor

1685 Death of Charles II


Family Trees

Descent

Ancestry

On 09 Apr 1649 James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 was born illegitimately to Charles II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (18) and Lucy Walter 1630-1658 (19) at Rotterdam .

In 1658 Lucy Walter 1630-1658 (28) died

In 1658 William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (47) was created 1st Baron Crofts of Saxham and was given charge of Charle's illegitimate son James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (8) whose mother Lucy Walter 1630-1658 (28) had died.

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (38) . Portrait of Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (25) and (probably) William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (27) .

On 14 Feb 1663 James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (13) was created 1st Duke Monmouth , 1st Earl Doncaster , 1st Baron Scott of Tynedale .

On 28 Mar 1663 James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (13) was appointed 467th Knight Garter: Charles II .

On 20 Apr 1663 James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (14) was created 1st Duke Buccleuch , 1st Earl Dalkeith , 1st Baron Scott of Whitchester and Eskdale . Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (12) by marriage Duchess Buccleuch .

On 20 Apr 1663 James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (14) and Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (12) were married . Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (12) by marriage Duchess Monmouth .

In 1667 King Chales II (36) , his brother James (33) , Prince Rupert (47) and James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (17) dined with Richard Neville 1615-1676 (51) at Billingbear House, Waltham St Lawrence, Berkshire .

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May . Wednesday 19 May 1669 . With my coach to St. James’s ; and there finding the Duke of York (35) gone to muster his men, in Hyde Park , I alone with my boy thither, and there saw more, walking out of my coach as other gentlemen did, of a soldier’s trade, than ever I did in my life: the men being mighty fine, and their Commanders, particularly the Duke of Monmouth (20) ; but me-thought their trade but very easy as to the mustering of their men, and the men but indifferently ready to perform what was commanded, in the handling of their arms. Here the news was first talked of Harry Killigrew’s being wounded in nine places last night, by footmen, in the highway, going from the Park in a hackney-coach towards Hammersmith , to his house at Turnham Greene : they being supposed to be my Lady Shrewsbury’s (27) men, she being by, in her (27) coach with six horses; upon an old grudge of his saying openly that he had lain with her. Thence by and by to White Hall , and there I waited upon the King (38) and Queen (59) all dinner-time, in the Queen’s lodgings, she being in her white pinner and apron, like a woman with child; and she seemed handsomer plain so, than dressed. And by and by, dinner done, I out, and to walk in the Gallery, for the Duke of York’s (35) coming out; and there, meeting Mr. May (47) , he took me down about four o’clock to Mr. Chevins’s (67) lodgings, and all alone did get me a dish of cold chickens, and good wine; and I dined like a prince, being before very hungry and empty. By and by the Duke of York (35) comes, and readily took me to his closet, and received my petition, and discoursed about my eyes, and pitied me, and with much kindness did give me his consent to be absent, and approved of my proposition to go into Holland to observe things there, of the Navy; but would first ask the King’s (38) leave, which he anon did, and did tell me that the King (38) would be a good master to me, these were his words, about my eyes, and do like of my going into Holland, but do advise that nobody should know of my going thither, but pretend that I did go into the country somewhere, which I liked well. Glad of this, I home, and thence took out my wife, and to Mr. Holliard’s (60) about a swelling in her cheek, but he not at home, and so round by Islington and eat and drink, and so home, and after supper to bed. In discourse this afternoon, the Duke of York (35) did tell me that he was the most amazed at one thing just now, that ever he was in his life, which was, that the Duke of Buckingham (41) did just now come into the Queen’s (59) bed-chamber, where the King (38) was, and much mixed company, and among others, Tom Killigrew (57) , the father of Harry , who was last night wounded so as to be in danger of death, and his man is quite dead; and [ Buckingham (41) ] there in discourse did say that he had spoke with some one that was by (which all the world must know that it must be his whore, my Lady Shrewsbury (27) ), who says that they did not mean to hurt, but beat him, and that he did run first at them with his sword; so that he do hereby clearly discover that he knows who did it, and is of conspiracy with them, being of known conspiracy with her, which the Duke of York (35) did seem to be pleased with, and said it might, perhaps, cost him his life in the House of Lords; and I find was mightily pleased with it, saying it was the most impudent thing, as well as the most foolish, that ever he knew man do in all his life.

