Hover the mouse over the coloured text for more information, click to go to the Pages. Hover over paintings for larger versions. Click on the Arms to go to the Heraldry pages. Click on Home in the Menu above to go to today's On This Day in History page.

Saint Paul's Letters

First Letter to the Ephesians

First Letter to the Ephesians 1

First Letter to the Ephesians 1:18

First Letter to the Ephesians 1:18. NIV. I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in his holy people,.

First Letter to the Ephesians 1:19

First Letter to the Ephesians 1:19. NIV. and his incomparably great power for us who believe. That power is the same as the mighty strength.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 Oct. 17 Oct 1686. Simon Patrick Bishop 1626-1707 (60), preached at St Paul's Church, Bedford Street, Covent Garden on Ephes. v. First Letter to the Ephesians 1:19, First Letter to the Ephesians 1:19, showing the custom of the primitive saints in serving God with hymns, and their frequent use of them upon all occasions: touching the profane way of mirth and intemperance of this ungodly age. Afterward I visited my William Davys Lord Chief Justice of Ireland 1633-1687 (53), with whom I had long and private discourse concerning the miserable condition that kingdom was like to be in, if Richard Talbot 1st Earl Tyrconnell 1630-1691 (56) counsel should prevail at Court.

First Letter to the Romans

First Letter to the Romans Verse 18

First Letter to the Romans Verse 18. NIV. The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness,.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 Feb. 27 Feb 1687. Mr. Chetwin preached at Whitehall on First Letter to the Romans Verse 18, a very quaint, neat discourse of Moral righteousness.

First Letter to the Corinthians

First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 6 Verse 12

First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 6 Verse 12. All things are lawful unto me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 Mar. 21 Mar 1683. Thomas Tenison Archbishop Canterbury 1636-1715 (46) preached at Whitehall Palace on First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 6 Verse 12; I esteem him to be one of the most profitable preachers in the Church of England, being also of a most holy conversation, very learned and ingenious. The pains he takes and care of his parish will, I fear, wear him out, which would be an inexpressible loss.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall Palace and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 16

First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 16 Verse 22

First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 16 Verse 22. If any man love not the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be Anathema Maranatha.

First Epistle to the Corinthians Chapter 6

First Epistle to the Corinthians Chapter 6 Verse 20

First Epistle to the Corinthians Chapter 6 Verse 20. KJV. For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's.

First Epistle to the Corinthians Chapter 6 Verse 20. BEB. For a payment has been made for you: let God be honoured in your body.

First Epistle to the Corinthians Chapter 6 Verse 20. WEB. For you were bought with a price. Therefore glorify God in your body and in your spirit, which are God's.

First Letter to the Thessalonians

Thessalonians I Chapter 4

Thessalonians I Chapter 4 Verse 11

Thessalonians I Chapter 4 Verse 11. and to make it your ambition to lead a quiet life: You should mind your own business and work with your hands, just as we told you,.

