Twenty Trees

email@twentytrees.co.uk

History of Suffolk

Suffolk is in East Anglia

Around 1517 Frances Vere 1517-1577 was born to John Vere 15th Earl Oxford 1471-1540 (46) and Elizabeth Trussell Countess Oxford at Suffolk.

Aldeburgh

Arwarton

Around 1698 Philip Parker 2nd Baronet Parker 1650-1698 (48) died at Arwarton. His son Philip Parker A Morley Long 3rd Baronet Parker 1682-1741 (16) succeeded 3rd Baronet Parker of Arwarton in Suffolk.

20 Jan 1741. Tuesday. This morning died my brother-in-law, Sir Philip Parker (59), at 3 o'clock, choked by one of those fits he has for 12 weeks past had at sundry times. He was last night as well or rather better than at any time before. I spent a great part of the day with Lady Parker and my nieces. At night, the will and codicil were opened in presence of Mrs. East, Lady Parker's mother, Mr. Gilbert East, Lady Parker's brother, my 2 nieces, Mrs. Gosset and myself, wherein Lady Parker and my niece Martha (25), the eldest, are left executors, and myself, Mr. Gilbert East and Mr. Kirk, the counsellor, who drew the will, are made trustees. The estate is divided between my nieces; the Wiltshire and what lies in some other places to my niece Martha (25) : and the Suffolk estate to my niece Elizabeth (24). He left divers legacies and,among the others, 50Z. to my wife (51), 20 guineas to my son (29), 100?. to each of the Trustees, 101. to my cousin Fortrey and 500Z. to my niece Bering. He ordered to be buried at Arwarton. The will we judged very ill and confusedly drawn, but happily the persons concerned are only my Lady Parker and her two daughters. In case of my nieces' death without children, their estates go to the heirs general, which are my wife and niece Bering. It is surprising that he mentioned not the places in the Funds where his money lies, but only bequeathed his personal estate in general terms, and that he kept no book of receipts and disbursements whereby might be known where his ready money lies, which I have to reason to suppose is more than 30,000l, but Mr. Gosset believes it nearer 50,000?.
This affair prevented my attending the committee at the Georgia Office, which met to consider of the powers for the President entered to be appointed at Savannah. I learned Sir Robert Walpole (64) was not down at the House of Commons early enough to declare the King's consent to our petition for money, but that he came after the order of the day was called for, which was a sUght of the Trustees.
The Committee present were : Mr. Ayers, Hen. Archer, Lord Shaftsbury (29), Mr. Smith, Mr. Vernon, who made some progress in the affair and adjourned the affair to Friday.

Badley

Around 1539 Susannah Crofts 1539-1603 was born to John Poley 1511-1589 (28) and Anne Wentworth 1520-1575 (19) at Badley.

In 1542 Margaret Poley Lady Palmer 1542-1625 was born to John Poley 1511-1589 (31) and Anne Wentworth 1520-1575 (22) at Badley.

On 28 Aug 1575 Anne Wentworth 1520-1575 (55) died at Badley.

On 20 Oct 1589 John Poley 1511-1589 (78) died at Badley. He was buried at Badley.

Barham

Shrubland Hall Barham

Barking

Barrow

All Saints Church Barrow

The Rectory Barrow

Before 26 Mar 1633 Mary Beale 1582 1625 aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699 was born to John Cradock at The Rectory Barrow. She was baptised by her father at All Saints Church.

Chedburh Suffolk

On 09 Mar 1838 Walter Rowlands Ingram Sculptor 1838-1903 was born to Rev George Ingram at Chedburh Suffolk.

Edwardstone

Bures

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 856, which was the eighth after Alfred's birth, the second year of king Charles III, and the eighteenth year of the reign of Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, Humbert, bishop of the East-Angles, anointed with oil and consecrated as king the glorious Edmund, with much rejoicing and great honour in the royal town called Burva, in which at that time was the royal seat, in the fifteenth year of his age, on a Friday, the twenty-fourth moon, being Christmas-day.

Blythburgh

On 12 Aug 1944 Joseph Patrick Kennedy 1915-1944 (29) was killed at Blythburgh when his plane exploded over the English Channel during a top-secret mission.

Blythburgh Priory Blythburgh

Jurmin Wuffingas -654 was buried at Blythburgh Priory Blythburgh.

Bulcamp Blythburgh

Battle of Bulcamp

In 654 Penda King Mercia -655 defeated the East Anglian army at the Battle of Bulcamp at Bulcamp Blythburgh. Anna King East Anglia -654 and his son Jurmin Wuffingas -654 were killed. Anna's son Æthelhere King East Anglia -655 succeeded King East Anglia.

Botesdale

Around 1538 Nicholas Bacon 1510-1579 (27) was given the manors of Redgrave, Botesdale and Gislingham in Suffolk, and Gorhambury by Henry VIII (46).

Bramfield

St Andrew's Church Bramfield

On 14 Nov 1627 Elizabeth Waldegrave -1627 died. On 06 Dec 1629 Arthur Coke 1587-1629 (42) died in Bury St Edmunds. Jacobean Hooded Monument sculpted by Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (40) in St Andrew's Church Bramfield. White and black marble; reclining effigy of Elizabeth with Arthur kneeling in prayer above within an arched Recess; Arms over the arch and surrounding it are seven Cartouches.

Brome

On 24 Dec 1803 Jemima Cornwallis 4th Countess St Germans 1803-1856 was born to Charles Cornwallis 2nd Marquess Cornwallis 1774-1823 (29) and Louisa Gordon Marchioness Cornwallis 1776-1850 (26) at Brome.

Bruisyard Abbey

Catherine Pole 1410- was appointed Nun at Bruisyard Abbey.

On 05 May 1377 Maud Plantagenet Countess Ulster 1310-1377 (67) died at Bruisyard Abbey. She was buried at Bruisyard Abbey.

Bungay

On 30 Jan 1352 Alice Plantagenet 1324-1352 (28) died at Bungay.

Burnt Bradfield

Bury St Edmunds

Campsey

On 13 Jul 1499 Christopher Willoughby 10th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1453-1499 (46) died at Campsey. He was buried at Campsey Nunnery Campsey. His son William Willoughby 11th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1482-1526 (17) succeeded 11th Baron Willoughby Eresby.

Cavendish

In 1253 Thomas Grey 1253-1321 was born to John Grey at Cavendish.

Around 1306 Thomas Grey 1306-1365 was born to Thomas Grey 1253-1321 (53) at Cavendish.

Around 1320 Robert Cavendish 1320-1351 was born at Cavendish.

In Jan 1321 Thomas Grey 1253-1321 (68) died at Cavendish.

Around 1346 John Cavendish 1346-1381 was born to Robert Cavendish 1320-1351 (26) at Cavendish.

Around 1402 William Cavendish 1402-1433 was born to John Cavendish 1374-1417 (28)at Cavendish.

In 1472 Thomas Cavendish 1472-1524 was born to Thomas Cavendish 1430-1477 (42) and Catherine Scudamore 1434-1489 (38) at Cavendish.

In 1549 the Leche family sold Chatsworth House to William Cavendish 1505-1557 (44). His wife Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (22) had persuraded him to sell his ancestral lands around Cavendish and buy land around her ancestral lands.

Podbrooke Hall Cavendish

Around 1450 John Smith 1450-1480 was born at Podbrooke Hall Cavendish.

In 1478 Alice Smith 1478-1515 was born at Podbrooke Hall Cavendish.

Church of St Mary Cavendish

Peasant's Revolt

On 15 Jun 1381 John Cavendish 1346-1381 (35) was captured at Church of St Mary Cavendish during the Peasant's Revolt. He (35) was beheaded in the Market Place in Bury St Edmunds.

Chilton

On 10 Jun 1630 Susan Crane 1630-1667 was born to Robert Crane 1st Baronet Crane 1586-1643 (44) and Susan Alinton in Chilton.

In 1631 Anne Crane 1631-1662 was born to Robert Crane 1st Baronet Crane 1586-1643 (45) and Susan Alinton in Chilton.

Clare

Around 1066 Gilbert Clare 1066-1117 was born to Richard Clare 1024-1090 (42) and Rohese Giffard -1113 at Clare.

Around 1100 Hervey Clare 1100-1189 was born to Gilbert Clare 1066-1117 (34) and Adeliza Claremont 1058-1117 (42) at Clare.

Around 1156 Mabel Clare Baroness Okehampton Baroness Mowbray 1156-1204 was born to Roger Clare 2nd Earl Hertford 1116-1173 (40) and Maud St Hilary Countess Hertford at Clare.