Around 1625 John Hoskins 1590-1664 (35) . Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15) .

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (42) . Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (32) and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (42) . Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (32) and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629 .

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck 1599-1641 (42) . Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (32) .

Around 1670 . John Riley 1646-1691 (24) . Portrait of James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (20) .

On 24 Aug 1672 Charles Scott 1st Earl Doncaster 1672-1674 was born to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (23) and Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (21) .

On 23 May 1674 James Scott 1674-1705 was born to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (25) and Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (23) .

On 17 Feb 1675 Anne Scott 1675-1685 was born to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (25) and Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (24)

In 1676 Henry Scott 1st Earl Deloraine 1676-1730 was born to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (26) and Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (24) .

Around 1682 Henriette Scott 1682-1730 was born illegitimately to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (32) and Eleanor Needham .

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 Jun . 22 Jun 1684 . Last Friday Sir Tho. Armstrong was executed at Tyburn for treason, without tryal, having ben outlaw'd and apprehended in Hol land, on the conspiracy of the Duke of Monmouth (35) , Lord Russell , &c. which gave occasion of discourse to people and lawyers, in reguard it was on an outlawry that judgment was given and execution.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Feb . 04 Feb 1685 . I went to London, hearing his Ma* (54) had ben the Monday before ( 02 Feb 1685 ) surpriz'd in his bed-chamber with an apoplectic fit, so that if, by God's providence, Dr. King (that excellent chirurgeon as well as physitian) had not ben accidentally present to let him blood (having his lancet in his pocket) his Ma* had certainly died that moment, which might have ben of direful consequence, there being nobody else present with the King save this Doctor and one more, as I am assur'd. It was a mark of the extraordinary dexterity, resolution, and presence of mind in the Dr, to let him bloud in the very paroxysm, without staying the coming of other physitians, which regularly should have ben don, and for want of which he must have a regular pardon, as they tell me *. This rescu'd his Ma* for the instant, but it was only a short reprieve. He still complain'd, and was relapsing, often fainting, with sometimes epileptic symptoms, till Wednesday, for which he was cupp'd, let bloud in both jugulars, had both vomit and purges, which so rellev'd him that on Thursday hopes of recovery were signified in the publiq Gazette, but that day, about noone, the physitians thought him feaverish. This they seem'd glad of, as being more easily allay'd and methodically dealt with than his former fits; so as they prescrib'd the famous Jesuits powder : but it made him worse, and some very able Doctors who were present did not think it a fever, but the effect of his frequent bleeding and other sharp operations us'd by them about his head, so that probably the powder might stop the circulation, and renew his former fits, which now made him very weake. Thus he pass'd Thursday night with greate difficulty, when complaining of a paine in his side, they drew 12 ounces more of bloud from him; this was by 6 in the morning on Friday, and it gave him reliefe, but it did not continue, for being now in much paine, and strugling for breath, he lay dozing, and after some conflicts, the physitians despairing of him, he gave up the ghost at halfe an houre after eleven in the morning, being the 06 Feb 1685 , in the 36th yeare of his reigne, and 54th of his age.
Prayers were solemnly made in all the Churches, especialy in both ye Court Chapells, where the Chaplaines reliev'd one another every halfe quarter of an houre from the time he began to be in danger till he (54) expir'd, according to the forme prescrib'd in the Church Offices. Those who assisted his Majesty's (54) devotions were, the Abp. of Canterbury (68) , the Bishops of London (53) , Durham (52) , and Ely (47) , but more especialy Dr. Ken, the Bp. of Bath and Wells (47) receiving the Holy Sacrament, but his Ma* told them he would consider of it, which he did so long 'till it was too late. Others whisper'd that the Bishops and Lords, except the Earles of Bath (56) and Feversham (44) , being order'd to withdraw the night before, Hurlston, the 'Priest, had presumed to administer the Popish Offices. He gave his breeches and keys to yc Duke (51) , who was almost continually kneeling by his bed-side, and in teares. He (54) also recommended to him the care of his natural children, all except the Duke of Monmouth (35) , now in Holland, and in his displeasure. He intreated the Queene (46) to pardon him (not without cause); who a little before had sent a Bishop to excuse her not more frequently visiting him, in reguard of her excessive griefe, and withall, that his Ma* (54) would forgive it if at any time she had offended him. He spake to ye Duke (51) to be kind to the Dutchesse of Cleaveland (44) , and especialy Portsmouth (35) , and that Nelly (35) might not starve. Thus died King Charles II (54) of a vigorous and robust constitution, and in all appearance promising a long life. He was a Prince of many virtues, and many greate imperfections; debonaire, easy of accesse, not bloudy nor cruel; his countenance fierce, his voice greate, proper of person, every motion became him; a lover of the sea, and skilfull in shipping; not affecting other studies, yet he had a laboratory, and knew of many empyrical medicines, and the