Twenty Trees

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Royal Household

King's Cupbearer

Around 1509 William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton 1490-1542 (19) was appointed King's Cupbearer.

Cupbearer

Wedding of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence

Chronica Majora: The ceremonies at the marriage of Henry the Third. 14 Jan 1236. There were assembled at the king's (28) nuptial festivities such a host of nobles of both sexes, such numbers of religious men, such crowds of the populace, and such a variety of actors, that London, with its capacious bosom, could scarcely contain them. The whole city was ornamented with flags and banners, chaplets and hangings, candles and lamps, and with wonderful devices and extraordinary representations, and all the roads were cleansed from mud and dirt, sticks, and everything offensive. The citizens, too, went out to meet the king (28) and queen, dressed out in their ornaments, and vied with each other in trying the speed of their horses. On the same day, when they left the city for Westminster, to perform the duties of butler to the king (which office belonged to them by right of old, at the coronation), they proceeded thither dressed in silk garments, with mantles worked in gold, and with costly changes of raiment, mounted on valuable horses, glittering with new bits and saddles, and riding in troops arranged in order. They carried with them three hundred and sixty gold and silver cups, preceded by the king's trumpeters and with horns sounding, so that such a wonderful novelty struck all who beheld it with astonishment. The archbishop of Canterbury (61), by the right especially belonging to him, performed the duty of crowning, with the usual solemnities, the bishop of London assisting him as a dean, the other bishops taking their stations according to their rank. In the same way all the abbats, at the head of whom, as was his right, was the abbat of St. Alban's (for as the Protomartyr of England, B. Alban, was the chief of all the martyrs of England, so also was his abbat the chief of all the abbats in rank and dignity), as the authentic privileges of that church set forth. The nobles, too, performed the duties, which, by ancient right and custom, pertained to them at the coronations of kings. In like manner some of the inhabitants of certain cities discharged certain duties which belonged to them by right of their ancestors. The earl of Chester (29) carried the sword of St. Edward, which was called " Curtein", before the king, as a sign that he was earl of the palace, and had by right the power of restraining the king if he should commit an error. The earl was attended by the constable of Chester (44), and kept the people away with a wand when they pressed forward in a disorderly way. The grand marshal of England, the earl of Pembroke (39), carried a wand before the king and cleared the way before him both, in the church and in the banquet-hall, and arranged the banquet and the guests at table. The Wardens of the Cinque Ports carried the pall over the king, supported by four spears, but the claim to this duty was not altogether undisputed. The earl of Leicester (28) supplied the king with water in basins to wash before his meal; the Earl Warrenne performed the duty of king's Cupbearer, supplying the place of the earl of Arundel, because the latter was a youth and not as yet made a belted knight. Master Michael Belet was butler ex officio; the earl of Hereford (32) performed the duties of marshal of the king's household, and William Beauchamp (51) held the station of almoner. The justiciary of the forests arranged the drinking cups on the table at the king's right hand, although he met with some opposition, which however fell to the ground. The citizens of London passed the wine about in all directions, in costly cups, and those of Winchester superintended the cooking of the feast; the rest, according to the ancient statutes, filled their separate stations, or made their claims to do so. And in order that the nuptial festivities might not be clouded by any disputes, saving the right of any one, many things were put up with for the time which they left for decision at a more favourable opportunity. The office of chancellor of England, and all the offices connected with the king, are ordained and assized in the Exchequer. Therefore the chancellor, the chamberlain, the marshal, and the constable, by right of their office, took their seats there, as also did the barons, according to the date of their creation, in the city of London, whereby they each knew his own place. The ceremony was splendid, with the gay dresses of the clergy and knights who were present. The abbat of Westminster sprinkled the holy water, and the treasurer, acting the part of sub-dean, carried the Paten. Why should I describe all those persons who reverently ministered in the church to God as was their duty? Why describe the abundance of meats and dishes on the table & the quantity of venison, the variety of fish, the joyous sounds of the glee-men, and the gaiety of the waiters? Whatever the world could afford to create pleasure and magniiicence was there brought together from every quarter.
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In 1540 Richard Manners Esquire to the Body 1509-1551 (30) was appointed Cupbearer.

After Aug 1614 George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 was appointed Cupbearer to James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.

In 1650 Charles Lyttelton 3rd Baronet 1628-1716 (22) was appointed Cupbearer to Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (19) while the King was in exile.

Knight of the Body

Henry Willoughby 1451-1528 was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Henry Willoughby 1451-1528 was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.

Ralph Hastings -1495 was appointed Knight of the Body to Edward IV King England 1442-1483.

Around 1483 John Conyers Sheriff of Yorkshire 1411-1490 (72) was appointed Knight of the Body to Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30).

Before Sep 1483 Marmaduke Constable 1457-1518 was appointed Knight of the Body to Richard III King England 1452-1485.

Before May 1486 Marmaduke Constable 1457-1518 was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

In 1516 Philip Boteler 1492-1545 (23) was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (24).

Carver

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 28 Jul 1461. Westminster. Appointment, during good behaviour, of John Howard (36), knight, as one of the king's carvers, receiving 40lyearly, viz 20l from the far of the town of Ipswich, co Suffolk, ad 20l from the issues of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. By p.s.

Chief Butler of England

In 1407 John Tiptoft 1st Baron Tiptoft -1443 was appointed Chief Butler of England.

Coronation of Catherine of Valois

On 23 Feb 1421 Catherine of Valois (19) was crowned Queen Consort England at Westminster Abbey. Robert Willoughby 6th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1385-1452 (36) was appointed Chief Butler of England. James I (26) attended, and was honoured by sitting immediately on the queen's left at the coronation banquet.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476-1485. 14 Aug 1483 Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (27) was appointed Chief Butler of England. Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster. Grant for life to the king's kinsman Francis Lovell (27), knight, viscount Lovel, the king's chamberlain, of the office of Chief Butler of England, void by the death of Anthony, late earl Rivers, receiving fees of 100l yearly from the customs and prises of wines and other issues of his office, with all other profits. By p.s.

In 1521 John Hussey 1st Baron Hussey Sleaford 1465-1537 (56) was appointed Chief Butler of England.

Gentlemen

Grooms

Groom of the Bedchamber

Edward Wray -1658 was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber.

Henry Murray was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

Henry Murray was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

In 1532 John Seymour 1474-1536 (58) was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber.

In 1622 James Palmer 1585-1658 (36) was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber.

On 12 Apr 1645 William Legge -1670 was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (44).

After 1657 Colonel Silius Titus 1623-1704 was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 for having published a pamphlet "Killing No Muder" advocating the assassination of Oliver Cromwell Lord Protector 1599-1658.

In 1665 Henry Savile 1642-1687 (23) was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to the Duke of York (31).

In 1670 Sidney Godolphin 1st Earl Godolphin 1645-1712 (24) was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber.

From 1673 to May 1678 Henry Savile 1642-1687 (36) was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (42).

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 May. 16 May 1675. This day was my dear friend, Mrs. Blagg (22), married at the Temple Church to my friend, Mr. Sidney Godolphin (29), Groom of the Bedchamber to his Majesty (44).

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 11 Jun 1683. The Lord Dartmouth (10) was elected Master of the Trinity House; son to George Legge (36), late Master of the Ordnance, and one of the grooms of the bedchamber; a great favorite of the Duke's (49), an active and understanding gentleman in sea affairs.

In 1727 Thomas Paget -1741 was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760 (43).

In 1724 Charles Jervas Painter 1675-1739 (49). Portrait of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760 (40).

Before 02 Nov 1739 Charles Jervas Painter 1675-1739. Portrait of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

Before 1744 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman Painter 1694-1744. Portrait of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

Before 25 Oct 1760 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

Before 25 Oct 1760 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

In 1744 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779 (43). Portrait of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760 (60).

After 31 Jul 1760 John Waldegrave 3rd Earl Waldegrave 1718-1784 was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber.

