Twenty Trees

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History of Hampshire

Hampshire is in Wessex

In 495 Cerdic King Wessex -534 landed with his son Cynric King Wessex in five ships at Hampshire.

Alton

Treaty of Alton

After 25 Jul 1101 King Henry I "Beauclerc" England and Robert Curthose Normandy III Duke Normandy 1051-1134, brothers, both sons of William "Conqueror" I King England 1028-1087, signed the Treaty of Alton at Alton by which Robert Curthose Normandy III Duke Normandy 1051-1134 agreed to renounce his claim to the English throne in exchange for a yearly stipend and other concessions.

East Worldham, Alton

Around 1322 John Burghesh 1322-1349 was born to Bartholomew "The Elder" Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh 1287-1355 (35) and Elizabeth Verdun Baroness Burghesh 1306-1360 (16) at East Worldham, Alton.

Andover

In 1604 Thomas Jermyn 1573-1645 (31) was elected MP Andover.

In 1625 Henry Wallop 1568-1642 (56) was elected MP Andover.

Short Parliament

On Apr 1640 William Waller 1597-1668 (43) was elected MP Andover during the Short Parliament.

Long Parliament

On 03 May 1642 William Waller 1597-1668 (45) was elected MP Andover during the Long Parliament.

In 1644 Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 (26) was wounded on the bridge of his nose during a skirmish at Andover.

1727 General Election

In 1727 Charles Colyear 2nd Earl Portmore 1700-1785 (26) was elected MP Andover in the 1727 General Election.

In 1758 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (34). Portrait of Charles Colyear 2nd Earl Portmore 1700-1785 (57).

In 1754 Francis Blake Delaval 1727-1771 (26) was elected MP Andover. He held the seat until 1768.

In 1751. Arthur Pond Painter 1705-1758 (46). Portrait of Rhoda Delaval 1725-1757 (25) and her siblings Francis Blake Delaval 1727-1771 (23), Edward Hussey Delaval 1729-1814 (22), John Delaval 1st Baron Delaval 1728-1808 (22), Anne Hussey Delaval 1743- and Sarah Delaval Countess Mexborough 1742-1821 (9).

Basing

In 1225 John St John 1225-1309 was born to Robert St John 1200-1266 (25) and Agnes Cantilupe 1202-1279 (23) at Basing.

In 1259 Edward St John 1259-1368 was born to John St John 1225-1309 (34) and Agnes Fitzpiers 1234-1305 (24) at Basing.

Around 1262 Amadeus St John 1262- was born to John St John 1225-1309 (37) and Agnes Fitzpiers 1234-1305 (27) at Basing.

On 07 Mar 1266 Robert St John 1200-1266 (66) died at Basing.

On Oct 1273 John St John 1st Baron St John Basing 1273-1329 was born to John St John 1225-1309 (48) and Agnes Fitzpiers 1234-1305 (39) at Basing.

In 1275 Agnes St John Countess Devon 1275-1345 was born to John St John 1225-1309 (50) and Agnes Fitzpiers 1234-1305 (40) at Basing.

On 29 Sep 1309 John St John 1225-1309 (84) died at Basing.

On 26 May 1310 Hugh St John 2nd Baron St John Basing 1310-1335 was born to John St John 1st Baron St John Basing 1273-1329 (36) and Isabel Courtenay Baroness St John Basing 1283-1335 (27) at Basing.

On 23 Apr 1323 John St John Lagenham 2nd Baron St John Lagenham 1281-1323 (42) died at Basing. His son John St John Lagenham 3rd Baron St John Lagenham 1308-1349 (15) succeeded 3rd Baron St John Lagenham.

On 14 May 1329 John St John 1st Baron St John Basing 1273-1329 (55) died at Basing. His son Hugh St John 2nd Baron St John Basing 1310-1335 (18) succeeded 2nd Baron St John Basing. Mirabelle Wake Baroness St John Basing by marriage Baroness St John Basing.

On 29 Jun 1333 Isabel St John 4th Baroness St John Basing 1333-1393 was born to Hugh St John 2nd Baron St John Basing 1310-1335 (23) and Isabel Wake Baroness St John Basing at Basing.

In 1334 Edmund St John 3rd Baron St John Basing 1334-1347 was born to Hugh St John 2nd Baron St John Basing 1310-1335 (23) and Isabel Wake Baroness St John Basing at Basing.

On May 1335 Hugh St John 2nd Baron St John Basing 1310-1335 (24) died at Basing. His son Edmund St John 3rd Baron St John Basing 1334-1347 (1) succeeded 3rd Baron St John Basing.

On 10 May 1335 Isabel Courtenay Baroness St John Basing 1283-1335 (52) died at Basing.

On 30 Nov 1368 Edward St John 1259-1368 died at Basing.

Around 1427 John Paulet 1427-1492 was born to John Paulet 1400-1436 (27) and Constance Poynings 1408-1442 (19) at Basing.

On 11 Jan 1436 John Paulet 1400-1436 (36) died at Basing.

In 1452 John Paulet 1452-1525 was born to John Paulet 1427-1492 (25) and Eleanor Ros 1432-1509 (19) at Basing.

On 05 Oct 1492 John Paulet 1427-1492 (65) died at Basing.

Before May 1509 Eleanor Ros 1432-1509 died at Basing.

On 05 Jan 1525 John Paulet 1452-1525 (73) died at Basing. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Basing.

Basing Castle, Basing

St Mary's Church, Basing

On 05 Jan 1525 John Paulet 1452-1525 (73) died at Basing. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Basing.

On 19 Mar 1556 Elizabeth Seymour Baroness Cromwell Oakham 1518-1556 (38) died. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Basing.

Basingstoke

In 1685 George Wheeler Traveller 1651-1724 (33) was appointed Vicar of Basingstoke.

Beaulieu

Battle of Blackheath aka Cornish Rebellion

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1498. This yeare was Blackheath feild in June. The Lord Awdley chiefe capteyn with 30,000 Cornishe men. The capteynes put to death, and in August Perkin Warbeck (24) landed in Cornwale, and by pursuit fledd to Bowdley St. Marie , but by appoyntment he came to the Kinge (40), followinge the Courte. See Battle of Blackheath aka Cornish Rebellion.

Beaulieu Abbey, Beaulieu

Perkin Warbreck 1474-1499 was captured at Beaulieu Abbey, Beaulieu.

On 17 Jan 1240 Nicholas Cornwall 1240-1240 died at Berkhamsted Castle. He was buried with his mother at Beaulieu Abbey, Beaulieu.

1471. Letter XXXIX. Anne Countess of Warwick to the House of Commons. 1471. Letter XXXVIII. Anne Countess of Warwick (14) to the House of Commons.
To the right worshipful and discreet Commons of this present Parliament.
Sheweth unto your wisdoms and discretions the king's true liege woman, Anne countess of Warwick, which never offended his most redoubted highness; for she, immediately after the death of her lord and husband (17) — on whose soul God have mercy — for none offence by her done, but dreading only trouble, being that time within this realm, entered into the sanctuary of Beaulieu for surety of her person, to dispose for the weal and health of the soul of her said lord and husband, as right and conscience required her so to do; making within five days, or near thereabouts, after her entry into the said sanctuary, her labours, suits, and means to the king's highness for her safeguard, to be had as diligently and effectually as her power would extend. She not ceasing, but after her power continiling in such labours, suits, and means, insomuch that, in absence of clerks, she hath written letters in that behalf to the king's highness with her own hand, and not only making such labours, suits, and means to the king's highness, soothly also to the queen's (34) good grace, to my right redoubted lady the king's mother, to my lady the king's eldest daughter, to my lords the king's brethren, to my ladies the king's sisters, to my lady of Bedford (56), mother to the queen, and to other ladies noble of this realm; in which labours, suits, and means, she hath continued hitherto, and so will continue, as she owes to do, till it may please the king, of his most good and noble grace, to have consideration that, during the life of her said lord and husband, she was covert baron, which point she remits to your great wisdoms, and that after his decease, all the time of her being in the said sainctuary, she hath duly kept her fidelity and liegeance, and obeyed the king's commandments. Howbeity it hath pleased the king's highness, by some sinister information to his said highness made, to direct his most dread letters to the abbot of the monastery of Beaulieu, with right sharp commandment that such persons as his highness sent to the said monastery should have guard and strait keeping of her person, which was and is to her great heart's grievance, she specially fearing that the privileges and liberties of the church, by such keeping of her person, might be interrupted and violated, where the privileges of the said sanctuary were never so largely attempted unto this time, as is said; yet the said Anne and Countess, under protestations by her made, hath suffered strait keeping of her person and yet doth, that her fidelity and liegeance to the king's highness the better might be understood, hoping she might the rather have had largess to make suits to the king's highness in her own person for her livelihood and rightful inheritance, which livelihood and inheritance, with all revenues and profits thereto pertaining, with her jointure also, and dower of the earldom of Salisbury, fully and wholly hath been restrained from her, from the time of the death of her said lord and husband unto this day. And forasmuch as our sovereign lord the king of his great grace hath set and assembled his high court of Parliament for reformations, right, and equity to all his subjects and liege people duly to be ministered, the said Anne and Countess humbly beseecheth your great wisdom to ponder and weigh in your consciences her right and true title of her inheritance, as the earldom of Warwick and Spencer's lands, to which she is rightfully born by lineal succession, and also her jointure and dower of the earldom of Salisbury aforesaid. And to shew her your benevolence, that by the king's good grace and authority of this his noble Parliament she may to her foresaid livelihood and rightful inheritance duly be restored and it enjoy, as the laws of Almighty God and of this noble realm, right, also, and conscience doth require; beseeching heartily your great goodnesses, in the reverence of Almighty God and of his most blessed mother, will of grace to consider the poor estate she stands in, how in her own person she may not solicit the premises as she would, an she might, nor is of power any sufficient solicitor in this behalf to make; and though she might, as (she; may not, there is none that dare take it upon him; to have also this poor bill in your tender remembrance, that your perfect charity and good will may solicit the eflFect of the same, which to do, her power at this time may not extend. And shall pray and do pray to God for you.