easier mechanical mathe matics; he lov'd planting and building, and brought in a politer way of living, which pass'd to luxury and intolerable expence. He had a particular talent in telling a story, and facetious passages, of which he had innumerable; this made some buffoons and vitious wretches too presumptuous and familiar, not worthy the favour they abus'd. He tooke delight in having a number of little spaniels follow him and lie in his bed-chamber, where he often suffer'd the bitches to puppy and give suck, which render'd it very offensive, and indeede made the whole Court nasty and stinking. He would doubtlesse have ben an excellent Prince, had he ben less addicted to women, who made him uneasy, 'and allways in want to supply their unmeasurable profusion, to ye detriment of many Indigent persons who had signaly serv'd both him and his father. He frequently and easily chang'd favorites, to his greate prejudice. As to other publiq transactions and unhappy miscarriages, .'tis not here I intend to number them; but certainly never had King more glorious opportunities to have made himselfe, his people, and all Europe happy, and prevented innumerable mischeifs, had not his too easy nature resign'd him to be manag'd by crafty men, and some abandon'd and profane wretches who corrupted his otherwise sufficient parts, disciplin'd as he had ben by many afflictions during his banishment, which gave him much experience and knowledge of men and things; but those wicked creatures took him off from all application becoming so greate a King. The history of his reigne will certainely be the most wonderfull for the variety of matter and accidents, above any extant in former ages : the sad tragical death of his father, his banishment and hardships, his miraculous restauration, conspiracies against him, parliaments, wars, plagues, fires, comets, revolutions abroad happening in his time, with a thousand other particulars. He was ever kind to me, and very gracious upon all occasions, and therefore I cannot, without ingratitude, but deplore his losse, which for many respects as well as duty I do with all my soul. His Majesty being dead, the Duke, now K. James II. went immediately to Council, and before entering into any businesse, passionately declaring his sorrow, told their Lordships that since the succession had fallen to him, he would endeavour to follow the example of his predecessor in his clemency and tendernesse to his people; that, however he had ben misrepresented as affecting arbitrary power, they should find the contrary, for that the Laws of England had made ye King as greate a monarch as he could desire; that he would endeavor to maintain the Government both in Church and State, as by Law established, its principles being so firme for monarchy, and the members of it shewing themselves so good and loyal subjects; and that as he would never depart from the just rights and prerogatives of y Crown, so would he never invade any man's property; but as he had often adventur'd his life in defence of the Nation, so he would still proceede, and preserve it in all its lawful rights and liberties. This being the substance of what he said, the Lords desir'd it might be publish'd, as ontaining matter of greate satisfaction to a jealous people upon this change, which his Ma* consented to. Then were the Counsel sworn, and a Proclamation order'd to be publish'd, that all Officers should continue in their stations, that there might be no failure of public justice, till his further pleasure should be known. Then the King rose, the Lords accompanying him to his bed-chamber, where, whilst he repos'd himselfe, tired indeede as he was with griefe and watching, they return'd againe Into the Council-chamber to take order for the proclaiming his Ma*, which (after some debate) they consented should be in the very forme his grandfather K. James I. was, after ye death of Queene Elizabeth; as likewise that the Lords, &c. should proceede in their coaches thro' the Citty for the more solemnity of it. Upon this was I, and severall other Gentlemen waiting in the Privy-gallerie, admitted into ye Council-chamber to be witnesse of what was resolv'd on. Thence with the Lords, the Lord Marshall and Heraulds, and other Crowne Officers being ready, we first went to White-hall gate, where the Lords stood on foote bare-headed, whilst the Herauld proclaim'd his Majesty's title to the Imperial Crowne and Succession according to ye forme, the trumpets and kettle-drums having first sounded 3 times, which ended with the people's acclamations. Then a Herauld call'd the Lords' coaches according to rank, myselfe accompanying the solemnity in my Lord Cornwallis's (29) coach, first to Temple Barr, where the Lord Maior and his brethren met us on horseback, in all theire formalities, and proclaim'd the King; hence to the Exchange in Cornhlll, and so we return'd in the order we set forth. Being come to Whitehall, we all went and kiss'd the King (51) and Queenes (26) hands. He had ben on ye bed, but was now risen and in his undresse. The Queene (22) was in bed in her appartment, but put forth her hand, seeming to be much afflicted, as I believe she was, having deported herselfe so decently upon all occasions since she came into England, which made her universally belov'd. Thus concluded this sad and not joyfull day.
I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and prophanenesse, gaming and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfullnesse of God (it being Sunday evening) which this day se'nnight I was wit nesse of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleaveland, and Mazarine, &c a French boy singing love songs, in that glorious gallery, whilst about 20 of the greate courtiers and other dissolute persons were at Basset round a large table, a bank of at least 2000 in gold before them, upon which two gentlemen who were with me made reflexions with astonishment. Six days after was all in the dust ! It was enjoyn'd that those who put on mourning should wear it as for a father, in ye most solemn manner.