On 23 Apr 1307 Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (35) died at Clare.

In 1382 Joanne Clopton Baroness Beauchamp Bletsoe 1352-1382 (24) died at Clare.

Clare Priory Clare

In 1153 Gilbert Clare 1st Earl Hertford 1115-1153 (38) died. He was buried at Clare Priory Clare. His brother Roger Clare 2nd Earl Hertford 1116-1173 (37) succeeded 2nd Earl Hertford 1C 1138. Rohese Vere Countess Essex Countess Hertford 1110-1170 (43) by marriage Countess Hertford 1C 1138.

On 10 Dec 1363 Elizabeth Burgh Duchess of Clarence 1332-1363 (31) died at Dublin. She was buried at Clare Priory Clare.

On 07 Oct 1368 Lionel Plantagenet 1st Duke Clarence 1338-1368 (29) died from poisoning at Alba. There was strong speculation he had been poisoned by his wife's (14) father (48). He was buried at Clare Priory Clare. His daughter Philippa Plantagenet Countess March 5th Countess Ulster 1355-1382 (13) succeeded 5th Earl Ulster.

On 18 Jan 1425 Edmund Mortimer 5th Earl March 7th Earl Ulster 1391-1425 (33) died at Trim Castle, Trim, County Meath. He was buried at Clare Priory Clare.