On 12 Nov 1764 Edward Ligonier 1st Earl Ligonier 1740-1782 (24) was appointed Groom of the Bedchamber to William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (20).

In 1775 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (47). Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (31).

Around 1804. John Opie Painter 1761-1807 (42). Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (60).

Groom of the Chamber

In 1542 William Sharington 1495-1553 (47) was appointed Groom of the Chamber.

Before 1642 Thomas Blagge 1613-1660 was appointed Groom of the Chamber.

Groom of the Privy Chamber

In 1524 William Brereton 1487-1536 was appointed Groom of the Privy Chamber to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (32).

In 1532 Mark Smeaton 1512-1536 was appointed Groom of the Privy Chamber to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (40).

Arrest and Imprisonment of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VIII 1536. Item, the 12th daie of Maie, 1536, being Fridaie, their were arraygned at Westminster Sir Frances Weston, knight, Henrie Norrisy esquier, Brerton, and Markes, being all fower of the Kinges Privie Chamber, and their condempned of high treason against the Kinge (44) for using fornication with Queene Anne (35), wife to the Kinge, and also for conspiracie of the Kinges death, and their judged to be hanged, drawen, and quartered, their members cutt of and brent before theim, their heades cutt of and quartered; my Lord Chauncelor (48) being the highest Commissioner he geving their judgment, with other lordes of the Kinges Counsell being presente at the same tyme. See Arrest and Imprisonment of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused.

Before 1576 William Killigrew 1555-1622 was appointed Groom of the Privy Chamber.

In 1584 Richard Drake 1535-1603 (49) was appointed Groom of the Privy Chamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (50).

Around 1577 George Gower Painter 1540-1596 (37). Portrait of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (42). The heraldic escutcheon shows seven quarters as follows:
1: . Drake of Ash in the parish of Musbury, Devon
2: Argent, on a chief gules three cinquefoils of the first; Billet of Ash
3: Gules, on a fess argent two mullets sable; Hamton of Rockbere and Ash
4: Ermine, on a chief indented sable three crosslets fitchee or; Orwey of Orwey and Ash
5: Barry of seven argent and sable.
6: Azure, six lions rampant argent crowned Gules, 3, 2, 1; Forde of Forde.
7: Argent, two chevrons sable (Esse/Ash of Ash); Esse or Ash of Ash.

Groom of the Robes

Richard Cecil 1495-1553 was appointed Groom of the Robes.

In 1540 William Sharington 1495-1553 (45) was appointed Groom of the Robes.

Groom of the Stool

Henry Norreys 1482-1536 was appointed Groom of the Stool.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 February. Lord Godolphin made Chamberlaine to ye Queene; Lord Peterborow Groome of ye Stole in place of the Earle of Bath; the Treasurer's staff to the Earle of Rochester; and his brother the Earle of Clarendon Lord Privie Seale in place of the Marquis of Halifax, who was made President of the Council; the Secretarys of State remaining as before.

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. Francois de Troy Painter 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

Thomas Heneage 1480-1553 was appointed Groom of the Stool to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.

In 1509 William Compton 1482-1528 (27) was appointed Groom of the Stool to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (17).

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 17 Jun 1683. I dined at the Earl of Sunderland's (41) with the Earls of Bath (54), Castlehaven (66), Lords Viscount Falconberg (56), Falkland (27), Bishop of London (27), the Grand Master of Malta, brother to the Duke de Vendôme (a young wild spark), and Mr. Dryden (51), the poet. After evening prayer, I walked in the park with my Lord Clarendon, where we fell into discourse of the Bishop of Salisbury (Dr. Seth Ward) (66), his subtlety, etc. Dr. Durell, late Dean of Windsor, being dead, Dr. Turner, one of the Duke's chaplains was made dean.
I visited my Lady Arlington (49), groom of the stole to her Majesty (44), who being hardly set down to supper, word was brought her that the Queen (44) was going into the park to walk, it being now near eleven at night; the alarm caused the Countess (49) to rise in all haste, and leave her supper to us.
By this one may take an estimate of the extreme slavery and subjection that courtiers live in, who had not time to eat and drink at their pleasure. It put me in mind of Horace's "Mouse," and to bless God for my own private condition.
Here was Monsieur de l'Angle, the famous minister of Charenton, lately fled from the persecution in France, concerning the deplorable condition of the Protestants there.

In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656 (58). Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau-Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (17).

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

In 1685 Robert Leke 3rd Earl Scarsdale 1654-1707 (30) was appointed Groom of the Stool.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 January. 23 Jan 1686. I din'd at my Lady Arlington's (52), groome of the stole to the Queene Dowager (47), at Somerset House, where din'd the Countesses of Devonshire (40), Dover (76), &c. in all 11 ladys of quality, no man but myselfe being there.

In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656 (58). Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau-Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (17).

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 December. 05 Dec 1686. I dined at my Lady Arlington's (52), Groom of the Stole to the Queen Dowager (48) at Somerset House, where dined divers French noblemen, driven out of their country by the persecution.

In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656 (58). Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau-Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (17).

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Coronation William III and Mary II

On 22 Apr 1689 Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 (29) was appointed Principal Lady in Waiting to Mary Stewart II Queen England, Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26) as well as Groom of the Stool and Mistress of the Robes attracting a salary of £1200 per annum (£800 and £400 respectively).

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 08 Dec 1700. Great alterations of officers at Court, and elsewhere, — Lord Chief Justice Treby died; he was a learned man in his profession, of which we have now few, never fewer; the Chancery requiring so little skill in deep law-learning, if the practicer can talk eloquently in that Court; so that probably few care to study the law to any purpose. Lord Marlborough (50) Master of the Ordnance, in place of Lord Romney (59) made Groom of the Stole. The Earl of Rochester (58) goes Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

Gentleman Usher of the Privy Chamber

Before 1619 Thomas Stafford 1574-1655 was appointed Gentleman Usher of the Privy Chamber.

In 1629 James Palmer 1585-1658 (43) was appointed Gentleman Usher of the Privy Chamber.

Usher of the King's Chamber

In 1455 Thomas Tresham 1420-1471 was appointed Usher of the King's Chamber.

Gentlemen of the Bedchamber

Charles Beauclerk 2nd Duke St Albans 1696-1751 was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber.

Christopher Villiers 1st Earl Anglesey 1593-1630 was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.

Before 1599 Henry Carey 1st Viscount Falkland 1575-1633 wasa appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber.

In 1603 James Hay 1st Earl Carlisle 1580-1636 (23) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to James IV King Scotland 1473-1513.

After Jan 1649 Henry Wilmot 1st Earl Rochester 1612-1658 was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1652 William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (41) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to the exiled Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (21).

In 1679 James Hamilton 4th Duke Hamilton, 1st Duke Brandon 1658-1712 (20) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (48).

In 1689 Richard Lumley 1st Earl Scarborough 1650-1721 (39) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber.

In 1689 Emanual Scrope Howe 1663-1709 (26) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber.

In 1695 Arnold Keppel 1st Earl Albermarle 1670-1718 (24) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber and Master of the Robes.

In 1719 Peregrine Bertie 2nd Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1686-1741 (32) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to George I King Great Britain and Ireland 1660-1727 (58).

Before 1727. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of George I King Great Britain and Ireland 1660-1727.

In 1760 William Douglas 4th Duke Queensberry 1724-1810 (35) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (21).

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

In 1830 William Feilding 6th Earl Desmond, 7th Earl Denbigh 1796-1865 (33) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber to George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (67).

Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (19).

Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.

In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (33). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29) when Prince of Wales.

In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (48). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (44) in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

Gentleman of the Horse

Before 01 Jul 1690 Henry Hobart 4th Baronet Hobart 1657-1698 was appointed Gentleman of the Horse to William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

Gentleman of the King's Chamber

In 1527 Gilbert Tailboys 1st Baron Tailboys 1498-1530 (29) was appointed Gentleman of the King's Chamber.

Keeper

Keeper of Hyde Park

In 1612 Walter Cope 1553-1614 (59) was appointed Keeper of Hyde Park.