Philipians

Philipians Chapter 1

Philipians Chapter 1 Verse 21

Philipians Chapter 1 Verse 21. For to me, to live is Christ and to die is gain.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 Mar. 07 Mar 1685. My daughter Mary Evelyn 1665-1685 (20) was taken with the small pox, and there soon was found no hope of her recovery. A very greate affliction to me : but God's holy will be done.
10 Mar 1685. She receiv'd the blessed Sacrament; after which, disposing herselfe to suffer what God should detErmine to inflict, she bore the remainder of her sicknesse with extraordinary patience and piety, and more than ordinary resignation and blessed frame of mind. She died the 14 Feb 1685, to our unspeakable sorrow and affliction, and not to ours onely, but that of all who knew her, who were many of the best quality, greatest and most virtuous persons. The justnesse of her stature, person, comelinesse of countenance, gracefull nesse of motion, unaffected tho' more than ordinary beautifull, were the least of her ornaments compared with those of her mind. Of early piety, singularly religious, spending a part of every day in private devotion, reading and other vertuous exereises; she had collected and written out many of the most usefull and judicious periods of the books she read in a kind of common-place, as out of Dr. Hammond on the New Testament, and most of the best practical treatises. She had read and digested a considerable deale of history and of places. The French tongue was as familiar to her as English; she understood Italian, and was able to render a laudable account of what she read and observed, to which assisted a most faithful memory and discernment; and she did make very prudent and discreete reflexions upon what she had observed of the conversations among which she had at any time ben, which being continualy of persons of the best quality, she thereby improved. She had an excellent voice, to which she play'd a thorough-bass on the harpsichord, in both which she arived to that perfection, that of the schollars of those two famous masters Signors Pietro and Bartholomeo she was esteem'd the best; for the sweetnesse of her voice and management of it added such an agreeablenesse to her countenance, without any constraint or concerne, that when she sung, it was as charming to the eye as to the eare; this I rather note, because it was a universal remarke, and for which so many noble and judicious persons in musiq desired to heare her, the last being at Lord Arundel's of Wardour (see above). What shall 1 say, or rather not say, of the cheerefullness and agreeablenesse of her humour ? condescending to the meanest servant in the family, or others, she still kept up respect, without the least pride. She would often reade to them, examine, instruct, and pray with them if they were sick, so as she was exceedingly beloved of every body. Piety was so prevalent an ingredient in her constitution (as I may say) that even amongst equals and superiors she no sooner became intimately acquainted, but she would endeavour to improve them, by insinuating something of religious, and that tended to bring them to a love of devotion; she had one or two confidents with whom she used to passe whole dayes In fasting, reading and prayers, especialy before the monethly communion and other solemn occasions. She abhorr'd flattery, and tho' she had aboundance of witt, the raillery was so innocent and ingenuous that it was most agreeable; she sometimes would see a play, but since the stage grew licentious, express'd herselfe weary of them, and the time spent at the theater was an unaccountable vanity. She never play'd at cards without extreame importunity and for the company, but this was so very seldome that I cannot number it among any thing she could name a fault. No one could read prose or verse better or with more judgment; and as she read, so she writ, not only most correct orthography, with that maturitie of judgment and exactnesse of the periods, choice of expressions, and familiarity of stile, that some letters of hers have astonish'd me and others to whom she has occasionally written. She had a talent of rehersing any comical part or poeme, as to them she might be decently free with was more pleasing than heard on yb theater; she daunc'd with the greatest grace I had ever seene, and so would her master say, who was Monsr Isaac; but she seldome shew'd that perfection, save in the gracefullnesse of her carriage, which was with an aire of spritely modestie not easily to be described. Nothing affected, but natural and easy as well in her deportment as in her discourse, which was always materiall, not trifling, and to which the extraordinary sweetnesse of her tone, even in familiar speaking, was very charming. Nothing was so pretty as her descending to play with little children, whom she