Stoke by Clare

Stoke by Clare Priory

On 01 Apr 1495 Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (79) made her last will. It was proved 27 Aug 1495.
Source: A Selection From the Wills of Eminent Persons by Camden Society (Great Britain). Published 1838. Transcribed by John Gough Nichols and John Bruce.
IN the name of allmyghty God, the blessed Trinite, fader and son and the holigost, trusting in the meanes and mediacions of oure blessed Lady Moder, of oure most blessed Saviour Jh’u Crist, and by the intercession of holy Saint John Baptist, and all the saintes of heven: I, CECILLE, wife unto the right noble prince Richard late Duke of Yorke, fader unto the most cristen prince my Lord and son King Edward the iiij th , the first day of Aprill the yere of our Lord M.CCCC.lxxxxv. after the computacion of the Church of Englond, of hole mynde and body, loving therfore be it to Jh’u, make and ordeigne my testament in fourme and maner ensuyng.
Furst, I bequeath and surrendour my soule in to the mercifull handes of allmyghty God my maker, and in to protecion of the blessed yrgin our lady Saint Mary, and suffrage of Saint John Baptist, and of all other saintes of heven. Also my body to be buried beside the body of my moost entierly best beloved Lord and housbond, fader unto my said lorde and son, and in his tumbe within the collegiate church of Fodringhay, a if myn executours by the sufferaunce of the King (38) finde goode sufficient therto; and elles at the Kinges (38) pleasure. And I will that after my deceasse all my dettes sufficiently appering and proved be paid, thanking oure Lord at this tyme of making of this my testament to the knolege of my conscience I am not muche in dett; and if it happen, as I trust to God it shalnot, that there be not found sufficient money aswell to pay my dettes as to enture my body, than in advoiding such charges as myght growe for the same, the whiche God defende, I lymytte and assigne all such parcelles of plate as belongith to my chapell, pantry, cellour, ewry, and squillery, to the perfourmyng of the same, as apperith in the inventary, except such plate as I have bequeithed. Also I geve and bequeith to the Kinges noble grace all such money as is owing to me of the customes, and two cuppes of gold.
Also I geve and bequeith to the Quene (29) a crosse croslette of diamantes, a sawter with claspes of silver and guilte enameled covered with grene clothe of golde, and a pix with the fleshe of Saint Cristofer.
Also I bequeith to my lady the Kinges moder (51) a portuos with claspes of gold covered with blacke cloth of golde.
Also I geve to my lord Prince (8) a bedde of arres of the Whele of Fortune and testour of the same, a counterpoint of arras, and a tappett of arres with the pope.
Also I geve to my lord Henry Duke of Yorke (3) b three tappettes of arres, oon of them of the life of Saint John Baptist, another of Mary Maudeleyn, and the thirde of the passion of our Lord and Saint George.
And if my body be buried at Fodringhay in the colege there with my most entierly best beloved lord and housbond, than I geve to the said colege a square canapie of crymeson clothe of gold with iiij. staves, twoo auter clothes of crymeson clothe of gold, twoo copes of crymeson cloth of gold, a chesibull and twoo tenucles of cryinyson clothe of golcrvith iij. abes, c twoo auter clothes of crymeson damaske browdered, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and iij. copes of blewe velwett brodered, with iij. abes, thre masse bokes, thre grayles, and vij. processioners.
Also I geve to the colege of Stoke Clare a chesibull and twoo tenucles of playn crymyson cloth of gold with iij. abes, twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and fyve coopes of white damaske browdered, with iij. abes, twoo awter clothes of crymeson velwett upon the velwete (sic), a vestement of crymeson playne velvet, iiij. antiphoners, iiij. grayles, and sixe processioners.
Also I geve to the house of Sion two of the best coopes of crymyson clothe of gold.
Note. These next four people refer to her grand-daughters, children of Edward IV.
Also I geve to my doughter Brigitte (14) the boke of Legenda Aurea in velem, a boke of the life of Saint Kateryn of Sene, a boke of Saint Matilde.
Also I geve to my doughter Cecill (26) a portuous with claspes silver and gilte covered with purple velvet, and a grete portuous without note.
Also I geve to my doughter Anne (19) the largest bedde of bawdekyn, withe countrepoint of the same, the barge with bailies, tilde, and ores belonging to the same.
Also I geve to my doughter Kateryn (15) a traves of blewe satten.
Also I geve to my doughter of Suffolke (50) a the chare with the coveryng, all the quoshons, horses, and harneys belonging to the same, and all my palfreys.
Note. The next people are her grand-children, children of her daughter Elizabeth York Duchess Suffolk 1444-1503 (50).
Also I geve to my son of Suffolke (24) b a clothe of estate and iij. quoschons of purpull damaske cloth of gold.
Also I geve to my son Humfrey (21) c two awter clothes of blewe damaske brawdered and a vestyment of crymeson satten for Jh’us masse.
Also I geve to my son William (17) d a traves of white sarcenet, twoo beddes of downe, and twoo bolsters to the same.
Also I geve to my doughter Anne priores of Sion, a boke of Bonaventure and Hilton in the same in Englishe, and a boke of the Revelacions of Saint Burgitte.
Also I woll that all my plate not bequeithed be sold, and the money thereof be putte to the use of my burying, that is to sey, in discharging of suche costes and expensis as shalbe for carying of my body from the castell of Barkehampstede unto the colege of Fodringhey. And if any of the said plate be lefte unexpended I woll the said colege have it.
Also I geve to the colege of saint Antonies in London an antiphoner with the ruelles of musik in the later ynd.
Also I geve unto Master Richard Lessy all suche money as is owing unto me by obligations what soever they be, and also all such money as is owing unto me by the Shirfe of Yorkeshire, to helpe to bere his charges which he has to pay to the Kinges grace, trusting he shall the rather nyghe the said dettes by the help and socour of his said grace.
Also I geve to Master William Croxston a chesibull, stoles, and fanons of blake velwett, with an abe.
Also I geve to Master Eichard Henmershe a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of crymyson damaske, with an abe; and a chesibill, stoles and fanons of crymeson saten, with an abe.
Also I geve to Sir John More a frontell of purpull cloth of gold, a legend boke, and a colett boke.
Also I give to Sir Kandall Brantingham a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymson velvet, with an abe, the better of bothe.
Also I geve to Sir William Grave a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymeson velvett, with an abe; a masse-boke that servith for the closett, a prymour with claspes silver and gilt, covered with blewe velvett, and a sawter that servith for the closett covered with white ledder.
Also I geve to Sir John Blotte a gospell boke, a pistill covered with ledder, and a case for a corporax of grene playne velvett. Also I geve to Sir Thomas Clerk a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, fanons, of rede bawdeken, with iij. abes.
Also I geve to Sir William Tiler twoo coopes of rede bawdekyn.
Also I geve to Robert Claver iij. copes of white damaske brawdered, and a gowne of the Duchie b facion of playne blake velvett furred with ermyns.
Also I geve to John Bury twoo old copes of crymysyn satten cloth of gold, a frontell of white bawdekyn, twoo curteyns of rede sarcenett fringed, twoo curteyns of whit sarcenet fringed, a feder bed, a bolstour to the same, the best of feders, and two whit spervers of lynyn.
Also I geve to John Poule twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of white bawdekyn, with iij. abes; a short gowne of purple playne velvett furred with ermyns, the better of ij. and a kirtill of damaske with andelettes of silver and gilt furred.
Also I geve to John Smyth twoo auter clothes, a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of blew bawdekyn, with iij. abes. Also I geve to John Bury twoo copes of crymysyn clothe of gold that servith for Sondays.
Also I geve to John Walter a case for corporax of purple playne velvett, twoo cases for corporax of blewe bawdekyn, twoo auter clothes, a chesibill of rede and grene bawdekyn, a canapie of white sarcenett, iij. abes for children, and iiij. pair of parrours of white bawdekyn, twoo pair parrours of crymsyn velvett, twoo pair parrours of rede bawdekyn, a housling towell that servith for my selfe, twoo corteyns of blewe sarcenett fringed, a sudory of crymy-syn and white, the egges blak, a crose cloth and a cloth of Saint John Baptist of sarcenett painted, a long lantorn, a dext standing doble, twoo grete stondardes and ij. litill cofers.
Also I geve to John Peit-wynne twoo vestimentes of white damaske, a white bedde of lynnyn, a federbedde and a bolstour, and a short gowne of purple playne velvet furred with sabilles. Also I geve to Thomas Lentall six auter clothes of white sarcenett, with crosses of crymsyn velvet.
Also I geve to John Long iij. peces of bawdekyn of the lengur sorte. Also I geve to Sir [John] Verney knighte and Margarett his wiffe a a crosse [of] silver and guilte and berall, and in the same a pece of the holy crosse and other diverse reliques.
Also I geve to Dame Jane Pesemershe, widue, myne Inne that is called the George in Grauntham, during terme of her life; and after her decesse I woll that the reversion therof be unto the college of Fodringhay for evermore, to find a prest to pray for my Lord my housbond and me.
Also I geve to Nicholas Talbott and Jane his wife a spone of gold with a sharp diamount in the ende, a dymy-sent of gold with a collumbine and a diamont in the same, a guirdill of blewe tissue harnessed with gold, a guirdill of gold with a bokull and a pendaunt and iiij. barres of gold, a hoke of gold with iij. roses, a pomeamber of gold garnesshed with a diamont, sex rubies and sex perles, and the surnap and towell to the same.
Also I geve to Richard Boyvile and Gresild his wife my charrett and the horses with the harnes that belongith therunto, a gowne with a dymy trayn of purpull saten furred with ermyns, a shorte gowne of purple saten furred with jennetes, a kirtill of white damaske with aunde lettes silver and gilte, a spone of gold, a dymysynt of gold with a columbyne garnesshed with a diainant, a saphour, an amatist, and viij. perles, a pomeamber of gold enameled, a litell boxe with a cover of gold and a diamant in the toppe.
Also I geve to Richard Brocas and Jane his wife a long gown of purpull velvett upon velvet furred with ermyns, a greate Agnus of gold with the Trinite, Saint Erasmus, and the Salutacion of our Lady; an Agnus of gold with our Lady and Saint Barbara; a litell goblett with a cover silver and part guild; a pair of bedes of white amber gauded with vj. grete stones of gold, part aneled, with a pair of bedes of x. stones of gold and v. of corall; a cofor with a rounde lidde bonde with iron, which the said Jane hath in her keping, and all other thinges that she hath in charge of keping.
Also I geve to Anne Pinchbeke all other myne Agnus unbequeithed, that is to sey, ten of the Trinite, a litell malmesey pott with a cover silver and parte guilte, a possenett with a cover of silver, a short gowne of playne russett velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of playne blewe velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of purple playn velvet furred with grey, a tester, a siler, and a countrepoint of bawdekyn, the lesser of ij.
Also I geve to Jane Lessy a dymysent of gold with a roos, garnisshed with twoo rubies, a guirdell of purple tissue with a broken bokull, and a broken pendaunt silver and guilte, a guirdill of white riband with twoo claspes of gold with a columbyne, a guirdell of blewe riband with a bokell and a pendaunt of gold, a litell pair of bedes of white amber gaudied with vij. stones of gold, an haliwater stope with a strynkkill silver and gilte, and a laier silver and part guilte.
Also I geve to John Metcalfe and Alice his wife all the ringes that I have, except such as hang by my bedes and Agnus, and also except my signet, a litell boxe of golde with a cover of golde, a pair of bedes of Ixj. rounde stones of golde gaudied with sex square stones of golde enemeled, with a crosse of golde, twoo other stones, and a scalop shele of geete honging by.
Also I geve to Anne Lownde a litell bokull and a litell pendaunt of golde for a guirdill, a litell guirdell of golde and silke with a bokill and a pendaunt of golde, a guirdell of white riband with aggelettes of golde enameled, a hoke of golde playne, a broken hoke of golde enameled, and a litell rounde bottumed basyn of silver.
Also I geve to the house of Asshe-rugge a chesibull and ij. tenucles of crymysyn damaske embrawdered, with thre abes.
Also I geve to the house of Saint Margaretes twoo auter clothes with a crucifix and a vestiment of grete velvet.
Also I geve to the parish church of Stoundon a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.
Also I geve to the parishe church of Much Barkehampstede a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.
Also I geve to the parish church of Compton by sides Guilford a eorporax case of blake cloth of gold and iiij. auter clothes of white sarcenett embrawdered with garters.
Also I geve to Alisaunder Cressener my best bedde of downe and a bolster to the same.
Also I geve to Sir Henry Haidon knyght a tablett and a cristall garnesshed with ix. stones and xxvij. perles, lacking a stone and iij. perles.
Also I geve to Gervase Cressy a long gown of playn blewe velvet furred with sabilles.
Also I geve to Edward Delahay twoo gownes of musterdevilers furred with mynckes, and iiij u of money.
Also I geve to Thomas Manory a short gowne of crymesyn playn velvet lyned, purfilled with blake velvet, and iiij ll in money.
Also I geve to John Broune all such stuf as belongith to the kechyn in his keping at my place at Baynardcastell in London, and iiij u in money.
Also I geve to William Whitington a short gown of russett cloth furred with matrons and calabour wombes, a kirtill of purpull silke chamblett with awndelettes silver and gilte, all such floures of brawdery werke and the cofer that they be kept in, and xls. in money.
Also I geve to all other gentilmen that be daily a waiting in my houshold with Mr. Richard Cressy and Robert Lichingham everich of theime iiij u in money.
Also I geve to every yoman that be daily ad waiting in my houshold with John Otley xls. in money.
Also I geve to every grome of myne xxvj s. viij d. in money. And to every page of myne xiij s. iiij d. in money.
Also I geve to Robert Harison xls. in money and all the gootes.
And if ther be no money founde in my cofers to perfourme this my will and bequest, than I will that myne executours, that is to sey the reverend fader in God Master Olyver King bisshop of Bath (63), Sir Reignolde Bray (55) knight, Sir Thomas Lovell, councellours to the Kinges grace, Master William Pikinham doctour in degrees dean of the colege of Stoke Clare, Master William Felde master of the colege of Fodringhey, and Master Richard Lessy dean of my chapell, havyng God in reverence and drede, unto whome I geve full power and auctorite to execute this my will and testament, make money of such goodes as I have not geven and bequeithed, and with the same to content my dettes and perfourme this my will and testament.
And the foresaid reverend fader in God, Sir Rignold Bray knyght, Sir Thomas Lovell knyght, Master William Pikenham, and Master William Felde, to be rewarded of suche thinges as shalbe delivered unto theme by my commaundement by the hondes of Sir Henry Haidon knyght stieward of my houshold and Master Richard Lessy, humbly beseching the Kinges habundant grace in whome is my singuler trust to name such supervisour as shalbe willing and favorabull diligently to se that this my present testament and will be perfittely executed and perfourmyd, gevyng full power also to my said executours to levey and receyve all my dettes due and owing unto me at the day of my dethe, as well of my receyvours as of all other officers, except such dettes as I have geven and bequeathed unto Master Richard Lessy aforesaid, as is above specified in this present will and testament.
And if that Master Richard Lessy cannot recover such money as I have geven to hym of the Shirffes of Yorkeshire and of my obligacions, than I will he be recompensed of the revenues of my landes to the sume of v c. marcs at the leest.
IN WITTENESSE HEROF I have setto my signet and signemanuell at my castell of Berkehamstede the last day of May the yere of our Lord abovesaid, being present Master Richard Lessy, Sir William Grant my confessour, Richard Brocas clerc of my kechyn, and Gervays Cressy. Proved at “Lamehithe” the 27 th day of August, A.D. 1495, and commission granted to Master Richard Lessy the executor in the said will mentioned to administer, &c. &c.