Before 1691 . John Riley 1646-1691 (44) . Portrait of Nathaniel Crew Bishop 1633-1721 (57) .

In 1698 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723 . Portrait of Nathaniel Crew Bishop 1633-1721 (64) .

Around 1675 John Greenhill 1644-1676 (31) (attributed).Portrait of Nathaniel Crew Bishop 1633-1721 (41) .

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler 1634-1687 (52) . Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (48) .

Around 1663 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (44) . Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24) . Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel.The sitter looks to two putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head.She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (46) . Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26) .

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (37) . Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31) .

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (62) . Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (57) .

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (62) . Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (57) .

Around 1664 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (45) . Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess Cleveland 1640-1709 (23) and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child.

Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723 . Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (73) .

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (62) . Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (31) .

In 1670 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (35) . Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (20) .

In 1673 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (38) . Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (23) .

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (66) . Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (51) .

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (66) . Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (51) .

Before 08 Oct 1699 Mary Cradock 1633-1699 (66) (attributed). Portrait of Nell Gwyn 1650-1687 .

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710 . Portrait of Nell Gwyn 1650-1687 (29) .

Before 14 Nov 1687 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710 . Portrait of Nell Gwyn 1650-1687 (37) .

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely 1618-1680 . Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28) .

In 1698 . François de Troy 1645-1730 (52) . Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39) .

Around 1685 Willem Wissing 1656-1687 (29) . Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26) .

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710 . Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21) .

Death of Charles II

On 06 Feb 1685 Charles II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (54) died at 1145 in the morning at Whitehall Palace, Westminster . His brother James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (51) succeeded as II King England Scotland and Ireland: Stewart . Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26) by marriages Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland .
His brother James II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (51) , William Chiffinch 1602-1691 (83) , Richard Mason 1633-1685 (52) and William Sancroft Archbishop Canterbury 1617-1693 (68) were present.

Before 08 Mar 1685 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (52) . Portrait of Richard Mason 1633-1685 (52) .