would caresse and humour with greate delight. But she most affected to be with grave and sober men, of whom she might learne something, and improve herselfe. I have ben assisted by her in reading and praying by me; comprehensive of uncommon notions, curious of knowing every thing to some excesse, had I not sometimes repressed it. Nothing was so delightfull to her as to go into my study, where she would willingly have spent whole dayes, for as I sayd she had read aboundance of history, and all the best poets, even Terence, Plautus, Homer, Virgil, Horace, Ovid; all the .best romances and modern poemes; she could compose happily, and put in pretty symbols, as in the Mundus Mulie bris, wherein is an enumeration of the immense variety of the modes and ornaments belonging to the sex; but all these are vaine trifles to the virtues which adorn'd her soule; she was sincerely religious, most dutifull to her parents, whom she lov'd with an affection temper'd with greate esteeme, so as we were easy and free^ and never were so well pleas'd as when she was with us, nor needed we other conversation; she was kind to her sisters, and was still improving them by her constant course of piety. Oh deare, sweete, and desireable child, how shall I part with all this goodness and virtue without the bittemesse of sorrow and reluctancy of a tender parent! Thy affection, duty, and love to me was that of a friend as well as a child. Nor lesse deare to thy mother, whose example and tender care of thee was unparellel'd, nor was thy returne to her lesse conspicuous; Oh ! how she mourns thy loss! how desolate hast thou left us! To the grave shall we both carry thy memory!
God alone (in whose bosom thou art at rest and happy !) give us to resigne thee and all our contentments (for thou indeede wert all in this world) to his blessed pleasure ! Let him be glorified by our submission, and give us grace to blesse him for the graces he planted in thee, thy virtuous life, pious and holy death, which is indeede the onely comfort of our soules, hastening thro' the infinite love and mercy of the Lord Jesus to be shortly with thee, deare child, and with thee and those blessed saints like thee, glorifye the Redeemer of the world to all eternity ! Amen !
It was in the 19th year of her age that this sicknesse happen'd to her. An accident contributed to this disease; she had an apprehension of it in particular, and which struck her but two days before she came home, by an imprudent gentlewoman whom she went with Lady Falkland to visite, who after they had ben a good while in the house, told them she had a servant sick of the small pox (who indeede died the next day); this my poore child acknowledg'd made an impression on her spirits. There were foure gentlemen of quality offering to treate with me about marriage, and I freely gave her her owne choice, knowing her discretion. She showed great indifference to marrying at all, for truly, says she to her mother (the other day), were I assur'd of your life and my deare father's, never would I part from you; I love you and this home, where we serve God, above all things, nor ever shall I be so happy; I know and consider the vicissitudes of the world, I have some experience of its vanities, and but for decency more than inclination, and that you judge it expedient for me, I would not change my condition, but rather add the fortune you designe me to my sisters, and keepe up the reputation of our family, This was so discreetly and sincerely utter'd that it could not but proceede from an extraordinary child, and one who lov'd her parents beyond example.
At London she tooke this fatal disease, and the occasion of her being there was this; my Anthony Carey 5th Viscount Falkland 1656-1694 (29) Rebecca Lytton Viscountess Falkland -1709 having ben our neighbour (as he was Treasurer of the Navy), she tooke so greate an affection to my daughter, that when they went back in the autumn to the Citty, nothing would satisfie their incessant importunity but letting her accompany my Lady, and staying sometime with her; it was with yc greatest reluctance I complied. Whilst she was there, my Anthony Carey 5th Viscount Falkland 1656-1694 (29) being musical, when I saw my Lady would not part with her till Christmas, I was not unwilling she should improve the opportunity of learning of Signr Pietro, who had an admirable way both of composure and teaching. It was the end of February before I could prevail with my Lady to part with her; but my Lord going into Oxfordshire to stand for Knight of the Shire there, she express'd her wish to come home, being tir'd of ye vain and empty conversation of the towne, ye theatres, the court, and trifling visites wch consum'd so much precious time, and made her sometimes misse of that regular course of piety that gave her ye greatest satisfaction. She was