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1675 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503. From a work of 1500.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1499-1525 (10). Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535 (40). Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince Wales 1486-1502 (13).

Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

Clopton

In 1145 Gilbert Peche 1145-1212 was born at Clopton.

Around 1327 William Clopton 1327-1377 was born to Walter Clopton 1298-1327 (29) at Clopton. Some sources describe his date of bith as 1366 but since his father died in 1327, and dates of death are usually more accurate than those of birth, William's date of birth has been adjusted to 1327.

In 1350 John Clopton 1350- was born to William Clopton 1327-1377 (23) and Anne Morehall at Clopton.

In 1372 Ivetta Grey 1340-1372 (32) died at Clopton.

In 1374 Richard Dudley 1374-1465 was born to Richard Dudley 1378- at Clopton.

In 1377 William Clopton 1327-1377 (50) died at Clopton.

Around 1382 William Clopton 1382-1417 was born to John Clopton 1350- at Clopton.

Around 1404 Thomas Clopton 1404- was born to William Clopton 1382-1417 (22) at Clopton.

Cosford

In 1284 Robert Lisle 1246-1284 (38) died at Cosford.

Nedging Cosford

In 1262 Robert Lisle 1212-1262 (49) died at Nedging Cosford.

Cotton

On 16 Oct 1396 William "Jackanapes" Pole 1st Duke Suffolk 1396-1450 was born to Michael Pole 2nd Earl Suffolk 1361-1415 (35) and Katherine Stafford Countess Suffolk 1376-1419 (20) at Cotton.

On 27 Nov 1420 Hugh Burnell 2nd Baron Burnell 1347-1420 (73) died at Cotton. He was buried at Hales Abbey Halesowen.

Crowfield

Culford

On 22 Nov 1624 Nicholas Bacon 1st Baronet Bacon 1540-1624 (84) died in Culford. His son Edmund Bacon 1st Baronet Bacon 1570-1649 (54) succeeded 1st Baronet Bacon of Redgrave.

Darsham

In 1674 William Grey 1652-1687 (21) and Elizabeth Bedingfield 1650- were married at Darsham.

Dennington

In 1353 William Phelip 1353-1404 was born to Richard Phelip 1312- at Dennington.

St Mary's Church Dennington

Drinkstone

Around 1380 John Bacon 1380-1453 was born in Drinkstone.

In 1422 Edmund Bacon 1422-1453 was born to John Bacon 1380-1453 (42) in Drinkstone.

In 1453 Edmund Bacon 1422-1453 (31) died in Drinkstone.

In 1454 John Bacon 1454-1500 was born to Edmund Bacon 1422-1453 and Elizabeth Crofts 1425-1470 (29) in Drinkstone.

In 1457 Agnes Cockfield 1457-1488 was born to Thomas Cockfield 1420-1510 (37) in Drinkstone.

In 1478 Isabel or Eleanor Cage 1478-1535 was born to John Cage 1460- in Drinkstone.

In 1479 Robert Bacon 1479-1548 was born to John Bacon 1454-1500 (25) and Agnes Cockfield 1457-1488 (22) in Drinkstone.

In 1488 Agnes Cockfield 1457-1488 (31) died in Drinkstone.

In 1500 John Bacon 1454-1500 (46) died in Drinkstone.

On 25 Nov 1510 Thomas Cockfield 1420-1510 (90) died in Drinkstone.

Before 27 Nov 1852 Rev Edgar Rust d’Eye of Abbot’s Hall 1795-1852 was appointed Drinkstone.

Dunwich

1287 Great Storm

On 14 Dec 1287 a great storm caused a significant number of deaths on both sides of the English Channel. In the Low Countries around 50,000 people are believed to have died. In England hundreds were killed. The port of New Romney was so changed as to be replaced by Rye through which the course of the River Rother now ran. The port of Dunwich never recovered from the storm and thereafter declined.

Elveden

Eriswell

On 10 May 1401 Thomas Tuddenham 1401-1462 was born to Robert Tuddenham 1366-1405 (35) and Margaret Harling 1380-1416 (21) at Eriswell.

Euston

Harriet Stanhope Baroness Southampton was buried at Euston.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 10 Sep 1677. To divert me, my Lord (59) would needs carry me to see Ipswich, when we dined with one Mr. Mann by the way, who was Recorder of the town. There were in our company my Lord Huntingtower (28), son to the Duchess of Lauderdale (50), Sir Edward Bacon, a learned gentleman of the family of the great Chancellor Verulam, and Sir John Felton, with some other knights and gentlemen. After dinner came the bailiff and magistrates in their formalities with their maces to compliment my Lord (59), and invite him to the town-house, where they presented us a collation of dried sweetmeats and wine, the bells ringing, etc. Then, we went to see the town, and first, the Lord Viscount Hereford's (3) house, which stands in a park near the town, like that at Brussels, in Flanders; the house not great, yet pretty, especially the hall. The stews for fish succeeded one another, and feed one the other, all paved at bottom. There is a good picture of the blessed virgin in one of the parlors, seeming to be of Holbein, or some good master. Then we saw the Haven, seven miles from Harwich. The tide runs out every day, but the bedding being soft mud, it is safe for shipping and a station. The trade of Ipswich is for the most part Newcastle on Tyne coals, with which they supply London; but it was formerly a clothing town. There is not any beggar asks alms in the whole place, a thing very extraordinary, so ordered by the prudence of the magistrates. It has in it fourteen or fifteen beautiful churches: in a word, it is for building, cleanness, and good order, one of the best towns in England. Cardinal Wolsey was a butcher's son of Ipswich, but there is little of that magnificent Prelate's foundation here, besides a school and I think a library, which I did not see. His intentions were to build some great thing. We returned late to Euston, having traveled about fifty miles this day.
Since first I was at this place, I found things exceedingly improved. It is seated in a bottom between two graceful swellings, the main building being now in the figure of a Greek II with four pavilions, two at each corner, and a break in the front, railed and balustered at the top, where I caused huge jars to be placed full of earth to keep them steady upon their pedestals between the statues, which make as good a show as if they were of stone, and, though the building be of brick, and but two stories besides cellars and garrets covered with blue slate, yet there is room enough for a full court, the offices and outhouses being so ample and well disposed. the King's (47) apartment is painted à fresco, and magnificently furnished. There are many excellent pictures of the great masters. The gallery is a pleasant, noble room; in the break, or middle, is a billiard table, but the wainscot, being of fir, and painted, does not please me so well as Spanish oak without paint. The chapel is pretty, the porch descending to the gardens. The orange garden is very fine, and leads into the greenhouse, at the end of which is a hall to eat in, and the conservatory some hundred feet long, adorned with maps, as the other side is with the heads of the Cæsars, ill cut in alabaster; above are several apartments for my Lord, Lady, and Duchess, with kitchens and other offices below, in a lesser form; lodgings for servants, all distinct for them to retire to when they please and would be in private, and have no communication with the palace, which he tells me he will wholly resign to his son-in-law and daughter, that charming young creature.
The canal running under my Lady's (43) dressing room chamber window, is full of carps and fowl, which come and are fed there. The cascade at the end of the canal turns a cornmill that provides the family, and raises water for the fountains and offices. To pass this canal into the opposite meadows, Sir Samuel Morland (52) has invented a screw bridge, which, being turned with a key, lands you fifty feet distant at the entrance of an ascending walk of trees, a mile in length,—as it is also on the front into the park,—of four rows of ash trees, and reaches to the park pale, which is nine miles in compass, and the best for riding and meeting the game that I ever saw. There were now of red and fallow deer almost a thousand, with good covert, but the soil barren and flying sand, in which nothing will grow kindly. The tufts of fir, and much of the other wood, were planted by my direction some years before. This seat is admirably placed for field sports, hawking, hunting, or racing. The mutton is small, but sweet. The stables hold thirty horses and four coaches. The out-offices make two large quadrangles, so as servants never lived with more ease and convenience; never master more civil. Strangers are attended and accommodated as at their home, in pretty apartments furnished with all manner of conveniences and privacy.
There is a library full of excellent books; bathing rooms, elaboratory, dispensary, a decoy, and places to keep and fat fowl in. He had now in his new church (near the garden) built a dormitory, or vault, with several repositories, in which to bury his family.
In the expense of this pious structure, the church is most laudable, most of the houses of God in this country resembling rather stables and thatched cottages than temples in which to serve the Most High. He has built a lodge in the park for the keeper, which is a neat dwelling, and might become any gentleman. The same has he done for the parson, little deserving it for murmuring that my Lord put him some time out of his wretched hovel, while it was building. He has also erected a fair inn at some distance from his palace, with a bridge of stone over a river near it, and repaired all the tenants' houses, so as there is nothing but neatness and accommodations about his estate, which I yet think is not above £1,500 a year. I believe he had now in his family one hundred domestic servants.
His lady (43) (being one of the Brederode's daughters, grandchild to a natural son of Henry Frederick, Prince of Orange) [Note. Evelyn confused here. Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (43) was the daughter of Louis Nassau Beverweert 1602-1665 who was the illegitimate son of Maurice Orange Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625. Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 was the younger brother of Maurice Orange Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.] is a good-natured and obliging woman. They love fine things, and to live easily, pompously, and hospitably; but, with so vast expense, as plunges my Lord (59) into debts exceedingly. My Lord (59) himself is given into no expensive vice but building, and to have all things rich, polite, and princely. He never plays, but reads much, having the Latin, French, and Spanish tongues in perfection. He has traveled much, and is the best bred and courtly person his Majesty (47) has about him, so as the public Ministers more frequent him than any of the rest of the nobility. While he was Secretary of State and Prime Minister, he had gotten vastly, but spent it as hastily, even before he had established a fund to maintain his greatness; and now beginning to decline in favor (the Duke being no great friend of his), he knows not how to retrench. He was son of a Doctor of Laws, whom I have seen, and, being sent from Westminster School to Oxford, with intention to be a divine, and parson of Arlington, a village near Brentford, when Master of Arts the Rebellion falling out, he followed the King's (47) Army, and receiving an HONORABLE WOUND IN THE FACE, grew into favor, and was advanced from a mean fortune, at his Majesty's (47) Restoration, to be an Earl and Knight of the Garter, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, and first favorite for a long time, during which the King (47) married his natural son, the Duke of Grafton (13), to his only daughter (22) and heiress, as before mentioned, worthy for her beauty and virtue of the greatest prince in Christendom. My Lord is, besides this, a prudent and understanding person in business, and speaks well; unfortunate yet in those he has advanced, most of them proving ungrateful. The many obligations and civilities I have received from this noble gentleman, extracts from me this character, and I am sorry he is in no better circumstances.
Having now passed near three weeks at Euston, to my great satisfaction, with much difficulty he suffered me to look homeward, being very earnest with me to stay longer; and, to engage me, would himself have carried me to Lynn-Regis, a town of important traffic, about twenty miles beyond, which I had never seen; as also the Traveling Sands, about ten miles wide of Euston, that have so damaged the country, rolling from place to place, and, like the Sands in the Deserts of Lybia, quite overwhelmed some gentlemen's whole estates, as the relation extant in print, and brought to our Society, describes at large.

