Twenty Trees

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History of City of London

City of London is in London

Execution of Anne Boleyn's Co accused

851 Battle of Oakley

1376 Good Parliament

1381 Peasant's Revolt

1397 Arrest and Execution of Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey 11th Earl Arundel

1462 Vere Plot to Murder Edward IV

1483 Buckingham's Rebellion

1485 Execution of Roger Clifford

1495 Perkin Warbreck Plot

1497 Battle of Blackheath aka Deptford Bridge

1499 Trial and Execution of Perkin Warbreck and Edward Earl of Warwick

1510 Execution of Richard Empson and Edmund Dudley

1513 Battle of Flodden

1521 Trial and Execution of the Duke of Buckingham

1525 Knighting of Henry Fitzroy

1535 Trial and Execution of Bishop Fisher and Thomas More

1537 Bigod's Rebellion

1538 Exeter Conspiracy

1540 Execution of Thomas Cromwell

1549 Trial and Execution of Thomas Seymour

1552 Plot to Murder John Dudley 1st Duke Northumberland

1552 Edward Seymour's Execution

1553 Arrival of Queen Mary I in London

1553 Trial and Execution of Lady Jane Grey's Supporters

1554 Wyatt's Rebellion

1554 Execution of Lady Jane Grey and Guildford Dudley

1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

1601 Essex Rebellion

1616 Thomas Overbury Murder and Trial of his Murderers

1631 1533 Buggery Act

1641 Trial and Execution of the Earl of Strafford

1644 Execution of Alexander Carew 2nd Baronet

1645 Trial and Execution of the Hothams

1645 Execution of Archbishop William Laud

1660 Rump Parliament

1661 Coronation of Charles II

1662 Execution of Henry Vane "The Younger"

1666 Great Fire of London

1666 Great Plague of London

1680 Trial and Execution of William Howard 1st Viscount Stafford

1683 Rye House Plot

1683 Indemnity and Oblivion Act

1685 Execution of the Duke of Monmouth

1715 Battle of Preston

Battle of Oakley

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 851, which was the third after the birth of king Alfred, Ceorl, earl of Devon, fought with the men of Devon against the pagans at a place called Wiegambeorg; and the Christians gained the victory; and that same year the pagans first wintered in the island called Sheppey, which means the Sheep-isle, and is situated in the River Thames between Essex and Kent, but is nearer to Kent than to Essex; it has in it a fine monastery.
The same year also a great army of the pagans came with three hundred and fifty ships to the mouth of the River Thames, and sacked Dorobernia, which is the city of the Cantuarians, and also the city of London, which lies on the north bank of the River Thames, on the confines of Essex and Middlesex; but yet that city belongs in truth to Essex; and they put to flight Berthwulf, king of Mercia, with all the army, which he had led out to oppose them.
After these things, the aforesaid pagan host went into Surrey, which is a district situated on the south bank of the River Thames, and to the west of Kent. And Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, and his son Ethelbald, with all their army, fought a long time against them at a place called Ac-lea, i.e. the Oak-plain, and there, after a lengthened battle, which was fought with much bravery on both sides, the greater part of the pagan multitude was destroyed and cut to pieces, so that we never heard of their being so defeated, either before or since, in any country, in one day; and the Christians gained an honourable victory, and were triumphant over their graves.
In the same year king Athelstan, son of king Ethelwulf, and earl Ealhere slew a large army of pagans in Kent, at a place called Sandwich, and took nine ships of their fleet; the others escaped by flight.

On 16 Jan 1245 Edmund Crouchback Plantagenet 1st Earl of Leicester 1st Earl Lancaster 1245-1296 was born to Henry III King England 1207-1272 (37) and Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (22) at City of London.

On 24 Mar 1275 Beatrice Plantagenet 1242-1275 (32) died at City of London. He was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

On 07 Nov 1306 John Strathbogie 9th Earl Atholl 1266-1306 (40) was hanged on a scaffold thirty feet higher than the others to denote his status at City of London. His son David Strathbogie 10th Earl Atholl -1326 succeeded 10th Earl Atholl 1C .

In 1352 William Wittelsbach I Duke Lower Bavaria 1330-1389 (21) and Maud Plantagenet Duchess Lower Bavaria 1339-1362 (12) were married at City of London. Maud Plantagenet Duchess Lower Bavaria 1339-1362 (12) by marriage Duchess Lower Bavaria. William Wittelsbach I Duke Lower Bavaria 1330-1389 (21) by marriage 5th Earl of Leicester 2C 1265.

In 1357 Thomas Manny 1357-1362 was born to Walter Manny 1st Baron Manny 1310-1372 (47) and Margaret Plantagenet 2nd Countess Norfolk -1399 at City of London.

In 1364 John "The Good" II King France 1319-1364 (44) was imprisoned at City of London.

On 09 Feb 1372 Constance of Castile Duchess of Lancaster 1354-1394 (18), the wife of John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster 1340-1399 (31) made a ceremonial entry at City of London.

Good Parliament

After 28 Apr 1376 William Latimer 4th Baron Latimer Corby 1330-1381 impeached (the earliest impeachment in England) at City of London during the Good Parliament.

Before 30 Sep 1388 Thomas Lancaster 1st Duke Clarence 1388-1421 was born to Henry IV King England 1367-1413 and Mary Bohun 1368-1394 at City of London.

On 27 Sep 1450 Richard 3rd Duke York 1411-1460 (39) arrived at City of London.

Before Dec 1531 Rhys ap Gruffydd Deheubarth 1508-1531 was imprisoned at City of London.

In Dec 1531 Rhys ap Gruffydd Deheubarth 1508-1531 (23) was executed by Henry VIII (40) for treason for purportedly for inscribing the name Fitz Uryan on his armour at City of London.

Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

Around 1643 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (24) arrived in City of London.

In 1659 Thomas Allen 1st Baronet 1633-1690 (26) was appointed Lord Mayor of London in which role he welcomed Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) into the City of London on 29 May 1660; an important step to his Restoration.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In Feb 1666 Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (35) returned at City of London.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

On 18 Apr 1895 William Grey 9th Earl Stamford 5th Earl Warrington 1850-1910 (45) and Penelope Theobald Countess Stamford Countess Warrington -1959 were married at City of London. Penelope Theobald Countess Stamford Countess Warrington -1959 by marriage Countess Stamford, Earl Warrington 2C 1796.

On 27 Oct 1896 Roger Grey 10th Earl Stamford 6th Earl Warrington 1896-1976 was born to William Grey 9th Earl Stamford 5th Earl Warrington 1850-1910 (46) and Penelope Theobald Countess Stamford Countess Warrington -1959 at City of London.

Roads

Cheapside

Aldgate Ward

Arrival of Queen Mary I in London

On 03 Aug 1553 Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558 (37) made her formal entrance into London.
The Diary of Henry Machyn, Citizen and Merchant-Taylor of London, 1550-1563, describes the event:.
The third day of August, the Queen came riding to London and so to the Tower. She made her entrance at Aldgate, which was hanged with a great number of streamers hanging about the said gate; and all the streets into Leadenhall and unto the Tower were laid with gravel, and all the crafts of London stood in a row, with their banners and streamers hanging over their heads. Her Grace came, preceded by the Mayor of London carrying the mace and the Earl of Arundel carrying the sword, and all the trumpets blowing. After the Queen came the Lady Elizabeth (19), and after her the Duchess of Norfolk (56), and after her the Marchioness of Exeter (49) and other ladies. And after them the aldermen, and then the guard with bows and javelins, and all the rest who departed from Aldgate in green and white, and red and white, and blue and green, to the number of three thousand horses and spears and javelins.
Strype’s Complete History of England describes Mary's entrance to the Tower:.
There met her as humble supplicants the Duke of Norfolk (80), who had been a prisoner ever since his son the Earl of Surrey (80) was put to death by King Henry the ; Edward Courtenay (26), son of the Marquis of Exeter who was executed in the year 1538; Gardiner (70), deprived of his Bishopric of Winchester about two years before; and the Dowager Duchess of Somerset (56). They presented themselves on their knees, and Gardiner in the name of them all, made a congratulatory speech to the Queen, who kindly raised them one after another, saluted them, saying they were her own proper prisoners and ordered their immediate discharge. The next day she restored Courtenay (26) to the honor of his family. Gardiner (70) not only obtained his bishopric again but on the 23rd of August following was made Lord Chancellor, even though he had formerly subscribed to the Sentence of Divorce against the Queen’s mother and had written in defense of King Henry’s proceedings.

Great Minories Aldgate Ward

Sphere & Sun Diall Great Minories Aldgate Ward

Around 1654 John Brown Instrument Maker -1697 was working from the Sphere & Sun Diall Great Minories Aldgate Ward.

Holy Trinity Priory Aldgate Ward

St Andrew Undershaft Aldgate Ward

On 10 Jun 1610 John Craven 1st Baron Craven 1610-1648 was baptised at St Andrew Undershaft Aldgate Ward.

On 18 Jul 1618 William Craven Lord Mayor 1548-1618 (70) died. He was buried at St Andrew Undershaft Aldgate Ward.

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 December. 02 Dec 1657. Dr. Raynolds (58) (since Bishop of Norwich) preached before the company at St. Andrew Under-shaft, on Nehemiah xiii. 31, showing, by the example of Nehemiah, all the perfections of a trusty person in public affairs, with many good precepts apposite to the occasion, ending with a prayer for God's blessing on the company and the undertaking.

St Katharine Cree Aldgate Ward

Before 14 Oct 1694 Jacob Bouverie 1st Viscount Folkestone 1694-1761 was born. On 14 Oct 1694 Jacob Bouverie 1st Viscount Folkestone 1694-1761 was baptised at St Katharine Cree Aldgate Ward.

Aldersgate

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet Street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (36).

Aldersgate Street Aldersgate

Excise Office Aldersgate Street Aldersgate

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Tuesday 04 May 1669. Up, and to the office, and then my wife (28) being gone to see her mother at Deptford, I before the office sat went to the Excise Office, and thence being alone stepped into Duck Lane, and thence tried to have sent a porter to Deb.’s (18), but durst not trust him, and therefore having bought a book to satisfy the bookseller for my stay there, a 12d. book, Andronicus of Tom Fuller, I took coach, and at the end of Jewen Street next Red Cross Street I sent the coachman to her lodging, and understand she is gone for Greenwich to one Marys’s, a tanner’s, at which I, was glad, hoping to have opportunity to find her out; and so, in great fear of being seen, I to the office, and there all the morning, dined at home, and presently after dinner comes home my wife (28), who I believe is jealous of my spending the day, and I had very good fortune in being at home, for if Deb. (18) had been to have been found it is forty to one but I had been abroad, God forgive me. So the afternoon at the office, and at night walked with my wife (28) in the garden, and my Lord Brouncker (49) with us, who is newly come to W. Pen’s (48) lodgings; and by and by comes Mr. Hooke (33); and my Lord (43), and he, and I into my Lord’s lodgings, and there discoursed of many fine things in philosophy, to my great content, and so home to supper and to bed.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Friday 07 May 1669. Up, and by coach to W. Coventry’s (41); and there to talk with him a great deal with great content; and so to the Duke of York (35), having a great mind to speak to him about Tangier; but, when I come to it, his interest for my Lord Middleton (61) is such that I dare not. So to the Treasury chamber, and then walked home round by the Excise Office, having by private vows last night in prayer to God Almighty cleared my mind for the present of the thoughts of going to Deb. (18) at Greenwich, which I did long after. I passed by Guildhall, which is almost finished, and saw a poor labourer carried by, I think, dead with a fall, as many there are, I hear. So home to dinner, and then to the office a little, and so to see my Lord Brouncker (49), who is a little ill of the gout; and there Madam Williams told me that she heard that my wife (28) was going into France this year, which I did not deny, if I can get time, and I pray God I may. But I wondering how she come to know it, she tells me a woman that my wife (28) spoke to for a maid, did tell her so, and that a lady that desires to go thither would be glad to go in her company. Thence with my wife (28) abroad, with our coach, most pleasant weather; and to Hackney, and into the marshes, where I never was before, and thence round about to Old Ford and Bow; and coming through the latter home, there being some young gentlewomen at a door, and I seeming not to know who they were, my wife’s (28) jealousy told me presently that I knew well enough it was that damned place where Deb. (18) dwelt, which made me swear very angrily that it was false, as it was, and I carried [her] back again to see the place, and it proved not so, so I continued out of humour a good while at it, she being willing to be friends, so I was by and by, saying no more of it. So home, and there met with a letter from Captain Silas Taylor (44), and, with it, his written copy of a play that he hath wrote, and intends to have acted. — It is called "The Serenade or Disappointment," which I will read, not believing he can make any good of that kind. He did once offer to show Harris (35) it, but Harris (35) told him that he would judge by one Act whether it were good or no, which is indeed a foolish saying, and we see them out themselves in the choice of a play after they have read the whole, it being sometimes found not fit to act above three times; nay, and some that have been refused at one house is found a good one at the other. This made Taylor (44) say he would not shew it him, but is angry, and hath carried it to the other house, and he thinks it will be acted there, though he tells me they are not yet agreed upon it. But I will find time to get it read to me, and I did get my wife (28) to begin a little to-night in the garden, but not so much as I could make any judgment of it. So home to supper and to bed.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Friday 28 May 1669. To St. James’s, where the King’s (38) being with the Duke of York (35) prevented a meeting of the Tangier Commission. But, Lord! what a deal of sorry discourse did I hear between the King (38) and several Lords about him here! but very mean methought. So with Creed to the Excise Office, and back to White Hall, where, in the Park, Sir G. Carteret (59) did give me an account of his discourse lately, with the Commissioners of Accounts, who except against many things, but none that I find considerable; among others, that of the Officers of the Navy selling of the King’s (38) goods, and particularly my providing him with calico flags, which having been by order, and but once, when necessity, and the King’s (38) apparent profit, justified it, as conformable to my particular duty, it will prove to my advantage that it be enquired into. Nevertheless, having this morning received from them a demand of an account of all monies within their cognizance, received and issued by me, I was willing, upon this hint, to give myself rest, by knowing whether their meaning therein might reach only to my Treasurership for Tangier, or the monies employed on this occasion. I went, therefore, to them this afternoon, to understand what monies they meant, where they answered me, by saying, "The eleven months’ tax, customs, and prizemoney," without mentioning, any more than I demanding, the service they respected therein; and so, without further discourse, we parted, upon very good terms of respect, and with few words, but my mind not fully satisfied about the monies they mean. At noon Mr. Gibson and I dined at the Swan, and thence doing this at Brook house, and thence calling at the Excise Office for an account of payment of my tallies for Tangier, I home, and thence with my wife (28) and brother spent the evening on the water, carrying our supper with us, as high as Chelsea; so home, making sport with the Westerne bargees, and my wife (28) and I singing, to my great content.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

Ironmonger's Hall

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 September. 21 Sep 1671. I dined in the city, at the fraternity feast in Ironmongers' Hall, where the four stewards chose their successors for the next year, with a solemn procession, garlands about their heads, and music playing before them; so, coming up to the upper tables where the gentlemen sat, they drank to the new stewards; and so we parted.