Wardrobe

Keeper of the Great Wardrobe

From 1390 to 1398 Richard Boteville Bishop of Bath and Wells, Bishop of Worcester, Bishop of London -1421 was appointed Keeper of the Great Wardrobe.

On 26 Oct 1446 Thomas Tuddenham 1401-1462 was appointed Keeper of the Great Wardrobe.

Controller of the Wardrobe

In 1307 William Melton Archbishop of York 1275-1340 (32) was appointed Controller of the Wardrobe.

Keeper of the Privy Seal

From 1396 to 1397 Guy Mone Aka Mohun Bishop of St David's -1407 was appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal.

On 04 Mar 1439 Edmund Stafford Bishop of Exeter 1344-1419 was appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal.

Edward IV Rewards his Followers

On 28 Jul 1461 Robert Stillington Bishop of Bath and Wells 1420-1491 (41) was appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal. .

On 01 Nov 1461 Robert Stillington Bishop of Bath and Wells 1420-1491 (41) was appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal.

On May 1474 John Russell Bishop of Rochester, Bishop of Lincoln -1494 was appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal.

On 25 May 1523 Cuthbert Tunstall Bishop of Durham 1474-1559 (49) was appointed Keeper of the Privy Seal.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 January. 23 Jan 1683. Sir Francis North (45), son to the Lord North, and Lord Chief Justice, being made Lord Keeper on the death of the Earl of Nottingham, the Lord Chancellor, I went to congratulate him. He is a most knowing, learned, and ingenious man, and, besides being an excellent person, of an ingenious and sweet disposition, very skillful in music, painting, the new philosophy, and politer studies.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 December. 22 Dec 1685. Our patent for executing the office of Privy Seal during the absence of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, being this day seal'd by the Lord Chancellor (40), we went afterwards to St James's, where the Court then was on occasion of building at Whitehall; his Ma* (52) deliver'd the seale to my Lord Tivlot and myselfe, the other Commissioners not being come, and then gave us his hand to kisse. There were the two Venetian Ambassadors, and a world of company; amongst the rest the first Popish Nuncio that had ben in England since the Reformation, so wonderfully were things chang'd, to the universal jealousy.

Keeper of the King's Private Closet

In 1668 William Chiffinch 1602-1691 (66) was appointed Keeper of the King's Private Closet.

Privy Purse

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 July. 11 Jul 1675. We heard the speeches, and saw the ceremony of creating doctors in Divinity, Law and Physic. I had, early in the morning, heard Dr. Morison, Botanic Professor, read on divers plants in the Physic Garden; and saw that rare collection of natural curiosities of Dr. Plot's, of Magdalen Hall, author of "The Natural History of Oxfordshire," all of them collected in that shire, and indeed extraordinary, that in one county there should be found such variety of plants, shells, stones, minerals, marcasites, fowls, insects, models of works, crystals, agates, and marbles. He was now intending to visit Staffordshire, and, as he had of Oxfordshire, to give us the natural, topical, political, and mechanical history. Pity it is that more of this industrious man's genius were not employed so to describe every county of England; it would be one of the most useful and illustrious works that was ever produced in any age or nation.
I visited also the Bodleian Library and my old friend, the learned Obadiah Walker (59), head of University College, which he had now almost rebuilt, or repaired. We then proceeded to Northampton, where we arrived the next day.
In this journey, went part of the way Mr. James Graham (26) (since Privy Purse to the Duke (41)), a young gentleman exceedingly in love with Mrs. Dorothy Howard (24), one of the maids of honor in our company. I could not but pity them both, the mother not much favoring it. This lady was not only a great beauty, but a most virtuous and excellent creature, and worthy to have been wife to the best of men. My advice was required, and I spoke to the advantage of the young gentleman, more out of pity than that she deserved no better match; for, though he was a gentleman of good family, yet there was great inequality.

Ladies

First Lady of the Bedchamber

Before 1572 Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 was appointed First Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

After 19 Oct 1670 Flower Backhouse Countess Clarendon -1700 was appointed First Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 her niece.

Lady of the Bedchamber

Agnes Launcekrona Duchess Ireland was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Anne of Bohemia Queen Consort England 1366-1394.

Anne Bourchier Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1470-1530 was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536.

Around 1497. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Aragon (11) or Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555 (18).

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536 (34).

Susan Villiers Countess Denbigh 1583-1652 was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Margaret Dymoke 1500-1545 was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Jane Seymour Queen Consort England 1509-1537.

After 1486 Elizabeth Tilney Countess Surrey 1444-1497 was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503.

After 1549 Lettice Knollys Countess Essex 1543-1634 was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Around 1567 Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (40) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (33).

In 1580 Anne Vavasour 1560-1650 (20) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth (46).

Around 1589 Margaret Radclyffe of Ordsall Hall 1573-1599 (16) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (55). Elizabeth (55) had become enamoured of her when she and her twin brother Alexander Radclyffe of Ordsall Hall 1573-1599 (16) were arrived at Court. The arrival of the two young Person so wondrously alike in their striking physical beauty created something of a mild sensation. She soon became chief among Elizabeth's ladies.

In 1660 Barbara Villiers Countess Suffolk 1622-1680 (37) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (42) which position she held until 1681.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

In 1663 Mary Fairfax Duchess Buckingham 1638-1720 (24) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (54) which position she held until 1693.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

In 1714 Henrietta Hobart Countess Suffolk 1689-1767 (25) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Caroline Hohenzollern Queen Consort England 1683-1737 (30).

Before 1715 Camilla Colville Countess Tankerville 1697-1775 was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.

In 1798. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830 (28). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (29).

1819. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (41). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (50).

1820. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (42). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (51).

In 1761 Elizabeth Gunning Duchess Hamilton 1733-1790 (27) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (16).

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany Painter 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

In 1837 Pyne Crosbie Lady of the Bedchamber 1780-1844 (57) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (17).

1845 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

In 1854 Jane Conyngham Baroness Churchill 1826-1900 (27) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (34).

1845 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

In 1863 Charlotte Knollys Lady of the Bedchamber 1835-1930 (27) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Alexandra Princess Wales (18).

Times Newspaper Obituaries. 24 Dec 1895. The Duke of Leeds died at Hornby Castle, yesterday morning at 5 o'clock. He recently contracted a severe chill, which led to an attack of bronchitis. He took to his bed about a week ago and gradually sank. George Godolphin Osborne, ninth Duke of Leeds in the peerage of England, Marquis of Carmarthen, Earl of Danby, Viscount Latimer, and Baron Osbome of Kiveton, all in the peerage of England; Viscount Osbome and Viscount Dunblane in the peerage of Scotland; and Baron Godolphin of Paraham Royal, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, a baronet, and a Prince or the Holy Roman Empire, was born in Paris in 1828, the eldest son of the eighth duke. He married, in 1861, the Hon. Fanny Georgiana Pitt (58), daughter of the fourth Baron Rivers, who was born in 1836 and was Lady of the Bedchamber to the Princess of Wales from 1863 to 1873. He was appointed captain in the North Yorks Militia in 1852, and resigued in 1859, but was reappoined in 1861. He succeeded to the family honours in 1872, and has issue living three sons and five daughters. The family descends from Sir Edward Osborne, knight, who was Vice-President of the Council of the North in 1629 and Lieutenant-General of the forces raised there against the Parliamentary Army in 1841. His son was Treasurer of the Navy and Lord High Chancellor, and as Earl of Danby was impeeched by the Commons in 1679. The fifth duke married Amelia, in her own right Baroness Conyers, but this title left the main line in 1859 on the death of the seventh duke. The late duke was nephew of the late Rev. Lord Sydney Godolphin Osborne, who wrote much over the familiar signature "S.G.O.," and brother of Lord Francis George Godolphin Osborne (65), who was rector of Great Elm, but joined the Church of Rome in 1875. The Duke of Leeds is succeeded by his eldest surviving son (33), the Marquis of Carmarthen, who was born in 1862, was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, and was formerly a lieutenant in the Yorkshire Hussars. Lord Carmarthen unsuccessfully contested the Newmarket Division of Cambridgeshire as a Conservative in 1886, and has sat since July, 1887, for the Brixton Division of Lambeth, in which constituency his sucoession to the peerage now creates a vacancy. Lord Carmarthen was an assistant Private Secretary to the Secretary for the Colonies (Lord Knutsford) from 1886 to 1888. He was appointed Treasurer of the Household on the formation of the present Ministry. He married, in 1884, Lady Katherine Frances Lambton (33), daughter of the second Earl of Durham, and has issue four daughters.