Around 1641 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (22). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (14).

Around 1648 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (29). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (21).

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (38).

Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (56). Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682 (58) and Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (48).

Around 1647 John Weesop Painter -1652. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (20).

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656 (58). Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (17).

1645 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (26). Portrait of Samuel Morland Polymath 1st Baronet 1625-1695 (20).

Around 1650. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Louis Nassau Beverweert 1602-1665 (48).

In 1623 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641 (56). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (38).

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Before 27 Jun 1641 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Maurice Orange Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.

In 1756 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (32). Portrait of Henry Fitzroy 1st Duke Grafton 1663-1690 in his Garter Robes.

Euston Hall Euston

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 July. 22 Jul 1670. We rode out to see the great mere, or level, of recovered fen land, not far off. In the way, we met Lord Arlington (52) going to his house in Suffolk, accompanied with Count Ogniati, the Spanish minister, and Sir Bernard Gascoigne (56); he was very importunate with me to go with him to Euston, being but fifteen miles distant; but, in regard of my company, I could not. So, passing through Newmarket, we alighted to see his Majesty's (40) house there, now new-building; the arches of the cellars beneath are well turned by Mr. Samuel, the architect, the rest mean enough, and hardly fit for a hunting house. Many of the rooms above had the chimneys in the angles and corners, a mode now introduced by his Majesty (40), which I do at no hand approve of. I predict it will spoil many noble houses and rooms, if followed. It does only well in very small and trifling rooms, but takes from the state of greater. Besides, this house is placed in a dirty street, without any court or avenue, like a common one, whereas it might and ought to have been built at either end of the town, upon the very carpet where the sports are celebrated; but, it being the purchase of an old wretched house of my Lord Thomond's, his Majesty (40) was persuaded to set it on that foundation, the most improper imaginable for a house of sport and pleasure.
We went to see the stables and fine horses, of which many were here kept at a vast expense, with all the art and tenderness imaginable.
Being arrived at some meres, we found Lord Wotton and Sir John Kiviet (43) about their draining engines, having, it seems, undertaken to do wonders on a vast piece of marsh-ground they had hired of Sir Thomas Chicheley (master of the ordnance). They much pleased themselves with the hopes of a rich harvest of hemp and coleseed, which was the crop expected.
Here we visited the engines and mills both for wind and water, draining it through two rivers or graffs, cut by hand, and capable of carrying considerable barges, which went thwart one the other, discharging the water into the sea. Such this spot had been the former winter; it was astonishing to see it now dry, and so rich that weeds grew on the banks, almost as high as a man and horse. Here, my Lord and his partner had built two or three rooms, with Flanders white bricks, very hard. One of the great engines was in the kitchen, where !I saw the fish swim up, even to the very chimney hearth, by a small cut through the room, and running within a foot of the very fire.
Having, after dinner, ridden about that vast level, pestered with heat and swarms of gnats, we returned over Newmarket Heath, the way being mostly a sweet turf and down, like Salisbury Plain, the jockeys breathing their fine barbs and racers and giving them their heats.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Woodcock and Flatfoot Race at Newmarket

09 Oct 1671. 09 Oct 1671 and 10 Oct 1671. I went, after evening service, to London, in order to a journey of refreshment with Mr. Treasurer (41), to Newmarket, where the King (41) then was, in his coach with six brave horses, which we changed thrice, first, at Bishop-Stortford, and last, at Chesterford; so, by night, we got to Newmarket, where Mr. Henry Jermain (35) (nephew to the Earl of St. Alban (66)) lodged me very civilly. We proceeded immediately to Court, the King (41) and all the English gallants being there at their autumnal sports. Supped at the Lord Chamberlain's; and, the next day, after dinner, I was on the heath, where I saw the great match run between Woodcock and Flatfoot, belonging to the King (41), and to Mr. Eliot, of the bedchamber, many thousands being spectators; a more signal race had not been run for many years.
This over, I went that night with Mr. Treasurer (41) to Euston, a palace of Lord Arlington's (53), where we found Monsieur Colbert (46) (the French Ambassador), and the famous new French Maid of Honor, Mademoiselle Querouaille (22), now coming to be in great favor with the King (41). Here was also the Countess of Sunderland (25), and several lords and ladies, who lodged in the house.
During my stay here with Lord Arlington (53), near a fortnight, his Majesty (41) came almost every second day with the Duke (37), who commonly returned to Newmarket, but the King (41) often lay here, during which time I had twice the honor to sit at dinner with him (41), with all freedom. It was universally reported that the fair lady —— [Note. Probably Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (22)], was bedded one of these nights, and the stocking flung, after the manner of a married bride; I acknowledge she was for the most part in her undress all day, and that there was fondness and toying with that young wanton; nay, it was said, I was at the former ceremony; but it is utterly false; I neither saw nor heard of any such thing while I was there, though I had been in her chamber, and all over that apartment late enough, and was myself observing all passages with much curiosity. However, it was with confidence believed she was first made a Miss, as they called these unhappy creatures, with solemnity at this time.
On Sunday, a young Cambridge divine preached an excellent sermon in the chapel, the King (41) and the Duke of York (37) being present.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

In 1670 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (35). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (20).

In 1673 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (38). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (23).