Around 1688 Jacob Huysmans 1633-1696 (55) . Portrait of Richard Mason 1633-1685 .

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Jun . 14 Jun 1685 . There was now certaine intelligence of the Duke of Monmouth (36) landing at Lyme in Dorsetshire, and of his having set up his standard as King of England. I pray God deliver us from the confusion which these beginnings threaten! Such a dearth for want of raine was never in my memory.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Jun . 17 Jun 1685 . The Duke (36) landed with but 150 men, but the whole Kingdom was alarm'd, fearing triat the disaffected would joyn them, many of the train'd bands flocking to him. At his landing he (36) publish'd a declaration, charging his Ma* (51) with usurpation and several horrid crimes, on pretence of his owne title, and offering to call a free Parliament. This declaration was order'd to be burnt by the hangman, the Duke proclaim'd a traytor, and a reward of £5,000 to any who should kill him. At this time the words engraved on the monument in London, intimating that the Papists fir'd the Citty, were erased and cut out.
The exceeding drowth still continues.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Jul . 02 Jul 1685 . No considerable account of the troops sent against the Duke (36) , tho' greate forces sent. There was a smart skirmish, but he would not be provok'd to come to an encounter, but still kept in the fastnesses. Dangerfield whipp'd, like Oates (35) , for perjurie.

Battle of Sedgemoor

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Jul . 08 Jul 1685 . Came news of Monmouth's (36) utter defeate, and the next day of his being taken by Sr Wm Portman (41) and Lord Lumley (35) with the militia of their counties. It seemes the horse, commanded by Lord Grey (29) , being newly rais'd and undisciplin'd, were not to be brought in so short a time to endure the fire, which expos'd the foote to the King's, so as when Monmouth had led the foote in greate silence and order, thinking to surprize Lieut Gen Lord Feversham (44) newly encamp'd, and given him a smart charge, interchanging both greate and small shot, the horse, breaking their owne ranks, Monmouth (36) gave it over, and fled with Grey (29) , leaving their party to be cut in pieces to the number of 2000. The whole number reported to be above 8,000, the King's but 2,700. The slaine were most of them Mendip-miners, who did greate execution with their tooles, and sold their lives very dearely, whilst their leaders flying were pursu'd and taken the next morning, not far from one another. Monmouth (36) Lord Lumley in a dry ditch cover'd with fern-brakes, but without sword, pistol, or any weapon, and so might have pass'd for some countryman, his beard being grown so long and so grey as hardly to be known, had not his George [Note. This is possible a reference to the Small St George Pendant] discover'd him, which was found in his pocket. 'Tis said he trembl'd exceedingly all over, not able to speake. Grey (29) was taken not far from him. Most of his party were anabaptists and poore cloth workers of yu country, no gentlemen of account being come in to him. The arch-boutefeu Ferguson, Matthews, *&c. were not yet found. The £5,000 to be given to whoever should bring Monmouth in, was to be distributed among the militia by agreement between Sr Wm Portman (41) and Lord Lumley (35) . The battail ended, some words, first In jest, then in passion, pass'd between Sherrington Talbot (a worthy gent. son to Sr John Talbot (55) , and who had behav'd himselfe very handsomely) and one Capt. Love, both commanders of the militia, as to whose souldiers fought best, both drawing their swords and passing at one another. Sherrington was wounded to death on the spot, to the greate regret of those who knew him. He was Sir John's only son.