In 1901 Alice Maude Olivia Montagu Countess Derby 1862-1957 (38) was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (56).

Lady in Waiting

Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland 1495-1551 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Catherine Howard Queen Consort England 1523-1542.

Margaret Bourchier 1st Lady Bryan 1468-1552 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536.

Around 1497. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Aragon (11) or Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555 (18).

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536 (34).

Mary Dudley 1530-1586 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Margaret Neville -1559 was appointed Lady in Waiting.

Maud Green Baroness Vaux Harrowden 1492-1531 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536.

Around 1497. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Aragon (11) or Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555 (18).

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536 (34).

Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland 1495-1551 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557.

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (42). Portrait of Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557 (23).

Jane Parker Viscountess Rochford 1505-1542 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557.

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (42). Portrait of Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557 (23).

Catherine Howard was appointed Lady in Waiting to Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557.

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (42). Portrait of Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557 (23).

Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland 1495-1551 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Jane Seymour Queen Consort England 1509-1537.

Jane Parker Viscountess Rochford 1505-1542 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Catherine Howard Queen Consort England 1523-1542.

Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland 1495-1551 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Anne Boleyn Queen Consort England.

Jane Parker Viscountess Rochford 1505-1542 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Jane Seymour Queen Consort England 1509-1537.

Maud Parr was appointed Lady in Waiting to Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548.

Olivia Boteler -1663 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

After 1464 Elizabeth Tilney Countess Surrey 1444-1497 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492.

Around 1554 Jane Dormer Duchess Feria 1538-1612 (15) was appointed Lady in Waiting to Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558 (37).

Around 1605 Dorothy Bulstrode Lady in Waiting 1592-1590 (13) was appointed Lady in Waiting to Anne of Denmark Queen Consort Scotland, England and Ireland 1574-1619 (30).

Around 1605 Cecily Bulstrode 1584-1609 (20) was appointed Lady in Waiting to Anne of Denmark Queen Consort Scotland, England and Ireland 1574-1619 (30).

Before 1813 Anne Hamilton 1766-1846 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 which position she held until 1813.

In 1798. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830 (28). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (29).

1819. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (41). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (50).

1820. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (42). Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (51).

Before 1847 Alice Gordon Lady-in-Waiting 1787–1847 was appointed Lady in Waiting to Princess Sophia of Gloucester 1773-1844.

Mother of the Maids

Before 1676 Bridget Tyrrell 1604-1681 was appointed Mother of the Maids.

Maid of Honour

Anne Temple was appointed Maid of Honour to Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Jane Seymour 1541-1561 was appointed Maid of Honour.

Elizabeth Vere Countess Derby 1575-1627 was appointed Maid of Honour to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Catherine Carey 1524-1569 was appointed Maid of Honour to Catherine Howard Queen Consort England 1523-1542.

Elizabeth Hales was appointed Maid of Honour to Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.

Frances Radclyffe -1602 was appointed Maid of Honour to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Catherine Carey 1524-1569 was appointed Maid of Honour to Maid of Honour to Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557.

Around 1513 Elizabeth "Bessie" Blount Baroness Clinton, Baroness Tailboys 1498-1540 (15) came to court as a Maid of Honour to Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536 (27).

Around 1497. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Aragon (11) or Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555 (18).

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon Queen Consort England 1485-1536 (34).

In 1576 Elizabeth Howard Countess Carrick 1564-1646 (11) was appointed Maid of Honour to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (49) which position she held until 1583.

In 1577 Mary Grey 1545-1578 (32) was appointed Maid of Honour to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (43).

Around 1580 Elizabeth Trentham Maid of Honour Countess Oxford -1612 was appointed Maid of Honour to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (46).

Around 1630 Cecilia Crofts 1610-1638 (20) was appointed Maid of Honour to Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (20).

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Before 1669 Margaret Blagge Maid of Honour 1652-1678 was appointed Maid of Honour.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 July. 31 Jul 1672. I entertained the Maids of Honor (among whom there was one (19) I infinitely esteemed for her many and extraordinary virtues) at a comedy this afternoon, and so went home.

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 June. 10 Jun 1673. Came to visit and dine with me my Lord Viscount Cornbury (11) and his Lady (10); Lady Frances Hyde, sister to the Duchess of York; and Mrs. Dorothy Howard (22), Maid of Honour [Note. Dorothy Howard and Colonel James Graham 1649-1730 (24) were married in 1675 - may be an example of Evelyn writing his diary retrospectively she being referred to as 'Mrs' although possibly the term was used irrecspective of marriage - see 09 Oct 1671 - Use of the Term Miss]. We went, after dinner, to see the formal and formidable camp on Blackheath, raised to invade Holland; or, as others suspected for another design. Thence, to the Italian glass-house at Greenwich, where glass was blown of finer metal than that of Murano, at Venice.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 July. 11 Jul 1675. We heard the speeches, and saw the ceremony of creating doctors in Divinity, Law and Physic. I had, early in the morning, heard Dr. Morison, Botanic Professor, read on divers plants in the Physic Garden; and saw that rare collection of natural curiosities of Dr. Plot's, of Magdalen Hall, author of "The Natural History of Oxfordshire," all of them collected in that shire, and indeed extraordinary, that in one county there should be found such variety of plants, shells, stones, minerals, marcasites, fowls, insects, models of works, crystals, agates, and marbles. He was now intending to visit Staffordshire, and, as he had of Oxfordshire, to give us the natural, topical, political, and mechanical history. Pity it is that more of this industrious man's genius were not employed so to describe every county of England; it would be one of the most useful and illustrious works that was ever produced in any age or nation.
I visited also the Bodleian Library and my old friend, the learned Obadiah Walker (59), head of University College, which he had now almost rebuilt, or repaired. We then proceeded to Northampton, where we arrived the next day.
In this journey, went part of the way Mr. James Graham (26) (since Privy Purse to the Duke (41)), a young gentleman exceedingly in love with Mrs. Dorothy Howard (24), one of the maids of honor in our company. I could not but pity them both, the mother not much favoring it. This lady was not only a great beauty, but a most virtuous and excellent creature, and worthy to have been wife to the best of men. My advice was required, and I spoke to the advantage of the young gentleman, more out of pity than that she deserved no better match; for, though he was a gentleman of good family, yet there was great inequality.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 15 Sep 1685. I accompanied Mr. Pepys (52) to Portsmouth, whither his Ma* (51) was going the first time since his coming to the Crowne, to see in what state the fortifications were. We tooke coach and six horses, late after dinner, yet got to Bagshot that night. Whilst supper was making ready I went and made a visit to Mrs. Graham (34), some time maid of honour to ye Queene Dowager (46), now wife to James Graham, Esq (36) of the privy purse to the King; her house being a walke in the forest, within a little quarter of a mile from Bagshot towne. Very importunate she was that I would sup, and abide there that night, but being obliged by my companion, I return'd to our inn, after she had shew'd me her house, wch was very commodious and well furnish'd, as she was an excellent housewife, a prudent and virtuous lady. There is a parke full of red deere about it. Her eldest son was now sick there of the small-pox, but in a likely way of recovery, and other of her children run about, and among the infected, wnh she said she let them do on purpose that they might whilst young pass that fatal disease she fancied they were to undergo one time or other, and that this would be the best: the severity of this cruell disease so lately in my poore family confirming much of what she affirmed.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Siege of Colchester