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 October continued. 18 Oct 1671. I returned to Euston, in Lord Henry Howard's (43) coach, leaving him at Norwich, in company with a very ingenious gentleman, Mr. White, whose father and mother (daughter to the late Lord Treasurer Weston, Earl of Portland) I knew at Rome, where this gentleman was born, and where his parents lived and died with much reputation, during their banishment in our civil broils.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 October continued. 21 Oct 1671. Quitting Euston, I lodged this night at Newmarket, where I found the jolly blades racing, dancing, feasting, and reveling; more resembling a luxurious and abandoned rout, than a Christian Court. The Duke of Buckingham (43) was now in mighty favor, and had with him that impudent woman, the Countess of Shrewsbury (29), with his band of fiddlers, etc.
Next morning, in company with Sir Bernard Gascoyne (57), and Lord Hawley (63), I came in the Treasurer's coach to Bishop Stortford, where he gave us a noble supper. The following day, to London, and so home.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 August. 28 Aug 1677. To visit my Lord Chamberlain (59), in Suffolk; he sent his coach and six to meet and bring me from St. Edmund's Bury to Euston.

On 04 Jun 1892 Charles Alfred Euston Fitzroy 10th Duke Grafton 1892-1970 was born to Charles Edward Fitzroy 1857-1911 (35) and Ismay Fitzroy 1863-1952 (29) at Euston Hall Euston.

In Sep 1924 Florence Emily Sharon 1858–1924 (66) died at Euston Hall Euston.

1895. Emile Wauters Painter 1846-1933 (48). Portrait of Florence Emily Sharon 1858–1924 (37).

On 07 Apr 2011 Hugh Denis Charles Fitzroy 11th Duke Grafton 1919-2011 (92) died at Euston Hall Euston. His grandson Henry Fitzroy 12th Duke Grafton 1978- succeeded 12th Duke Grafton 1C 1675, 12th Earl Euston, 12th Viscount Ipswich, 12th Baron Sudbury. Olivia Staden Duchess Grafton by marriage Duchess Grafton 1C 1675.

The Church of St Genevieve

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 09 Sep 1677. A stranger preached at Euston Church, and fell into a handsome panegyric on my Lord's (59) new building the church, which indeed for its elegance and cheerfulness, is one of the prettiest country churches in England. My Lord (59) told me his heart smote him that, after he had bestowed so much on his magnificent palace there, he should see God's House in the ruin it lay in. He has also rebuilt the parsonage-house, all of stone, very neat and ample.

Ewarton

Around 1580 Calthorp Parker 1580-1618 was born to Philip Parker 1549-1605 (31) at Ewarton.

In 1618 Calthorp Parker 1580-1618 (38) died at Ewarton.

Eye

On 15 May 1846 Spencer Rodney 5th Baron Rodney 1785-1846 (61) died at Harley Street Marylebone. He was buried at Eye.

Framlingham

On 07 Mar 1226 Ida Tosny Countess Norfolk 1156-1226 (70) died at Framlingham.

Framlingham Castle

In 1314 John Botetort 1st Baron Botetort 1265-1324 (49) was appointed Governor of Framlingham Castle.

On 04 Aug 1338 Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300-1338 (38) died at Framlingham Castle. His daughter Margaret Plantagenet 2nd Countess Norfolk -1399 succeeded 2nd Earl Norfolk 3C 1312.

On 10 Dec 1472 Anne Mowbray 8th Countess Norfolk 1472-1481 was born to John Mowbray 4th Duke Norfolk 1444-1476 (28) and Elizabeth Talbot Duchess Norfolk 1442-1507 (30) at Framlingham Castle.

Death of the Duke of Norfolk

On 14 Jan 1476 John Mowbray 4th Duke Norfolk 1444-1476 (31) died at Framlingham Castle. Suspicious since he was only 32. His daughter Anne Mowbray 8th Countess Norfolk 1472-1481 (3) succeeded 8th Earl Norfolk 3C 1312, 11th Baron Mowbray 1C 1283, 12th Baron Segrave 2C 1295. His only child Anne Mowbray 8th Countess Norfolk 1472-1481 (3) who inherited the vast Mowbray estates was subsequently married to Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473- two years later.

On 21 May 1524 Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (81) died at Framlingham Castle. He was buried at Thetford Priory Thetford and subsequently reburied at the Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham. His son Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (51) succeeded 3rd Duke Norfolk 3C 1483, 2nd Earl Surrey 3C 1483, 14th Baron Mowbray 1C 1283, 15th Baron Segrave 2C 1295. Elizabeth Stafford Duchess Norfolk 1497-1558 (27) by marriage Duchess Norfolk 3C 1483.

Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham

On 24 Apr 1472 John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (47) was appointed 207th Knight of the Garter by Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (29).. After 22 Aug 1485 John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (60) was buried at Thetford Priory Thetford. He was reburied at Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham.

On 21 May 1524 Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (81) died at Framlingham Castle. He was buried at Thetford Priory Thetford and subsequently reburied at the Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham. His son Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (51) succeeded 3rd Duke Norfolk 3C 1483, 2nd Earl Surrey 3C 1483, 14th Baron Mowbray 1C 1283, 15th Baron Segrave 2C 1295. Elizabeth Stafford Duchess Norfolk 1497-1558 (27) by marriage Duchess Norfolk 3C 1483.

On 23 Jul 1536 Henry Fitzroy Tudor 1st Duke Richmond and Somerset 1519-1536 (17) died at St James's Palace. He was buried at Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham.

On 19 Jan 1547 Henry Howard 1516-1547 (31) was beheaded at Tower Hill. He was buried at Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham. He had foolishly added the arms of Edward the Confessor to his own arms. He was charged with treasonably quartering the royal arms. His father survived sentence since the King died the day before it was due to take place.

Around 1575 Unknown Painter. Based on a work of 1546. After William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Henry Howard 1516-1547.

Around 1575 based on a work of 1546.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Henry Howard 1516-1547.

In 1546 Unknown Painter. Italian. Portrait of Henry Howard 1516-1547 (30) wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter. His right , his left .

On 25 Aug 1554 Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (81) died at Kenninghall. He was buried at Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham. His grandson Thomas Howard 4th Duke Norfolk 1536-1572 (18) succeeded 4th Duke Norfolk 3C 1483, 3rd Earl Surrey 3C 1483.

Fressingfield

Ufford Hall Fressingfield

On 30 Jan 1617 William Sancroft Archbishop of Canterbury 1617-1693 was born in Ufford Hall Fressingfield.

Gedding

Around 1438 Robert Chamberlayne 1438-1491 was born to Roger Chambelayne 1389- in Gedding.

Gislingham

Around 1538 Nicholas Bacon 1510-1579 (27) was given the manors of Redgrave, Botesdale and Gislingham in Suffolk, and Gorhambury by Henry VIII (46).

Gipping

Thomas Tyrrell -1551 lived at Gipping.

Hadleigh

Around 890 Guthrum Viking -890 died. He was, according to the 12th Century Annals of St Neots, buried in Hadleigh.

On 17 Dec 1825 Thomas Woolner Sculptor 1825-1892 was born in Hadleigh.

Hartismere

Denham Hartismere

On 24 Sep 1277 William Marshal 1st Baron Marshal 1277-1314 was born to John Marshal 1240-1282 (37) and Hawise Unknown at Denham Hartismere.

Hawstead

In 1454 Robert Drury 1454-1536 was born at Hawstead.

On 02 Oct 1527 William Drury 1527-1579 was born to Robert Drury 1503-1577 (24) at Hawstead.

Helmingham

Church of St Mary Helmingham

On 15 Aug 1591 Lionel Tollemache 2nd Baronet Talmash 1591-1640 was baptised at Church of St Mary Helmingham.

On 06 Sep 1640 Lionel Tollemache 2nd Baronet Talmash 1591-1640 (49) died at Tilbury. He was buried at Church of St Mary Helmingham. On 06 Sep 1640 His son Lionel Tollemache 3rd Baronet Talmash 1624-1669 (16) succeeded 3rd Baronet Talmash of Helmingham in Suffolk. Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (13) by marriage Lady Talmash of Helmingham in Suffolk.

Around 1641 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (22). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (14).

Around 1648 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (29). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (21).

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (38).

Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (56). Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682 (58) and Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (48).

Around 1647 John Weesop Painter -1652. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (20).

Hengrave

Herringerhall

In 1724 John Gore 1724-1794 was born to William Gore 1692-1748 (32) in Herringerhall.

Hesset

In 1535 Isabel or Eleanor Cage 1478-1535 (57) died in Hesset.

On 02 Nov 1548 Robert Bacon 1479-1548 (69) died in Hesset.

Heveningham

Around 1545 Arthur Heveningham 1545-1630 was born to Anthony Heveningham 1501-1557 (44) at Heveningham.

In 1639 Elizabeth Heveningham 1639- was born to William Heveningham 1604-1678 (35) and Katherine Wallop -1648 at Heveningham.