Jewen Street Aldersgate

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Tuesday 04 May 1669. Up, and to the office, and then my wife (28) being gone to see her mother at Deptford, I before the office sat went to the Excise Office, and thence being alone stepped into Duck Lane, and thence tried to have sent a porter to Deb.’s (18), but durst not trust him, and therefore having bought a book to satisfy the bookseller for my stay there, a 12d. book, Andronicus of Tom Fuller, I took coach, and at the end of Jewen Street next Red Cross Street I sent the coachman to her lodging, and understand she is gone for Greenwich to one Marys’s, a tanner’s, at which I, was glad, hoping to have opportunity to find her out; and so, in great fear of being seen, I to the office, and there all the morning, dined at home, and presently after dinner comes home my wife (28), who I believe is jealous of my spending the day, and I had very good fortune in being at home, for if Deb. (18) had been to have been found it is forty to one but I had been abroad, God forgive me. So the afternoon at the office, and at night walked with my wife (28) in the garden, and my Lord Brouncker (49) with us, who is newly come to W. Pen’s (48) lodgings; and by and by comes Mr. Hooke (33); and my Lord (43), and he, and I into my Lord’s lodgings, and there discoursed of many fine things in philosophy, to my great content, and so home to supper and to bed.

Austin Friars

In 1458 Thomas Tuddenham 1401-1462 was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household. He was buried at Austin Friars.

After 06 May 1502 James Tyrrell 1455-1502 was buried at Austin Friars.

Barbican

Bassishaw Ward

St Alphege London Wall aka Cripplegate Bassishaw

On 10 Oct 1560 William Drury 1527-1579 (33) and Margery Wentworth were married at St Alphege London Wall aka Cripplegate Bassishaw.

St Michael Bassishaw Bassishaw

On 23 Oct 1556 John Gresham Lord Mayor 1495-1556 (61) died. He was buried at St Michael Bassishaw Bassishaw.

Billinsgate Ward

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1506. This yeare a great parte of the cittie of Norwich was burnt, and the towne of Berkwaye more then halfe burnt. Also a great fier in London betwene the Custome Howsse and Billinsgate, that did great hurte.

Bishopsgate

On 01 Sep 1566 Edward Alleyn Comedian 1566-1626 was born in Bishopsgate.

In 1660 Alderman Thomas Backwell 1618-1683 (42) was elected Alderman of Bishopsgate.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet Street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (36).

Bishopsgate Street Bishopsgate

Old James Bishopsgate Street Bishopsgate

Execution of Deceased Regicides

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1661 January. 30 Jan 1661..Fast day1. The first time that this day hath been yet observed: and Mr. Mills made a most excellent sermon, upon "Lord forgive us our former iniquities;" speaking excellently of the justice of God in punishing men for the sins of their ancestors.
Home, and John Goods comes, and after dinner I did pay him 30l. for my Lady, and after that Sir W. Pen (39) and I into Moorfields and had a brave talk, it being a most pleasant day, and besides much discourse did please ourselves to see young Davis and Whitton, two of our clerks, going by us in the field, who we observe to take much pleasure together, and I did most often see them at play together.
Back to the Old James in Bishopsgate Street, where Sir W. Batten and Sir Wm. Rider met him about business of the Trinity House. So I went home, and there understand that my mother is come home well from Brampton, and had a letter from my brother John, a very ingenious one, and he therein begs to have leave to come to town at the Coronacion.
Then to my Lady Batten’s; where wife (20) and she are lately come back again from being abroad, and seeing of Cromwell, Ireton, and Bradshaw hanged and buried at Tyburn. Then I home.
Note 1. 30 Jan the anniversary of the execution of Charles I and was regarded as a Fast Day.

Around 1650. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658 (51). Portrait of Henry Ireton 1611-1651 (39).

Devonshire House Bishopsgate

On 20 Jun 1628 William Cavendish 2nd Earl Devonshire 1590-1628 (38) died at Devonshire House Bishopsgate. He was buried at Derby Cathedral Derby. His son William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 (10) succeeded 3rd Earl Devonshire.

On 28 Jul 1806 Charles Augustus Bennet 5th Earl Tankerville 1776-1859 (30) and Corisande Armandine Sophie Léonie Hélène Gramont Countess Tankerville 1782-1865 (23) were married at Devonshire House Bishopsgate.

Before 30 Mar 1842 Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun Painter 1755-1842. Portrait of Corisande Armandine Sophie Léonie Hélène Gramont Countess Tankerville 1782-1865.

St Botolph's without Bishopgate Bishopsgate

On 27 Jan 1569 Aemilia Bassano 1569-1645 was baptised at St Botolph's without Bishopgate Bishopsgate.

On 11 Mar 1603 John Savage 2nd Earl Rivers 1603-1654 was christened at St Botolph's without Bishopgate Bishopsgate.

On 12 Jan 1667 Johnathan "The Elder" Richardson Painter 1667-1745 was born in St Botolph's without Bishopgate Bishopsgate.

In Mar 1691 John Riley Painter 1646-1691 (45) died of gout. He was buried in St Botolph's without Bishopgate Bishopsgate.

New Churchyard St Botolph's without Bishopgate Bishopsgate

On 28 Oct 1656 Stephen Bachiler 1561-1656 (95) died. He was buried at New Churchyard St Botolph's without Bishopgate Bishopsgate.

St Helen's Church Bishopsgate

Around 1521 Robert Knollys -1521 died. He was buried at St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

On 13 Oct 1542 William Holles Lord Mayor 1471-1542 (71) died. He was buried at St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

On 13 Mar 1543 Elizabeth Scopham -1543 died. She was buried at St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

In Jan 1565 William St Lo 1518-1565 (47) died suddenly in the company of his brother Edward St Lo 1519-1578 (46). He was buried in St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

On 21 Nov 1579 Thomas Gresham 1519-1579 (60) died of apoplexy. He was buried in St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

On 22 Mar 1610 John Spencer Lord Mayor -1610 was buried at St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

On 07 Feb 1677 Charles Edwin was baptised at St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

On 01 Oct 1678 Stephen Anderson 2nd Baronet Anderson 1678-1741 was born to Stephen Anderson 1st Baronet Anderson 1644-1707 (34). He was baptised at St Helen's Church Bishopsgate on the same day.

Before 05 Jul 1703 John Eyles Lord Mayor -1703 died. On 05 Jul 1703 John Eyles Lord Mayor -1703 was buried in St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

On 05 Jun 1716 Francis Eyles 1st Baronet Eyles -1716 was buried at St Helen's Church Bishopsgate.

Blackfriars

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 November. 23 Nov 1654. I went to London, to visit my cousin Fanshawe, and this day I saw one of the rarest collections of agates, onyxes, and intaglios, that I had ever seen either at home or abroad, collected by a conceited old hatmaker in Blackfriars, especially one agate vase, heretofore the great Earl of Leicester's.

Bread Street

On 09 Dec 1608 John Milton Poet 1608-1674 was born to John Milton Composer 1562-1647 (46) and Sara Jeffrey 1572-1637 (36) in Bread Street.

Church of Augustin Friars Bread Street

In 1388 Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey 11th Earl Arundel 1346-1397 (42) was appointed Governor of Brest. He was buried at Church of Augustin Friars Bread Street.

St Mildred's Church Bread Street

On 02 Aug 1669 Edward Worth Bishop Killaloe 1620-1669 (49) died at Hackney. He was buried at St Mildred's Church Bread Street.

On 03 Oct 1791 Henry Cecil 1st Marquess Exeter 1754-1804 (37) and Sarah Hoggins Countess Exeter 1774-1797 (17) were married at St Mildred's Church Bread Street.

Bridewell Palace

Knighting of Henry Fitzroy

On 18 Jun 1525 Henry Fitzroy (6) was created 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset, 1st Earl Lincoln 7C 1525 at Bridewell Palace by his father Henry VIII (33). .
Henry Clifford 1st Earl Cumberland 1493-1542 (32) was created 1st Earl Cumberland, Warden of the West Marches and Governor of Carlisle Castle.
Henry Courtenay 1st Marquess Exeter 1496-1538 was created 1st Marquess Exeter 1C 1525.
Thomas Manners 1st Earl Rutland 1492-1543 (33) was created 1st Earl Rutland 3C 1525.
Henry Percy 5th Earl of Northumberland 1478-1527 (47) carried the Sword of State. Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 (47) read the patents of nobility. Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (41), Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset 1477-1530 (47),.
Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (52), William Fitzalan 18th Earl Arundel 1476-1544 (49) and John Vere 14th Earl Oxford 1499-1526 (25) attended.
Around 18 Jun 1525 Henry Clifford 2nd Earl Cumberland 1517-1570 (8) and Eleanor Brandon Countess Cumberland 1519-1547 (6) were married (he was her half third cousin) at Bridewell Palace. .

Bridge

Fishmongers' Hall

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 December. 02 Dec 1664. We delivered the Privy Council's letters to the Governors of St. Thomas's Hospital, in Southwark, that a moiety of the house should be reserved for such sick and wounded as should from time to time be sent from the fleet during the war. This being delivered at their Court, the President and several Aldermen, Governors of that Hospital, invited us to a great feast in Fishmongers' Hall.

John Evelyn's Diary 1680 July. 26 Jul 1680. My most noble and illustrious friend, the Earl of Ossory (46), espying me this morning after sermon in the privy gallery, calling to me, told me he was now going his journey (meaning to Tangier, whither he was designed Governor, and General of the forces, to regain the losses we had lately sustained from the Moors, when Inchiquin (40) was Governor). I asked if he would not call at my house (as he always did whenever he went out of England on any exploit). He said he must embark at Portsmouth, "wherefore let you and me dine together to-day; I am quite alone, and have something to impart to you; I am not well, shall be private, and desire your company.".
Being retired to his lodgings, and set down on a couch, he sent to his secretary for the copy of a letter which he had written to Lord Sunderland (38) (Secretary of State), wishing me to read it; it was to take notice how ill he resented it, that he should tell the King (50) before Lord Ossory's (46) face, that Tangier was not to be kept, but would certainly be lost, and yet added that it was fit Lord Ossory (46) should be sent, that they might give some account of it to the world, meaning (as supposed) the next Parliament, when all such miscarriages would probably be examined; this Lord Ossory (46) took very ill of Lord Sunderland (38), and not kindly of the King (50), who resolving to send him with an incompetent force, seemed, as his Lordship (46) took it, to be willing to cast him away, not only on a hazardous adventure, but in most men's opinion, an impossibility, seeing there was not to be above 300 or 400 horse, and 4,000 foot for the garrison and all, both to defend the town, form a camp, repulse the enemy, and fortify what ground they should get in. This touched my Lord (46) deeply, that he should be so little considered as to put him on a business in which he should probably not only lose his reputation, but be charged with all the miscarriage and ill success; whereas, at first they promised 6,000 foot and 600 horse effective.
My Lord (46), being an exceedingly brave and valiant person, and who had so approved himself in divers signal battles, both at sea and land; so beloved and so esteemed by the people, as one they depended on, upon all occasions worthy of such a captain;—he looked on this as too great an indifference in his Majesty (50), after all his services, and the merits of his father, the Duke of Ormond (69), and a design of some who envied his virtue. It certainly took so deep root in his mind, that he who was the most void of fear in the world (and assured me he would go to Tangier with ten men if his Majesty (50) commanded him) could not bear up against this unkindness. Having disburdened himself of this to me after dinner, he went with his Majesty (50) to the sheriffs at a great supper in Fishmongers' Hall; but finding himself ill, took his leave immediately of his Majesty (50), and came back to his lodging. Not resting well this night, he was persuaded to remove to Arlington House, for better accommodation. His disorder turned to a malignant fever, which increasing, after all that six of the most able physicians could do, he became delirious, with intervals of sense, during which Dr. Lloyd (52) (after Bishop of St. Asaph) administered the Holy Sacrament, of which I also participated. He died the Friday following, the 30th of July, to the universal grief of all that knew or heard of his great worth, nor had any a greater loss than myself. Oft would he say I was the oldest acquaintance he had in England (when his father was in Ireland), it being now of about thirty years, contracted abroad, when he rode in the Academy in Paris, and when we were seldom asunder.
His Majesty (50) never lost a worthier subject, nor father a better or more dutiful son; a loving, generous, good-natured, and perfectly obliging friend; one who had done innumerable kindnesses to several before they knew it; nor did he ever advance any that were not worthy; no one more brave, more modest; none more humble, sober, and every way virtuous. Unhappy England in this illustrious person's loss! Universal was the mourning for him, and the eulogies on him; I stayed night and day by his bedside to his last gasp, to close his dear eyes! O sad father, mother, wife, and children! What shall I add? He deserved all that a sincere friend, a brave soldier, a virtuous courtier, a loyal subject, an honest man, a bountiful master, and good Christian, could deserve of his prince and country. One thing more let me note, that he often expressed to me the abhorrence he had of that base and unworthy action which he was put upon, of engaging the Smyrna fleet in time of peace, in which though he behaved himself like a great captain, yet he told me it was the only blot in his life, and troubled him exceedingly. Though he was commanded, and never examined further when he was so, yet he always spoke of it with regret and detestation. The Countess (45) was at the seat of her daughter, the Countess of Derby (20), about 200 miles off.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1649 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656 (56). Portrait of Emilia Nassau Beverweert 1635-1688 (13).

