Biography of King Edward II of England

1254 Wedding of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile

1274 Coronation Edward I

1290 Death of Eleanor of Castile

1297 Marriage of Princess Elizabeth and John of Holland

1301 Edward II Created Prince of Wales

1307 Death of Edward I

1307 Return of Piers Gaveston

1307 Marriage of Piers Gaveston and Margaret de Clare

1307 Tournament at Wallingford

1308 Boulogne Agreement

1308 King Edward II and Isabella of France arrive in England

1308 Coronation of Edward II and Isabella

1308 de Clare and de Burgh Double Marriage

1308 Marriage of King Edward II and Isabella of France

1311 Council of Ordainers

1311 Exile of Piers Gaveston

1312 Gaveston's Escape from Newcastle

1312 Gaveston Returns from Exile

1314 Battle of Bannockburn

1315 Funeral of Piers Gaveston

1321 Siege of Leeds Castle

1322 Despencer War Executions

1323 Battle of Boroughbridge

1327 Coronation of Edward III

1327 Death of Edward II

1327 Abdication of Edward II

1358 Death of Isabella of France Queen Consort

1376 Creation of Garter Knights


Family Trees

Descent

Ancestry

Wedding of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile

On 01 Nov 1254 [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (15) and [his mother] Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (13) were married (he was her second-cousin once-removed) at Abbey of Santa Maria la Real de Huelgas.

Coronation Edward I

On 19 Aug 1274 [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (35) was crowned I King England: Plantagenet Angevin at Westminster Abbey. [his mother] Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (33) was crowned Queen Consort England. .

On 25 Apr 1284 King Edward II of England was born to [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (44) and [his mother] Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (43) at Caernarfon Castle.

On 30 Apr 1290 Gilbert "Red Earl" Clare 7th Earl Gloucester, 6th Earl Hertford 1243-1295 (46) and [his sister] Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester, Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (18) were married at Clerkenwell. Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester, Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (18) by marriage Countess Gloucester (1C 1121), Earl Hertford (1C 1138).

Death of Eleanor of Castile

On 28 Nov 1290 [his mother] Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (49) died at Harby. Her viscera were buried at Lincoln Cathedral.

On Jan 1297 Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer 1270-1325 (27) and [his sister] Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester, Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (24) were married in secret greatly offending her father [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (57). Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer 1270-1325 (27) was imprisoned; he was released in Aug 1297.

Marriage of Princess Elizabeth and John of Holland

On 08 Jan 1297 John Gerulfing I Count Holland 1284-1299 (13) and [his sister] Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex, Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (14) were married at Ipswich. Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex, Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (14) by marriage Countess Holland. The wedding was attended by her sister [his sister] Margaret Plantagenet Duchess Brabant 1275-1333 (21), her father [his father] King Edward I (57), her brother Edward (12) and her future second husband Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (21).

On 08 Sep 1299 [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (60) and Margaret of France Queen Consort England 1279-1318 (20) were married (he was her first-cousin once-removed). Margaret of France Queen Consort England 1279-1318 (20) by marriage Queen Consort England.

Edward II Created Prince of Wales

On 07 Feb 1301 King Edward II of England (16) was appointed Prince Wales by his father [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (61); the first English heir to receive the title. Created Earl Chester the same day.

On 14 Nov 1302 Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (26) and [his sister] Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex, Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (20) were married (he was her third-cousin). Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex, Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (20) by marriage Countess Essex (3C 1239), Earl Hereford (6C 1199). Westminster Abbey.

John of Fordun's Chronicle of the Scottish Nation Volume IV - The King of England scours the plains and hills, and brings the Kingdom of Scotland under peaceful subjection to himself. In revenge for the foregoing outrages, the [his father] king of England (63), with a very large force, both by sea and by land, entered Scotland, in the year 1303, with the deliberate design of once for all fully bringing it, and the dwellers therein, under his yoke ; or, of sweeping out the inhabitants altogether, and reducing the land itself to an utter and irreclaimable wilderness. Having, therefore, scoured the hills and plains, both on this side of the hills and beyond them, he, in person, reached Lochindorb ; and, after making some stay there, he received the submission of the northern districts, and appointed officers of his in all the castles and fortified towns surrendered to him. Eeturning thence leisurely, he received the submission of all the communities, as well as fortresses and castles they passed through, with none to withstand or attack him ; and, after much winding about through the land, he got to Dunfermline, where he lingered a long time, wintering there until Candlemas. The same year, his son and heir, Edward of Carnarvon (18), Prince of Wales, made a long stay in the town of Perth. Food was in such plenty there, for the whole of the aforesaid time, that a laggen, Scottish measure, of good wine sold for fourpence.

John of Fordun's Chronicle of the Scottish Nation Volume IV - Stirling Castle besieged by the King of England. Just after Easter, in the year 1304, that same king besieged Strivelyn Castle for three months without a break. For this siege, he commanded all the lead of the refectory of Saint Andrews to be pulled down, and had it taken away for the use of his engines. At last, the aforesaid castle was surrendered and delivered unto him on certain conditions, drawn up in writing, and sealed with his seal. But when he had got the castle, the [his father] king (64) belied his troth, and broke through the conditions: for William Oliphant, the warden thereof, he threw bound into prison in London, and kept him a long time in thrall. The same year, when both great and small in the kingdom of Scotland (except William Wallace alone) had made their submission unto him ; when the surrendered castles and fortified towns, which had formerly been broken down and knocked to pieces, had been all rebuilt, and he had appointed wardens of his own therein ; and after all and sundry of Scottish birth had tendered him homage, the king (64), with the Prince of Wales (19), and his whole army, returned to England. He left, however, the chief warden as his lieutenant, to amend and control the lawlessness of all the rest, both Scots and English. He did not show his face in Scotland after this.

Around 1305 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (21) assigned to the household of the young (future) King Edward II of England (20).

On 26 Feb 1307 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (23) exiled by [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (67) for being his son Edward's (22) favourite.

On 23 Apr 1307 [his sister] Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester, Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (35) died at Clare.

Death of Edward I

On 07 Jul 1307 [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (68) died at Burgh by Sands whilst on his way north to Scotland. His son King Edward II of England (23) succeeded II King England: Plantagenet Angevin.
Edward (68) had gathered around him Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (29), Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl Warwick 1272-1315 (35), Aymer Valence 2nd Earl Pembroke 1275-1324 (32) and Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (33) and charged them with looking after his son in particular ensuring Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (23) didn't return from exile.

Return of Piers Gaveston

On 06 Aug 1307 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (23) was appointed 1st Earl Cornwall (5C 1307) by King Edward II of England (23) to the shock of the nobility; Earl Cornwall usually reserved for the heir. The earldom gave Gaveston substantial landholdings over great parts of England, to the value of £4,000 a year. These possessions consisted of most of Cornwall, as well as parts of Devonshire in the south-west, land in Berkshire and Oxfordshire centred on the honour of Wallingford, most of the eastern part of Lincolnshire, and the honour of Knaresborough in Yorkshire, with the territories that belonged to it.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 06 Aug 1307 King Edward II (23). Dumfries. To the treasurer and the barons of the Exchequer. Order to discharge the Abbot of Hayles of 50l.Yearly, which he used to pay for the town of Leechelade to the late Edmund earl of Cornwall, and, after his death, to the late King, the king having granted the earldom of Cornwall and all the lands of the said Edmund to Peter de Gavaston, knight.
To the like favour of Michael de Meldon for 4 marks annually for his lands in Worton.

Marriage of Piers Gaveston and Margaret de Clare

On 02 Nov 1307 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (23) and Margaret Clare Countess Gloucester -1342 were married. Arranged by King Edward II of England (23). Margaret Clare Countess Gloucester -1342 grand-daughter of Edward I through his daughter Joan and, as such, significantly higher than Gaveston in the nobility.

Tournament at Wallingford

On 02 Dec 1307 King Edward II of England (23) held a tournament to celebrate Piers Gaveston's (23) recent wedding. Gaveston (23) took the opportunity to humiliate the older nobility including John Warenne 7th Earl Surrey 1286-1347 (21), Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (31) and Edmund Fitzalan 9th Earl Arundel 1285-1326 (22) further increasing his unpopularity.

