Biography of William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483

1461 Proclamation of Edward IV as King

1461 Battle of Towton

1461 Edward IV Rewards his Followers

1461 Battle of Mortimer's Cross

1467 Tournament Bastard of Burgundy

1470 Welles' Rebellion & Battle of Losecoat Field aka Empingham

1471 Edward IV lands at Ravenspur

1471 Battle of Barnet

1471 Battle of Tewkesbury

1475 Treaty of Picquigny

1476 Reburial of Richard and Edmund of York

1483 Funeral of Edward IV

1483 Execution of Hastings

1483 Death of Edward IV


Family Trees

Descent

Ancestry

Before 1423 [his father] Leonard Hastings 1396-1455 and [his mother] Alice Camoys were married.

Around 1431 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 was born to [his father] Leonard Hastings 1396-1455 (35) and [his mother] Alice Camoys.

In 1455 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (24) was appointed High Sheriff of Leicestershire and High Sheriff of Warwickshire.

On 20 Oct 1455 [his father] Leonard Hastings 1396-1455 (59) died at Kirkby.

In 1458 William Bonville 6th Baron Harington 1442-1460 and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503 (16) were married.

In 1461 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (30) was appointed Master of the Mint.

In 1461 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (30) was appointed Lord Chamberlain.

Battle of Mortimer's Cross

On 02 Feb 1461 at the Battle of Mortimer's Cross at Wigmore the future Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) commanded the Yorkist forces including [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (30), John Wenlock 1st Baron Wenlock 1400-1471, John Tuchet 6th Baron Audley Heighley, 3rd Baron Tuchet 1426-1490 (35), John Savage 1444-1492 and Roger Vaughan 1410-1471 (51). In the Lancastrian army Owen Tudor 1400-1461 (61) (captured by Roger Vaughan 1410-1471 (51) ) and his son Jasper Tudor 1st Duke Bedford 1431-1495 (29) fought as well as James Butler 1st Earl Wiltshire, 5th Earl Ormonde 1420-1461 (40). Gruffydd ap Nicholas Deheubarth 1393-1461 (68) was killed.
Following the battle Owen Tudor 1400-1461 (61) was beheaded in the Market Place, Hereford. He was buried thereafter in Greyfriars Church, Hereford in a tomb paid for by his son David Owen 1459-1535 (2).

Proclamation of Edward IV as King

On 04 Mar 1461 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) declared himself King of England. [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (30) was present. .

Battle of Towton

On 29 Mar 1461 the Battle of Towton was a decisive victory for Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) bringing to an end the first war of the Wars of the Roses. Said to be the bloodiest battle on English soil 28000 were killed mainly during the rout that followed the battle.
The Yorkist army was commanded by Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) with John Mowbray 3rd Duke Norfolk 1415-1461 (45), Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter 1430-1475 (30), William Neville 1st Earl Kent 1405-1463 (56), [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (30) (knighted), Walter Blount 1st Baron Mountjoy 1416-1474 (45), Henry Bourchier 2nd Count Eu, 1st Earl Essex 1404-1483 (57), John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (23) and John Wenlock 1st Baron Wenlock 1400-1471.
The Lancastrian army suffered significant casualties including Richard Percy 1426-1461 (35), Ralph Bigod 1410-1461, John Bigod -1461, Robert Cromwell 1390-1461, Ralph Dacre 1st Baron Dacre Gilsland 1412-1461, Ralph Eure 1412-1461, John Neville 1st Baron Neville Raby 1410-1461, John Beaumont 1428-1461, Thomas Dethick 1400-1461, Everard Simon Digby -1461, William Plumpton -1461 and William Welles 1410-1461 who were killed.
Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland 1421-1461 (39) was killed. His son Henry Percy 4th Earl of Northumberland 1449-1489 (12) succeeded 4th Earl of Northumberland (1C 1377). Maud Herbert Countess Northumberland 1458-1485 (3) by marriage Countess of Northumberland (1C 1377).
Lionel Welles 6th Baron Welles 1406-1461 (55) was killed. His son Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (33) succeeded 7th Baron Welles.
Those who fought for the Lancaster included William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme 1415-1464 (46), John Dudley 1st Baron Dudley 1400-1487 (60), William Norreys 1441-1507 (20), Thomas Grey 1st Baron Grey Richemont 1418-1461 (43), Robert Hungerford 3rd Baron Hungerford 1431-1464 (30), John Talbot 3rd Earl Shrewsbury, 3rd Earl Waterford 1448-1473 (12), Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (33), Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469 (56), James Butler 1st Earl Wiltshire, 5th Earl Ormonde 1420-1461 (40), John Butler 6th Earl Ormonde 1422-1476 (39), William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (22) and Thomas Tresham 1420-1471. Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (41) were captured.
On 03 Apr 1461 Thomas Courtenay 14th Earl Devon 1432-1461 (29) was beheaded at York. His brother John Courtenay 15th Earl Devon 1435-1471 (26) succeeded 15th Earl Devon (2C Courtenay). Laura Bourchier Countess Devon 1440- by marriage Countess Devon (2C Courtenay).
Robert Dethick 1375-1461 (86) was killed.
John Heron of Ford Castle Northumberland 1416-1461 (45) was killed.
Thomas Grey 1st Baron Grey Richemont 1418-1461 (43) was executed.