Tower Bridge

St Magnus the Martyr Church

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1504. This yeare the Taylors sued to the Kinge (46) to be called Marchant Taylors. And this yeare was a great fier at the ende of London Bridge next to St. Magnus.

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

London Bridge

St George's Day Jousting

On 23 May 1390, St George's Day, a Jousting Tournament was held at London Bridge. David Lindsay 1st Earl Crawford 1360-1407 so easily unhorsed the King's Champion John Welles 5th Baron Welles 1352-1421 as to make the crowd suspect Lindsay of foul play by fastening himself to his saddle. To prove the crowd wrong David Lindsay 1st Earl Crawford 1360-1407 leapt from his horse in full armour, then back again. Realising John Welles 5th Baron Welles 1352-1421 was injured he rushed to his aid. He visited Welles every day until he recovered. The two became firm friends.

Execution of William Wallace

On 23 Aug 1305 William Wallace -1305 was hanged at Elms Smithfield. His head being displayed on London Bridge.

On 22 Sep 1471 Thomas "Bastard of Fauconberg" Neville 1429-1471 (42) was beheaded at Middleham Castle. His head was displayed at London Bridge.

Battle of Blackheath aka Deptford Bridge

On 28 Jun 1497 James Tuchet 7th Baron Audley Heighley 1463-1497 (34) was beheaded at Tower Hill. He was buried at Blackfriars Church Holborn. His head was placed on a spike at London Bridge. His lands and titles were forfeit. In 1512 His son John Tuchet 8th Baron Audley Heighley 1483-1557 (14) was restored 8th Baron Audley Heighley in Staffordshire. Mary Griffin Baroness Audley Heighley by marriage Baroness Audley Heighley in Staffordshire.

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 03 Sep 1666. I had public prayers at home. The fire continuing, after dinner, I took coach with my wife (31) and son, and went to the Bankside in Southwark, where we beheld that dismal spectacle, the whole city in dreadful flames near the waterside; all the houses from the Bridge, all Thames street, and upward toward Cheapside, down to the Three Cranes, were now consumed; and so returned, exceedingly astonished what would become of the rest.
The fire having continued all this night (if I may call that night which was light as day for ten miles round about, after a dreadful manner), when conspiring with a fierce eastern wind in a very dry season, I went on foot to the same place; and saw the whole south part of the city burning from Cheapside to the Thames, and all along Cornhill (for it likewise kindled back against the wind as well as forward), Tower street, Fenchurch Street, Gracious street, and so along to Baynard's Castle, and was now taking hold of St. Paul's church, to which the scaffolds contributed exceedingly. The conflagration was so universal, and the people so astonished, that, from the beginning, I know not by what despondency, or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it; so that there was nothing heard, or seen, but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods; such a strange consternation there was upon them, so as it burned both in breadth and length, the churches, public halls, Exchange, hospitals,. Monuments, and ornaments; leaping after a prodigious manner, from house to house, and street to street, at great distances one from the other. For the heat, with a long set of fair and warm weather, had even ignited the air, and prepared the materials to conceive the fire, which devoured, after an incredible manner, houses, furniture, and every thing. Here, we saw the Thames covered with goods floating, all the barges and boats laden with what some had time and courage to save, as, on the other side, the carts, etc., carrying out to the fields, which for many miles were strewn with movables of all sorts, and tents erecting to shelter both people and what goods they could get away. Oh, the miserable and calamitous spectacle! such as haply the world had not seen since the foundation of it, nor can be outdone till the universal conflagration thereof. All the sky was of a fiery aspect, like the top of a burning oven, and the light seen above forty miles round about for many nights. God grant mine eyes may never behold the like, who now saw above 10,000 houses all in one flame! The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children, the hurry of people, the fall of towers, houses, and churches, was like a hideous storm; and the air all about so hot and inflamed, that at the last one was not able to approach it, so that they were forced to stand still, and let the flames burn on, which they did, for near two miles in length and one in breadth. The clouds also of smoke were dismal, and reached, upon computation, near fifty miles in length. Thus, I left it this afternoon burning, a resemblance of Sodom, or the last day. It forcibly called to my mind that passage—"non enim hic habemus stabilem civitatem"; the ruins resembling the picture of Troy. London was, but is no more! Thus, I returned.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet Street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (36).

Bridge Tavern

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 February. 02 Feb 1660. Thursday. Drank at Harper's with Doling, and so to my office, where I found all the officers of the regiments in town, waiting to receive money that their soldiers might go out of town, and what was in the Exchequer they had. At noon after dining at home I called at Harper's for Doling, and he and I met with Luellin and drank with him at the Exchequer at Charing Cross, and thence he and I went to the Temple to Mr. Calthrop's (36) chamber, and from thence had his man by water to London Bridge to Mr. Calthrop, a grocer, and received L60 for my Lord. In our way we talked with our waterman, White, who told us how the watermen had lately been abused by some that had a desire to get in to be watermen to the State, and had lately presented an address of nine or ten thousand hands to stand by this Parliament, when it was only told them that it was to a petition against hackney coaches; and that to-day they had put out another to undeceive the world and to clear themselves, and that among the rest Cropp, my waterman and one of great practice, was one that did cheat them thus. After I had received the money we went to the Bridge Tavern and drank a quart of wine and so back by water, landing Mr. Calthrop's man at the Temple and we went homewards, but over against Somerset House, hearing the noise of guns, we landed and found the Strand full of soldiers. So I took my money and went to Mrs. Johnson, my Lord's sempstress, and giving her my money to lay up, Doling and I went up stairs to a window, and looked out and see the foot face the horse and beat them back, and stood bawling and calling in the street for a free Parliament and money. By and by a drum was heard to beat a march coming towards them, and they got all ready again and faced them, and they proved to be of the same mind with them; and so they made a great deal of joy to see one another. After all this, I took my money, and went home on foot and laying up my money, and changing my stockings and shoes, I this day having left off my great skirt suit, and put on my white suit with silver lace coat, and went over to Harper's, where I met with W. Simons, Doling, Luellin and three merchants, one of which had occasion to use a porter, so they sent for one, and James the soldier came, who told us how they had been all day and night upon their guard at St. James's, and that through the whole town they did resolve to stand to what they had began, and that to-morrow he did believe they would go into the City, and be received there. After all this we went to a sport called, selling of a horse for a dish of eggs and herrings, and sat talking there till almost twelve o'clock and then parted, they were to go as far as Aldgate. Home and to bed.

Broad Street

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 February. 12 Feb 1660. Sunday. In the morning, it being Lord's day, Mr. Pierce came to me to enquire how things go. We drank our morning draft together and thence to White Hall, where Dr. Hones preached; but I staid not to hear, but walking in the court, I heard that Sir Arth. Haselrigge (59) was newly gone into the City to Monk (51), and that Monk's (51) wife (40) removed from White Hall last night. Home again, where at noon came according to my invitation my cos. Thos. Pepys and his partner and dined with me, but before dinner we went and took a walk round the park, it being a most pleasant day as ever I saw. After dinner we three went into London together, where I heard that Monk (51) had been at Paul's in the morning, and the people had shouted much at his coming out of the church.
In the afternoon he was at a church in Broad-street, whereabout he do lodge. But not knowing how to see him we went and walked half a hour in Moorfields, which were full of people, it being so fine a day. Here I took leave of them, and so to Paul's, where I met with Mr. Kirton's apprentice (the crooked fellow) and walked up and down with him two hours, sometimes in the street looking for a tavern to drink in, but not finding any open, we durst not knock; other times in the churchyard, where one told me that he had seen the letter printed.
Thence to Mr. Turner's, where I found my wife, Mr. Edw. Pepys (43), and Roger (42) and Mr. Armiger being there, to whom I gave as good an account of things as I could, and so to my father's (59), where Charles Glascocke was overjoyed to see how things are now; who told me the boys had last night broke Barebone's (62) windows.
Hence home, and being near home we missed our maid, and were at a great loss and went back a great way to find her, but when we could not see her we went homewards and found her there, got before us which we wondered at greatly. So to bed, where my wife and I had some high words upon my telling her that I would fling the dog which her brother gave her out of window if he [dirtied] the house any more.

Candlewick Ward

Crooked Lane Candlewick Ward

Church of St Michael Crooked Lane Candlewick Ward

In 1385 William Walworth Lord Mayor -1385 died. He was buried at Church of St Michael Crooked Lane Candlewick Ward.

Castle Baynard

Cheap Ward

In 1621 Edward Barkham Lord Mayor 1570-1634 (51) was appointed Alderman of Cheap Ward.

St Martin Pomeroy aka St Martin Ironmonger Lane Cheap Ward

On 11 Jan 1478 Ralph Verney 1410-1478 (68) died. He was buried at St Martin Pomeroy aka St Martin Ironmonger Lane Cheap Ward.

Cordwainer Ward

On 03 May 1709 George Thorold 1st Baronet 1666–1722 (43) was elected Alderman of Cordwainer Ward.

St Benet Sherehog Cordwainer Ward

Around May 1547 Edward Hall Author 1496-1548 (51) died. He was buried in St Benet Sherehog Cordwainer Ward.

St Mary le Bow Cheapside

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 February. 13 Feb 1692. Mr. Boyle having made me one of the trustees for his charitable bequests, I went to a meeting of the Bishop of Lincoln (55), Sir Rob.... wood, and serjeant, Rotheram, to settle that clause in the will which related to charitable uses, and especially the appointing and electing a minister to preach one sermon the first Sunday in the month, during the four summer months, expressly against Atheists, Deists, Libertines, Jews, etc., without descending to any other controversy whatever, for which £50 per annum is to be paid quarterly to the preacher; and, at the end of three years, to proceed to a new election of some other able divine, or to continue the same, as the trustees should judge convenient. We made choice of one Mr. Bentley, chaplain to the Bishop of Worcester (Dr. Stillingfleet) (56). The first sermon was appointed for the first Sunday in March, at St. Martin's; the second Sunday in April, at Bow Church, and so alternately.

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 April. 04 Apr 1692. Mr. Bentley preached Mr. Boyle's lecture at St. Mary-le-Bow. So excellent a discourse against the Epicurean system is not to be recapitulated in a few words. He came to me to ask whether I thought it should be printed, or that there was anything in it which I desired to be altered. I took this as a civility, and earnestly desired it should be printed, as one of the most learned and convincing discourses I had ever heard.

On 27 Aug 1782 Shute Barrington Bishop of Llandaff Bishop of Salisbury Bishop of Durham 1734-1826 (48) was translated Bishop of Salisbury upon the confirmation of the election at St Mary le Bow Cheapside.

Cornhill

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 03 Sep 1666. I had public prayers at home. The fire continuing, after dinner, I took coach with my wife (31) and son, and went to the Bankside in Southwark, where we beheld that dismal spectacle, the whole city in dreadful flames near the waterside; all the houses from the Bridge, all Thames street, and upward toward Cheapside, down to the Three Cranes, were now consumed; and so returned, exceedingly astonished what would become of the rest.
The fire having continued all this night (if I may call that night which was light as day for ten miles round about, after a dreadful manner), when conspiring with a fierce eastern wind in a very dry season, I went on foot to the same place; and saw the whole south part of the city burning from Cheapside to the Thames, and all along Cornhill (for it likewise kindled back against the wind as well as forward), Tower street, Fenchurch Street, Gracious street, and so along to Baynard's Castle, and was now taking hold of St. Paul's church, to which the scaffolds contributed exceedingly. The conflagration was so universal, and the people so astonished, that, from the beginning, I know not by what despondency, or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it; so that there was nothing heard, or seen, but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods; such a strange consternation there was upon them, so as it burned both in breadth and length, the churches, public halls, Exchange, hospitals,. Monuments, and ornaments; leaping after a prodigious manner, from house to house, and street to street, at great distances one from the other. For the heat, with a long set of fair and warm weather, had even ignited the air, and prepared the materials to conceive the fire, which devoured, after an incredible manner, houses, furniture, and every thing. Here, we saw the Thames covered with goods floating, all the barges and boats laden with what some had time and courage to save, as, on the other side, the carts, etc., carrying out to the fields, which for many miles were strewn with movables of all sorts, and tents erecting to shelter both people and what goods they could get away. Oh, the miserable and calamitous spectacle! such as haply the world had not seen since the foundation of it, nor can be outdone till the universal conflagration thereof. All the sky was of a fiery aspect, like the top of a burning oven, and the light seen above forty miles round about for many nights. God grant mine eyes may never behold the like, who now saw above 10,000 houses all in one flame! The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children, the hurry of people, the fall of towers, houses, and churches, was like a hideous storm; and the air all about so hot and inflamed, that at the last one was not able to approach it, so that they were forced to stand still, and let the flames burn on, which they did, for near two miles in length and one in breadth. The clouds also of smoke were dismal, and reached, upon computation, near fifty miles in length. Thus, I left it this afternoon burning, a resemblance of Sodom, or the last day. It forcibly called to my mind that passage—"non enim hic habemus stabilem civitatem"; the ruins resembling the picture of Troy. London was, but is no more! Thus, I returned.