In 1486 Anne Beauchamp 16th Countess Warwick 1426-1492 (59) resided at Beaulieu Abbey, Beaulieu.

Belmont

On 20 Dec 1802 Ulick Burgh 1st Marquess Clanricarde 1802-1874 was born to John Thomas Burgh 13th Earl Clanricarde 1744-1808 (58) at Belmont.

Bentley

Around 1446 Robert Scrope 1446-1500 was born to Henry Scrope 4th Baron Scrope Bolton 1418-1459 (27) and Elizabeth Scrope Baroness Scrope Bolton -1498 at Bentley.

On Apr 1485 Richard Scrope 1442-1485 (43) died at Bentley.

Bishop's Waltham

On 27 Sep 1404 William of Wykeham Chancellor Bishop Winchester 1320-1404 (84) died at Bishop's Waltham. He was buried in a chantry chapel on the south side of Winchester Cathedral.

Bishop Waltham's Palace

On 10 Oct 1344 Mary Plantagenet Duchess Brittany 1344-1361 was born to King Edward III England (31) and Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 1314-1369 (30) at Bishop Waltham's Palace.

Bishopstoke

Around 1589 Richard Dummer 1589-1679 was born to Thomas Dummer at Bishopstoke.

Bournemouth

On 15 Oct 1893 Charles Villiers 1830-1893 (63) died at Bournemouth.

On 01 Feb 1936 Charles Yorke 8th Earl Hardwicke 1869-1936 (66) died at Bournemouth. His nephew Philip Grantham Yorke 9th Earl Hardwicke 1906-1974 (29) succeeded 9th Earl Hardwicke.

Broughton

In 1466 Oliver King Bishop of Bath and Wells 1432-1503 (34) was appointed Rector of Broughton.

Burghclere

On 16 Apr 1833 Henry George Herbert 2nd Earl Carnarvon 1772-1833 (60) died at Grosvenor Square. He was buried at Burghclere. His son Henry John George Herbert 3rd Earl Carnarvon 1800-1849 (32) succeeded 3rd Earl Carnarvon (3C 1793) 3rd Baron Porchester. Henrietta Anna Howard-Molyneux-Howard Countess Carnarvon 1804-1876 (28) by marriage Countess Carnarvon (3C 1793).

Buriton

In 1319 Peter Cornwall 1319-1377 was born to Edmund Cornwall 1280-1354 (39) at Buriton.

Cadlands

Chauton

Before 1362 Elizabeth Strange Countess Nottingham 1362-1383 was born to John Strange 4th Baron Strange Blackmere 1332-1361 and Mary Fitzalan Baroness Strange Blackmere at Chauton.

Clatford

Red Rice

On 04 Aug 1842 William Noel-Hill 3rd Baron Berwick 1773–1842 (68) died at Red Rice unmarried and without issue at Red Rice. He was buried at St Eata's Church. His brother Richard Noel-Hill 4th Baron Berwick 1774–1848 (67) succeeded 4th Baron Berwick of Attingham in Shropshire.

East Stratton

Eastleigh

Hamble-le-Rice, Eastleigh

Exbury

Fareham

Titchfield Abbey, Fareham

Marriage of Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou

On 23 Apr 1445 Henry VI King England, II King France 1421-1471 (23) and Margaret of Anjou Queen Consort England 1430-1482 (15) were married (he was her third-cousin) at Titchfield Abbey, Fareham.

Farnborough

St Peter's Church, Farnborough

On 03 Nov 1690 Richard Power 1st Earl Tyrone 1630-1690 was buried in St Peter's Church, Farnborough.

Fordingbridge

In 1375 Amice Pembridge 1330-1375 (45) died at Fordingbridge.

On Nov 1517 Edward Willoughby 1491-1517 (26) died at Fordingbridge.

Gosport

On 14 Feb 1778 John Amherst 1718-1778 (60) died in Gosport.

Hale

Harley Wintney

Havant

Warblington, Havant

Around 1358 Eleanor Montagu 1358-1387 was born to John Montagu 1st Baron Montagu, 3rd Baron Monthermer 1330-1389 (28) and Margaret Monthermer Baroness Montagu, 3rd Baroness Monthermer -1395 at Warblington, Havant.

Herriard

Highclere

Hursley

Hursley House, Hursley

Isle of Wight

After 495 Cerdic King Wessex -534 conquered the Isle of Wight.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 650-699. 661. This year, at Easter, Kenwal fought at Pontesbury; and Wulfere (21), the son of Penda, pursued him as far as Ashdown. Cuthred, the son of Cwichelm, and King Kenbert, died in one year. Into the Isle of Wight also Wulfere (21), the son of Penda, penetrated, and transferred the inhabitants to Ethelwald, king of the South-Saxons, because Wulfere adopted him in baptism. And Eoppa, a mass-priest, by command of Wilfrid and King Wulfere, was the first of men who brought baptism to the people of the Isle of Wight.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 9th July 1638. I went home to visit my friends, and, on the 26th, with my brother (21) and sister to Lewes, where we abode till the 31st; and thence to one Mr. Michael's, of Houghton, near Arundel, where we were very well treated; and, on the 2d of August, to Portsmouth, and thence, having surveyed the fortifications (a great rarity in that blessed halcyon time in England), we passed into the Isle of Wight, to the house of my Baroness Richards, in a place called Yaverland; but were turned the following day to Chichester, where, having viewed the city and fair cathedral, we returned home.

Glorious Revolution

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 November. 04 Nov 1688. Fresh reports of the Prince (38) being landed somewhere about Portsmouth, or the Isle of Wight, whereas it was thought it would have been northward. The Court in great hurry. .

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

In 1791 Thomas Orde-Powlett 1st Baron Bolton 1740-1807 (50) was appointed Governor of the Isle of Wight.

Bonchurch

St. Boniface Church

On 10 Apr 1909 Algernon Charles Poet Swinburne 1837–1909 (72) died. He was buried at St. Boniface Church.

Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849-887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 849 was born Alfred, king of the Anglo-Saxons, at the royal village of Wanating, in Berkshire, which country has its name from the wood of Berroc, where the box-tree grows most abundantly. His genealogy is traced in the following order. King Alfred was the son of king Ethelwulf, who was the son of Egbert, who was the son of Elmund, was the son of Eafa, who was the son of Eoppa, who the son of Ingild. Ingild, and Ina, the famous king of the West-Saxons, were two brothers. Ina went to Rome, and there ending this life honourably, entered the heavenly kingdom, to reign there for ever with Christ. IngildIna were the sons of Coenred, who was the son of Ceolwald, who was the son of Cudam, who was the son of Cuthwin, who was the son of Ceawlin, who was the son of Cynric, who was the son of Creoda, who was the son of Cerdic, who was the son of Elesa, who was the son of Gewis, from whom the Britons name all that nation Gegwis, (2) who was the son of Brond, who was the son of Beldeg, who was the son of Woden, who was the son of Frithowald, who was the son of Frealaf, who was the son of Frithuwulf, who was the son of Finn of Godwulf, who was the son of Gear, which Geat the pagans long worshipped as a god. Sedulius makes mention of him in his metrical Paschal poem, as follows:
When gentile poets with their fictions vain, In tragic language and bombastic strain, To their god Geat, comic deity, Loud praises sing, &c.
Geat was the son of Taetwa, who was the son of Beaw, who was the son of Sceldi, who was the son of Heremod, who was the son of Itermon, who was the son of Hathra, who was the son of Guala, who was the son of Bedwig, who was the son of Shem, who was the son of Noah, who was the son of Lamech, who was the son of Methusalem, who was the son of Enoch, who was the son of Malaleci, who was the son of Cainian, who was the son of Enos, who was the son of Seth, who was the son of Adam.
The mother of Alfred was named Osburga, a religious woman, noble both by birth and by nature; she was daughter of Oslac, the famous butler of king Ethtelwulf, which Oslac was a Goth by nation, descended from the Goths and Jutes, of the seed, namely, of Stuf and Whitgar, two brothers and counts; who, having received possession of the Isle of Wight from their uncle, King Cerdic, and his son Cynric their cousin, slew the few British inhabitants whom they could find in that island, at a place called Gwihtgaraburgh; for the other inhabitants of the island had either been slain, or escaped into exile.
Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849-887 Page 1.

Carisbrooke Castle

On 17 Jul 1431 Philippa Mohun Duchess Albemarle aka Aumale, Duchess York 1367-1431 (64) died at Carisbrooke Castle. She was buried at Chapel of St Nicholas, Chapels, Westminster Abbey. Her nephew Richard Strange 3rd Baron Mohun Dunster, 7th Baron Strange Knockin 1381-1449 (49) succeeded 3rd Baron Mohun Dunster as a result of her death bring the title out of abeyance.