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 March. 24 Mar 1688. I went with Sir Charles Littleton (60) to Sheen, a house and estate given him by Lord Brounker; one who was ever noted for a hard, covetous, vicious man; but for his worldly craft and skill in gaming few exceeded him. Coming to die, he bequeathed all his land, house, furniture, etc., to Sir Charles (60), to whom he had no manner of relation, but an ancient friendship contracted at the famous siege of Colchester, forty years before. It is a pretty place, with fine gardens, and well planted, and given to one worthy of them, Sir Charles (60) being an honest gentleman and soldier. He is brother to Sir Henry Littleton (64) of Worcestershire, whose great estate he is likely to inherit, his brother being without children. They are descendants of the great lawyer of that name, and give the same arms and motto. He is married to one Mrs. Temple, formerly Maid of Honour to the late Queen (49), a beautiful lady, and he has many fine children, so that none envy his good fortune.
After dinner, we went to see Sir William Temple's near to it; the most remarkable things are his orangery and gardens, where the wall-fruit-trees are most exquisitely nailed and trained, far better than I ever noted.
There are many good pictures, especially of Vandyke's, in both these houses, and some few statues and small busts in the latter.
From thence to Kew, to visit Sir Henry Capel's (50), whose orangery and myrtetum are most beautiful and perfectly well kept. He was contriving very high palisadoes of reeds to shade his oranges during the summer, and painting those reeds in oil.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

In 1761 Frances Bisshop 1741-1804 (20) was appointed Maid of Honour to Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (16).

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany Painter 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

After 08 Sep 1761 Susan Tracy Keck Maid of Honour 1745-1835 was appointed Maid of Honour to Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818.

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany Painter 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

In 1802 Charlotte Elizabeth Digby 1778-1820 (23) was appointed Maid of Honour to Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (57).

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany Painter 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

Masters

Master of the Buckhounds

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter IX: Deene and its History. The wicked Countess and her lover lived at Clieveden — "the bower of wanton Shrewsbury and of love " — and her spirit is supposed to haunt the beautiful riverside retreat, but I am thankful to say she has never appeared in the old home of her innocent girlhood. Her portrait by Sir Peter Lely hangs in the White Hall at Deene, and is a fine example of the artist's well-known very décolleté style of " robes loosely flowing, hair as free," with the usual mise en scène of a beauty of Charles II's time. The third Earl of Cardigan (44) was Master of the Buckhounds to Queen Anne ; he married a daughter (41) of the Earl of Ailesbury (74), and their fourth son (1) inherited the Ailesbury title and estates. Lord Cardigan's eldest son (17) married the heiress (19) of the Duke of Montagu (40) in 1766 [Note. Married on 07 Jul 1730. He was created Duke in 1766]. He was a friend of Horace Walpole (12), the influence of whose pseudo-Gothic tastes may still be seen in the south front of Deene, built at this time, and which now incorporates the great ball-room built for me by my dear husband.

Master of the Household

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 February. 12 Feb 1683. This morning I received the news of the death of my father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne (78), Knt. and Bart., who died at my house at Sayes Court this day at ten in the morning, after he had labored under the gout and dropsy for nearly six months, in the 78th year of his age. The funeral was solemnized on the 19th at Deptford, with as much decency as the dignity of the person, and our relation to him, required; there being invited the Bishop of Rochester (58), several noblemen, knights, and all the fraternity of the Trinity House, of which he had been Master, and others of the country. The vicar preached a short but proper discourse on Psalm xxxix. 10, on the frailty of our mortal condition, concluding with an ample and well-deserved eulogy on the defunct, relating to his honorable birth and ancestors, education, learning in Greek and Latin, modern languages, travels, public employments, signal loyalty, character abroad, and particularly the honor of supporting the Church of England in its public worship during its persecution by the late rebels' usurpation and regicide, by the suffrages of divers Bishops, Doctors of the Church, and others, who found such an asylum in his house and family at Paris, that in their disputes with the Papists (then triumphing over it as utterly lost) they used to argue for its visibility and existence from Sir R. Browne's chapel and assembly there. Then he spoke of his great and loyal sufferings during thirteen years' exile with his present Majesty (52), his return with him in the signal year 1660; his honorable employment at home, his timely Recess to recollect himself, his great age, infirmities, and death.
He gave to the Trinity Corporation that land in Deptford on which are built those almshouses for twenty-four widows of emerited seamen. He was born the famous year of the Gunpowder Treason, in 1605, and being the last [male] of his family, left my wife (48), his only daughter, heir. His grandfather, Sir Richard Browne, was the great instrument under the great Earl of Leicester (favorite to Queen Elizabeth) in his government of the Netherland. He was Master of the Household to King James, and Cofferer; I think was the first who regulated the compositions through England for the King (52)'s household, provisions, progresses,49 etc., which was so high a service, and so grateful to the whole nation, that he had acknowledgments and public thanks sent him from all the counties; he died by the rupture of a vein in a vehement speech he made about the compositions in a Parliament of King James. By his mother's side he was a Gunson, Treasurer of the Navy in the reigns of Henry VIII., Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth, and, as by his large pedigree appears, related to divers of the English nobility. Thus ended this honorable person, after so many changes and tossings to and fro, in the same house where he was born. "Lord teach us so to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom!"
By a special clause in his will, he ordered that his body should be buried in the churchyard under the southeast window of the chancel, adjoining to the burying places of his ancestors, since they came out of Essex into Sayes Court, he being much offended at the novel custom of burying everyone within the body of the church and chancel; that being a favor heretofore granted to martyrs and great persons; this excess of making churches charnel houses being of ill and irreverend example, and prejudicial to the health of the living, besides the continual disturbance of the pavement and seats, and several other indecencies. Dr. Hall, the pious Bishop of Norwich, would also be so interred, as may be read in his testament.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

Master of the Horse

In 1397 Richard Redman Master of the Horse 1350-1426 (47) was appointed Master of the Horse.

Welles' Rebellion & Battle of Losecoat Field aka Empingham

In Feb 1470 Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby Eresby 8th Baron Welles -1470 attacked Gainsborough Old Hall home of Thomas Burgh 1st Baron Burgh 1431-1496 (39), a senior Yorkist, Edward IV's (27) Master of the Horse. It isn't known whether this attack was a consequence of local or national issues. Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (27) summoned Robert's father Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (42) and uncle-in-law Thomas Dymoke 1428-1470 (married to Margaret Welles sister of Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby Eresby 8th Baron Welles -1470) to London. Both initially went into Sanctuary, Westminster Abbey but were pardoned on 03 Mar 1470.

In 1479 John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 (37) was appointed Master of the Horse.

On 06 Nov 1515 Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (26) was appointed Master of the Horse.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) wearing the Garter and Inter-twined Knots Collar with St George Pendant. Standing three-quarter length, richly dressed in velvet, fur and cloth-of-gold. Holbein has meticulously shown the varied texture of his cloth-of-gold double which is woven into a pomegranate pattern with a variety of different weaves including loops of gold thread. Similarly, he has carefully articulated the band of black satin running down Guildford’s arm against the richer black of the velvet of his sleeve. A lavish use of both shell-gold paint and gold leaf (which has been used to emulate the highlights of the gold thread in the material) emphasises the luxuriousness of the sitter’s dress and his high status. In his right-hand he holds the Comptroller of the Household Staff of Office.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Mary Wotton 1499-1535 (28) when she was thirty-two commissioned with that of her husband Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) possibly to celebrate their marriage. Hung with gold chains and embellished with pearls, Baroness Guildford embodies worldly prosperity, and with her prayer book she is also the very image of propriety.

In 1522 Nicholas Carew KG 1496-1539 (26) was appointed Master of the Horse.