After 02 Dec 1307 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 exiled as a result of the nobilty forcing King Edward II of England to do so.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 12 Dec 1307 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To John de Brittania, earl of Richmond, [keeper] of Scotland. Order to restore to Aymer de Valencia (32), earl of Pembrok, his lands, etc., in the counties of Sellekyrk and Twedale and in the forest of Sellekyrk, which he has seized into the king's hands because the men and tenants of the same had late traitoroursly adhered to Robert de Brus (33), the king's enemy and rebel.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 08 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23) To the Sheriff of Leicester. Order to cause a coroner for that county to be elected in place of John de Noveray, of Burton, lately elected in the late King's reign, who is insufficiently qualified.
Memorandum, that on Sunday before the Feast of St Vincent the Martyr [22 Jan], at Dover in the King's chamber in the Priory of St Martin, Dover, in the evening (crepsusculo noctis), in the presence of William Inge, knight, William de Melton and Adam de Osgoodby, clerks, John Langton Bishop of Chichester -1337Sir William Melton to be carried with him in the wardrobe beyond sea; and the King straightaway delivered by his own hand another seal of his shortly before made anew at London for the government of the realm in the King's absence in a red bag (bursa) sealed with the seal of William Inge to the chancellor. With which seal the chancellor caused writs to be sealed, after the King's passage, in the hospital of Domus Dei, under the testimony of Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24) then Keeper of the realm of England, on the Monday next following, on which day the King in the early morning (summo mane) passed the sea at Dover.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 22 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. Robert Terry, of Whytefield, imprisoned at Northampton for the death of Galianus de Bek, has letters to the Sheriff of Nottingham to bail him until the first assize. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 22 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover To the Sheriff of Kent. Order to provide 75 thousands of wood and 200 quarters of charcoal for the expenses of the King's household on his return from parts beyond the sea, so that he have at Dover against the King's return 25 thousands of wood and 30 quarters of coal, and at Canterbury 30 thousands of wood and 100 quarters of coal, and at Rochester (Rofham) 20 thousands of wood and 70 quarters of coal; to be delivered by indenture to John de Sumery, scullion (scutell') of the king's household, or such as supply his place. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 24 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Canterbury. To the Sheriffs of London. Order to deliver John de la Dune, Roger de Hopton, Richard le Harpour, Roger de Soppewalle, Roger le Keu, Rober le Hunt, Thomas de Sydenham, Henry le Gardener, Thomas de la More, Philip Kemp, John le Wayt, and John le Wodeward, the men and servants of Adam de Kyngeshemede, in the King's prison of Newgate for a trespass committed by them upon the King's men at Westminster, from prison upon their finding sufficient mainpernors to have them before the King (23) or his Lieutenant in the quinzaine of the Purification of St Mary to stand to right concerning the said trespass. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 24 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To John Sampson (61), constable of the king's castle of Scardeburgh. Order to permit Henry Percy (34) and his consort and their household to dwell in the houses within the said castle, provided that the castle be safely guarded.

Marriage of King Edward II and Isabella of France

On 25 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23) and [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (13) were married (he was her second-cousin once-removed) at Boulogne-sur-Mer.

Boulogne Agreement

On 31 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23) signed the Boulogne Agreement.

On 31 Jan 1308 a group of England's leading nobles signed the Boulogne Agreement that attempted to curtail King Edward's (23) rule. The signatories included Antony Bek, Bishop of Durham and Patriarch of Jerusalem, John Warenne 7th Earl Surrey 1286-1347 (21), Aymer Valence 2nd Earl Pembroke 1275-1324 (33), Henry Lacy 3rd Earl Lincoln, 4th Earl Salisbury 1251-1311 (57) and Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl Warwick 1272-1315 (36).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 03 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Ewell. To the Treasurer and the Barons of the Exchequer. Whereas the king lately commanded them to put into execution all the writs of the late King pending in the exchequer, and although the late King commanded his treasurer and barons of the exchquer, at the supplication of the burgesses of Great Yarmouth, by his writ now in the exchequer, as the said burgesses assert, to allow them 1,000 marks in which the late king was bound to them for a loan in the time when John de Kirkeby was his treasurer, and 1,760l. for the arrears of the wages of divers men sent by them to the late King's command into Gascony for the expedition of this war and for remaining there for a great time, and also for 250l.which they expended, by the order of the late King, in the making of two galleys (galiarum) in the said town, and also 780l. for the wages of certain sailors and divers other costs expended by them at divers times for the expedition of the war in Scotland, to be allowed to them out of the debts owing by them to the said late King, as well as the tenth, eleventh, sixth, seventh, twentieth, and thirtieth granted by the community of the kingdom to the late King, as from other causes whatsoever; they are ordered to execute the said writs. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

King Edward II and Isabella of France arrive in England

Fine Rolls Edward II. On 07 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23) and [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (13) returned from their wedding in Boulogne-sur-Mer to Dover.

07 Feb 1308. Be it remembered that on Wednesday after the Purification, Edward II (23), the king, returning from beyond seas, to wit, from Boulogne-sur-Mer, where he took to wife Isabel (13), daughter of the king of France (39), touched at Dover in his barge about the ninth hour [1500], Hugh le Despenser (46) and the lord of Castellione of Gascony being in his company, and the queen a little afterward touched there with certain ladies accompanying her, and because the great seal which had been taken with him beyond seas then remained in the keeping of the keeper of the wardrobe who could not arrive on that day, no writ was sealed from the hour of the king's coming until Friday following on which day the bishop of Chichester, chancellor, about the ninth hour [1500] delivered to the king in his chamber in Dover castle the seal used in England during the king's absence, and the king, receiving the same, delivered it to William de Melton (33), controller of the wardrobe, and forthwith delivered with his own hand to the chancellor the great seal under the seal of J. de Benstede, keeper of the wardrobe, and Master John Painter Fraunceis, in the presence of Thomas, earl of Lancaster (30), Peter, earl of Cornwall (24), and Hugh le Despenser (46), William Martyn and William Inge, knights, and Adam de Osgodby, clerk ; and the chancellor on that day after lunch in his room (hospicio) in God's House, Dover, sealed writs with the great seal.

Coronation of Edward II and Isabella

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 08 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. To William Leybourne. Order to attend the king's coronation with his wife on Sunday next after the feast of St Valentine.
The like to seventy others in various counties.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 09 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. To Alice, late wife of Roger Bigod, earl of Norfolk and Marshall of England. Order to meet the king at Dover on his return from France with his consort about Sunday next after the Feast of the Purification of St Mary. Witnessed by Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).
The like to:
[his sister] Elizabeth, countess of Hereford and Essex (25).
Henry de Lancastre (27)
Robert de Monte Alto
Almaric de Sancto Amando[Ibid]
To R Archbishop of Canterbury (63). Order to attend the king's coronaion on Sunday next after the feast of St Valentine [14 Feb] at Westminster, to execute what pertains to his office.
To the Sheriff of Surrey. Order to proclaim in market towns, etc., that no knight, esquire, or other shall, under pain of forfeiture, pressure to tourney or make jousts or bordices (torneare, justos seu burdseicas facere), or otherwise go armed at Croydon or elsewhere before the king's coronation.

Coronation of Edward II and Isabella

On 25 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23) was crowned II King England: Plantagenet Angevin at Westminster Abbey by Henry Woodlock, Bishop of Winchester. [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (13) was crowned Queen Consort England.
Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24) carried the Royal Crown.
William Marshal 1st Baron Marshal 1277-1314 (30) carried the Gilt Spurs.
Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (32) carried the Royal Sceptre.
Henry Plantagenet 3rd Earl of Leicester 3rd Earl Lancaster 1281-1345 (27) carried the Royal Rod.
Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (30) carried the sword Curtana (the sword of Edward the Confessor).
Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (20) carried the table bearing the Royal Robes.
Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (28) and Robert Fitzwalter 1st Baron Fitzwalter 1247-1326 (61) attended.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 06 Mar 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To Thomas de la Hide, late steward of Cornwall and Sheriff of the same. Order to deliver to Peter de Gavaston (24), knight, all the ferms, rents, and issues of the said County from Michaelmas last, and of the lands of the late Edmund earl of Cornwall, the king having granted to the said Peter the county of Cornwall, and all the lands of the said Edmund.
The like to John de Tresimple, for the ferms, etc., of the manor, etc.
The like to Walter de Gloucester, escheator this side of Trent, for the ferms, etc., of the manors.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 17 Mar 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Westminster. To John Sampson (61), constable of the king's castle of Scardeburgh. Order to permit Henry Percy and his consort and their household to dwell in the houses within the said castle, provided that the castle be safely guarded.