Edward IV Rewards his Followers

On 26 Jul 1461 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (30) was created 1st Baron Hastings (2C 1430) for supporting Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (19) in his claim to the throne.
Robert Ogle 1st Baron Ogle 1406-1469 (55) was created 1st Baron Ogle by Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (19) for having been the principal Northumbrian gentleman to support the Yorkist cause. .

In 1462 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (31) was appointed 188th Knight of the Garter by Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (19).

Before 06 Feb 1462 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503 were married. Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503 by marriage Baroness Hastings (2C 1430).

On 26 Nov 1466 [his son] Edward Hastings 2nd Baron Hastings 1466-1506 was born to [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (35) and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503 (24) at Kirkby Muxloe Castle, Kirkby Muxloe.

Tournament Bastard of Burgundy

On 29 May 1467 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (25) and Antoine "Bastard of Burgundy" 1421-1504 (46) met at Chelsea. [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (36), Henry Bourchier 2nd Count Eu, 1st Earl Essex 1404-1483 (63), Henry Stafford 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1454-1483 (12), Anthony Woodville 2nd Earl Rivers 1440-1483 (27), James Douglas 9th Earl Douglas, 3rd Earl Avondale 1426-1488 (41) and Thomas Montgomery -1495 accompanied Edward. .

Welles' Rebellion & Battle of Losecoat Field aka Empingham

On 19 Mar 1470 Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby Eresby 8th Baron Welles -1470 was beheaded at Doncaster. He was buried at Whitefriars, Doncaster. His sister Joan Welles 9th Baroness Willoughby Eresby -1475 succeeded 9th Baron Willoughby Eresby. [his son] Richard Hastings Baron Willoughby Eresby 1433-1503 (37) by marriage Baron Willoughby Eresby. He, Hastings, a favourite of Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (27), younger brother of Edward's (27) great friend [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (39).

In 1471 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (40) was appointed Chamberlain of the Exchequer.

Around 1471 [his daughter] Anne Hastings Countess Shrewsbury, Countess Waterford 1471-1520 was born to [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (40) and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503 (29).

In 1471 [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (40) was appointed Lieutenant Calais.

Edward IV lands at Ravenspur

On 14 Mar 1471 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (28) landed at Ravenspur, East Riding with [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (40). .