St Michael's Church Cornhill

After 1508 Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 and Anne Browne Duchess Suffolk were married at St Michael's Church Cornhill.

Around 1543 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (59).

Cripplegate Ward

On 19 Oct 1624 Robert Howard 1624- was born illegitimately to Robert Howard 1584-1653 (40) and Frances Coke Viscountess Purbeck 1602-1645 (22) in Cripplegate Ward. Illegitimate. His father probably Robert Howard 1584-1653 (40) with whom his mother was having a long term affair.

Cripplegate

Cripple Gate was originally the northern entrance to the Roman fort, built c. AD120. This Roman gate probably remained in use until at least the late Saxon period when it is mentioned in 10th and 11th century documents.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1490. This yeare Creplegate was new made, and E. Francke and other put to death.

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 05 Sep 1666. It crossed toward Whitehall; but oh! the confusion there was then at that Court! It pleased his Majesty (36) to command me, among the rest, to look after the quenching of Fetter-lane end, to preserve (if possible) that part of Holborn, while the rest of the gentlemen took their several posts, some at one part, and some at another (for now they began to bestir themselves, and not till now, who hitherto had stood as men intoxicated, with their hands across), and began to consider that nothing was likely to put a stop but the blowing up of so many houses as might make a wider gap than any had yet been made by the ordinary method of pulling them down with engines. This some stout seamen proposed early enough to have saved near the whole city, but this some tenacious and avaricious men, aldermen, etc., would not permit, because their houses must have been of the first. It was, therefore, now commended to be practiced; and my concern being particularly for the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, near Smithfield, where I had many wounded and sick men, made me the more diligent to promote it; nor was my care for the Savoy less. It now pleased God, by abating the wind, and by the industry of the people, when almost all was lost infusing a new spirit into them, that the fury of it began sensibly to abate about noon, so as it came no farther than the Temple westward, nor than the entrance of Smithfield, north: but continued all this day and night so impetuous toward Cripplegate and the Tower, as made us all despair. It also broke out again in the Temple; but the courage of the multitude persisting, and many houses being blown up, such gaps and desolations were soon made, as, with the former three days' consumption, the back fire did not so vehemently urge upon the rest as formerly. There was yet no standing near the burning and glowing ruins by near a furlong's space.
The coal and wood wharfs, and magazines of oil, rosin, etc., did infinite mischief, so as the invective which a little before I had dedicated to his Majesty (36) and published, giving warning what probably might be the issue of suffering those shops to be in the city was looked upon as a prophecy.
The poor inhabitants were dispersed about St. George's Fields, and Moorfields, as far as Highgate, and several miles in circle, some under tents, some under miserable huts and hovels, many without a rag, or any necessary utensils, bed or board, who from delicateness, riches, and easy accommodations in stately and well-furnished houses, were now reduced to extreme misery and poverty.
In this calamitous condition, I returned with a sad heart to my house, blessing and adoring the distinguishing mercy of God to me and mine, who, in the midst of all this ruin, was like Lot, in my little Zoar, safe and sound.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Cripple Gate was demolished in 1760.

Milk Street

Church of St Mary Magdalen Milk Street

On 03 Jun 1514 William Browne Lord Mayor 1468-1514 (46) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalen Milk Street.

St Giles without Cripplegate

On 09 Mar 1598 Henry Berkeley 7th Baron Berkeley 1534-1613 (63) and Jane Stanhope Baroness Berkeley 1547-1618 (51) were married at St Giles without Cripplegate. Jane Stanhope Baroness Berkeley 1547-1618 (51) by marriage Baroness Berkeley 2C 1421.

Before 15 Mar 1647 John Milton Composer 1562-1647 died. On 15 Mar 1647 he was buried in St Giles without Cripplegate.

In 1663 John Pritchett Bishop -1681 was appointed Vicar of St Giles without Cripplegate.

Redcross Street

The History of King Richard the Third. Some wise men also think that his plan—covertly conveyed—lacked not in helping his brother Clarence to his death, which he resisted openly, although somewhat (as men judged) more faintly than one who was heartily concerned for his welfare. And they who thus judged, they think he for a long time during King Edward’s life forethought to be king in case the King his brother (whose life he looked to, so that evil diet should shorten it) should happen to die (as indeed he did) while his children were young. And they judged that for this reason: he was glad of his brother’s death, that Duke of Clarence, whose life must needs have hindered his plans, whether the same Duke of Clarence had kept himself true to his nephew the young King, or enterprised to be king himself. But of all this point, is there no certainty, and whosoever divines upon conjectures may as well shoot too far as too short. However, this have I by credible information learned, that the same night in which King Edward died, one Mistlebrook, long before morning, came in great haste to the house of one Potter, dwelling in Redcross Street without Cripplegate, and when he was with hasty rapping quickly let in, he revealed unto Potter that King Edward was departed. "By my truth man," said Potter, "then will my master the Duke of Gloucester be king." What cause he had so to think it is hard to say: whether he, being well disposed toward him, knew anything about such a thing the Duke had purposed, or otherwise he had any inkling thereof, for he was not ever likely to speak of it.

Dowgate Ward

The Steelyard was located on the north bank of the Thames by the outflow of the Walbrook, in the Dowgate ward of the City of London. The site is bounded by Cousin Lane on the west, Upper Thames Street on the north, and Allhallows Lane on the east, an area of 5,250 m2 or 1.3 acres. The Steelyard was a separate walled community with its own warehouses on the river, its own weighing house, chapel, counting houses, a guildhall, cloth halls, wine cellars, kitchens, and residential quarters for Hanseatic League merchants.

Steelyard Dowgate Ward

The Steelyard was located on the north bank of the Thames by the outflow of the Walbrook, in the Dowgate ward of the City of London. The site is bounded by Cousin Lane on the west, Upper Thames Street on the north, and Allhallows Lane on the east, an area of 5,250 m2 or 1.3 acres. The Steelyard was a separate walled community with its own warehouses on the river, its own weighing house, chapel, counting houses, a guildhall, cloth halls, wine cellars, kitchens, and residential quarters for Hanseatic League merchants.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1493. This yeare was a risinge of yonge men againste the Stiliarde.

Farringdon Within

On 28 Feb 1611 Edward Barkham Lord Mayor 1570-1634 (41) was appointed Alderman of Farringdon Within.

Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within

On 24 Mar 1275 Beatrice Plantagenet 1242-1275 (32) died at City of London. He was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

On 16 Feb 1303 Walter Beauchamp 1243-1303 (60) died at Alcester. He was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

On 04 Jan 1344 Robert Lisle 1st Baron Lisle 1288-1344 (55) died. He was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within. His son John Lisle 2nd Baron Lisle 1318-1355 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Lisle of Rougemont 2C 1311.

1361 Plague Outbreak

On 07 Sep 1362 Joan of the Tower Queen Consort Scotland 1321-1362 (41) died of plague at Hertford Castle. He was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within..

On 22 Feb 1393 John Devereux 1st Baron Devereux 1337-1393 (56) died. He was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within. His son John Devereux 2nd Baron Devereux 1378-1396 (15) succeeded 2nd Baron Devereux.

In 1414 John Norbury 1375-1414 (39) died at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

On 21 Jun 1488 Elizabeth Norbury 1438-1488 (50) died at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

On 28 Jan 1501 John Dynham 1st Baron Dynham 1433-1501 (68) died at Lambeth. He was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

Around 1503 Richard Hastings Baron Willoughby Eresby 1433-1503 (70) was buried at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

In 1503 Richard Hastings Baron Willoughby Eresby 1433-1503 (70) died at Greyfriars Church Farringdon Within.

St Ann Blackfriars Church Farringdon Within

On 23 Oct 1615 Allen Apsley 1567-1630 (48) and Lucy St John 1593-1658 (22) were married at St Ann Blackfriars Church Farringdon Within.

Farringdon Without

In 1599 Thomas Smythe 1558-1625 (41) was elected Alderman of Farringdon Without.

Chancery Lane

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 January. 03 Jan 1660. Tuesday. I went out in the morning, it being a great frost, and walked to Mrs. Turner’s (8) to stop her from coming to see me to-day, because of Mrs. Jem’s coming, thence I went to the Temple to speak with Mr. Calthrop (36), and walked in his chamber an hour, but could not see him, so went to Westminster, where I found soldiers in my office to receive money, and paid it them. At noon went home, where Mrs. Jem, her maid, Mr. Sheply, Hawly, and Moore dined with me on a piece of beef and cabbage, and a collar of brawn. We then fell to cards till dark, and then I went home with Mrs. Jem, and meeting Mr. Hawly got him to bear me company to Chancery Lane, where I spoke with Mr. Calthrop (36), he told me that Sir James Calthrop was lately dead, but that he would write to his Lady, that the money may be speedily paid. Thence back to White Hall, where I understood that the Parliament had passed the act for indemnity to the soldiers and officers that would come in, in so many days, and that my Lord Lambert (40) should have benefit of the said act. They had also voted that all vacancies in the House, by the death of any of the old members, shall be filled up; but those that are living shall not be called in. Thence I went home, and there found Mr. Hunt and his wife, and Mr. Hawly, who sat with me till ten at night at cards, and so broke up and to bed.

Around 1652. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658 (53). Portrait of General John Lambert 1619-1684 (32).

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 February. 11 Feb 1660. Saturday. This morning I lay long abed, and then to my office, where I read all the morning my Spanish book of Rome. At noon I walked in the Hall, where I heard the news of a letter from Monk (51), who was now gone into the City again, and did resolve to stand for the sudden filling up of the House, and it was very strange how the countenance of men in the Hall was all changed with joy in half an hour's time. So I went up to the lobby, where I saw the Speaker (68) reading of the letter; and after it was read, Sir A. Haselrigge (59) came out very angry, and Billing (37) standing at the door, took him by the arm, and cried, "Thou man, will thy beast carry thee no longer? thou must fall!" The House presently after rose, and appointed to meet again at three o'clock. I went then down into the Hall, where I met with Mr. Chetwind, who had not dined no more than myself, and so we went toward London, in our way calling at two or three shops, but could have no dinner. At last, within Temple Bar, we found a pullet ready roasted, and there we dined. After that he went to his office in Chancery Lane, calling at the Rolls, where I saw the lawyers pleading. Then to his office, where I sat in his study singing, while he was with his man (Mr. Powell's son) looking after his business. Thence we took coach for the City to Guildhall, where the Hall was full of people expecting Monk (51) and Lord Mayor (27) to come thither, and all very joyfull. Here we stayed a great while, and at last meeting with a friend of his we went to the 3 Tun tavern and drank half a pint of wine, and not liking the wine we went to an alehouse, where we met with company of this third man's acquaintance, and there we drank a little. Hence I went alone to Guildhall to see whether Monk (51) was come again or no, and met with him coming out of the chamber where he had been with the Mayor and Aldermen, but such a shout I never heard in all my life, crying out, "God bless your Excellence." Here I met with Mr. Lock, and took him to an alehouse, and left him there to fetch Chetwind; when we were come together, Lock told us the substance of the letter that went from Monk (51) to the Parliament; wherein, after complaints that he and his officers were put upon such offices against the City as they could not do with any content or honour, that there are many members now in the House that were of the late tyrannical Committee of Safety. That Lambert (40) and Vane (46) are now in town, contrary to the vote of Parliament. That there were many in the House that do press for new oaths to be put upon men; whereas we have more cause to be sorry for the many oaths that we have already taken and broken. That the late petition of the fanatique people presented by Barebone (62), for the imposing of an oath upon all sorts of people, was received by the House with thanks. That therefore he (51) do desire that all writs for filling up of the House be issued by Friday next, and that in the mean time, he would retire into the City and only leave them guards for the security of the House and Council. The occasion of this was the order that he had last night to go into the City and disarm them, and take away their charter; whereby he and his officers say that the House had a mind to put them upon things that should make them odious; and so it would be in their power to do what they would with them. He told us that they [the Parliament] had sent Scott and Robinson to him (51) this afternoon, but he would not hear them. And that the Mayor and Aldermen had offered him their own houses for himself and his officers; and that his soldiers would lack for nothing. And indeed I saw many people give the soldiers drink and money, and all along in the streets cried, "God bless them!" and extraordinary good words. Hence we went to a merchant's house hard by, where Lock wrote a note and left, where I saw Sir Nich. Crisp (61), and so we went to the Star Tavern (Monk (51) being then at Benson's), where we dined and I wrote a letter to my Lord (34) from thence. In Cheapside there was a great many bonfires, and Bow bells and all the bells in all the churches as we went home were a-ringing. Hence we went homewards, it being about ten o'clock. But the common joy that was every where to be seen! The number of bonfires, there being fourteen between St. Dunstan's and Temple Bar, and at Strand Bridge' I could at one view tell thirty-one fires. In King-street seven or eight; and all along burning, and roasting, and drinking for rumps. There being rumps tied upon sticks and carried up and down. The butchers at the May Pole in the Strand rang a peal with their knives when they were going to sacrifice their rump. On Ludgate Hill there was one turning of the spit that had a rump tied upon it, and another basting of it. Indeed it was past imagination, both the greatness and the suddenness of it. At one end of the street you would think there was a whole lane of fire, and so hot that we were fain to keep still on the further side merely for heat. We came to the Chequers at Charing Cross, where Chetwind wrote a letter and I gave him an account of what I had wrote for him to write. Thence home and sent my letters to the posthouse in London, and my wife and I (after Mr. Hunt was gone, whom I found waiting at my house) went out again to show her the fires, and after walking as far as the Exchange we returned and to bed.