de Clare and de Burgh Double Marriage

On 29 Sep 1308 (possibly 30th) in a Double Marriage de Clare siblings married de Burgh siblings at Waltham Abbey, Waltham in the presence of King Edward II of England (24). John Burgh 1286-1313 (22) and Elizabeth Clare Lady Verdun 1295-1360 (13) were married John Burgh 1286-1313 (22) and Elizabeth Clare Lady Verdun 1295-1360 (13) were married.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. On 01 Aug 1309 King Edward II of England (25). Stamford. Order to proclaim in his full county [court] and elsewhere that no merchant or other, shall, under pain of forfeiture, carry armour, corn, meat, or other victuals to the king's enemies the Scots, who have brokern the truce, or communicate with them in any way.
To all like sheriffs in England.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. On 16 Jan 1310 King Edward II of England (25). Stamford. To the Sheriff of York. Order to proclaim that the king does not intend to change the money current in the Kingdom in the late King's time, as had been rumoured, and to forbid anyone from thinking little of it, whereby victuals and other necessaries may be sold more dearly.
The like to all the Sheriffs of England [Ibid].
Enrolment of deed of Peter de Gavaston (26), knight, surrendering to the king the castle, manor, and honour of Knaresborough, with the free chase of Knaresborough, and the manors of Routheclyve and Auldburgh, lately granted to him by the King for his lifetime. Witnesses: Gilbert Clare 8th Earl Gloucester, 7th Earl Hertford -1314, Henry Lacy 3rd Earl Lincoln, 4th Earl Salisbury 1251-1311 (59), John Warenne 7th Earl Surrey 1286-1347 (23), John de Brittania, Earl of Richmond, Hugh "Elder" Despencer 1st Earl Winchester 1261-1326 (48), Henry Percy 1st Baron Percy 1273-1314 (36), Robert son of Walter, Robert son of Payn, William de Burford, William Inge. Dated at Stamford July 26, 3 Edward II.
Enrolment of like surrender by the said Peter (26) of the county of Gaure and the castles of Talanon, Tantalon, and Mauleon, the provostships (preposituras) and Camparian(um) called 'la Cointal' and of the city of Bayonne, the manor of Erebafaveyra, Born, Comtad, Salmun, Dagenes, and the island of Oleron, and the lands of Marempne and of Lancras in Saintogne, and all rights, appurtenances, etc., etc., thereto pertaining to the king, which the king lately granted him for life. Witnesses as above. Dated August 4, 3 Edward II.
Memorandum, that this deed was delivered to the king in his chamber in the House of the Friars Preachers, Stamford at Stamford, by the hands of the said Peter (26) and the king delivered the said deed to J his chancellor, to be enrolled in the chancery, and it was afterwards delivered to Ingelard de Warle, keeper of the King's Wardrobe to be kept in the king's wardrobe, but the king's charters that the said Peter hereof were not then restored.[CONTINUES].

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 16 Jan 1310 King Edward II of England (25). The Grove, Watford. To the Treasurer and the Barons of the Exchequer. Order to discharge the Abbot of Hayles of 100l.yearly, the rent of the manor of Lychelad, as the King granted it to Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (26) and Margaret his wife.
To the same. Order to discharge the men of Wallingford of the ferm of that town from August 5 last, to Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (26) and Margaret his wife.

Council of Ordainers

Around 19 Mar 1311 the nobility attempt to constrain King Edward II of England (26) by imposing a Council of Ordainers upon him. The Council included twenty-one signatories including:
Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl Warwick 1272-1315 (39)
Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (36)
Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (33)
Gilbert Clare 8th Earl Gloucester, 7th Earl Hertford -1314
Henry Lacy 3rd Earl Lincoln, 4th Earl Salisbury 1251-1311
John Capet 5th Earl Richmond 1266-1334 (45)
William Marshal 1st Baron Marshal 1277-1314 (33), and
Aymer Valence 2nd Earl Pembroke 1275-1324 (36).

Exile of Piers Gaveston

In Apr 1311 Parliament exiled Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (27). Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (27) was appointed Lieutenant Ireland by King Edward II of England (26) who immediately started to plot for his return.

In 1312 [his half-brother] Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300-1338 (11) was created 1st Earl Norfolk (3C 1312).

Gaveston Returns from Exile

On 13 Jan 1312 King Edward II of England (27) and Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (28) were reunited at Knaresborough Castle (probably).

Gaveston's Escape from Newcastle

On 04 May 1312 King Edward II of England (28) and Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (28) were at Newcastle on Tyne Castle, Newcastle on Tyne where they barely escaped a force led by Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (34), Henry Percy 1st Baron Percy 1273-1314 (39) and Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (38). Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (28) escaped to Scarborough, North Yorkshire, King Edward II of England (28) to York.

On 12 Nov 1312 [his son] King Edward III England was born to King Edward II of England (28) and [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (17) at Windsor Castle.

Battle of Bannockburn

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter III - Here the matter speaketh of some of the predecessors of king Edward of England. FIRST, the better to enter into the matter of this honourable and pleasant history of the noble [his son] Edward king of England (1), who was crowned at London the year of our Lord God MCCCXXVI., on Christmasday, living the king his father and the queen his mother, it is certain that the opinion of Englishmen most commonly was as then, and oftentimes it was seen in England after the time of king Arthur, how that between two valiant kings of England there was most commonly one between them of less sufficiency both of wit and of prowess : and this was right well apparent by the same icing Edward the third (1); for his [his father] grandfather, called the good king Edward the first, was right valiant, sage, wise and hardy, adventurous and fortunate jn all feats of war, and had much ado against the Scots, and conquered them three or four times ; for the Scots could never have victory nor endure against him : and after his decease his son of his first wife, who was father to the said good king Edward the third, was crowned king and called Edward the second (30), who resembled nothing to his father in wit nor in prowess, but governed and kept his realm right wildly, and ruled himself by sinister counsel of certain persons, whereby at length he had no profit nor land, as ye shall hear after; for anon after he was crowned, Robert Bruce king of Scotland, who had often before given much ado to the said good king Edward the first, conquered again all Scotland, and brent and wasted a great part of the realm of England, a four or five days' journey within the realm at two times, and discomfited the king and all the barons of England at a place in Scotland called Stirling, by battle arranged the day of Saint John Baptist, in the seventh year of the reign of the same king Edward, in the year of our Lord MCCCXIV. The chase of this discomfiture endured two days and two nights, and the king of England (30) went with a small company to London and on mid-lent Sunday in the year of our Lord MCCCXVI. The Scots won again the city of Berwick by treason ; but because this is no part of our matter, I will leave speaking thereof.

On 24 Jun 1314 the Scottish army of Robert "The Bruce" I King Scotland 1274-1329 (39) including, James "Black" Douglas 1286-1330 (28), heavily defeated the English army led by King Edward II of England (30) at the Battle of Bannockburn. .
Gilbert Clare 8th Earl Gloucester, 7th Earl Hertford -1314, John Comyn 4th Lord Baddenoch 1294-1314, Robert Felton 1st Baron Felton 1270-1314 and William Vesci -1314 were killed.
William Marshal 1st Baron Marshal 1277-1314 (36) was killed. On 24 Jun 1314 His son John Marshal 2nd Baron Marshal 1292-1317 (22) succeeded 2nd Baron Marshal.
Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (40) was killed. His son Roger Clifford 2nd Baron Clifford 1300-1322 (14) succeeded 2nd Baron Clifford.
John Lovell 2nd Baron Lovel 1289-1314 (25) was killed. His son John Lovell 3rd Baron Lovel -1347 succeeded 3rd Baron Lovel of Titchmarsh.
Henry Bohun -1314 was killed by Robert "The Bruce" I King Scotland 1274-1329 (39).
Walter Fauconberg 2nd Baron Fauconberg 1264-1318 (50) possilby died although his death is also reported as being on 31 Dec 1318.
Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (38), Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (38), Goronwy ap Tudur Hen Tudor -1331, Henry Beaumont 4th Earl Buchan 1279-1340 (34), Aymer Valence 2nd Earl Pembroke 1275-1324 (39) and Robert Umfraville Earl Angus 1277-1325 (37) fought.
Pain Tiptoft 1st Baron Tibetot 1279-1314 (34) was killed. His son John Tiptoft 2nd Baron Tibetot 1313-1367 succeeded 2nd Baron Tibetot.
John Montfort 2nd Baron Montfort 1291-1314 was killed. Peter Montfort 3rd Baron Montfort 1291-1370 (23) succeeded 3rd Baron Montfort
Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (34) undertook a suicidal charge that contributed to the English defeat and subsequently blemished his career.
William Latimer 2nd Baron Latimer Corby 1276-1327 (38) was captured.
Michael Poynings 1270-1314 (44) was killed.

Funeral of Piers Gaveston

On 02 Jan 1315 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 was buried at King's Langley Priory in a lavish ceremony some two and a half years after his murder. The ceremony was attended by King Edward II of England (30) and his wife [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (20) as well as Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (39), Aymer Valence 2nd Earl Pembroke 1275-1324 (40), [his half-brother] Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300-1338 (14), Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (39), Hugh Despencer 2nd Baron Despencer 1308-1349 (7) and his son Hugh "Younger" Despencer 1286-1326 (29).