On 15 Jul 1685 James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (36) was beheaded at Tower Hill, City of London . Francis Turner Bishop 1637-1700 (47) acted a Chaplain.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Jul . 15 Jul 1685 . I went to see Dr. Tenison's (48) Library [in St. Martin's .].
Monmouth (36) was this day brought to London and examin'd before the King (51) , to whom he made greate submission, acknowledg'd his seduction by Ferguson the Scot (48) , whom he nam'd ye bloudy villain. He was sent to ye Tower , had an interview with his late Dutchesse (34) , whom he receiv'd coldly, having liv'd dishonestly with ye Lady Henrietta Wentworth (24) for two yeares. He obstinately asserted his conversation with that debauch'd woman to be no in, whereupon, seeing he could not be persuaded to his last breath, the divines who were sent to assist him thought not fit to administer the Holy Communion to him. For ye rest of his faults he profess'd greate sorrow, and so died without any apparent feare; he would not make use of a cap or other circumstance, but lying downe, bid the fellow do his office better than to the late Lord Russell , and gave him gold; but the wretch made five chopps before he had his head off; wch so incens'd the people, that had he not been guarded and got away, they would have torn him to pieces. The Duke (36) made no speech on the scaffold (wch was on Tower Hill ) but gave a paper containing not above 5 or 6 lines, for the King (51) , in which he disclaims all title to ye Crown, acknowledges that the late King , his father, had indeede told him he was but his base sonn, and so desir'd his Ma* to be kind to his wife and children. This relation I had from Dr. Tenison (Rector of St. Martin's) (48) , who, with the Bishops of Ely (47) and Bath and Wells (48) , were sent to him by his Ma*, and were at the execution.
Thus ended this quondam Duke, darling of his father and ye ladies, being extreamly handsome and adroit; an excellent souldier and dancer, a favourite of the people, of an easy nature, debauch'd by lust, seduc'd by crafty knaves who would have set him up only to make a property, and took the opportunity of the King being of another religion, to ga ther a party of discontented men. He fail'd, and perish'd. He was a lovely person, had a virtuous and excellent lady that brought him greate riches, and a second dukedom in Scotland. He was Master of the Horse , General of the King his father's Army, Gentleman of the Bedchamber, Knight of the Garter, Chancellor of Cambridge, in a word had accumulations without end. See what ambition and want of principles brought him to! He was beheaded on Tuesday 14th July . His mother , whose name was Barlow, daughter of some very meane creatures, was a beautiful strumpet, whom I had often seene at Paris; she died miserably without any thing to bury her; yet this Perkin had ben made to believe that the King had married her; a monstrous and ridiculous forgerie; and to satisfy the world of the iniquity of the report, the King his father (If his father he really was, for he most resembl'd one Sidney , who was familiar with his mother) publickly and most solemnly renounc'd it, to be so enter'd in the Council Booke some yeares since, with all ye Privy Councellors at testation.
Ross, tutor to the Duke of Monmouth, proposed to Bishop Cozens to sign a certificate of the King's marriage to Mrs. Barlow, though her own name was Walters: this the Bishop refused. She was born of a gentleman's family in Wales, but having little means and less grace, came to London to make her fortune. Algernon Sidney , then a Colonel in Cromwell's army, had agreed to give her 50 broad pieces (as he told the Duke of York) but being ordered hastily away with his regiment, he missed his bargain. She went into Holland, where she fell into the hands of his brother Colonel Robert Sidney , who kept her for some time, till the King hearing of her, got her from him. On which the Colonel was heard to say, Let who will have her she is already sped and after being with the King she was so soon with child that the world had no cause to doubt whose child it was, and the rather that when he grew to be a man, he very much resembled the Colonel both in stature and countenance, even to a wort on his face. However the King owned the child. In the King's absence she behaved so loosely, that on his return from his escape at Worcester, he would have no further commerce with her, and she became a common prostitute at Paris. Life of King James II. Vol I.
Had it not pleas'd God to dissipate this attempt in ye beginning, there would in all appearance have gather'd an irresistable force which would have desperately proceeded to ye ruine of ye Church and Govern ment, so general was the discontent and expectation of the opportunity. For my owne part I look'd upon this deliverance as most signal. Such an Inundation of phanatics and men of impious principles must needs have caus'd universal disorder, cruelty, injustice, rapine, sacrilege, and confusion, an unavoidable civil war and misery without end. Blessed be God the knot was happily broken, and a faire prospect of tranquil lity for the future if we reforme, be thankful!, and make a right use of this mercy.