In 1641 John Heveningham 1641- was born to William Heveningham 1604-1678 (37) and Katherine Wallop -1648 at Heveningham.

In 1642 Bridget Heveningham 1642- was born to William Heveningham 1604-1678 (38) and Katherine Wallop -1648 at Heveningham.

Heveningham Hall

Death of Princess Charlotte

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter V: Country House Visits. After my dear mother's death I visited a great deal with my father (53), and one year we went for the shooting to Lord Huntingfield's place, Heveningham Hall. I slept in the bedroom once occupied by the famous Chevalier d'Éon, who had been a frequent guest at Heveningham, and about whom there were many stories told. It was said that the Chevalier was the one and only lover of cross-grained Queen Charlotte, and that her son, George IV, was the result of their intimacy, although his paternity was of course admitted by King George III. The animosity always displayed by the old Queen to her grand-daughter, Princess Charlotte, was supposed to arise from the fact that as heiress to the throne she innocently dispossessed the other Royal Dukes from the succession. It is certainly a fact that the Princess's untimely death in childbirth was attributed to foul play at the time, and when later the accoucheur Sir Richard Croft, committed suicide, all classes of society were loud in condemnation of the Queen and the Prince Regent. I do not vouch for the accuracy of Queen Charlotte's love affair. I only give the Heveningham gossip as I heard it.
As D'Eon was undoubtedly one of the most picturesque and mysterious personages ot the eighteenth century I was naturally interested in these somewhat scandalous stories.
The Chevalier died when he was eighty-three years of age, after a most extraordinary career. He was at one time aide-de-camp to the Comte de Broglie, and fought in the French army ; but later on for some mysterious reason he discarded man's attire and passed as a woman for thirty-four years. Often when I went into my room I half expected to see a ghostly figure seated at the escritoire where the Chevalier wrote his secret cipher communications, and I wondered whether the brocade crowns and frills and furbelows that he wore as a woman had ever hung in the old wardrobe which I used.
My father and I also stayed with the Westmorlands at Apethorpe Hall ; we visited the Earl (38) and Countess of Chichester (36) at Stanmer Park, and we were welcome guests at Cadlands, Silverlands, Chiswick House, West Park, and my uncle Lord Stradbroke's place, Henham Hall, which was afterwards burnt down.
I had visited Deene Park with my mother in 1842, but I must deal with my future home in the chapter devoted to Deene and its associations.

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany Painter 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (19).

Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.

In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (33). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29) when Prince of Wales.

In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (48). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (44) in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

Ipswich

Marriage of Princess Elizabeth and John of Holland

On 08 Jan 1297 John Gerulfing I Count Holland 1284-1299 (13) and Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (14) were married at Ipswich. Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Plantagenet Countess Essex Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (14) by marriage Countess Holland. The wedding was attended by her sister Margaret Plantagenet Duchess Brabant 1275-1333 (21), her father King Edward I (57), her brother Edward (12) and her future second husband Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (21).

On 26 Dec 1502 Edmund Pole 3rd Duke Suffolk 1471-1513 (31) was proclaimed an outlaw at Ipswich for assuming his former title Duke Suffolk 1C 1448.

On 24 Jul 1553 Robert Wingfield 1513-1561 (40) hosted Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558 (37) during her journey to London to claim the throne from Lady Jane Grey (17) at Ipswich.

Siege of Colchester

John Evelyn's Diary 1656 July. 08 Jul 1656. To Colchester, a fair town, but now wretchedly demolished by the late siege, especially the suburbs, which were all burned, but were then repairing. The town is built on a rising ground, having fair meadows on one side, and a river with a strong ancient castle, said to have been built by King Coilus, father of Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, of whom I find no memory save at the pinnacle of one of their wool-staple houses, where is a statue of Coilus, in wood, wretchedly carved. The walls are exceedingly strong, deeply trenched, and filled with earth. It has six gates, and some watchtowers, and some handsome churches. But what was shown us as a kind of miracle, at the outside of the Castle, the wall where Sir Charles Lucas and Sir George Lisle, those valiant and noble persons who so bravely behaved themselves in the last siege, were barbarously shot, murdered by Ireton in cold blood, after surrendering on articles; having been disappointed of relief from the Scotch army, which had been defeated with the King at Worcester. The place was bare of grass for a large space, all the rest of it abounding with herbage. For the rest, this is a ragged and factious town, now swarming with sectaries. Their trading is in cloth with the Dutch, and baize and says with Spain; it is the only place in England where these stuffs are made unsophisticated. It is also famous for oysters and eringo root, growing hereabout, and candied for sale.
Went to Dedham, a pretty country town, having a very fair church, finely situated, the valley well watered. Here, I met with Dr. Stokes, a young gentleman, but an excellent mathematician. This is a clothing town, as most are in Essex, but lies in the unwholesome hundreds.
Hence to Ipswich, doubtless one of the sweetest, most pleasant, well-built towns in England. It has twelve fair churches, many noble houses, especially the Lord Devereux's; a brave quay, and commodious harbor, being about seven miles from the main; an ample market place. Here was born the great Cardinal Wolsey, who began a palace here, which was not finished.
I had the curiosity to visit some Quakers here in prison; a new fanatic sect, of dangerous principles, who show no respect to any man, magistrate, or other, and seem a melancholy, proud sort of people, and exceedingly ignorant. One of these was said to have fasted twenty days; but another, endeavoring to do the like, perished on the 10th, when he would have eaten, but could not.