The Sun Chancery Lane

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 January. 20 Jan 1660. Friday. In the morning I went to Mr Downing's (35) bedside and gave him an account what I had done as to his guests, land I went thence to my Lord Widdrington who I met in the street, going to seal the patents for the judges to-day, and so could not come to dinner. I called upon Mr. Calthrop (36) about the money due to my Lord (34). Here I met with Mr. Woodfine and drank with him at Sun in Chancery Lane and so to Westminster Hall, where at the lobby I spoke with the rest of my guests and so to my office. At noon went by water with Mr. Maylard and Hales to Swan in Fish Street at our Goal Feast, where we were very merry at our Jole of Ling, and from thence after a great and good dinner Mr. Falconberge would go drink a cup of ale at a place where I had like to have shot at a scholar that lay over the house of office. Thence calling on Mr. Stephens and Wootton (with whom I drank) about business of my Lord's (34) I went to the Coffee Club where there was nothing done but choosing of a Committee for orders. Thence to Westminster Hall where Mrs. Lane and the rest of the maids had their white scarfs, all having been at the burial of a young bookseller in the Hall1.
Thence to Mr. Sheply's and took him to my house and drank with him in order to his going to-morrow. So parted and I sat up late making up my accounts before he go. This day three citizens of London went to meet Monk (51) from the Common Council2!.
Note 1. These stationers and booksellers, whose shops disfigured Westminster Hall down to a late period, were a privileged class. In the statutes for appointing licensers and regulating the press, there is a clause exempting them from the pains and penalties of these obnoxious laws.
Note 2. Jan. 20th. Then there went out of the City, by desire of the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, Alderman Fowke and Alderman Vincett, alias Vincent, and Mr. Broomfield, to compliment General Monk (51), who lay at Harborough Town, in Leicestershire.
Jan. 21st. Because the Speaker was sick, and Lord General Monk (51) so near London, and everybody thought that the City would suffer for their affronts to the soldiery, and because they had sent the sword-bearer to, the General without the Parliament's consent, and the three Aldermen were gone to give him the welcome to town, these four lines were in almost everybody's mouth:.
Monk under a hood, not well understood,.
The City pull in their horns;.
The Speaker is out, and sick of the gout,.
And the Parliament sit upon thorns.
—Rugge's 'Diurnal.'—B.

Rolls Chapel Chancery Lane

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 February. 11 Feb 1660. Saturday. This morning I lay long abed, and then to my office, where I read all the morning my Spanish book of Rome. At noon I walked in the Hall, where I heard the news of a letter from Monk (51), who was now gone into the City again, and did resolve to stand for the sudden filling up of the House, and it was very strange how the countenance of men in the Hall was all changed with joy in half an hour's time. So I went up to the lobby, where I saw the Speaker (68) reading of the letter; and after it was read, Sir A. Haselrigge (59) came out very angry, and Billing (37) standing at the door, took him by the arm, and cried, "Thou man, will thy beast carry thee no longer? thou must fall!" The House presently after rose, and appointed to meet again at three o'clock. I went then down into the Hall, where I met with Mr. Chetwind, who had not dined no more than myself, and so we went toward London, in our way calling at two or three shops, but could have no dinner. At last, within Temple Bar, we found a pullet ready roasted, and there we dined. After that he went to his office in Chancery Lane, calling at the Rolls, where I saw the lawyers pleading. Then to his office, where I sat in his study singing, while he was with his man (Mr. Powell's son) looking after his business. Thence we took coach for the City to Guildhall, where the Hall was full of people expecting Monk (51) and Lord Mayor (27) to come thither, and all very joyfull. Here we stayed a great while, and at last meeting with a friend of his we went to the 3 Tun tavern and drank half a pint of wine, and not liking the wine we went to an alehouse, where we met with company of this third man's acquaintance, and there we drank a little. Hence I went alone to Guildhall to see whether Monk (51) was come again or no, and met with him coming out of the chamber where he had been with the Mayor and Aldermen, but such a shout I never heard in all my life, crying out, "God bless your Excellence." Here I met with Mr. Lock, and took him to an alehouse, and left him there to fetch Chetwind; when we were come together, Lock told us the substance of the letter that went from Monk (51) to the Parliament; wherein, after complaints that he and his officers were put upon such offices against the City as they could not do with any content or honour, that there are many members now in the House that were of the late tyrannical Committee of Safety. That Lambert (40) and Vane (46) are now in town, contrary to the vote of Parliament. That there were many in the House that do press for new oaths to be put upon men; whereas we have more cause to be sorry for the many oaths that we have already taken and broken. That the late petition of the fanatique people presented by Barebone (62), for the imposing of an oath upon all sorts of people, was received by the House with thanks. That therefore he (51) do desire that all writs for filling up of the House be issued by Friday next, and that in the mean time, he would retire into the City and only leave them guards for the security of the House and Council. The occasion of this was the order that he had last night to go into the City and disarm them, and take away their charter; whereby he and his officers say that the House had a mind to put them upon things that should make them odious; and so it would be in their power to do what they would with them. He told us that they [the Parliament] had sent Scott and Robinson to him (51) this afternoon, but he would not hear them. And that the Mayor and Aldermen had offered him their own houses for himself and his officers; and that his soldiers would lack for nothing. And indeed I saw many people give the soldiers drink and money, and all along in the streets cried, "God bless them!" and extraordinary good words. Hence we went to a merchant's house hard by, where Lock wrote a note and left, where I saw Sir Nich. Crisp (61), and so we went to the Star Tavern (Monk (51) being then at Benson's), where we dined and I wrote a letter to my Lord (34) from thence. In Cheapside there was a great many bonfires, and Bow bells and all the bells in all the churches as we went home were a-ringing. Hence we went homewards, it being about ten o'clock. But the common joy that was every where to be seen! The number of bonfires, there being fourteen between St. Dunstan's and Temple Bar, and at Strand Bridge' I could at one view tell thirty-one fires. In King-street seven or eight; and all along burning, and roasting, and drinking for rumps. There being rumps tied upon sticks and carried up and down. The butchers at the May Pole in the Strand rang a peal with their knives when they were going to sacrifice their rump. On Ludgate Hill there was one turning of the spit that had a rump tied upon it, and another basting of it. Indeed it was past imagination, both the greatness and the suddenness of it. At one end of the street you would think there was a whole lane of fire, and so hot that we were fain to keep still on the further side merely for heat. We came to the Chequers at Charing Cross, where Chetwind wrote a letter and I gave him an account of what I had wrote for him to write. Thence home and sent my letters to the posthouse in London, and my wife and I (after Mr. Hunt was gone, whom I found waiting at my house) went out again to show her the fires, and after walking as far as the Exchange we returned and to bed.

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 May. 28 May 1682. At the Rolls' chapel preached the famous Dr. Burnet (38) on 2 Peter 1:10, describing excellently well what was meant by election; viz, not the effect of any irreversible decree, but so called because they embraced the Gospel readily, by which they became elect, or precious to God. It would be very needless to make our calling and election sure, were they irreversible and what the rigid Presbyterians pretend. In the afternoon, to St. Lawrence's church, a new and cheerful pile.

Fetter Lane

On 31 Jan 1603 the will of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (68) was proved. He asked to be buried in St George's Church Esher. He appointed his son Francis Drake -1634 as his executor. He left his widow Ursula Stafford 1553- the lease on the manor of Walton on Thames Elmbridge, as well as a house on Fetter Lane and his coach and horses.

Around 1577 George Gower Painter 1540-1596 (37). Portrait of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (42). The heraldic escutcheon shows seven quarters as follows:.
1: . Drake of Ash in the parish of Musbury, Devon.
2: Argent, on a chief gules three cinquefoils of the first; Billet of Ash.
3: Gules, on a fess argent two mullets sable; Hamton of Rockbere and Ash.
4: Ermine, on a chief indented sable three crosslets fitchee or; Orwey of Orwey and Ash.
5: Barry of seven argent and sable.
6: Azure, six lions rampant argent crowned Gules, 3, 2, 1; Forde of Forde.
7: Argent, two chevrons sable (Esse/Ash of Ash); Esse or Ash of Ash.

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 05 Sep 1666. It crossed toward Whitehall; but oh! the confusion there was then at that Court! It pleased his Majesty (36) to command me, among the rest, to look after the quenching of Fetter-lane end, to preserve (if possible) that part of Holborn, while the rest of the gentlemen took their several posts, some at one part, and some at another (for now they began to bestir themselves, and not till now, who hitherto had stood as men intoxicated, with their hands across), and began to consider that nothing was likely to put a stop but the blowing up of so many houses as might make a wider gap than any had yet been made by the ordinary method of pulling them down with engines. This some stout seamen proposed early enough to have saved near the whole city, but this some tenacious and avaricious men, aldermen, etc., would not permit, because their houses must have been of the first. It was, therefore, now commended to be practiced; and my concern being particularly for the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, near Smithfield, where I had many wounded and sick men, made me the more diligent to promote it; nor was my care for the Savoy less. It now pleased God, by abating the wind, and by the industry of the people, when almost all was lost infusing a new spirit into them, that the fury of it began sensibly to abate about noon, so as it came no farther than the Temple westward, nor than the entrance of Smithfield, north: but continued all this day and night so impetuous toward Cripplegate and the Tower, as made us all despair. It also broke out again in the Temple; but the courage of the multitude persisting, and many houses being blown up, such gaps and desolations were soon made, as, with the former three days' consumption, the back fire did not so vehemently urge upon the rest as formerly. There was yet no standing near the burning and glowing ruins by near a furlong's space.
The coal and wood wharfs, and magazines of oil, rosin, etc., did infinite mischief, so as the invective which a little before I had dedicated to his Majesty (36) and published, giving warning what probably might be the issue of suffering those shops to be in the city was looked upon as a prophecy.
The poor inhabitants were dispersed about St. George's Fields, and Moorfields, as far as Highgate, and several miles in circle, some under tents, some under miserable huts and hovels, many without a rag, or any necessary utensils, bed or board, who from delicateness, riches, and easy accommodations in stately and well-furnished houses, were now reduced to extreme misery and poverty.
In this calamitous condition, I returned with a sad heart to my house, blessing and adoring the distinguishing mercy of God to me and mine, who, in the midst of all this ruin, was like Lot, in my little Zoar, safe and sound.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Hospital of St Bartholemew

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 05 Sep 1666. It crossed toward Whitehall; but oh! the confusion there was then at that Court! It pleased his Majesty (36) to command me, among the rest, to look after the quenching of Fetter-lane end, to preserve (if possible) that part of Holborn, while the rest of the gentlemen took their several posts, some at one part, and some at another (for now they began to bestir themselves, and not till now, who hitherto had stood as men intoxicated, with their hands across), and began to consider that nothing was likely to put a stop but the blowing up of so many houses as might make a wider gap than any had yet been made by the ordinary method of pulling them down with engines. This some stout seamen proposed early enough to have saved near the whole city, but this some tenacious and avaricious men, aldermen, etc., would not permit, because their houses must have been of the first. It was, therefore, now commended to be practiced; and my concern being particularly for the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, near Smithfield, where I had many wounded and sick men, made me the more diligent to promote it; nor was my care for the Savoy less. It now pleased God, by abating the wind, and by the industry of the people, when almost all was lost infusing a new spirit into them, that the fury of it began sensibly to abate about noon, so as it came no farther than the Temple westward, nor than the entrance of Smithfield, north: but continued all this day and night so impetuous toward Cripplegate and the Tower, as made us all despair. It also broke out again in the Temple; but the courage of the multitude persisting, and many houses being blown up, such gaps and desolations were soon made, as, with the former three days' consumption, the back fire did not so vehemently urge upon the rest as formerly. There was yet no standing near the burning and glowing ruins by near a furlong's space.
The coal and wood wharfs, and magazines of oil, rosin, etc., did infinite mischief, so as the invective which a little before I had dedicated to his Majesty (36) and published, giving warning what probably might be the issue of suffering those shops to be in the city was looked upon as a prophecy.
The poor inhabitants were dispersed about St. George's Fields, and Moorfields, as far as Highgate, and several miles in circle, some under tents, some under miserable huts and hovels, many without a rag, or any necessary utensils, bed or board, who from delicateness, riches, and easy accommodations in stately and well-furnished houses, were now reduced to extreme misery and poverty.
In this calamitous condition, I returned with a sad heart to my house, blessing and adoring the distinguishing mercy of God to me and mine, who, in the midst of all this ruin, was like Lot, in my little Zoar, safe and sound.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Smithfield

Peasant's Revolt

On 15 Jun 1381 Richard II King England 1367-1400 (14) met with Wat Tyler -1381 at Smithfield. During the course of the meeting Wat Tyler -1381 was wounded by William Walworth Lord Mayor -1385. Wat Tyler -1381 was then killed by John Cavendish 1374-1417 (7).