Battle of Barnet

On 14 Apr 1471 Edward IV (28) commanded at the Battle of Barnet supported by his brothers George (21) and Richard (18), John Babington 1423-1485 (48), Wiliam Hastings (40) (commanded), Ralph Hastings -1495, William Norreys 1441-1507 (30), William Parr KG 1434-1483 (37), John Savage 1422-1495 (49), Thomas St Leger 1440-1483 (31), John Tuchet 6th Baron Audley Heighley, 3rd Baron Tuchet 1426-1490 (45), Thomas Burgh 1st Baron Burgh 1431-1496 (40) and Thomas Strickland -1494.
The Yorkists William Blount -1471, Humphrey Bourchier 1431-1471, Humphrey Bourchier 1435-1471 and Thomas Parr -1471 were killed. Henry Stafford 1425-1471 (46) was killed making his wife Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 (27) a widow for the second time.
The Lancastrians Warwick the Kingmaker (43), John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 and William Tyrrell -1471 were killed.
William Fiennes 2nd Baron Saye and Sele 1428-1471 (43) was killed. His son Henry Fiennes 3rd Baron Saye and Sele 1446-1476 (25) succeeded 3rd Baron Saye and Sele. Anne Harcourt Baroness Saye and Sele by marriage Baroness Saye and Sele.
Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter 1430-1475 (40) commanded the left flank, was badly wounded and left for dead, Henry Stafford 1425-1471 (46) and John Paston 1444-1504 (27) were wounded, John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (28) commanded, and John Paston 1442-1479 (29) and William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (33) fought. .
Robert Harleston 1435-1471 (36) was killed.
Thomas Hen Salusbury 1409-1471 (62) was killed.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1499-1525 (10). Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge, St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535 (40). Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

Battle of Tewkesbury

On 04 May 1471 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (29) was victorious at the Battle of Tewkesbury.
His brother Richard (18), Richard Beauchamp 2nd Baron Beauchamp Powick 1435-1503 (36), John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (46), George Neville 4th Baron Bergavenny 1440-1492 (31), John Savage 1422-1495 (49), John Savage 1444-1492, Thomas St Leger 1440-1483 (31), John Tuchet 6th Baron Audley Heighley, 3rd Baron Tuchet 1426-1490 (45), Thomas Burgh 1st Baron Burgh 1431-1496 (40) fought. William Brandon 1425-1491 (46), George Browne 1440-1483 (31), Ralph Hastings -1495, [his son] Richard Hastings Baron Willoughby Eresby 1433-1503 (38), James Tyrrell 1455-1502 (16), Roger Kynaston of Myddle and Hordley 1433-1495 (38) were knighted. [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (40) commanded.
Margaret of Anjou (41) was captured. Her son Edward of Westinster Prince Wales 1453-1471 (17) was killed. He was the last of the Lancastrian line excluding the illegitmate Charles Somerset 1st Earl Worcester 1460-1526 (11) whose line continues to the present.
John Courtenay 15th Earl Devon 1435-1471 (36), John Wenlock 1st Baron Wenlock 1400-1471, Humphrey Tuchet 1434-1471 and John Beaufort 1441-1471 were killed.
Edmund Beaufort 4th Duke Somerset 1439-1471 and Hugh Courtenay 1427-1471 were captured.
William Vaux of Harrowden 1436-1471 (35) was killed.

On 05 Sep 1474 Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (19) and [his step-daughter] Cecily Bonville Marchioness Dorset 1460-1529 (14) were married (he was her half second-cousin once-removed).

Treaty of Picquigny

On 29 Aug 1475 Edward IV (33) signed the Treaty of Picquigny; in effect a non-aggression pact or, possiblY, a protection racket. France would pay Edward a pension of 50,000 crowns per year as long as he didn't invade France. Cardinal Bourchier (57) arbitrated on behalf of Edward. [his son] William Hastings (44) received a pension of 2000 crowns per year, John Howard and Thomas Montgomery 1200 each, Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York (52) 1000, Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (55) 600.
Edward's youngest brother Richard (22) opposed the Treaty considering it dishonourable. Roger Cheney 1442-1499 (33) was present at the signing, and remained as a hostage until Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (33) returned to England.

On 04 Sep 1475 [his son] Edward Hastings 2nd Baron Hastings 1466-1506 (8) and Mary Hungerford Baroness Hastings, 4th Baroness Hungerford 1466-1553 (9) were married (he was her second-cousin once-removed).

Reburial of Richard and Edmund of York

On 29 Jul 1476 Edward I's paternal grand-father Edward of York, his father Richard of York and and his younger brother Edmund were reburied at St Mary and All Saints in Fotheringhay in a ceremony attended by Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (34), George York 1st Duke Clarence 1449-1478 (26), Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (21), [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (45), Anthony Woodville 2nd Earl Rivers 1440-1483 (36).