1316. Letter XXII. Mary Daughter of Edward I, a Nun at Amesbury to her Brother Edward II. 1316. Letter XXII. Mary Daughter of Edward I (36), a Nun at Amesbury to her Brother Edward II (31).
To the very high and noble prince, her very dear lord and brother, my lord Edward, by the grace of God king of England, his sister Mary sends health and all manner of honour and reverence.
Very dear sire as a long time has passed since God did his will upon our prioress Dambert, we immediately after her death sent to our very dear cousin, the lady-abbess of Fontevraud, both on my part and on that of the convent, asking for a lady from this our convent, to wit, for the Lady Isabella, whom we understand to be well able and sufficient for the office, that she might be granted to us for our prioress. And we thought, dear sire, that she (the abbess) would have willingly granted us our request, for she is bound to do so since she was brought up and veiled amongst us, and so she should neither wish nor permit that the church should be so long without prelates; but as yet we have had no answer, only we understand from certain people that she intends to send us a prioress from beyond the sea there, and a prior by her counsel out there. And know, certainly, my very dear brother, that should she send any other than one belonging to our own convent, it would prove matter of discord in the convent, and of the destruction of the goods of the church, which I know well, sire, that you would not suffer willingly and wittingly; wherefore I pray you, dearest lord and brother, and require you, both for the love of me and' of our convent, which after God trust surely in you, that you would please to send word to my said lady-abbess, that she do not undertake to burden our church with any prioress out of the convent, nor with prior other than the one we have now, but that she would
Text Missing.

On 05 May 1316 Isabel Bohun 1316- was born to Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (40) and [his sister] Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex, Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (33). His mother Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex, Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (33) died in childbirth. She was buried at Walden Abbey, Saffron Walden.

On 15 Aug 1316 [his son] John of Eltham 1st Earl Cornwall 1316-1336 was born to King Edward II of England (32) and [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (21) at Eltham Palace.

On 18 Jun 1318 [his daughter] Eleanor of Woodstock Plantagenet 1318-1355 was born to King Edward II of England (34) and [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (23) at Woodstock Palace, Woodstock. She was named for her paternal grandmother Eleanor of Castile.

On 19 Apr 1319 Thomas Beauchamp 11th Earl Warwick 1313-1386 (6) and Katherine Mortimer Countess Warwick 1314-1369 (5) were married (he was her half second-cousin once-removed). Katherine Mortimer Countess Warwick 1314-1369 (5) by marriage Countess Warwick (1C 1088). An arranged marriage although not clear who arranged it or whose ward Thomas Beauchamp 11th Earl Warwick 1313-1386 (6) was (his father Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl Warwick 1272-1315 had died four years before) - possibly by King Edward II of England (34) as a means of securing the Welsh March. The Beauchamp family established, the Mortimer family aspirational. The marriage took place after Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (31) had returned from his tenure as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and before he rebelled against King Edward II of England (34) in opposition to Hugh "Younger" Despencer 1286-1326 (33).

In 1321 [his half-brother] Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (19) was created 1st Earl Kent (5C 1321).

On 05 Jul 1321 [his daughter] Joan of the Tower Queen Consort Scotland 1321-1362 was born to King Edward II of England (37) and [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (26) at the Tower of London.

Siege of Leeds Castle

In Oct 1321 [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (26) was returning from Canterbury to London. She sought accommodation at Leeds Castle which was under the protection of Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34) the wife of Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46). Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34) refused entry to the Queen killing around six of her retinue when they tried to force entry. King Edward II of England (37) commenced the Siege of Leeds Castle. Once King Edward II of England (37) gained possession of the castle, he had the garrison hanged from the battlements. Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34), her five children, and Bartholomew "The Elder" Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh 1287-1355 (34), her nephew, were imprisoned in the Tower of London.

Despencer War Executions

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter VI - Of the earl Thomas of Lancaster and twenty-two other of the great lords and knights of England, that were beheaded. 1322. THE foresaid king Edward the second (37), father to the noble [his son] king Edward the third (9), on whom our matter is founded, this said king governed right diversely his realm by the exhortation of sir Hugh Spencer (36), who had been nourished with him sith the beginning of his yongth ; the which sir Hugh (36) had so enticed the king (37), that his father and he were the greatest masters in all the realm, and by envy thought to surmount all other barons of England ; whereby after the great discomfiture that the Scots had made at Stirling great murmuring there arose in England between. The noble barons and the king's council, and namely against sir Hugh Spencer (36). They put on him that by his counsel they were discomfited, and that he was favourable to the king of Scots. And on this point the barons had divers times communication together, to be advised what they might do, whereof Thomas earl of Lancaster (44), who was uncle to the king, was chief. And anon when sir Hugh Spencer (36) had espied this, he purveyed for remedy, for he was so great with the king (37) and so near him, that he was more beloved with the king (37) than all the world after. So on a day he came to the king (37) and said, `Sir, certain lords of your realm have made alliance together against you, and without ye take heed thereto betimes, they purpose to put you out of your realm': and so by his malicious means he caused that the king made all the said lords to be taken, and their heads to be stricken off without delay, and without knowledge or answer to any cause. First of all sir Thomas earl of Lancaster (44), who was a noble and a wise, holy knight, and hath done sith many fair miracles in Pomfret, where he was beheaded, for the which deed the said sir Hugh Spencer (36) achieved great hate in all the realm, and specially of the queen (27) and of the [his half-brother] earl of Kent (20), brother to the king (37). And when he perceived the displeasure of the queen (27), by his subtle wit he set great discord between the king and the queen (27), so that the king (37) would not see the queen nor come in her company, the which discord endured a long space. Then was it skewed to the queen (27) secretly and to the earl of Kent (20), that without they took good heed to themselves, they were likely to be destroyage to Saint Thomas of Canterbury, and so to Winchelsea, and in the night went into a ship that was ready for her, and her young son Edward (9) with her, and the earl of Kent (20) and sir Roger Mortimer (34), and in another ship they had put all their purveyance, and had wind at will, and the next morning they arrived in the haven of Boulogne.

Before May 1322 John Giffard 2nd Baron Giffard Brimpsfield 1287-1322 was executed by King Edward II of England for being a rebel.

Battle of Boroughbridge

On 03 Mar 1323 Andrew Harclay 1st Earl Carlisle 1270-1323 (53) was hanged at Carlisle for having negotiated a truce with the Scots despite having successfuly defeated the rebels at the Battle of Boroughbridge a year before for which he was enobled by King Edward II of England (38).

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter VII - How the queen of England went and complained her to the king of France her brother of sir Hugh Spencer. 1324. WHEN queen Isabel (29) was arrived at Boulogne, and her [his son] son (11) with her and the [his half-brother] earl of Kent (22), the captains and abbot of the town came against her and joyously received her and her company into the abbey, and there she abode two days: then she departed and rode so long by her journeys that she arrived at Paris. Then king Charles (29) her brother, who was informed of her coming, sent to meet her divers of the greatest lords of his realm, as the lord sir Robert de Artois (37), the lord of Coucy, the lord of Sully, the lord of Roye and divers other, who honourably did receive her and brought her into the city of Paris to the king her brother (29). And when the king (29) saw his sister (29), whom he had not seen long before, as she should have entered into his chamber he met her and took her in his arms and kissed her, and said, ` Ye be welcome, fair sister, with my fair nephew your son,' and took them by the hands and led them forth. The queen, who had no great joy at her heart but that she was so near to the king her brother, she would have kneeled down two or three times at the feet of the king, but the king would not suffer her, but held her still by the right hand, demanding right sweetly of her estate and business. And she answered him right sagely, and lamentably recounted to him all the felonies and injuries done to her by sir Hugh Spencer (38), and required him of his aid and comfort. When the noble King Charles of France (29) had heard his sister's lamentation, who weepingly had shewed him all her need and business, be said to her : ` Fair sister, appease yourself, for by the faith I owe to God and to Saint Denis I shall right well purvey for you some remedy.' The queen then kneeled down, whether the king would or not, and said: 'My right dear lord and fair brother, I pray God reward you.' The king then took her in his arms and led her into another chamber, the which was apparelled for her and for the young Edward her son, and so departed from her, and caused at his costs and charges all things to be delivered that was behoveful for her and for her son. After it was not long, but that for this occasion Charles king of France (29) assembled together many great lords and barons of the realm of France, to have their counsel and good advice how they should ordain for the need and besynes of his sister queen of England. Then it was counselled to the king that he should let the queen his sister to purchase for herself friends, whereas she would, in the realm of France or in any other place, and himself to feign and be not known thereof; for they said, to move war with the king of England (39), and to bring his own realm into hatred, it were nothing appertinent nor profitable to him nor to his realm. But they concluded that conveniently he might aid her with gold and silver, for that is the metal whereby love is attained both of gentlemen and of poor soldiers. And to this counsel and advice accorded the king, and caused this to be shewed to the queen privily by sir Robert d'Artois (37), who as then was one of the greatest lords of all France.