Bigod's Rebellion

On 25 May 1537 Margaret Stafford 1511-1537 (26) was burned at the stake at Smithfield.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 May. 10 May 1652. Passing by Smithfield, I saw a miserable creature burning, who had murdered her husband. I went to see some workmanship of that admirable artist, Reeves, famous for perspective, and turning curiosities in ivory.

Charterhouse Smithfield

On 18 Mar 1589 Richard Sackville 3rd Earl Dorset 1589-1624 was born to Robert Sackville 2nd Earl Dorset 1561-1609 (28) and Margaret Howard 1562-1591 (27) at Charterhouse Smithfield.

On 11 May 1615 William Cope 2nd Baronet Hanwell -1637 was knighted by James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (48) at Charterhouse Smithfield.

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 April. 21 Apr 1657. Came Sir Thomas Hanmer (45), of Hanmer, in Wales, to see me. I then waited on my Lord Hatton (51), with whom I dined: at my return, I stepped into Bedlam, where I saw several poor, miserable creatures in chains; one of them was mad with making verses. I also visited the Charter House, formerly belonging to the Carthusians, now an old, neat, fresh, solitary college for decayed gentlemen. It has a grove, bowling green, garden, chapel, and a hall where they eat in common. I likewise saw Christ Church and Hospital, a very good Gothic building; the hall, school, and lodgings in great order for bringing up many hundreds of poor children of both sexes; it is an exemplary charity. There is a large picture at one end of the hall, representing the governors, founders, and the institution.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Hanmer 2nd Baronet Hamner 1612-1678 (26).

Church of St Bartholomew the Great Smithfield

On 31 May 1589 Walter Mildmay 1521-1589 (68) died at Hackney. He is buried at Church of St Bartholomew the Great Smithfield with his wife Mary Walsingham 1528-1576.

On 18 Jul 1618 Edward Carey 1540-1618 (78) died at Church of St Bartholomew the Great Smithfield.

On 13 Dec 1638 Henry Bourchier 5th Earl Bath 1587-1654 (51) and Rachael Fane Countess Bath Count Eu Countess Middlesex 1613- were married (he was her second cousin twice removed) at Church of St Bartholomew the Great Smithfield. Rachael Fane Countess Bath Count Eu Countess Middlesex 1613- by marriage Countess Bath 2C 1536, Count Eu.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 February. 19 Feb 1660. Sunday. Lord's day. Early in the morning I set my books that I brought home yesterday up in order in my study. Thence forth to Mr. Harper's to drink a draft of purle, [Note. Purl is hot beer flavoured with wormwood or other aromatic herbs. The name is also given to hot beer flavoured with gin, sugar, and ginger.] whither by appointment Monsieur L'Impertinent, who did intend too upon my desire to go along with me to St. Bartholomew's, to hear one Mr. Sparks, but it raining very hard we went to Mr. Gunning's (46) and heard an excellent sermon, and speaking of the character that the Scripture gives of Ann the mother of the blessed Virgin, he did there speak largely in commendation of widowhood, and not as we do to marry two or three wives or husbands, one after another. Here I met with Mr. Moore, and went home with him to dinner, where he told me the discourse that happened between the secluded members and the members of the House, before Monk (51) last Friday. How the secluded said, that they did not intend by coming in to express revenge upon these men, but only to meet and dissolve themselves, and only to issue writs for a free Parliament. He told me how Haselrigge (59) was afraid to have the candle carried before him, for fear that the people seeing him, would do him hurt; and that he is afraid to appear in the City. That there is great likelihood that the secluded members will come in, and so Mr. Crew (62) and my Lord are likely to be great men, at which I was very glad. After diner there was many secluded members come in to Mr. Crew (62), which, it being the Lord's day, did make Mr. Moore believe that there was something extraordinary in the business.
Hence home and brought my wife to Mr. Mossum's to hear him, and indeed he made a very good sermon, but only too eloquent for a pulpit. Here Mr. L'Impertinent helped me to a seat. After sermon to my father's (59); and fell in discourse concerning our going to Cambridge the next week with my brother John. To Mrs. Turner (37) where her brother, Mr. Edward Pepys (43), was there, and I sat a great while talking of public business of the times with him. So to supper to my father's (59), all supper talking of John's going to Cambridge. So home, and it raining my wife got my mother's French mantle and my brother John's hat, and so we went all along home and to bed.

On 05 Jan 1675 Edward Allen 1631-1692 (44) and Elizabeth Cornwallis -1708 were married at Church of St Bartholomew the Great Smithfield.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Elizabeth Cornwallis -1708.

Duck Lane Smithfield

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Tuesday 04 May 1669. Up, and to the office, and then my wife (28) being gone to see her mother at Deptford, I before the office sat went to the Excise Office, and thence being alone stepped into Duck Lane, and thence tried to have sent a porter to Deb.’s (18), but durst not trust him, and therefore having bought a book to satisfy the bookseller for my stay there, a 12d. book, Andronicus of Tom Fuller, I took coach, and at the end of Jewen Street next Red Cross Street I sent the coachman to her lodging, and understand she is gone for Greenwich to one Marys’s, a tanner’s, at which I, was glad, hoping to have opportunity to find her out; and so, in great fear of being seen, I to the office, and there all the morning, dined at home, and presently after dinner comes home my wife (28), who I believe is jealous of my spending the day, and I had very good fortune in being at home, for if Deb. (18) had been to have been found it is forty to one but I had been abroad, God forgive me. So the afternoon at the office, and at night walked with my wife (28) in the garden, and my Lord Brouncker (49) with us, who is newly come to W. Pen’s (48) lodgings; and by and by comes Mr. Hooke (33); and my Lord (43), and he, and I into my Lord’s lodgings, and there discoursed of many fine things in philosophy, to my great content, and so home to supper and to bed.

Elms Smithfield

Execution of William Wallace

On 23 Aug 1305 William Wallace -1305 was hanged at Elms Smithfield. His head being displayed on London Bridge.

St Bartholomew the Less

On 15 Jul 1650 Robert Kemp 2nd Baronet Kemp 1628-1710 (22) and Mary Kerridge Lady Kemp -1655 were married at St Bartholomew the Less. Mary Kerridge Lady Kemp -1655 by marriage Lady Kemp of Gissing in Norfolk.

On 12 Jan 1665 Fulke Greville 5th Baron Brooke 1643-1710 (21) and Sarah Dashwood Baroness Brooke 1646-1705 (19) were married at St Bartholomew the Less.

Whitefriars

On 10 Feb 1383 John Mowbray 1st Earl Nottingham 1365-1383 (17) died. He was buried at Whitefriars. His brother Thomas Mowbray 1st Duke Norfolk 1368-1399 (14) succeeded 6th Baron Mowbray 1C 1283, 7th Baron Segrave 2C 1295.

Fenchurch Street

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 03 Sep 1666. I had public prayers at home. The fire continuing, after dinner, I took coach with my wife (31) and son, and went to the Bankside in Southwark, where we beheld that dismal spectacle, the whole city in dreadful flames near the waterside; all the houses from the Bridge, all Thames street, and upward toward Cheapside, down to the Three Cranes, were now consumed; and so returned, exceedingly astonished what would become of the rest.
The fire having continued all this night (if I may call that night which was light as day for ten miles round about, after a dreadful manner), when conspiring with a fierce eastern wind in a very dry season, I went on foot to the same place; and saw the whole south part of the city burning from Cheapside to the Thames, and all along Cornhill (for it likewise kindled back against the wind as well as forward), Tower street, Fenchurch Street, Gracious street, and so along to Baynard's Castle, and was now taking hold of St. Paul's church, to which the scaffolds contributed exceedingly. The conflagration was so universal, and the people so astonished, that, from the beginning, I know not by what despondency, or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it; so that there was nothing heard, or seen, but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods; such a strange consternation there was upon them, so as it burned both in breadth and length, the churches, public halls, Exchange, hospitals,. Monuments, and ornaments; leaping after a prodigious manner, from house to house, and street to street, at great distances one from the other. For the heat, with a long set of fair and warm weather, had even ignited the air, and prepared the materials to conceive the fire, which devoured, after an incredible manner, houses, furniture, and every thing. Here, we saw the Thames covered with goods floating, all the barges and boats laden with what some had time and courage to save, as, on the other side, the carts, etc., carrying out to the fields, which for many miles were strewn with movables of all sorts, and tents erecting to shelter both people and what goods they could get away. Oh, the miserable and calamitous spectacle! such as haply the world had not seen since the foundation of it, nor can be outdone till the universal conflagration thereof. All the sky was of a fiery aspect, like the top of a burning oven, and the light seen above forty miles round about for many nights. God grant mine eyes may never behold the like, who now saw above 10,000 houses all in one flame! The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children, the hurry of people, the fall of towers, houses, and churches, was like a hideous storm; and the air all about so hot and inflamed, that at the last one was not able to approach it, so that they were forced to stand still, and let the flames burn on, which they did, for near two miles in length and one in breadth. The clouds also of smoke were dismal, and reached, upon computation, near fifty miles in length. Thus, I left it this afternoon burning, a resemblance of Sodom, or the last day. It forcibly called to my mind that passage—"non enim hic habemus stabilem civitatem"; the ruins resembling the picture of Troy. London was, but is no more! Thus, I returned.

On 12 Feb 1729 George Lascelles 1681-1729 (48) died at Fenchurch Street.

Mitre Tavern Fenchurch Street

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 January. 21 Jan 1660 Saturday. Up early in finishing my accounts and writing to my Lord (34) and from thence to my Lord's (34) and took leave of Mr. Sheply and possession of all the keys and the house. Thence to my office for some money to pay Mr. Sheply and sent it him by the old man. I then went to Mr Downing (35) who chid me because I did not give him notice of some of his guests failed him but I told him that I sent our porter to tell him and he was not within, but he told me that he was within till past twelve o'clock. So the porter or he lied. Thence to my office where nothing to do. Then with Mr. Hawly, he and I went to Mr. Crew's (62) and dined there. Thence into London, to Mr. Vernon's and I received my L25 due by bill for my troopers' pay. Then back again to Steadman's. At the Mitre, in Fleet street, in our way calling on Mr. Fage, who told me how the City have some hopes of Monk (51). Thence to the Mitre, where I drank a pint of wine, the house being in fitting for Banister (30) to come hither from Paget's. Thence to Mrs. Jem and gave her L5. So home and left my money and to Whitehall where Luellin and I drank and talked together an hour at Marsh's and so up to the clerks' room, where poor Mr. Cook, a black man, that is like to be put out of his clerk's place, came and railed at me for endeavouring to put him out and get myself in, when I was already in a good condition. But I satisfied him and after I had wrote a letter there to my Lord (34), wherein I gave him an account how this day Lenthall (68) took his chair again, and [the House] resolved a declaration to be brought in on Monday next to satisfy the world what they intend to do. So home and to bed.

Fleet Street

Gracechurch Street

Essex Rebellion

On 08 Feb 1601 Thomas Smythe 1558-1625 (43) was visited by Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (35) at his house Gracechurch Street. Smythe was later accused of complicity in the Essex Rebellion, he was examined before the Privy Council. He was fired from his office of Sheriff of and committed to the Tower of London.

In 1590 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (24).

Around 1596 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636 (34). Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (30).

Around 1597 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636 (35). Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (31).

St Benet Gracechurch

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1491. This yeare, June, King Henrie the Eight was borne at Greenewich, which was second sonne to King Henry the Vllth (33), named Duke of Yorke. Sir Robert Chamberlayne (53) beheaded. A conduict begon at Christ Churche. Note. Christ Churche is believed to be a typo for Grace Church.

Hart Street

St Olave's Church Hart Street

On 06 Nov 1649 Henry Caesar 1630–1668 (19) and Elizabeth Angell 1630-1670 (19) were married at St Olave's Church Hart Street.

On 17 Apr 1657 Daniel Milles Rector -1689 was appointed Rector of St Olave's Church Hart Street.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Sunday 09 May 1669. Lord’s day. Up and, after dressing in my best suit with gold trimming, I to the Office, and there with Gibson and Tom finishing against to-morrow my notes upon Commanders’ Instructions; and, when church-time, to church with my wife (28), leaving them at work. Dr. Mills preached a dull sermon, and so we home to dinner; and thence by coach to St. Andrew’s, Holborne, thinking to have heard Dr. Stillingfleete (34) preach, but we could not get a place, and so to St. Margaret’s, and there heard a sermon, and did get a place, the first we have heard there these many years, and here at a distance I saw Betty Michell, but she is become much a plainer woman than she was a girl. Thence towards the Park, but too soon to go in, so went on to Knightsbridge, and there eat and drank at "The World’s End," where we had good things, and then back to the Park, and there till night, being fine weather, and much company, and so home, and after supper to bed. This day I first left off both my waistcoats by day, and my waistcoat by night, it being very hot weather, so hot as to make me break out, here and there, in my hands, which vexes me to see, but is good for me.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Sunday 16 May 1669. Lord’s Day. My wife (28) and I at church, our pew filled with Mrs. Backewell, and six more that she brought with her, which vexed me at her confidence. Dined at home and W. Batelier with us, and I all the afternoon drawing up a foul draught of my petition to the Duke of York (35), about my eyes, for leave to spend three or four months out of the Office, drawing it so as to give occasion to a voyage abroad which I did, to my pretty good liking; and then with my wife (28) to Hyde Park, where a good deal of company, and good weather, and so home to supper and to bed.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

In Oct 1689 Daniel Milles Rector -1689 died. He was buried at St Olave's Church Hart Street.