On 27 Jun 1481 George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury, 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (13) and [his daughter] Anne Hastings Countess Shrewsbury, Countess Waterford 1471-1520 (10) were married (he was her second-cousin). Anne Hastings Countess Shrewsbury, Countess Waterford 1471-1520 (10) by marriage Countess Shrewsbury (2C 1442) Countess Waterford.

Death of Edward IV

On 25 Mar 1483 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (40) returned to Westminster from Windsor. A few days later he became sufficiently unwell to add codicils to his will, and to have urged reconciliation between [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28); it isn't clear what the cause of the friction between the two men was although it appears well known that Hastings resented the Woodville family.

On 09 Apr 1483 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (40) died at Westminster. His son Edward V King England 1470- (12) succeeded V King England: Plantagenet York. Those present included Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (46), [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28).

Funeral of Edward IV

On 17 Apr 1483 the coffin of Edward IV was carried to Westminster Abbey by Edward Stanley 1st Baron Monteagle 1462-1524 (21), John Savage 1444-1492, Thomas Wortley 1433-1514 (50), Thomas Molyneux 1445-1483 (38), probably John Welles 1st Viscount Welles 1450-1498 (33) who had married Edward's daughter Cecily), John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 (41), Walter Hungerford 1464-1516 (18), Guy Wolston 1433-1490 (50), John Sapcote 1448-1501 (35), Thomas Tyrrell 1453-1512 (30), John Risley, Thomas Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1467-1525 (15), John Norreys, Louis de Bretelles and John Comyn 4th Lord Baddenoch 1294-1314.
Those in the procession included:
Thomas St Leger 1440-1483 (43), widow of Edward's sister Anne
William Parr KG 1434-1483
John Astley 1373-1488
William Stonor 1450-1494 (33)
Henry Ferrers 1443-1500 (40)
James Radclyffe 1440-1484 (43)
George Browne 1440-1483 (43)
Gilbert Debenham
John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (58) walked in front of the coffin with Edward's personal arms.
John Marlow Abbot Bermondsey followed by:
Thomas Kempe Bishop of London 1390-1489 (93)
John Hales Bishop Coventry and Lichfield 1400- (83) (Bishop of Chester?)
Robert Stillington Bishop of Bath and Wells 1420-1491 (63)
Edward Story Bishop of Chichester -1503
Richard Bell Bishop Carlisle -1496
James Goldwell Bishop of Norwich -1499
William Dudley Bishop of Durham 1425-1483 (58)
John Russell Bishop of Rochester, Bishop of Lincoln -1494
Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (63) (as Bishop of Ely)
Edmund Tuchet Bishop of Rochester, Bishop of Hereford, Bishop of Salisbury 1443-1524 (40) (as Bishop of Rochester)
Peter Courtenay Bishop of Exeter, Bishop of Winchester -1492, and
Lionel Woodville Bishop of Salisbury 1447-1484 (36)
Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 (59) brought up the rear.
Cardinal Thomas Bourchier 1418-1486 (65), then Archbishop of Canterbury, took no part due to infirmity.
John Pole 1st Earl Lincoln 1462-1487 (21) ; the King's nephew,
[his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52)
Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28)
William Herbert 2nd Earl Pembroke 1451-1491 (32) (some sources say Earl of Huntingindon?)
William Berkeley 1st Marquess Berkeley 1426-1492 (57)
Thomas Stanley 1st Earl Derby 1435-1504 (48)
Richard Fiennes 7th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1415-1483 (68)
John Dudley 1st Baron Dudley 1400-1487 (82)
George Neville 4th Baron Bergavenny 1440-1492 (43)
John Tuchet 6th Baron Audley Heighley, 3rd Baron Tuchet 1426-1490 (57)
Walter Devereux 7th Baron Ferrers Chartley 1432-1485
Edward Grey 1st Viscount Lisle 1432-1492 (51)
Henry Lovell 9th Baron Marshal, 8th Baron Morley 1476-1489 (7)
Richard Woodville 3rd Earl Rivers 1453-1491 (30)
John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 (35)
[his son] Richard Hastings Baron Willoughby Eresby 1433-1503 (50)
John Bourchier 6th Baron Ferrers Groby 1438-1495 (45)
Thomas Bourchier -1492
Thomas Bourchier -1533.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 20 May 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's servant [his son] William Hastings (52), knight, of the office of master and worker of the king's moneys and keeper of the exchange within the Tower of London, the realm of England and the town of Calais according to the form of certain indentures, receiving the accustomed fees. By p.s.