On 06 Feb 1732 Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 (80) died . Her grandson Francis Scott 2nd Duke Buccleuch 1695-1751 (37) succeeded as 2nd Duke Buccleuch . Jane Douglas Duchess Buccleuch -1729 by marriage Duchess Buccleuch .

Isabel Scott was born illegitimately to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 and Eleanor Needham .

James Scott -1732 was born illegitimately to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 and Eleanor Needham .

Charlotte Scott was born to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 and Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 .

Francis Scott was born to James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth, 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 and Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth, Duchess Buccleuch 1651-1732 .

Family Trees

Paternal Family Tree: Stewart

Descendants Family Trees:

James VI King Scotland I King England Scotland and Ireland 1566-1625

Descent

Kings Wessex: Great x 23 Grand Son of Aethelwulf King Wessex -858

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 15 Grand Son of Owain "Great" King Gwynedd 1100-1170

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 21 Grand Son of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg, King Deheubarth 880-950

Kings Powys: Great x 16 Grand Son of Maredudd ap Bleddyn King Powys 1047-1132

Kings England: Son of Charles II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685

Kings Scotland: Great Grand Son of James VI King Scotland I King England Scotland and Ireland 1566-1625

Kings Franks: Great x 14 Grand Son of Louis VII King Franks 1120-1180

Kings France: Great Grand Son of Henry IV King France 1553-1610

Ancestry

Father: Charles II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 Son of Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649


GrandFather: Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 Son of James VI King Scotland I King England Scotland and Ireland 1566-1625


Great GrandFather: James VI King Scotland I King England Scotland and Ireland 1566-1625 Great x 2 Grandson of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509


Great x 2 GrandFather: Henry "Lord Darnley" Stewart 1545-1567 Great Grandson of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509


Great x 3 GrandFather: Matthew Stewart 4th Earl Lennox 1516-1571 Great x 4 Grandson of Edward III King England 1312-1377


Great x 3 GrandMother: Margaret Douglas Countess Lennox 1515-1578 Granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509


Great x 2 GrandMother: Mary "Queen of Scots" Stewart I Queen Scotland 1542-1587 Great Granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509


Great x 3 GrandFather: James V King Scotland 1512-1542 Grandson of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509


Great x 3 GrandMother: Mary of Guise Queen Consort Scotland 1515-1560 Great x 6 Granddaughter of Edward III King England 1312-1377


Great GrandMother: Anne of Denmark Queen Consort Scotland, England and Ireland 1574-1619


Great x 2 GrandFather: Frederick II King Denmark 1534-1588


Great x 3 GrandFather: Christian III King Denmark 1503-1559


GrandMother: Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 Great x 8 Granddaughter of Edward III King England 1312-1377


Great GrandFather: Henry IV King France 1553-1610 Great x 7 Grandson of Edward III King England 1312-1377


Great x 2 GrandFather: Antoine King Navarre 1518-1562 Great x 6 Grandson of Edward III King England 1312-1377


Great x 3 GrandFather: Charles Bourbon Duke Vendôme 1489-1537 Great x 5 Grandson of Edward III King England 1312-1377


Great x 3 GrandMother: Françoise Valois-Alençon Count Vendôme Great x 6 Granddaughter of Henry III King England 1207-1272


Great x 2 GrandMother: Jeanne Albret III Queen Navarre 1528-1572 Great x 8 Granddaughter of Henry III King England 1207-1272


Great x 3 GrandFather: Henry II King Navarre 1503-1555 Great x 8 Grandson of Henry III King England 1207-1272


Great x 3 GrandMother: Marguerite Valois-Orleans Queen Consort Navarre 1492-1549 Great x 7 Granddaughter of Henry III King England 1207-1272


Great GrandMother: Marie de Medici Queen Consort France 1575-1642


Great x 2 GrandFather: Francesco I de Medici Grand Duke of Tuscany 1541-1587


Great x 3 GrandFather: Cosimo I de Medici Grand Duke of Tuscany 1519-1574


Mother: Lucy Walter 1630-1658


GrandFather: William Walter -1650