Langbourn Ward

All Hallows Staining Church Langbourn Ward

Leadenhall Street

Arrival of Queen Mary I in London

On 03 Aug 1553 Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558 (37) made her formal entrance into London.
The Diary of Henry Machyn, Citizen and Merchant-Taylor of London, 1550-1563, describes the event:.
The third day of August, the Queen came riding to London and so to the Tower. She made her entrance at Aldgate, which was hanged with a great number of streamers hanging about the said gate; and all the streets into Leadenhall and unto the Tower were laid with gravel, and all the crafts of London stood in a row, with their banners and streamers hanging over their heads. Her Grace came, preceded by the Mayor of London carrying the mace and the Earl of Arundel carrying the sword, and all the trumpets blowing. After the Queen came the Lady Elizabeth (19), and after her the Duchess of Norfolk (56), and after her the Marchioness of Exeter (49) and other ladies. And after them the aldermen, and then the guard with bows and javelins, and all the rest who departed from Aldgate in green and white, and red and white, and blue and green, to the number of three thousand horses and spears and javelins.
Strype’s Complete History of England describes Mary's entrance to the Tower:.
There met her as humble supplicants the Duke of Norfolk (80), who had been a prisoner ever since his son the Earl of Surrey (80) was put to death by King Henry the ; Edward Courtenay (26), son of the Marquis of Exeter who was executed in the year 1538; Gardiner (70), deprived of his Bishopric of Winchester about two years before; and the Dowager Duchess of Somerset (56). They presented themselves on their knees, and Gardiner in the name of them all, made a congratulatory speech to the Queen, who kindly raised them one after another, saluted them, saying they were her own proper prisoners and ordered their immediate discharge. The next day she restored Courtenay (26) to the honor of his family. Gardiner (70) not only obtained his bishopric again but on the 23rd of August following was made Lord Chancellor, even though he had formerly subscribed to the Sentence of Divorce against the Queen’s mother and had written in defense of King Henry’s proceedings.

Coronation of Charles II

On 22 Apr 1661 Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) rode from the Tower of London to Whitehall Palace. At the Lime Street end of Leadenhall he passed under a triumphal arch built after the Doric order, with Rebellion, her crimson robe alive with snakes, being crushed by Monarchy Restored, and a fine painting of his Majesty's landing at Dover, "with ships at sea, great guns going off, one kneeling and kissing the King's hand, soldiers, horse and foot and many people gazing".
Outside the East India House in Leadenhall Street, that loyal and honourable trading company expressed their dutiful affections to his Majesty by two Indian youths, one attended by two blackamoors and the other mounted upon a camel, which bore on its back two panniers filled with jewels, spices, and silks to be scattered among the spectators.
At the Conduit in Cornhill a special treat was prepared for the bachelor king in the shape of eight nymphs clad in white. A little further down the street, just opposite the Royal Exchange, was another arch, with stages against it depicting the River Thames and the upper deck of one of his Majesty's ships.
The procession included the Duke of York (27), the Lord High Constable (58) and the Lord Great Chamberlain (53).
The Sword of State was carried by Esmé Stewart 2nd Duke Richmond 5th Duke Lennox 1649-1660.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

On 10 Oct 1732 William Burrell 1732-1796 was born to Peter Burrell 1692-1756 (40) and Elizabeth Lewis in Leadenhall Street.

Lothbury

In 1580 Robert Killigrew 1580-1633 was born to William Killigrew 1555-1622 (25) and Margery Saunders 1546- at Lothbury.

Mark Lane

On 29 Jul 1629 Paul Bayning 1st Viscount Bayning 1588-1629 (41) died at Mark Lane.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Thursday 27 May 1669. At the office all the morning, dined at home, Mr. Hollier (60) with me. Presented this day by Mr. Browne with a book of drawing by him, lately printed, which cost me 20s. to him. In the afternoon to the Temple, to meet with Auditor Aldworth about my interest account, but failed meeting him. To visit my cozen Creed, and found her ill at home, being with child, and looks poorly. Thence to her husband, at Gresham College, upon some occasions of Tangier; and so home, with Sir John Bankes (42) with me, to Mark Lane.

Minories

On 13 Oct 1670 William Legge -1670 died at Minories. He was buried at Holy Trinity Minories.

Holy Trinity Minories

On 13 Oct 1670 William Legge -1670 died at Minories. He was buried at Holy Trinity Minories.

On 25 Oct 1691 George Legge 1st Baron Dartmouth 1647-1691 (44) died at Tower of London. He was buried at Holy Trinity Minories.

Moorfields

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 February. 12 Feb 1660. Sunday. In the morning, it being Lord's day, Mr. Pierce came to me to enquire how things go. We drank our morning draft together and thence to White Hall, where Dr. Hones preached; but I staid not to hear, but walking in the court, I heard that Sir Arth. Haselrigge (59) was newly gone into the City to Monk (51), and that Monk's (51) wife (40) removed from White Hall last night. Home again, where at noon came according to my invitation my cos. Thos. Pepys and his partner and dined with me, but before dinner we went and took a walk round the park, it being a most pleasant day as ever I saw. After dinner we three went into London together, where I heard that Monk (51) had been at Paul's in the morning, and the people had shouted much at his coming out of the church.
In the afternoon he was at a church in Broad-street, whereabout he do lodge. But not knowing how to see him we went and walked half a hour in Moorfields, which were full of people, it being so fine a day. Here I took leave of them, and so to Paul's, where I met with Mr. Kirton's apprentice (the crooked fellow) and walked up and down with him two hours, sometimes in the street looking for a tavern to drink in, but not finding any open, we durst not knock; other times in the churchyard, where one told me that he had seen the letter printed.
Thence to Mr. Turner's, where I found my wife, Mr. Edw. Pepys (43), and Roger (42) and Mr. Armiger being there, to whom I gave as good an account of things as I could, and so to my father's (59), where Charles Glascocke was overjoyed to see how things are now; who told me the boys had last night broke Barebone's (62) windows.
Hence home, and being near home we missed our maid, and were at a great loss and went back a great way to find her, but when we could not see her we went homewards and found her there, got before us which we wondered at greatly. So to bed, where my wife and I had some high words upon my telling her that I would fling the dog which her brother gave her out of window if he [dirtied] the house any more.

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 05 Sep 1666. It crossed toward Whitehall; but oh! the confusion there was then at that Court! It pleased his Majesty (36) to command me, among the rest, to look after the quenching of Fetter-lane end, to preserve (if possible) that part of Holborn, while the rest of the gentlemen took their several posts, some at one part, and some at another (for now they began to bestir themselves, and not till now, who hitherto had stood as men intoxicated, with their hands across), and began to consider that nothing was likely to put a stop but the blowing up of so many houses as might make a wider gap than any had yet been made by the ordinary method of pulling them down with engines. This some stout seamen proposed early enough to have saved near the whole city, but this some tenacious and avaricious men, aldermen, etc., would not permit, because their houses must have been of the first. It was, therefore, now commended to be practiced; and my concern being particularly for the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, near Smithfield, where I had many wounded and sick men, made me the more diligent to promote it; nor was my care for the Savoy less. It now pleased God, by abating the wind, and by the industry of the people, when almost all was lost infusing a new spirit into them, that the fury of it began sensibly to abate about noon, so as it came no farther than the Temple westward, nor than the entrance of Smithfield, north: but continued all this day and night so impetuous toward Cripplegate and the Tower, as made us all despair. It also broke out again in the Temple; but the courage of the multitude persisting, and many houses being blown up, such gaps and desolations were soon made, as, with the former three days' consumption, the back fire did not so vehemently urge upon the rest as formerly. There was yet no standing near the burning and glowing ruins by near a furlong's space.
The coal and wood wharfs, and magazines of oil, rosin, etc., did infinite mischief, so as the invective which a little before I had dedicated to his Majesty (36) and published, giving warning what probably might be the issue of suffering those shops to be in the city was looked upon as a prophecy.
The poor inhabitants were dispersed about St. George's Fields, and Moorfields, as far as Highgate, and several miles in circle, some under tents, some under miserable huts and hovels, many without a rag, or any necessary utensils, bed or board, who from delicateness, riches, and easy accommodations in stately and well-furnished houses, were now reduced to extreme misery and poverty.
In this calamitous condition, I returned with a sad heart to my house, blessing and adoring the distinguishing mercy of God to me and mine, who, in the midst of all this ruin, was like Lot, in my little Zoar, safe and sound.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet Street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (36).

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 April. 18 Apr 1678. I went to see new Bedlam Hospital, magnificently built, and most sweetly placed in Moorfields, since the dreadful fire in London.

Bedlam Hospital

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 April. 21 Apr 1657. Came Sir Thomas Hanmer (45), of Hanmer, in Wales, to see me. I then waited on my Lord Hatton (51), with whom I dined: at my return, I stepped into Bedlam, where I saw several poor, miserable creatures in chains; one of them was mad with making verses. I also visited the Charter House, formerly belonging to the Carthusians, now an old, neat, fresh, solitary college for decayed gentlemen. It has a grove, bowling green, garden, chapel, and a hall where they eat in common. I likewise saw Christ Church and Hospital, a very good Gothic building; the hall, school, and lodgings in great order for bringing up many hundreds of poor children of both sexes; it is an exemplary charity. There is a large picture at one end of the hall, representing the governors, founders, and the institution.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Hanmer 2nd Baronet Hamner 1612-1678 (26).

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 April. 18 Apr 1678. I went to see new Bedlam Hospital, magnificently built, and most sweetly placed in Moorfields, since the dreadful fire in London.

Newgate Street

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 04 Sep 1666. The burning still rages, and it is now gotten as far as the Inner Temple. All Fleet Street, the Old Bailey, Ludgate hill, Warwick lane, Newgate, Paul's chain, Watling street, now flaming, and most of it reduced to ashes; the stones of Paul's flew like grenados, the melting lead running down the streets in a stream, and the very pavements glowing with fiery redness, so as no horse, nor man, was able to tread on them, and the demolition had stopped all the passages, so that no help could be applied. The eastern wind still more impetuously driving the flames forward. Nothing but the Almighty power of God was able to stop them; for vain was the help of man.

Christ Church Greyfriars

Death of Queen Consort Margaret of France

On 14 Feb 1318 Margaret of France Queen Consort England 1279-1318 (39) died at Marlborough Castle Marlborough. She was buried at Christ Church Greyfriars. Her tomb was destroyed during the Reformation.

Death of Isabella of France Queen Consort

On 22 Aug 1358 Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (63) died at Hertford Castle. She was buried in Christ Church Greyfriars.
The funeral was performed by Simon Islip Archbishop of Canterbury -1366. She was buried in the mantle she had worn at her wedding and at her request, Edward's heart, placed into a casket thirty years before, was interred with her. .

On 25 Mar 1399 Nicholas Brembre -1399 was beheaded. He was buried at Christ Church Greyfriars.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet Street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (36).

On 26 Jan 1698 Theodore Janssen 1658-1748 (40) and Williamsa Henley -1731 were married at Christ Church Greyfriars.

Newgate Prison

Close Rolls Edward II 1307 1313. 24 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Canterbury. To the Sheriffs of London. Order to deliver John de la Dune, Roger de Hopton, Richard le Harpour, Roger de Soppewalle, Roger le Keu, Rober le Hunt, Thomas de Sydenham, Henry le Gardener, Thomas de la More, Philip Kemp, John le Wayt, and John le Wodeward, the men and servants of Adam de Kyngeshemede, in the King's prison of Newgate for a trespass committed by them upon the King's men at Westminster, from prison upon their finding sufficient mainpernors to have them before the King (23) or his Lieutenant in the quinzaine of the Purification of St Mary to stand to right concerning the said trespass. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

After 31 Oct 1454 Richard Percy 1426-1461 was imprisoned at Newgate Prison.

After 31 Oct 1454 Thomas Percy 1st Baron Egremont 1422-1460 was imprisoned at Newgate Prison.

On 13 Nov 1456 Richard Percy 1426-1461 (30) escaped at Newgate Prison.

On 13 Nov 1456 Thomas Percy 1st Baron Egremont 1422-1460 (33) escaped at Newgate Prison.

Battle of Blackheath aka Deptford Bridge

After 17 Jun 1497 John Dynham 1st Baron Dynham 1433-1501 acted in judgement of James Tuchet 7th Baron Audley Heighley 1463-1497. He was tried as a peer and sentenced to be beheaded spending his last nigh in Newgate Prison.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 March. 20 Mar 1683. Dined at Dr. Whistler's, at the Physicians' College, with Sir Thomas Millington, both learned men; Dr. W. the most facetious man in nature, and now Censor of the college. I was here consulted where they should build their library; it is a pity this college is built so near Newgate Prison, and in so obscure a hole, a fault in placing most of our public buildings and churches in the city, through the avarice of some few men, and his Majesty (52) not overruling it, when it was in his power after the dreadful conflagration.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 November. 01 Nov 1688. Dined with Lord Preston (39), with other company, at Sir Stephen Fox's (61). Continual alarms of the Prince of Orange (37), but no certainty. Reports of his great losses of horse in the storm, but without any assurance. A man was taken with divers papers and printed manifestoes, and carried to Newgate, after examination at the Cabinet Council. There was likewise a declaration of the States for satisfaction of all public ministers at The Hague, except to the English and the French. There was in that of the Prince's an expression, as if the Lords both spiritual and temporal had invited him over, with a deduction of the causes of his enterprise. This made his Majesty (55) convene my Lord of Canterbury (71) and the other Bishops now in town, to give an account of what was in the manifesto, and to enjoin them to clear themselves by some public writing of this disloyal charge.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

1533 Buggery Act

On 08 Jul 1810 the Bow Street police raided the White Swan on Vere Street in London that had been established as a molly-house in early 1810 by two men, James Cook and Yardley. Twenty-seven men were arrested, but the majority of them were released (perhaps as a result of bribe); eight were tried and convicted. On 27 Sep 1810 six men were pilloried at the Haymarket. On 07 Mar 1811 John Hepburn (46) and Thomas White (16), a drummer boy, were hanged at Newgate Prison despite not being present on the night of the raid.