Execution of Hastings

On 13 Jun 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30) arranged a Council meeting at the Tower of London attended by [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52), Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (63), Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 (59) and Henry Stafford 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1454-1483 (28). During the course of the evening Richgard accused William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52), Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (63) and Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 (59) of treasonable conspiracy with the Queen (46).
William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) was beheaded at Tower Green, Tower of London. He was buried in North Aisle, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle next to Edward IV King England 1442-1483. His son [his son] Edward Hastings 2nd Baron Hastings 1466-1506 (16) succeeded 2nd Baron Hastings (2C 1430). Mary Hungerford Baroness Hastings, 4th Baroness Hungerford 1466-1553 (17) by marriage Baroness Hastings (2C 1430).
Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (63) and Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 (59) were arrested.

The History of King Richard the Third. King Edward in his life, although this dissension between his friends somewhat irked him, yet in his good health he somewhat the less regarded it because he thought whatsoever business should fall between them, he should always be able to rule both parties. But in his last sickness, when he perceived his natural strength so sore enfeebled that he despaired all recovery, then he, considering the youth of his children, suspecting nothing less than what would happen, and well foreseeing that many harms might grow by family debates while the youth of his children lacked discretion of themselves, and good counsel of their friends—because either party should counsel for their own advantage and by pleasant advice win themselves favor, rather than by profitable advertisement do the children good—he called some of them before him who were at variance, and especially, the Lord Marquis Dorset, the Queen’s son by her first husband, and Richard the Lord Hastings [Note. Text says Richard? Should be William!], a noble man, then Lord Chamberlain, against whom the Queen specially grudged for that great favor the King showed him, and also because she thought him secretly familiar with the King in wanton company. Her kindred also bore him dislike, as well for that the King had made him Captain of Calais (which office the Lord Rivers, brother to the Queen, claimed because of the King’s former promise), and for diverse other great gifts which he received that they looked for.