weary of this life, and I think went not thrice to Court all this time, except when her mother or I carried her. She did not affect shewing herselfe, she knew ye Court well, and pass'd one summer in it at Windsor with Lady Tuke one of the Queene's women of the bed chamber (a most virtuous relation of hers); she was not fond of that glittering scene, now become abominably licentious, though there was a designe of Henrietta Boyle Countess Rochester 1646-1687 (39) and Flower Backhouse Countess Clarendon -1700 to have made her a maid of honour to the Queene as soon as there was a vacancy. But this she did not set her heart upon, nor in deede on any thing so much as the service of God, a quiet and regular life, and how she might improve herselfe in the most necessary accomplishments, and to wch she was ariv'd at so greate a measure. This is y° little history and imperfect character of my deare child, whose piety, virtue, and incomparable endowments deserve a monument more durable than brasse and marble. Precious is the memorial of the just.
Much I could enlarge on every peribd of this hasty account, but that I ease and discharge my overcoming passion for the present, so many things worthy an excellent Christian and dutifull child crowding upon me. Never can I say enough, oh deare, my deare child, whose memory is so precious to me! This deare child was born at Wotton in the same house and chamber in which I first drew my breath, my wife having retir'd to my brother there in the great sicknesse that yeare upon the first of that moneth, and neere the ve'ry houre that I was borne, upon the last : viz. October. 16 March. She was interr'd in the South-east end of the St Paul's Church, Deptford, neere her grandmother and severall of my younger children and relations. My desire was she should have ben carried and layed among my own parents and relations at Wotton, where I desire to be interr'd myselfe, when God shall call me out of this uncertaine transitory life, but some circumstances did not permit it. Our vicar Dr. Holden preach'd her funeral sermon on Philipians Chapter 1 Verse 21. "For to me to live is Christ and to die is gaine," upon which he made an apposite discourse, as those who heard it assur'd me (for griefe suffer'd me not to be present), concluding with a modest recital of her many virtues and signal piety, so as to draw both teares and admiration from the hearers. I was not altogether unwilling that something of this sort should be spoken, for the edification and encouragement of other young people. Divers noble persons honour'd her funeral, some in person, others sending their coaches, of wch there were six or seven with six horses, viz. the Anne Digby Countess Sunderland 1646-1715 (39), Henry Hyde 2nd Earl Clarendon -1709, Francis Godolphin 2nd Earl Godolphin 1678-1766 (6), Stephen Fox Paymaster 1627-1716 (57), Sr Wm Godolphin, Viscount Falkland, and others. There were distributed amongst her friends about 60 rings. Thus liv'd, died, and was buried the joy of my life, and ornament of her sex and of my poore family ! God Almighty of his infinite mercy grant me the grace thankfully to resigne myselfe and all I have, or had, to his Divine pleasure, and in his good time, restoring health and comfort to my family : " teach me so to number my days that I may apply my heart to wisdom," be prepar'd for my dissolution, and that into the hands of my blessed Saviour I may recommend my spirit ! Amen !
On looking into her closet, it is incredible what a number of collections she had made from historians, poetes, travellers, &c. but above all devotions, contemplations, and resolutions on these contemplations, found under her hand in a booke most methodicaly dispos'd; prayers, meditations, and devotions on particular occasions, with many pretty letters to her confidants; one to a divine (not nam'd) to whom she writes that he would be her ghostly father, and would not despise her for her many errors and the imperfections of her youth, but beg of God to give her courage to acquaint him with all her faults, imploring his assistance and spiritual directions. I well remember she had often desir'd me to recommend her to such a person, but I did not think fit to do it as yet, seeing her apt to be scrupulous, and knowing the great innocency and integrity of her life. It is astonishing how one who had acquir'd such substantial and practical knowledge in other ornamental parts of education, especialy music both vocal and instrumental, In dauncing, paying and receiving visites, and necessary conversation, could accomplish halfe of what she has left; but as she never affected play or cards, which consume a world of precious time, so she was in continual exercise, which yet abated nothing of her most agreeable conversation. But she was a little miracle while she liv'd, and so she died!.