In 1325 [his half-brother] Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (23) and Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (27) were married. Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (27) by marriage Countess Kent (5C 1321).

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XI - How the queen of England besieged the king her husband in the town of Bristow. Oct 1326. AND then this tiding spread about the realm so much, that at the last it came to the knowledge of the lords by whom the queen (31) was called again into England. And they apparelled them in all haste to come to [his son] Edward (13) her son, whom they would have to their sovereign lord. And the first that came and gave them most comfort was Henry earl of Lancaster (45) with the wry neck, called Tort Col, who was brother to Thomas earl of Lancaster, beheaded as ye have heard herebefore, who was a good knight and greatly recommended, as ye shall hear after in this history. This earl Henry (45) came to the queen (31) with great company of men of war, and after him came from one part and other earls, barons, knights and squires, with so much people that they thought them clean out of perils, and always increased their power as they went forward. Then they took counsel among them that they should ride straight to the town of Bristow, whereas the king (42) was, and with him the Spencers. The which was a good town and a strong, and well closed, standing on a good port of the sea, and a strong castle, the sea beating round about it. And therein was the king (42) and Sir Hugh Spencer the elder (65), who was about ninety of age, and Sir Hugh Spencer (40) his son, who was chief governour of the king (42) and counselled him in all his evil deeds. Also there was the earl of Arundel (20), who had wedded the daughter (14) of sir Hugh Spencer (40), and di at Bristow, and besieged the town round about as near as they might: and the king (42) and sir Hugh Spencer the younger (40) held them in the castle, and the old sir Hugh Spencer (65) and the earl of Arundel (20) held them in the town. And when the people of the town saw the great power that the queen (31) was of (for almost all England was of her accord), and perceived what peril and danger evidently they were in, they took counsel among themselves and determined that they would yield up the town to the queen (31), so that their lives and goods might be saved. And so they sent to treat with the queen and her council in this matter ; but the queen nor her council would not agree thereto without she might do with sir Hugh Spencer (65) and with the earl of Arundel (20) what it pleased her. When the people of the town saw they could have no peace otherwise, nor save the town nor their goods nor their lives, in that distress they accorded to the queen (31) and opened the gates, so that the queen (31) and sir John of Hainault (38), and all her barons, knights and squires, entered into the town and took their lodgings within, as many as might, and the residue without. Then sir Hugh Spencer (65) and the earl of Arundel (20) were taken and brought before the queen (31), to do her pleasure with them. Then there was brought to the queen her own children, [his son] John her son (10) and her two daughters [Note. [his daughter] Eleanor of Woodstock Plantagenet 1318-1355 (8) and [his daughter] Joan of the Tower Queen Consort Scotland 1321-1362 (5)], the which were found there in the keeping of the said sir Hugh Spencer (65), whereof the queen had great joy, for she had not seen them long 'before. Then the king (42) might have great sorrow and sir Hugh Spencer the younger (40), who were fast enclosed in the strong castle, and the most part of all the realm turned to the queen's part and to Edward}{Edward (13) her eldest son.

Before 12 Oct 1326 [his half-brother] Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300-1338 and Alice Hales Countess Norfolk -1330 were married. Alice Hales Countess Norfolk -1330 by marriage Countess Norfolk (3C 1312).

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XII - How that sir Hugh Spencer the elder and the earl of Arundel were judged to death. WHEN the queen (31) and her barons and all her company were lodged at their ease, then they besieged the castle as near as they might. The queen (31) caused sir Hugh Spencer (65) the elder and the earl of Arundel (20) to be brought forth before [his son] Edward her son (13) and all the barons that were there present, and said how that she (31) and her son (13) should take right and law on them according to their deserts. Then sir Hugh Spencer (65) said, `Madam, God be to you a good judge and give you good judgment ,1 and if we cannot have it in this world, I pray God we may have it in another.' Then stept forth Sir Thomas Wake (29), a good knight and marshal of the host, and there openly he recounted their deeds in writing, and then turned him to another ancient knight to the intent that he should bring him on that case fauty, and to declare what should be done with such persons, and what judgment they should have for such causes. Then the said knight counselled with other barons and knights, and so reported their opinions, the which was, how they had well deserved death for divers horrible deeds, the which they have commised, for all the trespass rehearsed before to justify to be of truth ; wherefore they have deserved for the diversities of their trespasses to have judgment in three divers manners-first, to be drawn, and after to be headed, and then to be hanged on the gibbet. This in likewise as they were judged so it was done and executed before the castle of Bristow in the sight of the king and of sir Hugh Spencer the younger (65). This judgment was done in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVI., on Saint Denis' day in October [Note. Saint Denis' day is 09 Oct not 27 Oct?]. And after this execution the king (42) and the young Spencer (40), seeing themselves thus besieged in this mischief, and knew no comfort that might come to them, in a morning betimes they two with a small company entered into a little vessel behind the castle, thinking to have fled to the country of Wales. But they were eleven days in the ship, and enforced it to sail as much as they might; but whatsoever they did, the wind was every day so contrary to them by the will of God, that every day once or twice they were ever brought again within a quarter of a mile to the same castle. At the last it fortuned, sir Henry Beaumont (46), son to the viscount Beaumont in England, entered into a barge and certain company with him, and spied this vessel and rowed after him so long that the ship wherein the king}{king (42) was could not flee fast before them, but finally they were overtaken, and so brought again to the town of Bristow and delivered to the queen (31) and her son (13) as prisoners. Thus it befell of this high and hardy enterprise of sir John of Hainault (38) and his company. For when they departed and entered into their ships at Dordrecht, they were but three hundred men of arms ; and thus by their help and the lords in England, the queen Isabel conquered again all her estate and dignity, and put unto execution all her enemies, whereof all the most part of the realm were right joyous, without it were a few persons such as were favourable to sir Hugh Spencer (40) and of his part. And when the king (42) and sir Hugh Spencer (40) were brought to Bristow by the said sir Henry Beaumont, the king (42) was then sent by the counsel of all the barons and knights to the strong castle of Berkeley, and put under good keeping and honest, and there were ordained people of estate about him, such as knew right well what they ought to do ; but they were straitly commanded that they should in no wise suffer him to pass out of the castle. And sir Hugh Spencer (40) was delivered to sir Thomas Wake (29), marshal of the host. And after that the queen (31) departed and all her host toward London, which was the chief city of England, and so rid forth on their journeys, and sir Thomas Wake (29) caused sir Hugh Spencer (40) to be fast bound on the least and leanest 2 horse of all the host, and caused him to wear on a tabard such as traitors and thieves were wont to wear.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XIII - How sir Hugh Spencer was put to his judgment. 24 Nov 1326. WHEN this feast was done, then sir Hugh Spencer (40), who was nothing beloved, was brought forth before the queen (31) and all the lords and knights, and there before him in writing was rehearsed all his deeds, against the which he could give no manner of answer. And so he was then judged by plain sentence, first to be drawn on an hurdle with trumps and trumpets through all the city of Hereford, and after to be brought into the market-place, whereas all the people were assembled, and there to be tied on high upon a ladder that every man might see him; and in the same place there to be made a great fire, and there his privy members cut from him, because they reputed him as an heretic and so deemed, and so to be burnt in the fire before his face; and then his heart to be drawn out of his body and cast into the fire, because he was a false traitor of heart, and that by his traitor's counsel and exhortation the king (42) had shamed his realm and brought it to great mischief, for he had caused to be beheaded the greatest lords of his realm, by whom the realm ought to have been sustained and defended; and he had so induced the king (42) that he would not see the queen his wife nor Edward his [his son] eldest son (14), and caused him to chase them out of the realm for fear of their lives ; and then his head to be stricken off and sent to London. And according to his judgment he was executed. Then the queen (31) and all her lords took their way toward London, and did so much by their journeys that they arrived at the city of London, and they of the city with great company met them and did to the queen and to her son great reverence, and to all their company, as they thought it best bestowed. And when they had been thus received and feasted the space of fifteen days, the knights strangers, and namely sir John of Hainault (38), had great desire to return again into their own countries, for they thought they had well done their devoir and achieved great honour, and so took their leave of the queen and of the lords of the realm : and the queen and the lords required them to tarry longer a little space, to see what should be done with the king (42), who was in prison ; but the strangers had so great desire to return into their own countries that to pray them the contrary availed not. And when the queen and her council saw that, they yet desired sir John of Hainault (38) to tarry till it was past Christmas, and to retain with him such of his company as pleased him best. The gentle knight would not leave to perform his service, but courteously granted the queen to tarry as long as it pleased her, and caused to tarry such of his company as he could get that was but a few, for the remnant would in no wise tarry, whereof he was displeased. When the queen and her council saw that they would not abide for no prayers, then they made them great cheer and feasts. And the queen made to be given to them plenty of gold and silver for their costs and services, and did give great jewels to each of them according to their degrees, so as they all held themselves right well content. And over that they had silver for their horses, such as they would leave behind them, at their own estimation without any grudging. And thus sir John of Hainault (38) abode still with a small company among the Englishmen, who always did him as much honour as they could imagine, and to all his company. And in likewise so did the ladies and damosels of the country ; for there were great plenty of countesses and great ladies [and] gentle pucelles, who were come thither to accompany the queen. For it seemed well to them that the knight sir John of Hainault (38) had well deserved the cheer and feast that they made him.