In 1469 Simon Montfort -1495 was appointed Lieutenant Carisbroke Castle.

Treaty of Newport

Between 15 Sep 1648 and 27 Nov 1648 the Treaty of Newport attempted to reconcile Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (47) (who was imprisoned at nearby Carisbrooke Castle) with Parliament. Denzil Holles 1st Baron Holles 1599-1680 (48) and Henry "Younger" Vane 1613-1662 (35) represented Parliament. James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (37) represented King Charles. The Treaty eventually came to nothing.
Parliament was also represented by John Crew 1st Baron Crew 1598-1679 (50), John Glynne Judge 1602-1666 (46), Nathaniel Fiennes 1608-1669 (40), William Pierrepoint 1608-1678 (40), Algernon Percy 10th Earl of Northumberland 1602-1668 (45), William Fiennes 1st Viscount Saye and Sele 1582-1662 (66), Philip Herbert 4th Earl Pembroke, 1st Earl Montgomery 1584-1650 (63), William Cecil 2nd Earl Salisbury 1591-1668 (57), James Cranfield 2nd Earl Middlesex 1621-1651 (27) and Thomas Wenman 2nd Viscount Wenman 1596-1665 (52).

Cowes, Isle of Wight

On 28 Jul 1840 John "Radical Jack" Lambton 1st Earl Durham 1792-1840 (48) died at Cowes, Isle of Wight. He was buried at St Mary and St Cuthbert, Chester-le-Street.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter VII: My Marriage. If Lord Cardigan (60) and I had met in 1909 instead of in 1857 no particular comment would have been made on our friendship, but in 1857 Society was scandalised because I had the courage to ride and drive with a married man who had an unfaithful wife.
There was another and a stronger reason for the wagging tongues of slander, for they were prompted by jealousy. Lady Cardigan (60) was then very ill, and every one knew that her death was only a question of a year or two. Once free, Lord Cardigan (60) would be a prize well worth winning by match-making matrons with marriageable daughters, and his openly avowed affection for me had put an end to these hopes, I was not in the least disturbed by the incessant gossip, but my father (68) and my brothers were much worried and annoyed at the reports which were circulated, and although Lady Georgina Codrington (41) wrote to my father and begged him not to make a fuss about things, he suddenly became very angry and declared he would leave London for good and take me with him.
A most distressing scene followed. I said that, as there was no evil in my friendship with Lord Cardigan (60), I refused to give up his acquaintance, or to be taken into the country against my will, and I steadily defied my father and brothers to make me alter my decision. Family quarrels are, perhaps, the most rankling of any, for they are generally retaliative, and much is said that is never forgotten or quite forgiven ; ours was no exception, and the result of it was that I decided to leave home. With me, to think has always been to act, so I ordered my horse " Don Juan " to be brought round, and I rode away to liberty. My own income rendered me perfectly independent ; I put up at a quiet hotel in Hyde Park Square, and looked about for a furnished house. I did not go into exile alone, for my father's valet, Mathews, came with me, and his fidelity was well rewarded when he entered Lord Cardigan's service after our marriage.
I was lucky enough to find a charming little furnished house in Norfolk Street, Park Lane, and I installed myself there with Mathews and three other servants. It was a quiet household, and although at first things seemed strange to me, I was very happy. I rode with Cardigan (60) every day in the Park, regardless of the averted glances of those who had once called themselves my friends. I often wonder why friendship is so apostrophised, for real friends in trouble are practically non-existent, especially at the moment they are most needed. The ideal friend, whose aim in life should be to forget "base self," as the poets say, is as extinct as the Dodo, and those who talk most about friendship are usually the first to forget what is the true meaning of the word.
On the morning of July 12, 1858, I was awakened by a loud knocking at the front door. I looked at my watch, and saw that it was not seven o'clock ; I was, needless to say, very alarmed, as I wondered whether anything had happened to my father or my brothers. The knocking continued — I heard the bolts drawn, the door opened, and a voice I knew well called impatiently for me. It was Lord Cardigan (60) ! I had just time to slip on a dressing-gown before he came into my room, sans ceremonie, and taking me in his arms he said, "' My dearest, she's (60) dead . . . let's get married at once." Then I knew that the trying period of our probation was over, and that we were free to be happy together at last.
When Cardigan (60) grew calmer he told me he had just come from his wife's (60) death-bed. The poor lady (60) had urged him to marry me, saying she knew that I should make him happy. She had also warned him against Maria, Marchioness of Ailesbury (45), the extent of whose love affairs, it appears, was only known to Lady Cardigan (60), who told his Lordship (60) the unvarnished truth about them.
As I did not wish to insult the memory of the dead woman (60), who had shown me so many kindnesses, I refused to marry Cardigan (60) until some time had elapsed. He went to Ireland in his official capacity of Inspector of Cavalry, and I lived on quietly at Norfolk Street till September, when I left London for Cowes. I then went on board Lord Cardigan's yacht the Airedale, where he and a party of friends were awaiting me, and we sailed for Gibraltar.
Nothing particular occurred en route; we were all in the best of spirits, and I felt as though I were the Princess in some delightful fairy-tale. The day after we arrived at Gibraltar there was a terrible storm, almost tropical in its violence. Roofs were torn off houses and whirled, light as dead leaves, through the air, great trees were uprooted, heavy masonry fell everywhere, and the ships tossed about like cockle-shells in the harbour. It was almost a scene from the Inferno, and our horror was intensified when we saw the signals from a French vessel in distress. Nobody seemed inclined to put out, so I begged Lord Cardigan (60) to send the Airedale to try and save the crew. He assented, and through this timely aid from our yacht fourteen men were rescued, and we also took a French poodle off a raft to which he was clinging, his owner doubtless having been drowned.

On 02 May 1914 John Campbell 9th Duke Argyll 1845-1914 (68) died at Cowes, Isle of Wight. His nephew Niall Campbell 10th Duke Argyll 1872-1949 (42) succeeded 10th Duke Argyll.

Freshwater, Isle of Wight

On 28 Jul 1635 Robert Hooke Scientist 1635-1703 was born in Freshwater, Isle of Wight.

Newport, Isle of Wight

In Apr 1544 Thomas Fleming Judge 1544-1613 was born in Newport, Isle of Wight.

Osborne House, Isle of Wight

On 01 Jul 1862 Prince Louis Hesse-Darmstadt IV Grand Duke 1837-1892 (24) and Alice Windsor 1843-1878 (19) were married at Osborne House, Isle of Wight.

Times Newspaper Court Circulars. 03 Feb 1866.
Her Majesty (46) drove out yesterday morniug and afternoon. Mr. Engleheart arrived at Osborne on Thursday, and had the honour of dining with Her Majesty (46) and the Royal family yesterday. The Queen (46) held a Council today, which was attended by Earl Russell (73), Earl de Grey and Ripon (38), antd Mr. Guschen.
Mr. Helps was Clerk of the Council.
Earl Cowley (61), Viscount Sydney (60), and Sir Charles Young (70), Garter, arrived from London this morning. Lord Cowley (61) was introduced by Lord Sydney (60), Lord Chamberlain (Sir Charles Young (70) attending with the insignia of the Order of the Garter), and Her Majesty (46) invested Lord Cowley (61) with the Riband and Badge of the Garter.
Earl Russell (73) and Earl de Grey (38) had audiences of Her Majesty (46).
NOTE. On 03 Feb 1866 Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl Cowley 1804-1884 (61) was appointed 747th Knight of the Garter by Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (46).

1845 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

Before 1840. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871. Portrait of John Russell 1st Earl Russell 1792-1878 and Henry Vassall-Fox 3rd Baron Holland 1773-1840.

Death of Queen Victoria

On 22 Jan 1901 Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (81) died at Osborne House, Isle of Wight. Her son Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59) succeeded VII King United Kingdom: Saxe-Coburg-Gotha aka Windsor.

1845 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (4).

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927 (57). Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (59).

St. Helen's Point, Isle of Wight

Four Days' Battle

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 June. 01 Jun 1666. Being in my garden at 6 o'clock in the evening, and hearing the great guns go thick off, I took horse and rode that night to Rochester; thence next day toward the Downs and seacoast, but meeting the Lieutenant of the Hampshire frigate, who told me what passed, or rather what had not passed, I returned to London, there being no noise, or appearance at Deal, or on that coast of any engagement. Recounting this to his Majesty (36), whom I found at St. James's Park, impatiently expecting, and knowing that Prince Rupert (46) was loose about three at St. Helen's Point at N. of the Isle of Wight, it greatly rejoiced him; but he was astonished when I assured him they heard nothing of the guns in the Downs, nor did the Lieutenant who landed there by five that morning.

Whippingham, Isle of Wight

St Mildred's Church, Whippingham, Isle of Wight

On 23 Jul 1885 Henry Mountbatten 1858-1896 (26) and Beatrice Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1857-1944 (28) were married at St Mildred's Church, Whippingham, Isle of Wight.

Kingsclere

Around 1450 Edward Dinley 1450-1549 was born at Kingsclere.

On 25 Jan 1583 James Christopher Allen 1583-1653 was born to Christopher Allen 1560-1638 (22) in Kingsclere.

Lee

Mortimer's Hall

In 1442 Robert Mortimer 1442-1485 was born at Mortimer's Hall.

Netley

Netley Abbey, Netley

On 15 Apr 1136 Richard Clare -1136 died at Netley Abbey, Netley. His son Gilbert Clare 1st Earl Hertford 1115-1153 (21) succeeded 4th Lord Tonbridge.