Around 1665 Peter Lely 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Henrietta Boyle Countess Rochester 1646-1687 (19). One of the Windsor Beauties.

Before 1666 Peter Lely 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Digby Countess Sunderland 1646-1715. One of the Windsor Beauties.

Around 1725 Johnathan "The Elder" Richardson 1667-1745 (57). Portrait of Francis Godolphin 2nd Earl Godolphin 1678-1766 (46).

Before 1725. John James Baker -1725. Portrait of Stephen Fox Paymaster 1627-1716.

Philipians Chapter 1 Verse 22

Philipians Chapter 1 Verse 22. If I am to go on living in the body, this will mean fruitful labor for me. Yet what shall I choose? I do not know!.

Philipians Chapter 2

Philipians Chapter 2 Verse 5

Philipians Chapter 2 Verse 5. KJB. Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus:.

Philipians Chapter 2 Verse 5. ESV. Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus,.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 Mar. 18 Mar 1683. I went to hear Anthony Horneck Clergyman 1641-1697 (42) preach at the Savoy Chapel Royal, Strand, on Philipians Chapter 2 Verse 5. He was a German born, a most pathetic preacher, a person of a saint-like life, and hath written an excellent treatise on Consideration.

First Letter to Timothy

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 3

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 3. KJB. Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 Mar. 17 Mar 1686. I went to my house in the country, refusing to be present at what was to passe at the Privy Seale the next day. In the morning Thomas Tenison Archbishop Canterbury 1636-1715 (49) preached an incomparable discourse at Whitehall Palace, on 2 Timothy First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 3, First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 4.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall Palace and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 4

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 4. KJB. No man that warreth entangleth himself with the affairs of this life; that he may please him who hath chosen him to be a soldier.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 Mar. 17 Mar 1686. I went to my house in the country, refusing to be present at what was to passe at the Privy Seale the next day. In the morning Thomas Tenison Archbishop Canterbury 1636-1715 (49) preached an incomparable discourse at Whitehall Palace, on 2 Timothy First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 3, First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 4.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall Palace and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 16

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 16. NIV. Beyond all question, the mystery from which true godliness springs is great: He appeared in the flesh, was vindicated by the Spirit, was seen by angels, was preached among the nations, was believed on in the world, was taken up in glory.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 Jan. 01 Jan 1687. William Wake Archbishop Canterbury 1657-1737 (29) preached at St. Martin's on First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 16, concerning the mystery of godliness. He wrote excellently, in answer to the Bishop of Meaux.

Before 1737 Thomas Gibson 1680-1751. Portrait of William Wake Archbishop Canterbury 1657-1737.

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 24

First Letter to Timothy Chapter 2 Verse 24. And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient,.

Second Letter to Timothy

Second Letter to Timothy Chapter 3

Second Letter to Timothy Chapter 3 Verse 16

Second Letter to Timothy Chapter 3 Verse 16. NIV. All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness,.

First Letter to the Hebrews

Hebrews Chapter 12

Hebrews Chapter 12 Verse 15

Hebrews Chapter 12 Verse 15. KJB. Looking diligently lest any man fail of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble you, and thereby many be defiled;.

Hebrews Chapter 12 Verse 15. ESV. See to it that no one fails to obtain the grace of God; that no “root of bitterness” springs up and causes trouble, and by it many become defiled;.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 Mar. 07 Mar 1684. Richard Meggot -1692, Dean Winchester, preached an incomparable sermon, (the Charles II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (53) being now gone to Newmarket,) on Hebrews Chapter 12 Verse 15. shewing and pathetically pressing the care we ought to have least we come short of the grace of God. Afterwards I went to visite Thomas Tenison Archbishop Canterbury 1636-1715 (47) at Kensington, whither he was retired to refresh after he had ben sick of the small pox.

Letter to James

James Chapter 2

James Chapter 2 Verse 12

James Chapter 2 Verse 12. NIV. Speak and act as those who are going to be judged by the law that gives freedom,.

James Chapter 2 Verse 12. ESV. So speak and so act as those who are to be judged under the law of liberty.

James Chapter 2 Verse 12. KJV. So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 Oct. 26 Oct 1684. John Goodmand Preacher 1625-1690 (59) preach'd before the Charles II King England, Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (54) on James Chapter 2 Verse 12 concerning the law of liberty: an excellent discourse and in good method. He is author of "The Prodigal Son," a treatise worth reading, and another of the old Religion.