Coronation of Anne Boleyn

On 01 Jun 1533 the six months pregnant Anne Boleyn Queen Consort England (32) was crowned Queen Consort England by Thomas Cranmer Archbishop of Canterbury 1489-1556 (43) at Westminster Abbey. See Coronation of Anne Boleyn.
John Vere 15th Earl Oxford 1471-1540 (62) bore the Crown. Henry Grey 1st Duke Suffolk 1517-1554 (16) carried the Salt. Margaret Wotton Marchioness Dorset 1487-1535 (46) rode in the procession. William Coffin MP 1495-1538 (38) was appointed Master of the Horse. Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (50) served as Lord Sewer. Henry Parker 1513-1552 (19) and William Coffin MP 1495-1538 (38) were knighted. Thomas Berkeley 6th Baron Berkeley 1505-1534 (28) and Thomas Stanley 2nd Baron Monteagle 1507-1560 (26) were created Knight of the Bath. Margaret Wotton Marchioness Dorset 1487-1535 (46) rode in the procession. Arthur Hopton 1489-1555 (44) attended.
Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 (55) refused to attend. Shortly thereafter, More was charged with accepting bribes, but the charges had to be dismissed for lack of any evidence.

In 1544 Robert Tyrwhitt Master 1503-1572 (40) was appointed Master of the Horse.

On Apr 1554 Anthony Browne 1st Viscount Montague 1528-1592 (25) was appointed Master of the Horse.

On Jun 1587 Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (21) was appointed Master of the Horse.

In 1615 George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 (22) was appointed Master of the Horse.

In 1628 Henry Rich 1st Earl Holland 1590-1649 was appointed Master of the Horse.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 July. 15 Jul 1685. I went to see Dr. Tenison's (48) Library [in St. Martin's.].
Monmouth (36) was this day brought to London and examin'd before the King (51), to whom he made greate submission, acknowledg'd his seduction by Ferguson the Scot (48), whom he nam'd ye bloudy villain. He was sent to ye Tower, had an interview with his late Dutchesse (34), whom he receiv'd coldly, having liv'd dishonestly with ye Lady Henrietta Wentworth (24) for two yeares. He obstinately asserted his conversation with that debauch'd woman to be no in, whereupon, seeing he could not be persuaded to his last breath, the divines who were sent to assist him thought not fit to administer the Holy Communion to him. For ye rest of his faults he proFess'd greate sorrow, and so died without any apparent feare; he would not make use of a cap or other circumstance, but lying downe, bid the fellow do his office better than to the late Lord Russell, and gave him gold; but the wretch made five chopps before he had his head off; wch so incens'd the people, that had he not been guarded and got away, they would have torn him to pieces. The Duke (36) made no speech on the scaffold (wch was on Tower Hill) but gave a paper containing not above 5 or 6 lines, for the King (51), in which he disclaims all title to ye Crown, acknowledges that the late King, his father, had indeede told him he was but his base sonn, and so desir'd his Ma* to be kind to his wife and children. This relation I had from Dr. Tenison (Rector of St. Martin's) (48), who, with the Bishops of Ely (47) and Bath and Wells (48), were sent to him by his Ma*, and were at the execution.
Thus ended this quondam Duke, darling of his father and ye ladies, being extreamly handsome and adroit; an excellent souldier and dancer, a favourite of the people, of an easy nature, debauch'd by lust, seduc'd by crafty knaves who would have set him up only to make a property, and took the opportunity of the King being of another religion, to ga ther a party of discontented men. He fail'd, and perish'd. He was a lovely person, had a virtuous and excellent lady that brought him greate riches, and a second dukedom in Scotland. He was Master of the Horse, General of the King his father's Army, Gentleman of the Bedchamber, Knight of the Garter, Chancellor of Cambridge, in a word had accumulations without end. See what ambition and want of principles brought him to! He was beheaded on Tuesday 14th July. His mother, whose name was Barlow, daughter of some very meane creatures, was a beautiful strumpet, whom I had often seene at Paris; she died miserably without any thing to bury her; yet this Perkin had ben made to believe that the King had married her; a monstrous and ridiculous forgerie; and to satisfy the world of the iniquity of the report, the King his father (If his father he really was, for he most resembl'd one Sidney, who was familiar with his mother) publickly and most solemnly renounc'd it, to be so enter'd in the Council Booke some yeares since, with all ye Privy Councellors at testation.
Ross, tutor to the Duke of Monmouth, proposed to Bishop Cozens to sign a certificate of the King's marriage to Mrs. Barlow, though her own name was Walters: this the Bishop refused. She was born of a gentleman's family in Wales, but having little means and less grace, came to London to make her fortune. Algernon Sidney, then a Colonel in Cromwell's army, had agreed to give her 50 broad pieces (as he told the Duke of York) but being ordered hastily away with his regiment, he missed his bargain. She went into Holland, where she fell into the hands of his brother Colonel Robert Sidney, who kept her for some time, till the King hearing of her, got her from him. On which the Colonel was heard to say, Let who will have her she is already sped and after being with the King she was so soon with child that the world had no cause to doubt whose child it was, and the rather that when he grew to be a man, he very much resembled the Colonel both in stature and countenance, even to a wort on his face. However the King owned the child. In the King's absence she behaved so loosely, that on his return from his escape at Worcester, he would have no further commerce with her, and she became a common prostitute at Paris. Life of King James II. Vol I.
Had it not pleas'd God to dissipate this attempt in ye beginning, there would in all appearance have gather'd an irresistable force which would have desperately proceeded to ye ruine of ye Church and Govern ment, so general was the discontent and expectation of the opportunity. For my owne part I look'd upon this deliverance as most signal. Such an Inundation of phanatics and men of impious principles must needs have caus'd universal disorder, cruelty, injustice, rapine, sacrilege, and confusion, an unavoidable civil war and misery without end. Blessed be God the knot was happily broken, and a faire prospect of tranquil lity for the future if we reforme, be thankful!, and make a right use of this mercy.

In 1761 John Manners 3rd Duke Rutland 1696-1779 (64) was appointed Master of the Horse.

In 1795 George Bussy Villiers 4th Earl Jersey 1735-1805 (59) was appointed Master of the Horse to the Prince of Wales, the future George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (32).

Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (19).

Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.

In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (33). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29) when Prince of Wales.

In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (48). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (44) in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

In 1804 Francis Ingram-Seymour-Conway 2nd Marquess Hertford 1743-1822 (60) was appointed Master of the Horse by William "The Younger" Pitt Prime Minister 1759-1806 (44).

In 1806 Henry Herbert 1st Earl Carnarvon 1741-1811 (64) was appointed Master of the Horse.

Master of the Jewel Office

On Apr 1620 Henry Mildmay 1593-1668 (27) was appointed Master of the Jewel Office.

Master of the Jewel House

In Dec 1558 John Astley Master of the Jewel House 1507-1595 (51) was appointed Master of the Jewel House. Katherine "Kat" Champernowne 1502-1565 (56) was appointed Chief Lady of the Bedchamber to .

In 1660 Gilbert Talbot Master of the Jewel House 1606-1695 (54) was appointed Master of the Jewel House.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 August. 21st August 1662. I was admitted and then sworn one of the Council of the Royal Society, being nominated in his Majesty's (32) original grant to be of this Council for the regulation of the Society, and making laws and statutes conducible to its establishment and progress, for which we now set apart every Wednesday morning till they were all finished. Lord Viscount Brouncker (51) (that excellent mathematician) was also by his Majesty (32)President. The King (32) gave us the arms of England to be borne in a canton in our arms, and sent us a mace of silver gilt, of the same fashion and size as those carried before his Majesty (32), to be borne before our president on meeting days. It was brought by Sir Gilbert Talbot (56), master of his Majesty's jewel house.

Master of the King's Jewels

In 1465 Thomas Vaughan Master 1410-1483 was appointed Master of the King's Jewels.

Master of the Robes

Christopher Villiers 1st Earl Anglesey 1593-1630 was appointed Master of the Robes to James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.

Spencer Compton 2nd Earl of Northampton 1601-1643 was appointed Master of the Robes to the Prince of Wales.