The History of King Richard the Third. When these lords [Note. [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483, John Grey 1432-1461] with diverse others of both parties were come into his presence, the King, lifting up himself and propped up with pillows, as it is reported, after this fashion said unto them:
My lords, my dear kinsmen and allies, in what plight I lie, you see, and I feel. By which, the less while I expect to live with you, the more deeply am I moved to care in what case I leave you, for such as I leave you, such be my children like to find you. That if they should (God forbid) find you at variance, might by chance fall themselves at war before their discretion would serve to set you at peace. You see their youth, of which I reckon the only security to rest in your concord. For it suffices not that all you love them, if each of you hate the other. If they were men, your faithfulness by chance would suffice. But childhood must be maintained by men’s authority, and slippery youth supported with elder counsel, which neither they can have unless you give it, nor can you give it if you do not agree. For where each labors to break what the other makes, and for hatred of each other’s person impugns each other’s counsel, it must needs be long before any good conclusion go forward. And also while either party labors to be chief, flattery shall have more place than plain and faithful advice, of which must needs ensue the evil bringing up of the Prince, whose mind in tender youth infected shall readily fall to mischief and riot, and draw down with this noble realm to ruin—unless grace turn him to wisdom, which if God send, then they who by evil means before pleased him best shall after fall furthest out of favor, so that ever at length evil plans drive to nothing and good plain ways prosper.
Great variance has there long been between you, not always for great causes. Sometimes a thing right well intended, our misconstruction turns unto worse, or a small displeasure done us, either our own affection or evil tongues aggrieve. But this I know well: you never had so great cause of hatred as you have of love. That we be all men, that we be Christian men, this shall I leave for preachers to tell you (and yet I know never whether any preacher’s words ought to move you more than his words who is by and by going to the place that they all preach of). But this I desire you to remember: that the one part of you is of my blood, the other of mine allies, and each of you with the other, either of kindred or affinity; and also that spiritual kindred of affinity, if the sacraments of Christ’s Church bear that weight with us that God wished they did, should no less move us to charity than the respect of fleshly consanguinity. Our Lord forbid that you love together the worse for the same cause that you ought to love the better. And yet that happens. And nowhere find we so deadly debate as among them who by nature and law most ought to agree together.
Such a pestilent serpent is ambition and desire of vainglory and sovereignty that among those whom he once enters, he creeps forth so far till with division and variance he turns all to mischief: First, longing to be next to the best; afterward, equal with the best; and at last, chief and above the best. For immoderate appetite of worship—and therefore debate and dissension—has caused what loss, what sorrow, what trouble within these few years in this realm, I pray God as well forget as we well remember. Such things, if I could as well have foreseen as I have with my more pain than pleasure experienced, by God’s blessed Lady (that was ever his oath), I would never have won the courtesy of men’s knees with the loss of so many heads.
But since things passed cannot be brought back, much ought we the more beware by what occasion we have taken so great hurt before, that we soon afterwards fall not in that occasion again. Now be those griefs past, and all is (God be thanked) quiet, and likely right well to prosper in wealthful peace under your cousins, my children, if God send them life and you love. Of which two things, the less loss were they, if taken by God at his pleasure, for yet should the realm always find kings, and by chance good kings. But if you among yourselves in a child’s reign fall at debate, many a good man shall perish and perhaps he too, and you too, before this land find peace again.
Wherefore in these last words that ever I look to speak with you, I exhort you and require you all, for the love that I have ever bore to you, for the love that our Lord bears to us all, from this time forward, all griefs forgotten, each of you love the other. Which I verily trust you will, if you anything earthly regard—either God or your King, affinity or kindred, this realm, your own country, or your own surety.
And therewithal, the King, no longer enduring to sit up, laid himself down on his right side, his face toward them, and none was there present that could refrain from weeping. But the lords, encouraging him with as good words as they could and answering for the time as they thought to stand with his pleasure, there in his presence (as by their words appeared), each forgave the other and joined their hands together, when (as it after appeared by their deeds) their hearts were far asunder.

The History of King Richard the Third. With these words and writings and such others, the Duke of Gloucester soon set afire them that were of themselves easy to kindle, and especially two, Edward Duke of Buckingham [Note. Mistake for Humphrey] and Richard Lord Hastings [Note. Mistake for William] (the chamberlain), both men of honor and of great power: the one by long succession from his ancestry, the other by his office and the King’s favor. These two, not bearing each to the other so much love as hatred both unto the Queen’s part, on this point accorded together with the Duke of Gloucester: that they would utterly remove from the King’s company all his mother’s friends, under the name of their enemies. With this concluded, the Duke of Gloucester, understanding that the lords who were about the King intended to bring him up to his coronation, accompanied with such power of their friends that it should be hard for him to bring his purpose to pass without the gathering and great assembling of people and in manner of open war, the end of which he knew to be dubious, and with the King being on their side, his part should have the face and name of a rebellion, he secretly, therefore, by diverse means caused the Queen to be persuaded and brought to believe that it neither were needed and also should be jeopardizing for the King to come up strong. For whereas now every lord loved each other and none other thing studied upon but about the coronation and honor of the King, if the lords of her kindred should assemble in the King’s name many people, they should give the very same lords, between whom and them had been sometime debate, fear and suspicion, lest they should gather this people, not for the King’s safeguard, whom no man impugned, but for their destruction, having more regard to their old variance than their new atonement. For which cause, they should assemble on the other party many people again for their defense, whose power she knew well far stretched. And thus should all the realm fall into a roar. And of all the hurt that thereof should ensue, which was likely not to be little, and the most harm there like to fall where she least it would, all the world would put her and her kindred in the blame and say that they had unwisely and untruly also, broken the amity and peace that the King her husband so prudently made between his kin and hers on his death bed and which the other party faithfully observed.