New Forest

Before 1075 Richard Normandy 1054-1074 was killed whilst hunting at New Forest. He was buried at Winchester Cathedral.

Death of William Rufus

On 02 Aug 1100 William "Rufus" II King England 1056-1100 (44) was killed whilst hunting, not known whether accidentally or otherwise, in the New Forest. His brother King Henry I "Beauclerc" England (32) succeeded I King England: Norman. The brothers Robert Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester, Count Meulan 1040-1118 (60) and Henry Beaumont 1st Earl Warwick 1050-1119 (50), and Roger Clare 1066-1131 (34) and Gilbert Clare 1066-1117 (34) were present.
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Old Basing

Battle of Basing

On 22 Jan 871 Æthelred King Wessex 847-871 (24) was defeated by the Viking army at the Battle of Basing at Old Basing.

On 07 Mar 1429 Thomas Poynings 5th Baron St John Basing 1351-1429 (78) died at Old Basing.

Netley Marsh

In 508 Natanleod King Britons -508 was killed by Cerdic King Wessex -534 and 5000 of his men, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle at Netley Marsh.

Old Alresford

On 16 Jun 1820 Arthur George Onslow 1820-1856 was born to Arthur George Onslow 3rd Earl Onslow 1777-1870 (42) and Charlotte Hanmer Countess Onslow -1887 at Old Alresford.

On 07 Mar 1853 William Onslow 4th Earl Onslow 1853-1911 was born to George Augustus Cranley Onslow 1813-1855 (40) and Mary Harriet Anne Loftus at Old Alresford.

Owlesbury

St Andrew's Church, Owlesbury

On 16 Mar 1166 Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (33) travelled from St Andrew's Church, Owlesbury to Falaise, Calvados, Basse Normandie.

On 10 Feb 1732 George Carpenter 1st Baron Carpenter 1657-1732 (75) died. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Owlesbury. His son George Carpenter 2nd Baron Carpenter 1657-1749 (29) succeeded 2nd Baron Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary. Elizabeth Petty Baroness Carpenter by marriage Baroness Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary.

On 12 Jul 1749 George Carpenter 2nd Baron Carpenter 1657-1749 (46) died at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Owlesbury. His son George Carpenter 1st Earl Tyrconnel 1723-1762 (25) succeeded 3rd Baron Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary. Frances Clifton Countess Tyrconnel by marriage Baroness Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary.

Portchester Castle

Around 1200 Robert St John 1200-1266 was born at Portchester Castle.

Southampton Plot

On 31 Jul 1415, when Henry V King England 1386-1422 (28) was in Portchester Castle preparing to invade France, Edmund Mortimer 5th Earl March, 7th Earl Ulster 1391-1425 (23) revealed the Southampton Plot to him (28). Henry Scrope 3rd Baron Scrope Masham 1373-1415 (42), Thomas Grey 1384-1415 (30), and Richard York 1st Earl Cambridge 1385-1415 were intending to replace Henry V King England 1386-1422 (28) with Edmund Mortimer 5th Earl March, 7th Earl Ulster 1391-1425 (23) as King of England based on Edmund Mortimer 5th Earl March, 7th Earl Ulster 1391-1425 (23) having a better claim to the throne being descended from Edward III's second son Lionel Plantagenet 1st Duke Clarence 1338-1368 whereas Henry V King England 1386-1422 (28) was descended from the third son John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster 1340-1399.
Robert Willoughby 6th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1385-1452 (30), Richard Vere 11th Earl Oxford 1385-1417 (29), Thomas Montagu 1st Count Perche, 4th Earl Salisbury 1388-1428 (27) and Thomas Camoys 1st Baron Camoys 1351-1421 (64) sat in judgement.

Portsmouth

On 20 Jul 1101 Robert Curthose Normandy III Duke Normandy 1051-1134 (50) landed at Portsmouth.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 9th July 1638. I went home to visit my friends, and, on the 26th, with my brother (21) and sister to Lewes, where we abode till the 31st; and thence to one Mr. Michael's, of Houghton, near Arundel, where we were very well treated; and, on the 2d of August, to Portsmouth, and thence, having surveyed the fortifications (a great rarity in that blessed halcyon time in England), we passed into the Isle of Wight, to the house of my Baroness Richards, in a place called Yaverland; but were turned the following day to Chichester, where, having viewed the city and fair cathedral, we returned home.

Siege of Portsmouth

Between 10 Aug 1642 and 07 Sep 1642 Portsmouth was besieged by Parliamentary forces.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 January. 2d January 1661. The Queen-Mother (51), with the Princess Henrietta, began her journey to Portsmouth, in order to her return into France.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

On 14 May 1662 Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (23) landed at Portsmouth.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Marriage of Charles II and Catherine of Braganza

On 21 May 1662 Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (31) and Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (23) were married at Portsmouth. Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (23) by marriage Queen Consort England.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 May. 25th May 1662. I went this evening to London, in order to our journey to Hampton Court, to see the Queen (23); who, having landed at Portsmouth, had been married to the King (31) a week before by the Bishop of London (63).

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 04 Jan 1665. I went in a coach, it being excessive sharp frost and snow, toward Dover and other parts of Kent, to settle physicians, chirurgeons, agents, marshals, and other officers in all the sea ports, to take care of such as should be set on shore, wounded, sick, or prisoners, in pursuance of our commission reaching from the North Foreland, in Kent, to Portsmouth, in Hampshire. The rest of the ports in England were allotted to the other Commissioners. That evening I came to Rochester, where I delivered the Privy Council's letter to the Mayor to receive orders from me.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Saturday 01 May 1669. Up betimes. Called up by my tailor, and there first put on a summer suit this year; but it was not my fine one of flowered tabby vest, and coloured camelott tunique, because it was too fine with the gold lace at the hands, that I was afeard to be seen in it; but put on the stuff suit I made the last year, which is now repaired; and so did go to the Office in it, and sat all the morning, the day looking as if it would be fowle. At noon home to dinner, and there find my wife (28) extraordinary fine, with her flowered tabby gown that she made two years ago, now laced exceeding pretty; and, indeed, was fine all over; and mighty earnest to go, though the day was very lowering; and she would have me put on my fine suit, which I did. And so anon we went alone through the town with our new liveries of serge, and the horses’ manes and tails tied with red ribbons, and the standards there gilt with varnish, and all clean, and green refines, that people did mightily look upon us; and, the truth is, I did not see any coach more pretty, though more gay, than ours, all the day. But we set out, out of humour — I because Betty, whom I expected, was not come to go with us; and my wife (28) that I would sit on the same seat with her, which she likes not, being so fine: and she then expected to meet Sheres, which we did in the Pell Mell, and, against my will, I was forced to take him into the coach, but was sullen all day almost, and little complaisant: the day also being unpleasing, though the Park full of coaches, but dusty and windy, and cold, and now and then a little dribbling rain; and, what made it worst, there were so many hackney-coaches as spoiled the sight of the gentlemen’s; and so we had little pleasure. But here was W. Batelier and his sister in a borrowed coach by themselves, and I took them and we to the lodge; and at the door did give them a syllabub, and other things, cost me 12s., and pretty merry. And so back to the coaches, and there till the evening, and then home, leaving Mr. Sheres at St. James’s Gate, where he took leave of us for altogether, he being this night to set out for Portsmouth post, in his way to Tangier, which troubled my wife (28) mightily, who is mighty, though not, I think, too fond of him. But she was out of humour all the evening, and I vexed at her for it, and she did not rest almost all the night, so as in the night I was forced; to take her and hug her to put her to rest. So home, and after a little supper, to bed.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Wednesday 12 May 1669. Up, and to Westminster Hall, where the term is, and this the first day of my being there, and here by chance met Roger Pepys (52), come to town the last night: I was glad to see him. After some talk with him and others, and among others Sir Charles Harbord (29) and Sidney Montagu (18), the latter of whom is to set out tomorrow towards Flanders and Italy, I invited them to dine with me to-morrow, and so to Mrs. Martin’s lodging, who come to town last night, and there je did hazer her, she having been a month, I think, at Portsmouth with her husband, newly come home from the Streights. But, Lord! how silly the woman talks of her great entertainment there, and how all the gentry come to visit her, and that she believes her husband is worth 6 or 700l., which nevertheless I am glad of, but I doubt they will spend it a fast. Thence home, and after dinner my wife (28) and I to the Duke of York’s playhouse, and there, in the side balcony, over against the musick, did hear, but not see, a new play, the first day acted, "The Roman Virgin," an old play, and but ordinary, I thought; but the trouble of my eyes with the light of the candles did almost kill me. Thence to my Lord Sandwich’s (43), and there had a promise from Sidney (18) to come and dine with me to-morrow; and so my wife (34) and I home in our coach, and there find my brother John, as I looked for, come to town from Ellington, where, among other things, he tell me the first news that my sister Jackson (28) is with child, and far gone, which I know not whether it did more trouble or please me, having no great care for my friends to have children; though I love other people’s. So, glad to see him, we to supper, and so to bed.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 May. 10 May 1672. I was ordered, by letter from the Council, to repair forthwith to his Majesty (41), whom I found in the Pall-Mall, in St. James's Park, where his Majesty (41) coming to me from the company, commanded me to go immediately to the seacoast, and to observe the motion of the Dutch fleet and ours, the Duke (38) and so many of the flower of our nation being now under sail, coming from Portsmouth, through the Downs, where it was believed there might be an encounter.