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 July. 23d July 1678. Went to see Mr. Elias Ashmole's (61) library and curiosities, at Lambeth. He had divers MSS., but most of them astrological, to which study he is addicted, though I believe not learned, but very industrious, as his History of the order of the Garter proves. He showed me a toad included in amber. The prospect from a turret is very fine, it being so near London, and yet not discovering any house about the country. The famous John Tradescant bequeathed his Repository to this gentleman, who has given them to the University of Oxford, and erected a lecture on them, over the laboratory, in imitation of the Royal Society.
Mr. Godolphin (33) was made Master of the Robes to the King (48).

In 1695 Arnold Keppel 1st Earl Albermarle 1670-1718 (24) was appointed Gentlemen of the Bedchamber and Master of the Robes.

In 1714 William Cadogan 1st Earl Cadogan 1672-1726 (42) was appointed Master of the Robes.

In 1758 James Brudenell 5th Earl Cardigan 1725-1811 (32) was appointed Master of the Robes.

Master of the Hoyal Stables

From 1574 Richard Montpesson -1627 was appointed Master of the Hoyal Stables.

Mistress

Mistress of the Robes

Dorothy Stafford 1526-1604 was appointed Mistress of the Robes to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Coronation William III and Mary II

On 22 Apr 1689 Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 (29) was appointed Principal Lady in Waiting to Mary Stewart II Queen England, Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26) as well as Groom of the Stool and Mistress of the Robes attracting a salary of £1200 per annum (£800 and £400 respectively).

From 1913 to 1925 Winifred Anna Dallas-Yorke 6th Duchess Portland 1863-1954 (61) was Mistress of the Robes to Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (68).

Lord Chamberlain of the Household

John Charleton 1st Baron Cherleton 1268-1353 was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

John Charleton 2nd Baron Cherleton -1360 was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

In 1371 William Latimer 4th Baron Latimer Corby 1330-1381 (40) was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

In 1399 Thomas Erpingham 1355-1428 (44) was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

After 1422 William Phelip 1383-1441 was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

After 29 Sep 1422 Ralph Cromwell 3rd Baron Cromwell 1403-1456 was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household to Henry VI King England, II King France 1421-1471.

In 1450 Ralph Cromwell 3rd Baron Cromwell 1403-1456 (47) was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household to Henry VI King England, II King France 1421-1471 (28).

In 1526 William Sandys 1st Baron Sandys Vyne 1470-1540 (56) was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (34).

On 25 Dec 1557 Edward Hastings 1st Baron Hastings Loughborough 1521-1571 (36) was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

On Jul 1585 Henry Carey 1st Baron Hunsdon 1526-1596 (59) was appointed Lord Chamberlain of the Household to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (51).

Trial and Execution of the Earl of Strafford

On 13 Apr 1641 Thomas Wentworth 1st Earl Strafford 1593-1641 (48) was attainted by 204 votes to 59 ostensibly for his authoritarian rule as Lord Deputy of Ireland. Despite his promise not to Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (40) signed the death warrant on the 10 May 1641 in the light of increasing pressure from Parliament and the commons.
Wenceslaus Hollar Engraver 1607-1677 (33). Engraving of the Trial of Thomas Wentworth 1st Earl Strafford 1593-1641 (48) with the following marked:
A Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (40)
C Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (31)
D Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (10)
E Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel, 4th Earl Surrey, 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646 (55), Lord High Steward
F Henry Montagu 1st Earl Manchester 1563-1642 (78), Lord Keeper of the Great Seal
G John Paulet 5th Marquess Winchester 1598-1675 (43)
H Robert Bertie 1582-1642 1st Earl Lindsey 1582-1642 (58), Lord Chamberlain
I Philip Herbert 4th Earl Pembroke, 1st Earl Montgomery 1584-1650 (56), Lord Chamberlain of the Household
V Thomas Wentworth 1st Earl Strafford 1593-1641 (48)
Z Alethea Talbot Countess Arundel (56)

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 10th September 1677. To divert me, my Lord (59) would needs carry me to see Ipswich, when we dined with one Mr. Mann by the way, who was Recorder of the town. There were in our company my Lord Huntingtower (28), son to the Duchess of Lauderdale (50), Sir Edward Bacon, a learned gentleman of the family of the great Chancellor Verulam, and Sir John Felton, with some other knights and gentlemen. After dinner came the bailiff and magistrates in their formalities with their maces to compliment my Lord (59), and invite him to the town-house, where they presented us a collation of dried sweetmeats and wine, the bells ringing, etc. Then, we went to see the town, and first, the Lord Viscount Hereford's (3) house, which stands in a park near the town, like that at Brussels, in Flanders; the house not great, yet pretty, especially the hall. The stews for fish succeeded one another, and feed one the other, all paved at bottom. There is a good picture of the blessed virgin in one of the parlors, seeming to be of Holbein, or some good master. Then we saw the Haven, seven miles from Harwich. The tide runs out every day, but the bedding being soft mud, it is safe for shipping and a station. The trade of Ipswich is for the most part Newcastle on Tyne coals, with which they supply London; but it was formerly a clothing town. There is not any beggar asks alms in the whole place, a thing very extraordinary, so ordered by the prudence of the magistrates. It has in it fourteen or fifteen beautiful churches: in a word, it is for building, cleanness, and good order, one of the best towns in England. Cardinal Wolsey was a butcher's son of Ipswich, but there is little of that magnificent Prelate's foundation here, besides a school and I think a library, which I did not see. His intentions were to build some great thing. We returned late to Euston, having traveled about fifty miles this day.
Since first I was at this place, I found things exceedingly improved. It is seated in a bottom between two graceful swellings, the main building being now in the figure of a Greek II with four pavilions, two at each corner, and a break in the front, railed and balustered at the top, where I caused huge jars to be placed full of earth to keep them steady upon their pedestals between the statues, which make as good a show as if they were of stone, and, though the building be of brick, and but two stories besides cellars and garrets covered with blue slate, yet there is room enough for a full court, the offices and outhouses being so ample and well disposed. the King (47)'s apartment is painted à fresco, and magnificently furnished. There are many excellent pictures of the great masters. The gallery is a pleasant, noble room; in the break, or middle, is a billiard table, but the wainscot, being of fir, and painted, does not please me so well as Spanish oak without paint. The chapel is pretty, the porch descending to the gardens. The orange garden is very fine, and leads into the greenhouse, at the end of which is a hall to eat in, and the conservatory some hundred feet long, adorned with maps, as the other side is with the heads of the Cæsars, ill cut in alabaster; above are several apartments for my Lord, Lady, and Duchess, with kitchens and other offices below, in a lesser form; lodgings for servants, all distinct for them to retire to when they please and would be in private, and have no communication with the palace, which he tells me he will wholly resign to his son-in-law and daughter, that charming young creature.
The canal running under my Lady's (43) dressing room chamber window, is full of carps and fowl, which come and are fed there. The cascade at the end of the canal turns a cornmill that provides the family, and raises water for the fountains and offices. To pass this canal into the opposite meadows, Sir Samuel Morland (52) has invented a screw bridge, which, being turned with a key, lands you fifty feet distant at the entrance of an ascending walk of trees, a mile in length,—as it is also on the front into the park,—of four rows of ash trees, and reaches to the park pale, which is nine miles in compass, and the best for riding and meeting the game that I ever saw. There were now of red and fallow deer almost a thousand, with good covert, but the soil barren and flying sand, in which nothing will grow kindly. The tufts of fir, and much of the other wood, were planted by my direction some years before. This seat is admirably placed for field sports, hawking, hunting, or racing. The mutton is small, but sweet. The stables hold thirty horses and four coaches. The out-offices make two large quadrangles, so as servants never lived with more ease and convenience; never master more civil. Strangers are attended and accommodated as at their home, in pretty apartments furnished with all manner of conveniences and privacy.
There is a library full of excellent books; bathing rooms, elaboratory, dispensary, a decoy, and places to keep and fat fowl in. He had now in his new church (near the garden) built a dormitory, or vault, with several repositories, in which to bury his family.
In the expense of this pious structure, the church is most laudable, most of the houses of God in this country resembling rather stables and thatched cottages than temples in which to serve the Most High. He has built a lodge in the park for the keeper, which is a neat dwelling, and might become any gentleman. The same has he done for the parson, little deserving it for murmuring that my Lord put him some time out of his wretched hovel, while it was building. He has also erected a fair inn at some distance from his palace, with a bridge of stone over a river near it, and repaired all the tenants' houses, so as there is nothing but neatness and accommodations about his estate, which I yet think is not above £1,500 a year. I believe he had now in his family one hundred domestic servants.
His lady (43) (being one of the Brederode's daughters, grandchild to a natural son of Henry Frederick, Prince of Orange) [Note. Evelyn confused here. Elisabeth Nassau-Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (43) was the daughter of Louis Nassau-Beverweert 1602-1665 who was the illegitimate son of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625. Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 was the younger brother of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.] is a good-natured and obliging woman. They love fine things, and to live easily, pompously, and hospitably; but, with so vast expense, as plunges my Lord (59) into debts exceedingly. My Lord (59) himself is given into no expensive vice but building, and to have all things rich, polite, and princely. He never plays, but reads much, having the Latin, French, and Spanish tongues in perfection. He has traveled much, and is the best bred and courtly person his Majesty (47) has about him, so as the public Ministers more frequent him than any of the rest of the nobility. While he was Secretary of State and Prime Minister, he had gotten vastly, but spent it as hastily, even before he had established a fund to maintain his greatness; and now beginning to decline in favor (the Duke being no great friend of his), he knows not how to retrench. He was son of a Doctor of Laws, whom I have seen, and, being sent from Westminster School to Oxford, with intention to be a divine, and parson of Arlington, a village near Brentford, when Master of Arts the Rebellion falling out, he followed the King (47)'s Army, and receiving an HONORABLE WOUND IN THE FACE, grew into favor, and was advanced from a mean fortune, at his Majesty's (47) Restoration, to be an Earl and Knight of the Garter, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, and first favorite for a long time, during which the King (47) married his natural son, the Duke of Grafton (13), to his only daughter (22) and heiress, as before mentioned, worthy for her beauty and virtue of the greatest prince in Christendom. My Lord is, besides this, a prudent and understanding person in business, and speaks well; unfortunate yet in those he has advanced, most of them proving ungrateful. The many obligations and civilities I have received from this noble gentleman, extracts from me this character, and I am sorry he is in no better circumstances.
Having now passed near three weeks at Euston, to my great satisfaction, with much difficulty he suffered me to look homeward, being very earnest with me to stay longer; and, to engage me, would himself have carried me to Lynn-Regis, a town of important traffic, about twenty miles beyond, which I had never seen; as also the Traveling Sands, about ten miles wide of Euston, that have so damaged the country, rolling from place to place, and, like the Sands in the Deserts of Lybia, quite overwhelmed some gentlemen's whole estates, as the relation extant in print, and brought to our Society, describes at large.