[his son] William Hastings was born to William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503.

[his son] Richard Hastings was born to [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503.

[his son] George Hastings was born to [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503.

[his daughter] Elizabeth Hastings was born to [his son] William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 and [his wife] Katherine Neville Baroness Bonville, Baroness Hastings 1442-1503.

Family Trees

Paternal Family Tree: Hastings

Descent

Kings Wessex: Great x 17 Grand Son of Aethelwulf King Wessex -858

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 15 Grand Son of Maredudd ab Owain King Deheubarth, King Powys, King Gwynedd -999

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 17 Grand Son of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg, King Deheubarth 880-950

Kings Powys: Great x 15 Grand Son of Maredudd ab Owain King Deheubarth, King Powys, King Gwynedd -999

Kings England: Great x 9 Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Kings Scotland: Great x 6 Grand Son of William "Lion" I King Scotland 1143-1214

Kings Franks: Great x 19 Grand Son of Louis "Pious" King Aquitaine, I King Franks 778-840

Kings France: Great x 10 Grand Son of Henry I King France 1008-1060

Ancestry

Father: Leonard Hastings 1396-1455

GrandFather: Ralph Hastings 1340-1398

Great GrandFather: Ralph Hastings 1291-1346

Great x 2 GrandFather: Nicholas Hastings 1276-1316

Great x 3 GrandFather: Hugh Hastings 1249-1302

Great x 4 GrandFather: Nicholas Hastings 1223-1268

Great x 2 GrandMother: Agnes Unknown

Great GrandMother: Margaret Herle

GrandMother: Maud Sutton 1356-1400

Great GrandFather: Thomas Sutton 1315-1356

Great x 2 GrandFather: John Sutton 1st Baron Sutton Holderness 1270-1338

Great x 3 GrandFather: Sayer IV Sutton 1244-1292

Great x 4 GrandFather: Sayer III Sutton 1215-1306

Great x 3 GrandMother: Anne Ros 1244-1290

Great x 4 GrandFather: William Ros 1200-1265

Great x 4 GrandMother: Lucy Fitzpiers 1200-1247

Great x 2 GrandMother: Constantia Sampson Baroness Lexington 1273-1346

Great x 3 GrandFather: John Sampson 1247-1310

Mother: Alice Camoys 8 x Great Granddaughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

GrandFather: Thomas Camoys 1st Baron Camoys 1351-1421 7 x Great Grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great GrandFather: John Camoys 6 x Great Grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 2 GrandFather: Ralph Camoys 1st Baron Camoys -1336

Great x 2 GrandMother: Elizabeth Despencer Baroness Camoys 5 x Great Granddaughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 GrandFather: Hugh "Elder" Despencer 1st Earl Winchester 1261-1326 4 x Great Grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 4 GrandFather: Hugh Despencer 1st Baron Despencer 1223-1265

Great x 4 GrandMother: Aline Basset 1221-1281 3 x Great Granddaughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 GrandMother: Isabella Beauchamp Baroness Monthermer 1263-1306

Great x 4 GrandFather: William Beauchamp 9th Earl Warwick 1237-1298

Great x 4 GrandMother: Maud Fitzjohn Countess Warwick 1238-1301

Great GrandMother: Elizabeth Latimer

Great x 2 GrandFather: William Latimer 3rd Baron Latimer Corby 1300-1335

Great x 3 GrandFather: William Latimer 2nd Baron Latimer Corby 1276-1327

Great x 4 GrandFather: William Latimer 1st Baron Latimer Corby 1243-1304

Great x 4 GrandMother: Alicia Ledet Baroness Latimer Corby 1251-1316

Great x 2 GrandMother: Elizabeth Botetort Baroness Latimer Corby

Great x 3 GrandFather: John Botetort 1st Baron Botetort 1265-1324

Great x 3 GrandMother: Matilda Fitzotes Baroness Botetort

Great x 4 GrandFather: Thomas Fitzotes

GrandMother: Elizabeth Louches Baroness Camoys

Great GrandFather: William Louches