John Evelyn's Diary 1680 July. 26th July 1680. My most noble and illustrious friend, the Earl of Ossory (46), espying me this morning after sermon in the privy gallery, calling to me, told me he was now going his journey (meaning to Tangier, whither he was designed Governor, and General of the forces, to regain the losses we had lately sustained from the Moors, when Inchiquin (40) was Governor). I asked if he would not call at my house (as he always did whenever he went out of England on any exploit). He said he must embark at Portsmouth, "wherefore let you and me dine together to-day; I am quite alone, and have something to impart to you; I am not well, shall be private, and desire your company."
Being retired to his lodgings, and set down on a couch, he sent to his secretary for the copy of a letter which he had written to Lord Sunderland (38) (Secretary of State), wishing me to read it; it was to take notice how ill he resented it, that he should tell the King (50) before Lord Ossory's (46) face, that Tangier was not to be kept, but would certainly be lost, and yet added that it was fit Lord Ossory (46) should be sent, that they might give some account of it to the world, meaning (as supposed) the next Parliament, when all such miscarriages would probably be examined; this Lord Ossory (46) took very ill of Lord Sunderland (38), and not kindly of the King (50), who resolving to send him with an incompetent force, seemed, as his Lordship (46) took it, to be willing to cast him away, not only on a hazardous adventure, but in most men's opinion, an impossibility, seeing there was not to be above 300 or 400 horse, and 4,000 foot for the garrison and all, both to defend the town, form a camp, repulse the enemy, and fortify what ground they should get in. This touched my Lord (46) deeply, that he should be so little considered as to put him on a business in which he should probably not only lose his reputation, but be charged with all the miscarriage and ill success; whereas, at first they promised 6,000 foot and 600 horse effective.
My Lord (46), being an exceedingly brave and valiant person, and who had so approved himself in divers signal battles, both at sea and land; so beloved and so esteemed by the people, as one they depended on, upon all occasions worthy of such a captain;—he looked on this as too great an indifference in his Majesty (50), after all his services, and the merits of his father, the Duke of Ormond (69), and a design of some who envied his virtue. It certainly took so deep root in his mind, that he who was the most void of fear in the world (and assured me he would go to Tangier with ten men if his Majesty (50) commanded him) could not bear up against this unkindness. Having disburdened himself of this to me after dinner, he went with his Majesty (50) to the sheriffs at a great supper in Fishmongers' Hall; but finding himself ill, took his leave immediately of his Majesty (50), and came back to his lodging. Not resting well this night, he was persuaded to remove to Arlington House, for better accommodation. His disorder turned to a malignant fever, which increasing, after all that six of the most able physicians could do, he became delirious, with intervals of sense, during which Dr. Lloyd (52) (after Bishop of St. Asaph) administered the Holy Sacrament, of which I also participated. He died the Friday following, the 30th of July, to the universal grief of all that knew or heard of his great worth, nor had any a greater loss than myself. Oft would he say I was the oldest acquaintance he had in England (when his father was in Ireland), it being now of about thirty years, contracted abroad, when he rode in the Academy in Paris, and when we were seldom asunder.
His Majesty (50) never lost a worthier subject, nor father a better or more dutiful son; a loving, generous, good-natured, and perfectly obliging friend; one who had done innumerable kindnesses to several before they knew it; nor did he ever advance any that were not worthy; no one more brave, more modest; none more humble, sober, and every way virtuous. Unhappy England in this illustrious person's loss! Universal was the mourning for him, and the eulogies on him; I stayed night and day by his bedside to his last gasp, to close his dear eyes! O sad father, mother, wife, and children! What shall I add? He deserved all that a sincere friend, a brave soldier, a virtuous courtier, a loyal subject, an honest man, a bountiful master, and good Christian, could deserve of his prince and country. One thing more let me note, that he often expressed to me the abhorrence he had of that base and unworthy action which he was put upon, of engaging the Smyrna fleet in time of peace, in which though he behaved himself like a great captain, yet he told me it was the only blot in his life, and troubled him exceedingly. Though he was commanded, and never examined further when he was so, yet he always spoke of it with regret and detestation. The Countess (45) was at the seat of her daughter, the Countess of Derby (20), about 200 miles off.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 15 Sep 1685. I accompanied Mr. Pepys (52) to Portsmouth, whither his Ma* (51) was going the first time since his coming to the Crowne, to see in what state the fortifications were. We tooke coach and six horses, late after dinner, yet got to Bagshot that night. Whilst supper was making ready I went and made a visit to Mrs. Graham (34), some time maid of honour to ye Queene Dowager (46), now wife to James Graham, Esq (36) of the privy purse to the King; her house being a walke in the forest, within a little quarter of a mile from Bagshot towne. Very importunate she was that I would sup, and abide there that night, but being obliged by my companion, I return'd to our inn, after she had shew'd me her house, wch was very commodious and well furnish'd, as she was an excellent housewife, a prudent and virtuous lady. There is a parke full of red deere about it. Her eldest son was now sick there of the small-pox, but in a likely way of recovery, and other of her children run about, and among the infected, wnh she said she let them do on purpose that they might whilst young pass that fatal disease she fancied they were to undergo one time or other, and that this would be the best: the severity of this cruell disease so lately in my poore family confirming much of what she affirmed.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 17 Sep 1685. Early next morning we went to Portsmouth, something before his Ma* (51) ariv'd. We found all the way full of people, the women in their best dress, in expectation of seeing the King pass by, which he did riding on horseback a good part of the way. We found the Maior and Aldermen with their mace, and in their formalities, standing at the entrance of the fort, a mile on this side of the towne, where the Maior made a speech to the King, and then the guns of the fort were fired, as were those of the garrison so soone as the King was come into Portsmouth. All the souldiers (neere 3000) were drawn up, and lining the streetes and platforme to God's-house (the name of the Governor's house), where, after he had view'd the new fortifications and ship-yard, his Ma* was entertain'd at a magnificent dinner by Sir Slingsby yc Lieut. Governor (47)Sir Rob Holmes, Gov of ye Isle of Wight, to dine with him at a private house, where likewise we had a very sumptuous and plentiful repast of excellent venison, fowle, fish, and fruit.
After dinner I went to wait on his Ma* (51) againe, who was pulling on his bootes in ye Townehall, adjoyning the house where he din'd, and then having saluted some ladys, who came to kiss his hand, he tooke horse for Winchester, whither he returned that night. This hall is artificialy hung round with armes of all sorts, like the Hall and Keep at Windsor.
I went hence to see the ship-yard and dock, the fortifications, and other things.
Portsmouth when finish'd will be very strong, and a noble key.
There were now 32 men of war in ye harbour. I was invited by Sir R. Beach ye Commissioner, where, after a greate supper, Mr. Secretary and myselfe lay that night, and the next morning set out for Guildford, where we ariv'd in good hour, and so the day after to London. I had twice before ben at Portsmouth, ye Isle of Wight, &c. many yeares since I found this part of Hampshire bravely wooded, especialy about ye house and estate of Col. Norton, who, tho' now in being, having formerly made his peace by means of Col. Legg, was formerly a very fierce commander in the first Rebellion. His house is large, and standing low, on the road from Winchester to Portsmouth. By what I observ'd in this journey, is that infinite industry, sedulity, gravity, and greate understanding and experience of affaires, in his Ma*, that I cannot but predict much happiness to yc Nation, as to its political government; and if he so persist, there could be nothing more desir'd to accomplish our prosperity but that he was of the National Religion.

Glorious Revolution

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 November. 04 Nov 1688. Fresh reports of the Prince (38) being landed somewhere about Portsmouth, or the Isle of Wight, whereas it was thought it would have been northward. The Court in great hurry. .

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 November. 14 Nov 1688. The Prince (38) increases everyday in force. Several Lords go in to him. Lord Cornbury (26) carries some regiments, and marches to Honiton, the Prince's (38) headquarters. The city of London in disorder; the rabble pulled down the nunnery newly bought by the Papists of Lord Berkeley (60), at St. John's. The Queen (30) prepares to go to Portsmouth for safety, to attend the issue of this commotion, which has a dreadful aspect..

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. Francois de Troy Painter 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 December. 02 Dec 1688. Dr. Tenison (52) preached at St. Martin's on Psalm xxxvi. 5, 6, 7, concerning Providence. I received the blessed Sacrament. Afterward, visited my Lord Godolphin (43), then going with the Marquis of Halifax (55) and Earl of Nottingham (41) as Commissioners to the Prince of Orange (38); he told me they had little power. Plymouth declared for the Prince (38). Bath, York, Hull, Bristol, and all the eminent nobility and persons of quality through England, declare for the Protestant religion and laws, and go to meet the Prince (38), who every day sets forth new Declarations against the Papists. The great favorites at Court, Priests and Jesuits, fly or abscond. Everything, till now concealed, flies abroad in public print, and is cried about the streets. Expectation of the Prince (38) coming to Oxford. The Prince of Wales and great treasure sent privily to Portsmouth, the Earl of Dover (52) being Governor. Address from the Fleet not grateful to his Majesty (55). The Papists in offices lay down their commissions, and fly. Universal consternation among them; it looks like a revolution..