In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656 (58). Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau-Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (17).

Around 1650. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Louis Nassau-Beverweert 1602-1665 (48).

In 1623 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641 (56). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (38).

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Before 27 Jun 1641 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.

Vice-Chamberlain of the Household

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 June. 30 Jun 1665. To Chatham; and, 1st July, to the fleet with Lord Sandwich (39), now Admiral, with whom I went in a pinnace to the Buoy of the Nore, where the whole fleet rode at anchor; went on board the Prince, of ninety brass ordnance, haply the best ship in the world, both for building and sailing; she had 700 men. They made a great huzza, or shout, at our approach, three times. Here we dined with many noblemen, gentlemen, and volunteers, served in plate and excellent meat of all sorts. After dinner, came his Majesty, the Duke (31), and Prince Rupert (45). Here I saw the King (35) knight Captain Custance for behaving so bravely in the late fight. It was surprising to behold the good order, decency, and plenty of all things in a vessel so full of men. The ship received a hundred cannon shot in her body. Then I went on board the Charles, to which after a gun was shot off, came all the flag officers to his Majesty (35), who there held a General Council, which determined that his Royal Highness (35) should adventure himself no more this summer. I came away late, having seen the most glorious fleet that ever spread sails. We returned in his Majesty's (35) yacht with my Lord Sandwich (39) and Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, landing at Chatham on Sunday morning.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 May. 26 May 1671. The Earl of Bristol's (58) house in Queen's Street was taken for the Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, and furnished with rich hangings of the King (40)'s. It consisted of seven rooms on a floor, with a long gallery, gardens, etc. This day we met the Duke of Buckingham (43), Earl of Lauderdale (55), Lord Culpeper, Sir George Carteret (61), Vice-Chamberlain, and myself, had the oaths given us by the Earl of Sandwich (45), our President. It was to advise and counsel his Majesty (40), to the best of our abilities, for the well-governing of his Foreign Plantations, etc., the form very little differing from that given to the Privy Council. We then took our places at the Board in the Council-Chamber, a very large room furnished with atlases, maps, charts, globes, etc. Then came the Lord Keeper, Sir Orlando Bridgeman (65), Earl of Arlington (53), Secretary of State, Lord Ashley, Mr. Treasurer (40), Sir John Trevor (34), the other Secretary, Sir John Duncomb (49), Lord Allington (30), Mr. Grey, son to the Lord Grey, Mr. Henry Broncher, Sir Humphrey Winch (49), Sir John Finch, Mr. Waller (65), and Colonel Titus (48), of the bedchamber, with Mr. Slingsby, Secretary to the Council, and two Clerks of the Council, who had all been sworn some days before. Being all set, our Patent was read, and then the additional Patent, in which was recited this new establishment; then, was delivered to each a copy of the Patent, and of instructions: after which, we proceeded to business.
The first thing we did was, to settle the form of a circular letter to the Governors of all his Majesty's (40) Plantations and Territories in the West Indies and Islands thereof, to give them notice to whom they should apply themselves on all occasions, and to render us an account of their present state and government; but, what we most insisted on was, to know the condition of New England, which appearing to be very independent as to their regard to Old England, or his Majesty (40), rich and strong as they now were, there were great debates in what style to write to them; for the condition of that Colony was such, that they were able to contest with all other Plantations about them, and there was fear of their breaking from all dependence on this nation; his Majesty (40), therefore, commended this affair more expressly. We, therefore, thought fit, in the first place, to acquaint ourselves as well as we could of the state of that place, by some whom we heard of that were newly come from thence, and to be informed of their present posture and condition; some of our Council were for sending them a menacing letter, which those who better understood the peevish and touchy humor of that Colony, were utterly against.
A letter was then read from Sir Thomas Modiford (51), Governor of Jamaica; and then the Council broke up.
Having brought an action against one Cocke, for money which he had received for me, it had been referred to an arbitration by the recommendation of that excellent good man, the Chief-Justice Hale (61), but, this not succeeding, I went to advise with that famous lawyer, Mr. Jones, of Gray's Inn, and, 27th of May, had a trial before Chief Justice of the King (40)Lord Chief Justice Hale; and, after the lawyers had wrangled sufficiently, it was referred to a new arbitration. This was the very first suit at law that ever I had with any creature, and oh, that it might be the last!.

In Dec 1706 Thomas Coke 1674-1727 (32) exchanged offices with Peregrine Bertie (20). Thomas Coke 1674-1727 (32) was appointed Vice-Chamberlain of the Household which position he held for the rest of his life.

Lord Great Chamberlain

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 07 May 1461. Middleham Castle, Middleham. Appointment for life of the said earl (33) as great chamberlain of England, with the accustomed fees. By other latters patent.

On 19 Dec 1526 John Vere 15th Earl Oxford 1471-1540 (55) was appointed Lord Great Chamberlain.

Chamberlain

Richard Woodville 1385-1441 was appointed Chamberlain to John Lancaster 1st Duke Bedford 1389-1435.

Esquire to the Body

Ambrose Willoughby was appointed Esquire to the Body to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.