Abdication of Edward II

On 25 Jan 1327 King Edward II of England (42) abdicated II King England: Plantagenet Angevin. His son [his son] King Edward III England (14) succeeded III King England: Plantagenet Angevin.

Coronation of Edward III

On 01 Feb 1327 [his son] King Edward III England (14) was crowned III King England: Plantagenet Angevin at Westminster Abbey by Walter Reynolds, Archbishop of Canterbury. .

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XIV - The coronation of king Edward the third. 01 Feb 1327. AFTER that the most part of the company of Hainault were departed and sir John Hainault (39) lord of Beaumont tarried, the queen (32) gave leave to her people to depart, saving a certain noble knights, the which she kept still about her and her son to counsel them, and commanded all then that departed to be at London the next Christmas, for as then she was determined to keep open court, and all they promised her so to do. And when Christmas was come, she held a great court. And thither came dukes,' earls, barons, knights, and all the nobles of the realm, with prelates and burgesses of good towns; and at this assembly it was advised that the realm could not long endure without a head and a chief lord. Then they put in writing all the deeds of the king (42) who was in prison, and all that he had done by evil counsel, and all his usages and evil behavings, and how evil he had governed his realm, the which was read openly in plain audience, to the intent that the noble sages of the realm might take thereof good advice, and to fall at accord how the realm should be governed from thenceforth. And when all the cases and deeds that the king had done and consented to, and all his behaving and usages were read and well understanded, the barons and knights and all the counsels of the realm drew them apart to counsel ; and the most part of them accorded, and namely the great lords and nobles with the burgesses of the good towns, according as they had heard say and knew themselves the most part of his deeds. Wherefore they concluded that such a man (42) was not worthy to be a king, nor to bear a crown royal, nor to have the name of a king. But they all accorded that [his son] Edward (14) his eldest son, who was there present and was rightful heir, should be crowned king instead of his father, so that he would take good counsel, sage and true, about him, so than it was before, and that the old king his father (42) should be well and honestly kept as long as he lived, according to his estate. And thus as it was agreed by all the nobles, so it was accomplished ; and then was crowned with a crown royal at the palace of Westminster beside London the young king Edward the third (14), who in his, days after was right fortunate and happy in arms. This coronation was in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVI., on Christmasday [Note. Other sources day 01 Feb 1327], and as then the young king was about the age of sixteen ; and they held the feast till the Conversion of Saint Paul following, and in the meantime greatly was feasted sir John of Hainault (39) and all the princes and nobles of his country, and was given to him and to his company many rich jewels. And so he and his company in great feast and solace both with lords and ladies tarried till the Twelfth day. And then sir John of Hainault (39) heard tidings how that the king of Bohemia (30) and the earl of Hainault (41) his brother and other great plenty of lords of France had ordained to be at Conde at a great feast and tourney that was there cried. Then would sir John of Hainault no longer abide for no prayer, so great desire he had to be at the said tourney, and to see the earl his brother and other lords of his country, and specially the right noble king in largess the gentle Charles king of Bohemia. When the young king Edward (14) and the queen (32) his mother and the barons saw that he would no longer tarry, and that their request could not avail, they gave him leave sore against their wills, and the king (14) by the counsel of the queen (32) his mother did give him four hundred marks sterlings of rent heritable to hold of him in fee, to be paid every year in the town of Bruges, and also did give to Philip of Chateaux, his chief esquire and his sovereign counsellor, a hundred mark of rent yearly, to be paid at the said place, and also delivered him much money to pay therewith the costs of him and of his company, till he come into his own country, and caused him to be conducted with many noble knights to Dover, and there delivered hint all his passage free. And to the ladies that were come into England with the queen (32), and namely to the countess of Garennes, who was sister to the earl of Bar, and to divers other ladies and damosels, there were given many fair and rich jewels at their departing. And when sir John of Hainault was departed from the young king Edward, and all his company, and were come to Dover, they entered incontinent into their ships to pass the sea, to the intent to come betimes to the said tourney; and there went with him fifteen young lusty knights of England, to go to this tourney with him and to acquaint them with the strange lords and knights that should be there, and they had great honour of all the company that tourneyed at that time at Conde.

On 03 Apr 1327 Thomas Rich Berkeley 8th Baron Berkeley 1296-1361 (31) and John Maltravers 1st Baron Maltravers 1290-1365 (37) were made keepers of King Edward II of England (42).

On 05 Apr 1327 King Edward II of England (42) was imprisoned at Berkeley Castle, Berkeley.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XV - How that king Robert de Bruce of Scotland defied king Edward. AFTER that sir John of Hainault (39) was departed from [his son] king Edward (14), he and the queen (32) his mother governed the realm by the counsel of the [his half-brother] earl of Kent (25), uncle to the king, and by the counsel of sir Roger Mortimer (39), who had great lands in England to the sum of seven hundred pounds of rent yearly. And they both were banished and chased out of England with the queen (32), as ye have heard before. Also they used much after the counsel of sir Thomas Wake (30), and by the advice of other who were reputed for the most sagest of the realm. Howbeit there were some had envy thereat, the which never died in England, and also it reigneth and will reign in divers other countries. Thus passed forth the winter and the Lent season till Easter, and then the king (14) and the queen (32) and all the realm was in good peace all this season. Then so it fortuned that king Robert of Scotland (52), who had been right hardy and had suffered much travail against Englishmen, and oftentimes he had been chased and discomfited in the time of king Edward the first, grandfather to this young king Edward the third (14), he was as then become very old and ancient, and sick (as it was said) of the great evil and malady. When he knew the adventures that was fallen in England, how that the old king Edward the second (42) was taken and deposed down from his regaly and his crown, and certain of his counsellors beheaded and put to destruction, as ye have heard herebefore, then he bethought him that he would defy the young king Edward the third (14), because he was young and that the barons of the realm were not all of one accord, as it was said : therefore he [thought] the better to speed in his purpose to conquer part of England. And so about Easter in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. he sent his defiance to the young king Edward the third and to all the realm, sending them word how that he would enter into the realm of England and bren before him as he had done beforetime at such season as the discomfiture was at the castle of Stirling, whereas the Englishmen received great damage. When the king of England (14) and his council perceived that they were defied, they caused it to be known over all the realm, and commanded that all the nobles and all other should be ready apparelled every man after his estate, and that they should be by Ascension-day next after at the town of York, standing northward. The king sent much people before to keep the frontiers against Scotland, and sent a great ambassade to sir John of Hainault (39), praying him right affectuously that he would help to succour and to keep company with him in his voyage against the Scots, and that he world be with him at the Ascensionday next after at York, with such company as he might get of men of war in those parts. When sir John of Hainault lord of Beaumont (39) heard the king's (14) desire, he sent straight his letters and his messengers in every place whereas he thought to recover or attain to have any company of men of war, in Flanders, in Hainault, in Brabant, and in other places, desiring them that in their best apparel for the war they would meet him at Wissant, for to go over the sea with him into England. And all such as he sent unto came to him with a glad cheer, and divers other that heard thereof, in trust to attain to as much honour as they had that were with him in England before at the other voyage. So that by that time the said lord Beaumont (39) was come to Wissant, there was ready ships for him and his company, brought out of England. And so they took shipping and passed over the sea and arrived at Dover, and so then ceased not to ride till: they came within three days of Pentecost to the town of York, whereas the king (14) and the queen (32) his mother and all his lords were with great host tarrying the coming of sir John of Hainault (39), and had sent many before of their men of arms, archers and common people of the good towns and villages ; and as people resorted, they were caused to be lodged two or three leagues off, all about in the country. And on a day thither came sir John of Hainault (39) and his company, who were right welcome and well received both of the king (14), of the queen his mother, and of all other barons, and to them was delivered the suburbs of the city to lodge in. And to sir John of Hainault was delivered an abbey of white monks for him and his household. There came with him out of Hainault the lord of Enghien, who was called sir Gaultier, and sir Henry lord d'Antoing, and the lord of Fagnolle, and sir Fastres du Roeulx, sir Robert de Bailleul, and sir Guilliam de Bailleul his brother, and the lord of Havreth, chatelain of Mons, sir Allard de Briffeuil, sir Michael de Ligne, sir John de Montigny the younger and his brother, sir Sanses de Boussoit, the lord of Gommegnies, sir Perceval de Semeries, the lord of Beaurieu and the lord of Floyon. Also of the country of Flanders there was sir Hector of Vilain, sir John de Rhodes, sir Wu there was sir John le Belt and sir Henry his brother, sir Godfrey de la Chapelle, sir Hugh d'Ohey, sir John de Libyne, sir Lambert d'Oupey, and sir Gilbert de Herck: and out of Cambresis and Artois there were come certain knights of their own good wills to advance their bodies: so that sir John of Hainault had well in his company five hundred men of arms, well apparelled and richly mounted. And after the feast of Pentecost came thither sir Guilliam de Juliers (28), who was after duke of Juliers after the decease of his father, and sir Thierry of Heinsberg, who was after earl of Loos, and with them a right fair rout, and all to keep company with the gentle knight sir John of Hainault lord Beaumont.