On 27 Nov 1835 James Pratt 1805-1835 and John Smith 1795-1835 were the last two men to be executed under the 1828 Offences Against the Person Act which had replaced the 1533 Buggery Act. They were hanged in front of Newgate Prison.

In 1841 George Edward Waldegrave 7th Earl Waldegrave 1816-1846 (24) was imprisoned for six months at Newgate Prison for having having drunkenly assaulted a police officer in Kingston Upon Thames. His wife Frances Braham Countess Waldegrave 1821-1879 (19) and servants joined him during his imprisonment.

Paul's Wharf

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 March. 25 Mar 1649. I heard the Common Prayer (a rare thing in these days) in St. Peter's, at Paul's Wharf, London; and, in the morning, the Archbishop of Armagh, that pious person and learned man, Usher (68), in Lincoln's Inn Chapel.

Queenhithe

Fish Street

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 02 Sep 1666. This fatal night, about ten, began the deplorable fire, near Fish Street, in London.

Monument to the Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1681 May. 05 May 1681. Came to dine with me Sir William Fermor (32), of Northamptonshire, and Sir Christopher Wren (57), his Majesty's (50) architect and surveyor, now building the Cathedral of St. Paul, and the column in memory of the city's conflagration, and was in hand with the building of fifty parish churches. A wonderful genius had this incomparable person.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Painter's Hall Queenhithe

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 July. 03 Jul 1666. I went to sit with the Commissioners at the Tower, where our commission being read, we made some progress in business, our Secretary being Sir George Wharton (49), that famous mathematician who wrote the yearly Almanac during his Majesty's (36) troubles. Thence, to Painters' Hall, Queenhithe, to our other commission, and dined at my Lord Mayor's.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Four Days' Battle

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 July. 04 Jul 1666. The solemn Fast-day. Dr. Meggot preached an excellent discourse before the King (36) on the terrors of God's judgments. After sermon, I waited on my Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (49) and Bishop of Winchester (47), where the Dean of Westminster (31) spoke to me about putting into my hands the disposal of fifty pounds, which the charitable people of Oxford had sent to be distributed among the sick and wounded seamen since the battle. Hence, I went to the Lord Chancellor's (57) to joy him of his Royal Highness's (32) second son, now born at St. James's; and to desire the use of the Star-chamber for our Commissioners to meet in, Painters' Hall, Queenhithe not being so convenient.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

The Church of St Benet Paul's Wharf Queenhithe

On 22 Dec 1520 Edmund Denny Chief Baron 1457-1520 (63) died. He was buried at The Church of St Benet Paul's Wharf Queenhithe.

In 1533 Nicholas Bacon 1510-1579 (22) entered The Church of St Benet Paul's Wharf Queenhithe and was subsequently Called to the Bar.

Seething Lane

St Dunstan's in the East Parish

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 August. 08 Aug 1686. Our vicar gone to dispose of his country living in Rutlandshire, having St. Dunstan in the east given him by the Archbishop of Canterbury (69).
I went to visit the Marquis Ravigné, now my neighbor at Greenwich, retired from the persecution in France. He was the deputy of all the Protestants of that kingdom in the parliament of Paris, and several times Ambassador in this and other Courts; a person of great learning and experience.

On 22 May 1701 Henry St John 1st Viscount Bolingbroke 1678-1751 (22) and Frances Winchcombe Viscountess Bolingbroke 1680-1718 (20) were married at St Dunstan's in the East Parish.

Mincing Lane St Dunstan's in the East Parish

On 07 May 1622 James Boevey 1622-1696 was born to Andreas Boevey 1556-1625 (66) at Mincing Lane St Dunstan's in the East Parish.

St Lawrence Jewry

In 1463 Geoffrey Boleyn Lord Mayor London 1406-1463 (57) died. He was buried at St Lawrence Jewry.

Around 1470 Richard Rich 1470-1503 was born to Thomas Rich 1432-1475 (38) at St Lawrence Jewry.

On 14 Feb 1624 William Holliday 1565-1624 (59) died. He was buried at St Lawrence Jewry.

In 1661 Seth Ward Bishop 1617-1689 (44) was appointed to the living of St Lawrence Jewry by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30).

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 May. 28 May 1682. At the Rolls' chapel preached the famous Dr. Burnet (38) on 2 Peter 1:10, describing excellently well what was meant by election; viz, not the effect of any irreversible decree, but so called because they embraced the Gospel readily, by which they became elect, or precious to God. It would be very needless to make our calling and election sure, were they irreversible and what the rigid Presbyterians pretend. In the afternoon, to St. Lawrence's church, a new and cheerful pile.

Church of St Lawrence Jewry St Lawrence Jewry

On 16 Aug 1464 Richard Rich 1408-1464 (56) died. He was buried at Church of St Lawrence Jewry St Lawrence Jewry.

On 30 Jun 1695 Anne Brough was buried in the Church of St Lawrence Jewry St Lawrence Jewry.

House of Thomas Cressy St Lawrence Jewry

On 23 Jul 1409 Alice St Maur Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1409-1450 was born to Richard St Maur at House of Thomas Cressy St Lawrence Jewry.

St Lawrence Pountney

In Jan 1602 John Harrington and Mary Offley were married at St Lawrence Pountney.

Manor of the Rose St Lawrence Pountney

Mechant Taylor's School Manor of the Rose St Lawrence Pountney

In 1618 Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (12) educated at Mechant Taylor's School Manor of the Rose St Lawrence Pountney.

In 1634. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (28).

In 1650. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (44).

St Martin's Le Grand

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. On 10 Jun 1461. Westminster. Ratification for life of the estate of Master Robert Stillyngton (41), king's clerk as deacon of the king's free chapel of St Martin le Grand, London, archdeacon of Colchester in the cathedral of London and of Taunton in the cathedral of Wells, prebendary of Wetewang in the cathedral of York, Marther (possibly typo since 'Martha' unknown) in the cathedral of St Davids and the prebend which John Luca lately had in the king's free chapel of St Stephen within his palace of Wesminster, and person of the church of Aysshebury, in the diocese of Salisbury.

Temple

Middle Temple

Thames Street

Three Cranes

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 03 Sep 1666. I had public prayers at home. The fire continuing, after dinner, I took coach with my wife (31) and son, and went to the Bankside in Southwark, where we beheld that dismal spectacle, the whole city in dreadful flames near the waterside; all the houses from the Bridge, all Thames street, and upward toward Cheapside, down to the Three Cranes, were now consumed; and so returned, exceedingly astonished what would become of the rest.
The fire having continued all this night (if I may call that night which was light as day for ten miles round about, after a dreadful manner), when conspiring with a fierce eastern wind in a very dry season, I went on foot to the same place; and saw the whole south part of the city burning from Cheapside to the Thames, and all along Cornhill (for it likewise kindled back against the wind as well as forward), Tower street, Fenchurch Street, Gracious street, and so along to Baynard's Castle, and was now taking hold of St. Paul's church, to which the scaffolds contributed exceedingly. The conflagration was so universal, and the people so astonished, that, from the beginning, I know not by what despondency, or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it; so that there was nothing heard, or seen, but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods; such a strange consternation there was upon them, so as it burned both in breadth and length, the churches, public halls, Exchange, hospitals,. Monuments, and ornaments; leaping after a prodigious manner, from house to house, and street to street, at great distances one from the other. For the heat, with a long set of fair and warm weather, had even ignited the air, and prepared the materials to conceive the fire, which devoured, after an incredible manner, houses, furniture, and every thing. Here, we saw the Thames covered with goods floating, all the barges and boats laden with what some had time and courage to save, as, on the other side, the carts, etc., carrying out to the fields, which for many miles were strewn with movables of all sorts, and tents erecting to shelter both people and what goods they could get away. Oh, the miserable and calamitous spectacle! such as haply the world had not seen since the foundation of it, nor can be outdone till the universal conflagration thereof. All the sky was of a fiery aspect, like the top of a burning oven, and the light seen above forty miles round about for many nights. God grant mine eyes may never behold the like, who now saw above 10,000 houses all in one flame! The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children, the hurry of people, the fall of towers, houses, and churches, was like a hideous storm; and the air all about so hot and inflamed, that at the last one was not able to approach it, so that they were forced to stand still, and let the flames burn on, which they did, for near two miles in length and one in breadth. The clouds also of smoke were dismal, and reached, upon computation, near fifty miles in length. Thus, I left it this afternoon burning, a resemblance of Sodom, or the last day. It forcibly called to my mind that passage—"non enim hic habemus stabilem civitatem"; the ruins resembling the picture of Troy. London was, but is no more! Thus, I returned.

Threadneedle Street

Bartholomew Lane Threadneedle Street

St Bartholomew by the Exchange Bartholomew Lane Threadneedle Street

On 18 Feb 1558 George Barne Lord Mayor -1558 died. He was buried at St Bartholomew by the Exchange Bartholomew Lane Threadneedle Street.

On or before 27 Feb 1631 Josiah Child Merchant 1631-1699 was born to Richard Child and Elizabeth Roycroft. On 27 Feb 1631 Josiah Child Merchant 1631-1699 was baptised at St Bartholomew by the Exchange Bartholomew Lane Threadneedle Street.

Royal Exchange

In 1565 Thomas Gresham 1519-1579 (46) founded the Royal Exchange.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1660 January. 28 Jan 1660. Saturday. I went to Mr Downing (35) and carried him three characters, and then to my office and wrote another, while Mr. Frost staid telling money. And after I had done it Mr. Hawly came into the office and I left him and carried it to Mr Downing (35), who then told me that he was resolved to be gone for Holland this morning. So I to my office again, and dispatch my business there, and came with Mr. Hawly to Mr Downing's (35) lodging, and took Mr. Squib from White Hall in a coach thither with me, and there we waited in his chamber a great while, till he came in; and in the mean time, sent all his things to the barge that lay at Charing-Cross Stairs. Then came he in, and took a very civil leave of me, beyond my expectation, for I was afraid that he would have told me something of removing me from my office; but he did not, but that he would do me any service that lay in his power. So I went down and sent a porter to my house for my best fur cap, but he coming too late with it I did not present it to him. Thence I went to Westminster Hall, and bound up my cap at Mrs. Michell's, who was much taken with my cap, and endeavoured to overtake the coach at the Exchange and to give it him there, but I met with one that told me that he was gone, and so I returned and went to Heaven1, where Luellin and I dined on a breast of mutton all alone, discoursing of the changes that we have seen and the happiness of them that have estates of their own, and so parted, and I went by appointment to my office and paid young Mr. Walton L500; it being very dark he took L300 by content. He gave me half a piece and carried me in his coach to St. Clement's, from whence I went to Mr. Crew's (62) and made even with Mr. Andrews, and took in all my notes and gave him one for all. Then to my Lady Wright and gave her Lord's (34) letter which he bade me give her privately. So home and then to Will's for a little news, then came home again and wrote to Lord (34), and so to Whitehall and gave them to the post-boy. Back again home and to bed.
Note 1. A place of entertainment within or adjoining Westminster Hall. It is called in "Hudibras," "False Heaven, at the end of the Hall." There were two other alehouses near Westminster Hall, called Hell and Purgatory. "Nor break his fast In Heaven and Hell." Ben Jonson's Alchemist, act V. SC. 2.

Loss of The London

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1665 March. 08 Mar 1665. … though a bitter cold day, yet I rose, and though my pain and tenderness in my testicle remains a little, yet I do verily think that my pain yesterday was nothing else, and therefore I hope my disease of the stone may not return to me, but void itself in pissing, which God grant, but I will consult my physitian.
This morning is brought me to the office the sad newes of "The London," in which Sir J. Lawson’s men were all bringing her from Chatham to The Hope, and thence he was to go to sea in her; but a little a’this side the buoy of the Nower, she suddenly blew up. About 24 [men] and a woman that were in the round-house and coach saved; the rest, being above 300, drowned: the ship breaking all in pieces, with 80 pieces of brass ordnance. She lies sunk, with her round-house above water. Sir J. Lawson hath a great loss in this of so many good chosen men, and many relations among them. I went to the ’Change, where the news taken very much to heart. So home to dinner, and Mr. Moore with me. Then I to Gresham College, and there saw several pretty experiments, and so home and to my office, and at night about 11 home to supper and to bed. See Loss of The London.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Admiral John Lawson 1615-1665 (50). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet Street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (36).

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 December. 01 Dec 1673. To Gresham College, whither the city had invited the Royal Society by many of their chief aldermen and magistrates, who gave us a collation, to welcome us to our first place of assembly, from whence we had been driven to give place to the City, on their making it their Exchange on the dreadful conflagration, till their new Exchange was finished, which it now was. The Society having till now been entertained and having met at Arundel House.

Tower Hill

Vintry

St James Garlickhythe Vintry

In 1471 Eleanor Neville Baroness Stanley 1447-1471 (24) died. She was buried at St James Garlickhythe Vintry.

Walbrook

St Stephen's Church Walbrook

In 1608 Stephen Slaney Lord Mayor -1608 died. He was buried at St Stephen's Church Walbrook.