Battle of the Boyne

John Evelyn's Diary 1690 August. 15 Aug 1690. I was desired to be one of the bail of the Earl of Clarendon, for his release from the Tower, with divers noblemen. The Bishop of St. Asaph (62) expounds his prophecies to me and Mr. Pepys (57), etc. The troops from Blackheath march to Portsmouth. That sweet and hopeful youth, Sir Charles Tuke (19), died of the wounds he received in the fight of the Boyne, to the great sorrow of all his friends, being (I think) the last male of that family, to which my wife (55) is related. A more virtuous young gentleman I never knew; he was learned for his age, having had the advantage of the choicest breeding abroad, both as to arts and arms; he had traveled much, but was so unhappy as to fall in the side of his unfortunate King (56).
The unseasonable and most tempestuous weather happening, the naval expedition is hindered, and the extremity of wet causes the Siege of Limerick to be raised, King William (39) returned to England. Lord Sidney (41) left Governor of what is conquered in Ireland, which is near three parts [in four].

On 27 Dec 1693 HMS Sussex set sail from Portsmouth with a fleet of forty-eight warships and one hundred and sisty-six merchant ships.

1696 Plot to Assassinate King William III

John Evelyn's Diary 1696 February. 26 Feb 1696. There was now a conspiracy of about thirty knights, gentlemen, captains, many of them Irish and English Papists, and Nonjurors or Jacobites (so called), to murder King William (45) on the first opportunity of his going either from Kensington, or to hunting, or to the chapel; and upon signal of fire to be given from Dover Cliff to Calais, an invasion was designed. In order to it there was a great army in readiness, men-of-war and transports, to join a general insurrection here, the Duke of Berwick (25) having secretly come to London to head them, King James (62) attending at Calais with the French army. It was discovered by some of their own party. £1,000 reward was offered to whoever could apprehend any of the thirty named. Most of those who were engaged in it, were taken and secured. The Parliament, city, and all the nation, congratulate the discovery; and votes and resolutions were passed that, if King William (45) should ever be assassinated, it should be revenged on the Papists and party through the nation; an Act of Association drawing up to empower the Parliament to sit on any such accident, till the Crown should be disposed of according to the late settlement at the Revolution. All Papists, in the meantime, to be banished ten miles from London. This put the nation into an incredible disturbance and general animosity against the French King and King James. The militia of the nation was raised, several regiments were sent for out of Flanders, and all things put in a posture to encounter a descent. This was so timed by the enemy, that while we were already much discontented by the greatness of the taxes, and corruption of the money, etc., we had like to have had very few men-of-war near our coasts; but so it pleased God that Admiral Rooke (46) wanting a wind to pursue his voyage to the Straits, that squadron, with others at Portsmouth and other places, were still in the Channel, and were soon brought up to join with the rest of the ships which could be got together, so that there is hope this plot may be broken. I look on it as a very great deliverance and prevention by the providence of God. Though many did formerly pity King James's condition, this design of assassination and bringing over a French army, alienated many o£ his friends, and was likely to produce a more perfect establishment of King William.

John Evelyn's Diary 1704. Jan 1704. The King of Spain (20) landing at Portsmouth, came to Windsor, where he was magnificently entertained by the Queen (38), and behaved himself so nobly, that everybody was taken with his graceful deportment. After two days, having presented the great ladies, and others, with valuable jewels, he went back to Portsmouth, and immediately embarked for Spain.

Romsey

Ropley

On 12 Feb 1766 William Howley Archbishop of Canterbury 1766-1848 was born at Ropley.

Rotherwick

Tylney Hall, Rotherwick

Solent

Someroy

Harbridge, Someroy

On 06 Sep 1876 Edward Villiers 5th Earl Clarendon 1846-1914 (30) and Caroline Elizabeth Agar Countess Clarendon 1857-1894 (19) were married at Harbridge, Someroy. Caroline Elizabeth Agar Countess Clarendon 1857-1894 (19) by marriage Countess Clarendon (2C 1776).

South Stoneham

On 14 Nov 1739 Hans Sloane-Stanley 1739-1827 was born at South Stoneham.

South Warnborough

Southampton

Henry II Leaves Barfleur

On 07 Dec 1154 Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (21), the seven months pregnant Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (32) and their son William Plantagenet IX Count Poitiers 1153-1156 (1) left Barfleur, Basse Normandie for England. On 08 Dec 1154 Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (21) and his party landed near Southampton.

On 29 Dec 1158 Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (36) travelled from Normandy on board the Esnecca (Snake) with her children Henry the Young King 1155-1183 (3) and Matilda Plantagenet Duchess Saxony 1156-1189 (2) to Southampton. She then went to Winchester where she collected funds from the Royal Treasury and returned to Normandy.

On 11 Oct 1561 Thomas Lake 1561-1630 was baptised at Southampton.

After 24 Aug 1562 Chideock Tichbourne 1562-1586 was born to Peter Tichbourne at Southampton.

On Sep 1569 Arthur Lake Bishop of Bath and Wells 1569-1626 was born to Almeric Lake at Southampton.

Siege of Portsmouth

John Evelyn's Diary 1642 October. 3d October, 1642. To Chichester, and hence the next day to see the Siege of Portsmouth; for now was that bloody difference between the King and Parliament broken out, which ended in the fatal tragedy so many years after. It was on the day of its being rendered to Sir William Waller (45); which gave me an opportunity of taking my leave of Colonel Goring (34), the governor, now embarking for France. This day was fought that signal battle at Edgehill. Thence I went to Southampton and Winchester, where I visited the castle, school, church, and King Arthur's Round Table; but especially the church, and its Saxon kings' monuments, which I esteemed a worthy antiquity.

Around 1832 Henry Preston Prestilly-Percy 1832- was born to Algernon Percy 1779-1833 (53) and Anna-Maria Fitzgerald at Southampton.

King Edward VI School, Southampton

Around 1579 Arthur Lake Bishop of Bath and Wells 1569-1626 (9) educated at King Edward VI School, Southampton.

Rockbourne, Southampton

Southampton Castle

In 1361 Richard Pembridge 1320-1375 (41) was appointed Constable Southampton Castle.

St Mary's Area

In 634 Birinus Bishop of Dorchester 600-649 came to England landing at Hamwic where he founded St Mary's Church. He was appointed Bishop of Dorchester.

St Mary's Church

In 634 Birinus Bishop of Dorchester 600-649 came to England landing at Hamwic where he founded St Mary's Church. He was appointed Bishop of Dorchester.

Steventon

Birth of Jane Austen

On 16 Dec 1775 Jane Austen 1775-1817 was born to George Austen 1731-1805 (44) and Cassandra Leigh in Steventon. She was baptised on 05 Apr 1775 at St Nicholas' Church, Steventon at which her father was rector; the delay being caused by adverse weather.

St Nicholas' Church, Steventon

Birth of Jane Austen

On 16 Dec 1775 Jane Austen 1775-1817 was born to George Austen 1731-1805 (44) and Cassandra Leigh in Steventon. She was baptised on 05 Apr 1775 at St Nicholas' Church, Steventon at which her father was rector; the delay being caused by adverse weather.

Stratfield Saye

In 1706 John Pitt 1706-1787 was born to George Pitt 1663-1735 (43) in Stratfield Saye.

In 1754 Louisa Pitt 1754-1791 was born to George Pitt 1st Baron Rivers 1721-1821 (32) in Stratfield Saye.

Before 17 Dec 1806 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806. Portrait of George Pitt 1st Baron Rivers 1721-1821.

In 1787 John Pitt 1706-1787 (81) died in Stratfield Saye.

Stoneham Park

On 07 Aug 1613 Thomas Fleming Judge 1544-1613 (69) died in Stoneham Park.

Sutton Scotney

In 1310 Hugh Hastings 1310-1347 was born to John Hastings 13th Baron Bergavenny, 1st Baron Hastings 1262-1313 (47) and Isabel Despencer Baroness Hastings, Baroness Bergavenny -1334 at Sutton Scotney.

Sydmontham

On Apr 1661 Anne Kingsmill Countess Winchelsea 1661-1720 was born to William Kingsmill -1661 at Sydmontham.

Testwood

On 14 Dec 1590 John West 1590-1659 was born to Thomas West 2nd Baron De La Warr 1556-1602 (34) and Anne Knollys Baroness De La Warr 1555-1608 (35) at Testwood.

Timsbury

On 08 Oct 1892 Ralph Heneage Dutton 1821-1892 (71) died. He was buried at Timsbury. On 27 Feb 1895 Isabella Mansfield 1824-1895 (70) died. Memorials in Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, Sherborne to Ralph Heneage Dutton 1821-1892 (71) and Isabella Mansfield 1824-1895 (67).

Titchfield

Elizabeth's Royal Progress 1591

After 22 Aug 1591 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland arrived in Titchfield as a guest of Henry Wriothesley 2nd Earl of Southampton 1545-1581. .

On 10 Nov 1624 Henry Wriothesley 3rd Earl of Southampton 1573-1624 (51) died. He was buried at Titchfield. His son Thomas Wriothesley 4th Earl of Southampton 1607-1667 (17) succeeded 4th Earl of Southampton (2C 1547).

On 28 Dec 1624 James Wriothesley 1605-1624 was buried at Titchfield.

Upton Grey

St Mary's Church, Upton Grey

In 1650 Dorothy Bulstrode Lady in Waiting 1592-1590 (58) died. She was buried in St Mary's Church, Upton Grey.

Warnford

Around Jun 1376 Luke Poynings 4th Baron St John Basing 1317-1376 (59) died at Warnford.