Death of Edward II

On 21 Sep 1327 King Edward II of England (43) was murdered at Berkeley Castle, Berkeley. There is speculation as to the manner of his death, and as to whether he died at all. Some believe he may have lived the rest of his life in Europe.

After 21 Sep 1327 King Edward II of England was buried at Gloucester Cathedral.

Death of Edward II

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XIX - How king Edward was married to my lady Philippa of Hainault. Jun 1328. IT was not long after but that the [his son] king (15) and the queen (33) his mother, the [his half-brother] earl of Kent (26) his uncle, the earl of Lancaster (47), sir Roger Mortimer (40) and all the barons of England, and by the advice of the king's council, they sent a bishop' and two knights bannerets, with two notable clerks, to sir John of Hainault (40), praying him to be a mean that their lord the young king of England might have in marriage one of the earl's (42) daughters of Hainault, his brother (42), named Philippa (13) ; for the king and all the nobles of the realm had rather have her than any other lady, for the love of him. Sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont feasted and honoured greatly these ambassadors, and brought them to Valenciennes to the earl his brother, who honourably received them and made them such cheer, that it were over long here to rehearse. And when they had skewed the content of their message, the earl (42) said, 'Sirs, I thank greatly the king (15) your prince and the queen (33) his mother and all other lords of England, sith they have sent such sufficient personages as ye be to do me such honour as to treat for the marriage ; to the which request I am well agreed, if our holy father the pope will consent thereto'-. with the which answer these ambassadors were right well content. Then they sent two knights and two clerks incontinent to the pope, to Avignon, to purchase a dispensation for this marriage to be had ; for without the pope's licence they might not marry, for [by] the lineage of France they were so near of kin as at the third degree, for the two mothers [Note. [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (33) and Joan Valois Count Zeeland, Count Holland, Count Avesnes, Count Hainault 1294-1342 (34)] were cousin-germans issued of two brethren. And when these ambassadors were come to the pope, and their requests and considerations well heard, our holy father the pope with all the whole college consented to this marriage, and so feasted them. And then they departed and came again to Valenciennes with their bulls. Then this marriage was concluded and affirmed on both parties. Then was there devised and purveyed for their apparel and for all things honourable that belonged to such a lady, who should be queen of England: and there this princess was married by a sufficient procuration brought from the king of England ; and after all feasts and triumphs done, then this young queen entered into the sea at Wissant, and arrived with all her company at Dover. And sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont, her uncle, did conduct her to the city of London, where there was made great feast, and many nobles of England, ... queen was crowned. And there was also great jousts, tourneys, dancing, carolling and great feasts every day, the which endured the, space of three weeks. The English chronicle saith this marriage and coronation of the queen was done at York with much honour, the Sunday in the even of the Conversion of Saint Paul, in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. In the which chronicle is shewed many other things of the ruling of the realm, and of the death of king Edward of Caernarvon, and divers other debates that were within the realm, as in the same chronicle more plainly it appeareth : the which the author of this book speaketh no word of, because peradventure he knew it not ; for it was hard for a stranger to know all things. But according to his writing this young queen Philippa (13) abode still in England with a small company of any persons of her own country, saving one who was named Watelet of Manny (18), who abode still with the queen and was, her carver, and after did so many great prowesses in divers places, that it were hard to make mention of them all.

Death of Isabella of France Queen Consort

On 22 Aug 1358 [his wife] Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (63) died at Hertford Castle. She was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars.
The funeral was performed by Simon Islip Archbishop of Canterbury -1366. She was buried in the mantle she had worn at her wedding and at her request, Edward's heart, placed into a casket thirty years before, was interred with her. .

1376 Creation of Garter Knights

On 23 Apr 1376 [his son] King Edward III England (63) created a number of new Garter Knights ...
Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent 1350-1397 (26) was appointed 58th Knight of the Garter. He was the son of the wife Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Princess Wales 1328-1385 (47) whose second husband was Edward III's son Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince Wales 1330-1376 (45).
Thomas Percy 1st Earl Worcester 1343-1403 (33) was appointed 59th Knight of the Garter. He was the son of Mary Plantagenet Baroness Percy 1320-1362 who was the daughter of Henry Plantagenet 3rd Earl of Leicester 3rd Earl Lancaster 1281-1345 who was the first cousin of Edward III's father King Edward II of England.
John Montfort V Duke Brittany 1339-1399 (37) was appointed 54th Knight of the Garter.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter IV - Here mine author maketh mention of the parent of this good king Edward the third. THIS king Edward the second, father to the noble [his son] king Edward the third, had two brethren, the one called [the earl] [his half-brother] marshal, who was right wild and diverse of conditions, the other called sir [his half-brother] Edmund earl of Kent, right wise, amiable, gentle and well beloved with all people. This king Edward the second was married to Isabel, the daughter of Philip le Beau king of France, who was one of the fairest ladies of the world. The king had by her two sons and two daughters. The first son was the noble and hardy king Edward the third, of whom this history is begun. The second was named [his son] John, and died young. The first of the daughters was called [his daughter] Isabel, married to the young king David of Scotland, son to king Robert de Bruce, married in her tender youth by the accord of both realms of England and Scotland for to make perfect peace. The other [his daughter] daughter was married to the earl Raynold, who after was called duke of Gueldres, and he had by her two sons, Raynold and Edward, who after reigned in great puissance.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter V - Hereafter beginneth the occasion whereby the war moved between the kings of France and England. Now sheweth the history that this Philip le Beau king of France had three sons and a fair daughter named Isabel, married into England to king Edward the second ; and these three sons, the eldest named Louis, who was king of Navarre in his father's days and was called king Louis Hutin, the second had to name Philip the Great or the Long, and the third was called Charles; and all three were kings of France after iheir father's decease by right succession each after other, without having any issue male of their bodies lawfully begotten. So that after the death of Charles, last king of the three, the twelve peers and all the barons of France would not give the realm to Isabel the sister, who was queen of England, because they said and maintained, and yet do, that the realm of France is so noble that it ought not to go to a woman, and so consequently to Isabel, nor to the [his son] king of England her eldest son for they determined the son of the woman to have no right nor succession by his mother, since they declared the mother to have no right : so that by these reasons the twelve peers and barons of France by their common accord did give the realm of France to the lord Philip of Valois, nephew sometime to Philip le Beau king of France, and so put out the queen of England and her son, who was as the next heir male, as son to the sister of Charles, last king of France. Thus went the realm of France out of the right lineage, as it seemed to many folk, whereby great wars hath moved and fallen, and great destructions of people and countries in the realm of France and other places, as ye may hereafter [see]. This is the very right foundation of this history, to recount the great enterprises and great feats of arms that have fortuned and fallen. Sith the time of the good Charlemagne king of France there never fell so great adventures.

[his son] Adam Fitzroy Plantagenet was born to King Edward II of England.

