Biography of Robert Hooke Scientist 1635-1703

On 28 Jul 1635 Robert Hooke Scientist 1635-1703 was born in Freshwater, Isle of Wight.

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 March. 4th March 1664. Came to dine with me the Earl of Lauderdale (47), his Majesty's (33) great favorite, and Secretary of Scotland; the Earl of Teviot (38); my Lord Viscount Brouncker (53), President of the Royal Society; Dr. Wilkins (50), Dean of Ripon; Sir Robert Murray (56), and Mr. Hooke (28), Curator to the Society.
This spring I planted the Home field and West field about Sayes Court with elms, being the same year that the elms were planted by his Majesty (33) in Greenwich Park.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 August. 04 Aug 1665. I went to Wotton with my Son and his tutor, Mr. Bohun, Fellow of New College (recommended to me by Dr. Wilkins (51), and the President of New College, Oxford), for fear of the pestilence, still increasing in London and its environs. On my return, I called at Durdans, where I found Dr. Wilkins (51), Sir William Petty (42), and Mr. Hooke (30), contriving chariots, new rigging for ships, a wheel for one to run races in, and other mechanical inventions; perhaps three such persons together were not to be found elsewhere in Europe, for parts and ingenuity.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Tuesday 04 May 1669. Up, and to the office, and then my wife (28) being gone to see her mother at Deptford, I before the office sat went to the Excise Office, and thence being alone stepped into Duck Lane, and thence tried to have sent a porter to Deb.’s (18), but durst not trust him, and therefore having bought a book to satisfy the bookseller for my stay there, a 12d. book, Andronicus of Tom Fuller, I took coach, and at the end of Jewen Street next Red Cross Street I sent the coachman to her lodging, and understand she is gone for Greenwich to one Marys’s, a tanner’s, at which I, was glad, hoping to have opportunity to find her out; and so, in great fear of being seen, I to the office, and there all the morning, dined at home, and presently after dinner comes home my wife (28), who I believe is jealous of my spending the day, and I had very good fortune in being at home, for if Deb. (18) had been to have been found it is forty to one but I had been abroad, God forgive me. So the afternoon at the office, and at night walked with my wife (28) in the garden, and my Lord Brouncker (49) with us, who is newly come to W. Pen’s (48) lodgings; and by and by comes Mr. Hooke (33); and my Lord (43), and he, and I into my Lord’s lodgings, and there discoursed of many fine things in philosophy, to my great content, and so home to supper and to bed.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Wednesday 05 May 1669. Up, and thought to have gone with Lord Brouncker (49) to Mr. Hooke (33) this morning betimes; but my Lord is taken ill of the gout, and says his new lodgings have infected him, he never having had any symptoms of it till now. So walked to Gresham College, to tell Hooke (33) that my Lord could not come; and so left word, he being abroad, and I to St. James’s, and thence, with the Duke of York (35), to White Hall, where the Board waited on him all the morning: and so at noon with Sir Thomas Allen (57), and Sir Edward Scott, and Lord Carlingford (66), to the Spanish Embassador’s (49), where I dined the first time. The Olio not so good as Sheres’s. There was at the table himself (49) and a Spanish Countess, a good, comely, and witty lady — three Fathers and us. Discourse good and pleasant. And here was an Oxford scholar in a Doctor of Law’s gowne, sent from the College where the Embassador lay, when the Court was there, to salute him before his return to Spain: This man, though a gentle sort of scholar, yet sat like a fool for want of French or Spanish, but [knew] only Latin, which he spoke like an Englishman to one of the Fathers. And by and by he and I to talk, and the company very merry at my defending Cambridge against Oxford: and I made much use of my French and Spanish here, to my great content. But the dinner not extraordinary at all, either for quantity or quality. Thence home, where my wife (28) ill of those upon the maid’s bed, and troubled at my being abroad. So I to the office, and there till night, and then to her (28), and she read to me the Epistle of Cassandra, which is very good indeed; and the better to her, because recommended by Sheres. So to supper, and to bed.

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 May. 11 May 1676. I dined with Mr. Charleton, and went to see Mr. Montague's (37) new palace, near Bloomsbury, built by Mr. Hooke (40), of our Society, after the French manner.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 November. 5th November, 1679. I was invited to dine at my Lord Teviotdale's, a Scotch Earl, a learned and knowing nobleman. We afterward went to see Mr. Montague's new palace near Bloomsbury, built by our curator, Mr. Hooke (44), somewhat after the French; it was most nobly furnished, and a fine, but too much exposed garden.

On 03 Mar 1703 Robert Hooke Scientist 1635-1703 (67) died.

Robert Hooke Scientist 1635-1703.