Wherwell

On 12 Feb 1594 Herbert Pelham 1546-1620 (48) and Elizabeth West 1573-1663 (20) were married at Wherwell.

Wherwell Abbey

Unamed Wessex Abbess Wherwell was appointed Abbot Wherwell.

AelfflAed Bernicia Abbess Wherwell was appointed Abbot Wherwell.

On Sep 1141 John Fitzgilbert 1105-1165 (36) took refuge at Wherwell Abbey.

Whitchurch

Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch

In 1558 Robert Oxenbridge 1508-1574 (50) bought at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

Around 1568 Robert Oxenbridge 1568-1616 was born to Robert John Oxenbridge -1591 at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

On 22 Jan 1591 Robert John Oxenbridge -1591 died at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

In 1616 Robert Oxenbridge 1568-1616 (48) died at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

Winchester

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849-887 Page 1. In his days a large army of pagans came up from the sea, and attacked and destroyed the city of Winchester. As they were returning laden with booty to their ships, Osric, earl of Hampshire, with his men, and earl Ethelwulf, with the men of Berkshire, confronted them bravely; a severe battle took place, and the pagans were slain on every side; and, finding themselves unable to resist, took to flight like women, and the Christians obtained a triumph.

Death of King Alfred the Great

On 26 Oct 899 Alfred "The Great" King England 849-899 (50) died at Winchester. He was buried at Hyde Abbey, Winchester. His son Edward "Elder" King Anglo-Saxons 874-924 (25) succeeded King Anglo-Saxons. Ecgwynn Unknown Queen Consort Anglo-Saxons by marriage Queen Consort Anglo-Saxons.

Around 943 Edgar "Peaceful" I King England 943-975 was born to Edmund I King England 921-946 (22) and Aelfgifu Shaftesbury Queen Consort England at Winchester.

Death of King Eadwig

On 01 Oct 959 Eadwig "All Fair" I King England -959 died. He was buried at Winchester. His brother Edgar "Peaceful" I King England 943-975 (16) succeeded I King England Wessex.

Death of King Edgar Peaceful

On 08 Jul 975 Edgar "Peaceful" I King England 943-975 (32) died at Winchester. He was buried in Glastonbury Abbey. His son Edward "Martyr" I King England 962-978 (13) succeeded I King England Wessex.

Flower of History by Matthew of Westminster Chapter 1 1066-1087 How king William, feeling secure, at length becomes a tyrant instead of a king. 04 Apr 1070. On the fourth day of April, king William (42), being now become more secure on his throne, violated his promises in many respects ; and he caused the monasteries to be searched throughout the whole of England, and commanded the money found in them, and the charters, in the privileges granted by which the nobles of England placed their trust, and which the king, when in a position of difficulty, had sworn to observe himself, to be carried off by force from the churches where they had been deposited, and where they had hitherto lain in security, and to be taken to his own treasury.
Moreover, the whole Anglican Church held a great council in Easter week, at Winchester, by the management of the king, where many of the things which concerned the kingdom were changed. At that council too, Stigand, archbishop of Canterbury, was ignominiously degraded, and his brother, Aylmer, bishop of East Anglia, and many other bishops and abbots were deposed at the same time. Aegelwin, bishop of Durham, alone, of all the prelates of England, seeing the unjust oppression of his brethren, and sympathizing with them, and feeling zeal for God, went of his own accord into banishment from England, wishing to entangle the oppressors in the knot of excommunication. Stigand was succeeded by Lanfranc (65), a monk, a man of elegant learning, and adorned with many and various other accomplishments, who, among other magnificent works, composed a treatise on the Sacrament of the Altar, confirming the Catholic Faith. Aylmer was succeeded by Arfast, the king's chaplain ; and he transferred the seat of his diocese to Thetford.

In 1158 Saer Quincy 1090-1158 (68) died at Winchester.

On 29 Dec 1158 Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (36) travelled from Normandy on board the Esnecca (Snake) with her children Henry the Young King 1155-1183 (3) and Matilda Plantagenet Duchess Saxony 1156-1189 (2) to Southampton. She then went to Winchester where she collected funds from the Royal Treasury and returned to Normandy.

On 11 Apr 1184 William of Winchester Welf 1184-1213 was born to Henry "Lion" Welf XII Duke Saxony, III Duke Bavaria 1129-1195 (55) and Matilda Plantagenet Duchess Saxony 1156-1189 (28) in Winchester during his father's exile.

Around 1186 Arabella Quincy 1186-1258 was born to Saer Quincy 1st Earl Winchester 1170-1219 (16) and Margaret Beaumont Countess Winchester at Winchester.

Around 1242 Helen Zouche 1242- was born to Alan Zouche 1203-1270 (39) and Helen or Ela Quincy at Winchester.

On 12 Aug 1270 Alan Zouche 1203-1270 (67) was beheaded at Winchester.

In 1350 Hugh Hastings 7th Baron Hastings 1350-1386 was born to Hugh Hastings 6th Baron Hastings 1336-1369 (14) and Margaret Everingham Baroness Hastings 1331-1375 (19) at Winchester.

Marriage of Henry IV and Joanna of Navarre

On 07 Feb 1403 Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (35) and Joanna of Navarre Queen Consort England 1370-1437 (33) were married (he was her third-cousin) at Winchester. Joanna of Navarre Queen Consort England 1370-1437 (33) was crowned Queen Consort England. His third marriage, her second. She had eight children with her first husband but, despite ten years of marriage, none with Henry.

On 05 Apr 1578 Henry Seymour 1503-1578 (75) died at Winchester.

On 29 Aug 1609 Walter Sandys 1540-1609 (69) died in Winchester.

Siege of Portsmouth

John Evelyn's Diary 1642 October. 3d October, 1642. To Chichester, and hence the next day to see the Siege of Portsmouth; for now was that bloody difference between the King and Parliament broken out, which ended in the fatal tragedy so many years after. It was on the day of its being rendered to Sir William Waller (45); which gave me an opportunity of taking my leave of Colonel Goring (34), the governor, now embarking for France. This day was fought that signal battle at Edgehill. Thence I went to Southampton and Winchester, where I visited the castle, school, church, and King Arthur's Round Table; but especially the church, and its Saxon kings' monuments, which I esteemed a worthy antiquity.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 September. 26 Sep 1684. The King (54) being return'd from Winchester, there was a numerous Court at White-hall. At this time the Earle of Rochester (42) was remov'd from the Treasury to the Presidentship of the Council; Lord Godolphin (39) was made first Commissr of the Treasury in his place; Lord Middleton (34) (a Scot) made Secretary of State, in ye room of Lord Godolphin (39). These alterations being very unexpected and mysterious, gave greate occasion of discourse. There was now an Ambassador from ye King of Siam in ye East Indies to his Majesty (54).

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 16 Sep 1685. The next morning setting out early, we ariv'd soon enough at Winchester to waite on the King (51), who was lodg'd at the Dean's (Dr. Meggot). I found very few with him besides my Lords Feversham (44), Arran [Note. Not clear which Earl of Arran], Newport (65), and the Bishop of Bath and Wells (48). His Ma* (51) was discoursing with the Bishops concerning miracles, and what strange things the Saludadors would do in Spaine, as by creeping into heated ovens without hurt, and that they had a black crosse in the roofe of their mouthes, but yet were commonly notorious and profane wretches; upon which his Majesty (51) further said, that he was so extreamly difficult of miracles, for feare of being impos'd upon, that if he should chance to see one himselfe, without some other witness, he should apprehend it a delusion of his senses. Then they spake of ye boy who was pretended to have a wanting leg restor'd him, so confidently asserted by Fr. de Sta Clara and others. To all which the Bishop added a greate miracle happening In Winchester to his certaine knowledge, of a poor miserably sick and decrepit child (as I remember long kept unbaptiz'd), who immediately on his baptism recover'd; as also of yc salutary effect of K. Charles his Ma*s father's blood, in healing one that was blind.
There was something said of the second sight happening to some persons, especialy Scotch; upon which his Ma*, and I think Lord Arran, told us that Mons a French nobleman, lately here in England, seeing the late Duke of Monmouth come into yc play-house at London, suddenly cried out to somebody sitting in the same box, Voila Monsieur comme il entre sans tete. Afterwards his Ma* (51) spoke of some reliques that had effected strange cures, particularly a piece of our Bl. Saviour's Crosse, that heal'd a gentleman's rotten nose by onely touching; and speaking of the golden crosse and chaine taken out of the coffin of St. Edward the Confessor at Westmr*, by one of the singing men, who, as the scaffolds were taking down after his Ma*s coronation, espying a hole in the tomb, and something glisten, put his hand in, and brought it to the Deane, and he to the King; his Maty began to put the Bishop in mind how earnestly the late King (his brother) call'd upon him, during his agonie, to take out what he had in his pocket. I had thought, said the King, it had ben for some keys, which might lead to some cabinet that his Ma* would have me secure; but, says he, you well remember that I found nothing in any of his pockets but a crosse of gold, and a few insignificant papers; and thereupon he shew'd us the crosse, and was pleas'd to put it into my hand. It was of gold, about three inches long, having on one side a crucifix enamell'd and emboss'd, the rest was grav'd and garnish'd with goldsmiths' work, and two pretty broad table amethists (as I conceiv'd), and at the bottom a pendant pearle; within was inchas'd a little fragment, as was thought, of the true Crosse, and a Latine inscription in gold and Roman letters. More company coming in, this discourse ended. I may not forget a resolution which his Ma* made, and had a little before enter'd upon it at ye Council Board at Windsor or Whitehall, that the Negroes in the Plantations should all be baptiz'd, exceedingly declaiming against that impiety of their masters prohibiting it, out of a mistaken opinion that they would be ipso facto free; but his Ma* persists in his resolution to have them christen'd, wch piety ye Bishop blessed him for.
I went out to see the new Palace the late King had began, and brought almost to the covering. It is plac'd on the side of the hill where formerly stood the old Castle. It is a stately fabric, of three sides and a corridor, all built of brick, and cornish'd, windows and columns at the break and entrance of free-stone. It was intended for a hunting-house when his Ma* should come to these parts, and has an incomparable prospect. I believe there had already ben £20,000 and more expended, but his now Majesty did not seeme to encourage the finishing It, at least for a while.
Hence I went to see the Cathedral, a reverend pile, and in good repaire. There are still the coffins of the six Saxon Kings, whose bones had ben scatter'd by the sacrilegious Rebells of 1641, in expectation, I suppose, of finding some valuable reliques, and afterwards gather'd up againe and put into new chests, wch stand above the stalls of the Choir.