Family Trees

Paternal Family Tree: Plantagenet

Maternal Family Tree: Etienette Countess Provence Countess Arles

Descendants Family Trees:

Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189

John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216

Henry III King England 1207-1272

Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307

Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204

Raymond Berenguer Provence IV Count Provence 1198-1245

Descent

Kings Wessex: Great x 13 Grand Son of Aethelwulf King Wessex -858

Kings England: Son of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307

Kings Scotland: Great x 5 Grand Son of Malcolm III King Scotland 1031-1093

Kings Franks: Great x 3 Grand Son of Louis VII King Franks 1120-1180

Kings France: Great x 4 Grand Son of Louis "Fat" VI King France 1081-1137

Ancestry

Father: Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 Son of Henry III King England 1207-1272

GrandFather: Henry III King England 1207-1272 Son of John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216

Great GrandFather: John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 Son of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189

Great x 2 GrandFather: Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 Grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 GrandFather: Geoffrey Plantagenet Duke Normandy 1113-1151

Great x 4 GrandFather: Fulk "Young" King Jerusalem 1089-1143

Great x 4 GrandMother: Ermengarde La Flèche-De Baugency Count Anjou

Great x 3 GrandMother: Empress Matilda Duchess Normandy 1102-1167 Daughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 4 GrandFather: King Henry I "Beauclerc" England Son of William "Conqueror" I King England 1028-1087

Great x 4 GrandMother: Edith aka Matilda Dunkeld Queen Consort England 1080-1118

Great x 2 GrandMother: Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204

Great x 3 GrandFather: William "Saint" Poitiers X Duke Aquitaine 1099-1137

Great x 4 GrandFather: William "Troubadour" Poitiers IX Duke Aquitaine 1071-1127

Great x 4 GrandMother: Philippa Rouerge Duchess Aquitaine

Great x 3 GrandMother: Aenor Chatellerault Duchess Aquitaine 1103-1130

Great x 4 GrandFather: Aimery Chatellerault Viscount Châtellerault

Great x 4 GrandMother: Dangereuse Ile-Bouchard Viscountess Chatellerault 1079-1151

Great GrandMother: Isabella Angoulême Queen Consort England 1188-1246

Great x 2 GrandFather: Aymer Angoulême I Count Angoulême 1160-1202

Great x 3 GrandFather: William "Taillefer" Angoulême VI Count Angoulême -1179

Great x 4 GrandFather: Wulfgrin Angoulême II Count Angoulême -1140

Great x 4 GrandMother: Pontia La Marche Count Angoulême

Great x 2 GrandMother: Alice Courtenay Count Angoulême -1218

Great x 3 GrandFather: Peter Courtenay 1126-1183

Great x 4 GrandFather: Louis "Fat" VI King France 1081-1137

Great x 4 GrandMother: Adelaide Savoy Queen Consort France -1154

Great x 3 GrandMother: Elizabeth Courtenay 1140-1205

Great x 4 GrandFather: Renaud Courtenay 1105-1164

Great x 4 GrandMother: Helene du Donjon 1095-1189

GrandMother: Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291

Great GrandFather: Raymond Berenguer Provence IV Count Provence 1198-1245

Great x 2 GrandFather: Alfonso Barcelona II Count Provence 1174-1209

Great x 3 GrandFather: Alfonso II King Aragon 1157-1196

Great x 4 GrandFather: Raymond Berenguer Barcelona V Count Barcelona 1114-1162

Great x 4 GrandMother: Petronilla Jiménez Queen Aragon 1136-1173

Great x 3 GrandMother: Sancha Ivrea Queen Consort Aragon 1155-1208

Great x 4 GrandFather: Alfonso VII King Castile, VII King Leon 1105-1157

Great x 4 GrandMother: Richeza Unknown Queen Consort Castile, Queen Consort Leon

Great x 2 GrandMother: Gersenda II Sabran Count Provence

Great GrandMother: Beatrice Savoy Count Provence

Great x 2 GrandFather: Thomas Savoy I Count Savoy 1178-1233

Great x 3 GrandFather: Humbert Savoy III Count Savoy 1134-1188

Great x 4 GrandFather: Amadeus Savoy III Count Savoy 1095-1148

Great x 4 GrandMother: Mahaut Albon Count Savoy

Great x 3 GrandMother: Beatrice Macon Count Savoy

Great x 2 GrandMother: Margaret Geneva Countess Savoy

Mother: Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 2 x Great Granddaughter of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189

GrandFather: Ferdinand III King Castile, III King Leon 1199-1252 Great Grandson of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189

Great GrandFather: Alfonso IX King Leon 1171-1230

Great x 2 GrandFather: Ferdinand II King Leon 1137-1188

Great x 3 GrandFather: Alfonso VII King Castile, VII King Leon 1105-1157

Great x 4 GrandFather: Raymond Ivrea 1070-1107

Great x 4 GrandMother: Urracca "Reckless" Jiménez Queen Consort Aragon, Queen Consort Pamplona 1079-1126

Great x 3 GrandMother: Berenguela Barcelona Queen Consort Castile, Queen Consort Leon 1116-1149

Great x 4 GrandFather: Raymond Berenguer Barcelona III Count Barcelona 1082-1131

Great x 4 GrandMother: Douce Gevaudan Count Barcelona 1090-1127

Great x 2 GrandMother: Urraca Burgundy Queen Consort Leon 1148-1211

Great x 3 GrandFather: Afonso "Conqueror Founder Great" I King Portugal 1109-1185

Great x 4 GrandFather: Henry Burgundy Count Portugal 1066-1112

Great x 4 GrandMother: Teresa Alfónsez Jiménez 1080-1130

Great x 3 GrandMother: Malfada Savoy Queen Consort Portugal 1125-1157

Great x 4 GrandFather: Amadeus Savoy III Count Savoy 1095-1148

Great x 4 GrandMother: Mahaut Albon Count Savoy

Great GrandMother: Berengaria Ivrea I Queen Castile 1179-1246 Granddaughter of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189

Great x 2 GrandFather: Alfonso VIII King Castile 1155-1214

Great x 3 GrandFather: Sancho III King Castile 1134-1158

Great x 4 GrandFather: Alfonso VII King Castile, VII King Leon 1105-1157

Great x 4 GrandMother: Berenguela Barcelona Queen Consort Castile, Queen Consort Leon 1116-1149

Great x 3 GrandMother: Blanche Ramirez Queen Consort Castile 1133-1156

Great x 4 GrandFather: García "Restorer" IV King Navarre 1112-1150

Great x 4 GrandMother: Marguerite Aigle Queen Consort Navarre

Great x 2 GrandMother: Eleanor Plantagenet Queen Consort Castile 1161-1214 Daughter of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189

Great x 3 GrandFather: Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 Grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 4 GrandFather: Geoffrey Plantagenet Duke Normandy 1113-1151

Great x 4 GrandMother: Empress Matilda Duchess Normandy 1102-1167 Daughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 GrandMother: Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204

Great x 4 GrandFather: William "Saint" Poitiers X Duke Aquitaine 1099-1137

Great x 4 GrandMother: Aenor Chatellerault Duchess Aquitaine 1103-1130

GrandMother: Joan Dammartin Queen Consort Castile, Queen Consort Leon 1220-1279

Great GrandFather: Simon Dammartin 1180-1239

Great x 2 GrandFather: Alberic Dammartin -1200

Great x 2 GrandMother: Mathilde Clermont -1200

Great x 3 GrandFather: Renaud Clermont II Count Clermont 1075-1152

Great x 3 GrandMother: Adelaide Vermandois I Count Vermandois -1120

Great x 4 GrandFather: Herbert Vermandois IV Count Vermandois 1028-1080

Great x 4 GrandMother: Adela Valois Countess Blois Countess Vermandois

Great GrandMother: Marie Montgomery Count Ponthieu 1199-1250

Great x 2 GrandFather: William Montgomery IV Count Ponthieu 1179-1221

Great x 3 GrandFather: John Montgomery I Count Ponthieu 1140-1191

Great x 4 GrandFather: Guy Montgomery II Count Ponthieu 1120-1147

Great x 4 GrandMother: Ida Unknown Count Ponthieu

Great x 3 GrandMother: Beatrice St Pol Count Ponthieu

Great x 2 GrandMother: Alys Capet Count Ponthieu 1160-1220

Great x 3 GrandFather: Louis VII King Franks 1120-1180

Great x 4 GrandFather: Louis "Fat" VI King France 1081-1137

Great x 4 GrandMother: Adelaide Savoy Queen Consort France -1154

Great x 3 GrandMother: Constance of Castile 1140-1160

Great x 4 GrandFather: Alfonso VII King Castile, VII King Leon 1105-1157

Great x 4 GrandMother: Berenguela Barcelona Queen Consort Castile, Queen Consort Leon 1116-1149