Parish of St Faith, Winchester

On 28 Feb 1892 Charles George Edric Clowes 1892-1915 was born in the Parish of St Faith, Winchester.

See Hospital of St Cross, Winchester

Hyde Abbey, Winchester

Death of King Alfred the Great

On 26 Oct 899 Alfred "The Great" King England 849-899 (50) died at Winchester. He was buried at Hyde Abbey, Winchester. His son Edward "Elder" King Anglo-Saxons 874-924 (25) succeeded King Anglo-Saxons. Ecgwynn Unknown Queen Consort Anglo-Saxons by marriage Queen Consort Anglo-Saxons.

Itchen Valley, Winchester

Kings' House, Winchester

Rye House Plot

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 September. 23 Sep 1683. We had now the welcome tidings of the King (53) of Poland raising the siege of Vienna, which had given terror to all Europe, and utmost reproach to the French, who it is believed brought in the Turks for diversion, that the French King might the more easily swallow Flanders, and pursue his unjust conquest on the empire, while we sat unconcerned and under a deadly charm from somebody.
There was this day a collection for rebuilding Newmarket, consumed by an accidental fire, which removing his Majesty (53) thence sooner than was intended, put by the assassins, who were disappointed of their rendezvous and expectation by a wonderful providence. This made the King (53) more earnest to render Winchester the seat of his autumnal field diversions for the future, designing a palace there, where the ancient castle stood; infinitely indeed preferable to Newmarket for prospects, air, pleasure, and provisions. The surveyor has already begun the foundation for a palace, estimated to cost £35,000, and his Majesty (53) is purchasing ground about it to make a park, etc.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 16 Sep 1685. The next morning setting out early, we ariv'd soon enough at Winchester to waite on the King (51), who was lodg'd at the Dean's (Dr. Meggot). I found very few with him besides my Lords Feversham (44), Arran [Note. Not clear which Earl of Arran], Newport (65), and the Bishop of Bath and Wells (48). His Ma* (51) was discoursing with the Bishops concerning miracles, and what strange things the Saludadors would do in Spaine, as by creeping into heated ovens without hurt, and that they had a black crosse in the roofe of their mouthes, but yet were commonly notorious and profane wretches; upon which his Majesty (51) further said, that he was so extreamly difficult of miracles, for feare of being impos'd upon, that if he should chance to see one himselfe, without some other witness, he should apprehend it a delusion of his senses. Then they spake of ye boy who was pretended to have a wanting leg restor'd him, so confidently asserted by Fr. de Sta Clara and others. To all which the Bishop added a greate miracle happening In Winchester to his certaine knowledge, of a poor miserably sick and decrepit child (as I remember long kept unbaptiz'd), who immediately on his baptism recover'd; as also of yc salutary effect of K. Charles his Ma*s father's blood, in healing one that was blind.
There was something said of the second sight happening to some persons, especialy Scotch; upon which his Ma*, and I think Lord Arran, told us that Mons a French nobleman, lately here in England, seeing the late Duke of Monmouth come into yc play-house at London, suddenly cried out to somebody sitting in the same box, Voila Monsieur comme il entre sans tete. Afterwards his Ma* (51) spoke of some reliques that had effected strange cures, particularly a piece of our Bl. Saviour's Crosse, that heal'd a gentleman's rotten nose by onely touching; and speaking of the golden crosse and chaine taken out of the coffin of St. Edward the Confessor at Westmr*, by one of the singing men, who, as the scaffolds were taking down after his Ma*s coronation, espying a hole in the tomb, and something glisten, put his hand in, and brought it to the Deane, and he to the King; his Maty began to put the Bishop in mind how earnestly the late King (his brother) call'd upon him, during his agonie, to take out what he had in his pocket. I had thought, said the King, it had ben for some keys, which might lead to some cabinet that his Ma* would have me secure; but, says he, you well remember that I found nothing in any of his pockets but a crosse of gold, and a few insignificant papers; and thereupon he shew'd us the crosse, and was pleas'd to put it into my hand. It was of gold, about three inches long, having on one side a crucifix enamell'd and emboss'd, the rest was grav'd and garnish'd with goldsmiths' work, and two pretty broad table amethists (as I conceiv'd), and at the bottom a pendant pearle; within was inchas'd a little fragment, as was thought, of the true Crosse, and a Latine inscription in gold and Roman letters. More company coming in, this discourse ended. I may not forget a resolution which his Ma* made, and had a little before enter'd upon it at ye Council Board at Windsor or Whitehall, that the Negroes in the Plantations should all be baptiz'd, exceedingly declaiming against that impiety of their masters prohibiting it, out of a mistaken opinion that they would be ipso facto free; but his Ma* persists in his resolution to have them christen'd, wch piety ye Bishop blessed him for.
I went out to see the new Palace the late King had began, and brought almost to the covering. It is plac'd on the side of the hill where formerly stood the old Castle. It is a stately fabric, of three sides and a corridor, all built of brick, and cornish'd, windows and columns at the break and entrance of free-stone. It was intended for a hunting-house when his Ma* should come to these parts, and has an incomparable prospect. I believe there had already ben £20,000 and more expended, but his now Majesty did not seeme to encourage the finishing It, at least for a while.
Hence I went to see the Cathedral, a reverend pile, and in good repaire. There are still the coffins of the six Saxon Kings, whose bones had ben scatter'd by the sacrilegious Rebells of 1641, in expectation, I suppose, of finding some valuable reliques, and afterwards gather'd up againe and put into new chests, wch stand above the stalls of the Choir.

Micheldever, Winchester

St Mary the Virgin, Micheldever, Winchester

On 18 Nov 1873 Thomas Baring 1799-1873 (74) died. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin, Micheldever, Winchester.

Winchester Castle

On 01 Oct 1207 Henry III King England 1207-1272 was born to John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 (40) and Isabella Angoulême Queen Consort England 1188-1246 (19) at Winchester Castle.

In 1247 Nicholas Moels 1195-1268 (52) was appointed Constable Winchester Castle.

In 1307 Robert Fitzpayn 1st Baron Fitzpayn 1254-1315 (53) was appointed Governor of Winchester Castle.

Execution of Edmund of Woodstock

On 19 Mar 1330 the King's uncle Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (28) was beheaded at Winchester Castle. His son Edmund Plantagenet 2nd Earl Kent 1326-1331 (4) succeeded 2nd Earl Kent (5C 1321). The executioner was a convicted latrine cleaner who was also facing the death penalty; no-one else would undertake the task. Edmund had been convicted of plotting against the court believing his brother Edward II was still alive. It later emerged the plot had been created by Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (42) to entrap Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (28). King Edward III England (17) was unable to show leniency risking complicity in the plot.

Winchester College

Alvaro Antonio Orléans-Galliera 1910-1997 educated at Winchester College.

Ataúlfo Alejandro Orléans-Galliera 1913-1974 educated at Winchester College.

Alonso María Orléans-Galliera 1912-1936 educated at Winchester College.

In 1382 William of Wykeham Chancellor Bishop Winchester 1320-1404 (62) founded Winchester College.

On 28 Dec 1581 Arthur Lake Bishop of Bath and Wells 1569-1626 (12) educated at Winchester College.

In 1716 James Hamilton 5th Duke Hamilton, 2nd Duke Brandon 1703-1743 (13) educated at Winchester College.

In 1734 James Hamilton 6th Duke Hamilton, 3rd Duke Brandon -1758 (9) educated at Winchester College.

Around 1758 James Harris 1st Earl Malmesbury 1746-1820 (11) educated at Winchester College.

Around 1761 Richard Worsley 7th Baronet 1751-1805 (9) was educated at Winchester College.

Around 1771 Anthony Ashley-Cooper 5th Earl Shaftesbury 1761-1811 (9) educated at Winchester College.

Around 1777 Thomas Thynne 2nd Marquess Bath 1765-1837 (11) educated at Winchester College.

Around 1777 George Grey 6th Earl Stamford, 2nd Earl Warrington 1765-1845 (11) educated at Winchester College.

On 16 Mar 1828 George Ridding Bishop 1828-1904 was born at Winchester College where his father was vicar.

Around 1876 Walter Shirley 11th Earl Ferrers 1864-1937 (11) educated at Winchester College.

See Winchester Cathedral

See Wolvesey, Winchester

Wintney

Hartley, Wintney