Around 1590 based on a work of around 1520.Unknown Painter. French. Portrait of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey 1473-1530.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 10 Sep 1677. To divert me, my Lord (59) would needs carry me to see Ipswich, when we dined with one Mr. Mann by the way, who was Recorder of the town. There were in our company my Lord Huntingtower (28), son to the Duchess of Lauderdale (50), Sir Edward Bacon, a learned gentleman of the family of the great Chancellor Verulam, and Sir John Felton, with some other knights and gentlemen. After dinner came the bailiff and magistrates in their formalities with their maces to compliment my Lord (59), and invite him to the town-house, where they presented us a collation of dried sweetmeats and wine, the bells ringing, etc. Then, we went to see the town, and first, the Lord Viscount Hereford's (3) house, which stands in a park near the town, like that at Brussels, in Flanders; the house not great, yet pretty, especially the hall. The stews for fish succeeded one another, and feed one the other, all paved at bottom. There is a good picture of the blessed virgin in one of the parlors, seeming to be of Holbein, or some good master. Then we saw the Haven, seven miles from Harwich. The tide runs out every day, but the bedding being soft mud, it is safe for shipping and a station. The trade of Ipswich is for the most part Newcastle on Tyne coals, with which they supply London; but it was formerly a clothing town. There is not any beggar asks alms in the whole place, a thing very extraordinary, so ordered by the prudence of the magistrates. It has in it fourteen or fifteen beautiful churches: in a word, it is for building, cleanness, and good order, one of the best towns in England. Cardinal Wolsey was a butcher's son of Ipswich, but there is little of that magnificent Prelate's foundation here, besides a school and I think a library, which I did not see. His intentions were to build some great thing. We returned late to Euston, having traveled about fifty miles this day.
Since first I was at this place, I found things exceedingly improved. It is seated in a bottom between two graceful swellings, the main building being now in the figure of a Greek II with four pavilions, two at each corner, and a break in the front, railed and balustered at the top, where I caused huge jars to be placed full of earth to keep them steady upon their pedestals between the statues, which make as good a show as if they were of stone, and, though the building be of brick, and but two stories besides cellars and garrets covered with blue slate, yet there is room enough for a full court, the offices and outhouses being so ample and well disposed. the King's (47) apartment is painted à fresco, and magnificently furnished. There are many excellent pictures of the great masters. The gallery is a pleasant, noble room; in the break, or middle, is a billiard table, but the wainscot, being of fir, and painted, does not please me so well as Spanish oak without paint. The chapel is pretty, the porch descending to the gardens. The orange garden is very fine, and leads into the greenhouse, at the end of which is a hall to eat in, and the conservatory some hundred feet long, adorned with maps, as the other side is with the heads of the Cæsars, ill cut in alabaster; above are several apartments for my Lord, Lady, and Duchess, with kitchens and other offices below, in a lesser form; lodgings for servants, all distinct for them to retire to when they please and would be in private, and have no communication with the palace, which he tells me he will wholly resign to his son-in-law and daughter, that charming young creature.
The canal running under my Lady's (43) dressing room chamber window, is full of carps and fowl, which come and are fed there. The cascade at the end of the canal turns a cornmill that provides the family, and raises water for the fountains and offices. To pass this canal into the opposite meadows, Sir Samuel Morland (52) has invented a screw bridge, which, being turned with a key, lands you fifty feet distant at the entrance of an ascending walk of trees, a mile in length,—as it is also on the front into the park,—of four rows of ash trees, and reaches to the park pale, which is nine miles in compass, and the best for riding and meeting the game that I ever saw. There were now of red and fallow deer almost a thousand, with good covert, but the soil barren and flying sand, in which nothing will grow kindly. The tufts of fir, and much of the other wood, were planted by my direction some years before. This seat is admirably placed for field sports, hawking, hunting, or racing. The mutton is small, but sweet. The stables hold thirty horses and four coaches. The out-offices make two large quadrangles, so as servants never lived with more ease and convenience; never master more civil. Strangers are attended and accommodated as at their home, in pretty apartments furnished with all manner of conveniences and privacy.
There is a library full of excellent books; bathing rooms, elaboratory, dispensary, a decoy, and places to keep and fat fowl in. He had now in his new church (near the garden) built a dormitory, or vault, with several repositories, in which to bury his family.
In the expense of this pious structure, the church is most laudable, most of the houses of God in this country resembling rather stables and thatched cottages than temples in which to serve the Most High. He has built a lodge in the park for the keeper, which is a neat dwelling, and might become any gentleman. The same has he done for the parson, little deserving it for murmuring that my Lord put him some time out of his wretched hovel, while it was building. He has also erected a fair inn at some distance from his palace, with a bridge of stone over a river near it, and repaired all the tenants' houses, so as there is nothing but neatness and accommodations about his estate, which I yet think is not above £1,500 a year. I believe he had now in his family one hundred domestic servants.
His lady (43) (being one of the Brederode's daughters, grandchild to a natural son of Henry Frederick, Prince of Orange) [Note. Evelyn confused here. Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (43) was the daughter of Louis Nassau Beverweert 1602-1665 who was the illegitimate son of Maurice Orange Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625. Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 was the younger brother of Maurice Orange Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.] is a good-natured and obliging woman. They love fine things, and to live easily, pompously, and hospitably; but, with so vast expense, as plunges my Lord (59) into debts exceedingly. My Lord (59) himself is given into no expensive vice but building, and to have all things rich, polite, and princely. He never plays, but reads much, having the Latin, French, and Spanish tongues in perfection. He has traveled much, and is the best bred and courtly person his Majesty (47) has about him, so as the public Ministers more frequent him than any of the rest of the nobility. While he was Secretary of State and Prime Minister, he had gotten vastly, but spent it as hastily, even before he had established a fund to maintain his greatness; and now beginning to decline in favor (the Duke being no great friend of his), he knows not how to retrench. He was son of a Doctor of Laws, whom I have seen, and, being sent from Westminster School to Oxford, with intention to be a divine, and parson of Arlington, a village near Brentford, when Master of Arts the Rebellion falling out, he followed the King's (47) Army, and receiving an HONORABLE WOUND IN THE FACE, grew into favor, and was advanced from a mean fortune, at his Majesty's (47) Restoration, to be an Earl and Knight of the Garter, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, and first favorite for a long time, during which the King (47) married his natural son, the Duke of Grafton (13), to his only daughter (22) and heiress, as before mentioned, worthy for her beauty and virtue of the greatest prince in Christendom. My Lord is, besides this, a prudent and understanding person in business, and speaks well; unfortunate yet in those he has advanced, most of them proving ungrateful. The many obligations and civilities I have received from this noble gentleman, extracts from me this character, and I am sorry he is in no better circumstances.
Having now passed near three weeks at Euston, to my great satisfaction, with much difficulty he suffered me to look homeward, being very earnest with me to stay longer; and, to engage me, would himself have carried me to Lynn-Regis, a town of important traffic, about twenty miles beyond, which I had never seen; as also the Traveling Sands, about ten miles wide of Euston, that have so damaged the country, rolling from place to place, and, like the Sands in the Deserts of Lybia, quite overwhelmed some gentlemen's whole estates, as the relation extant in print, and brought to our Society, describes at large.

Around 1641 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (22). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (14).

Around 1648 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (29). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (21).

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (38).

Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (56). Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682 (58) and Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (48).

Around 1647 John Weesop Painter -1652. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (20).

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656 (58). Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (17).

1645 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (26). Portrait of Samuel Morland Polymath 1st Baronet 1625-1695 (20).

Around 1650. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Louis Nassau Beverweert 1602-1665 (48).

In 1623 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641 (56). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (38).

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Before 27 Jun 1641 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Maurice Orange Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.

In 1756 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788 (32). Portrait of Henry Fitzroy 1st Duke Grafton 1663-1690 in his Garter Robes.

Brantham Ipswich

Around 1561 Robert Wingfield 1513-1561 (48) died. He was buried at Brantham Ipswich.

Ixworth

In 1197 Robert Blount 1197-1288 was born at Ixworth.

Ketton

On 11 Jan 1709 Samuel Barnardiston 2nd Baronet Brightwell 1659-1709 was buried in Ketton.

Knotishall

Around 1453 Christopher Willoughby 10th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1453-1499 was born to Robert Willoughby 1410-1465 (43) and Cecily Welles at Knotishall.

Lavenham

In 1404 Lewis Clifford 1364-1404 (40) died at Lavenham.

Around 1420 Thomas Cockfield 1420-1510 was born in Lavenham.

In 1536 John Gurdon 1536-1623 was born to Robert Gurdon of Assington and Rose Sexton at Assington Hall.

On 20 Nov 1649 Henry Willoughby 1579-1649 (70) died at Lavenham. He was buried at Wilne.

Rose Sexton was born to Robert Sexton of Lavenham.

Robert Gurdon of Assington and Rose Sexton were married.

Letheringham

Around 1345 John Wingfield 1345-1389 was born to Thomas Wingfield 1328- at Letheringham.

In 1378 Robert Wingfield 1378-1409 was born to John Wingfield 1345-1389 (33) and Margaret Hastings 1355-1386 (23) at Letheringham.

On 06 Nov 1386 Margaret Hastings 1355-1386 (31) died at Letheringham.

In 1389 John Wingfield 1345-1389 (44) died at Letheringham.

Around 1403 Robert Wingfield 1403-1454 was born to Robert Wingfield 1378-1409 (25) at Letheringham.

On 31 Jan 1405 John Russell 1340-1405 (65) died at Letheringham.

On 03 May 1409 Robert Wingfield 1378-1409 (31) died at Letheringham.

Around 1432 Robert Wingfield 1432-1481 was born to Robert Wingfield 1403-1454 (29) and Elizabeth Goushill 1402- in Letheringham.

Around 1434 Henry Wingfield 1434-1494 was born to Robert Wingfield 1403-1454 (31) and Elizabeth Goushill 1402- in Letheringham.

On 21 Nov 1454 Robert Wingfield 1403-1454 (51) died at Letheringham.

Around 1469 Richard Wingfield 1469-1525 was born to John Wingfield 1428-1481 (41) and Elizabeth Fitzlewis 1431-1500 (38) at Letheringham.

On 22 Dec 1500 Elizabeth Fitzlewis 1431-1500 (69) died in Letheringham.

Linstead

Little Horringer

Little Malden

After 22 Sep 1545 Elizabeth Wentworth Countess Bath 1470-1545 died at Little Malden.

Little Saxham

In 1618 Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 was baptised at Little Saxham.

In Mar 1667 Henry Crofts 1590-1667 (76) died. He was buried on Little Saxham.

Little Saxham Hall Little Saxham

In 1667 William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 inherited Little Saxham Hall Little Saxham following the death of his father.

Long Melford

Around 1571 Richard Alington 1535-1571 (36) died in Long Melford.

Kentwell Hall Long Melford

On or before 02 Mar 1612 Anne Clopton 1612-1641 was born to William Clopton of Kentwell Hall 1592-1616 in Kentwell Hall Long Melford. She was baptised 02 Mar 1612.

Lowestoft

Somerleyton Lowestoft

Somerleyton Hall Somerleyton Lowestoft

In 1678 Thomas Allin 1st Baronet 1612-1685 (66) retired from public life settling at his country seat Somerleyton Hall Somerleyton Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Thomas Allin 1st Baronet 1612-1685 (53). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Milden

On 18 Dec 1602 Simonds Ewes 1602-1650 was born to Paul Ewes at Milden.

Nacton

On 30 Oct 1757 Edward Vernon 1684-1757 (72) died in Nacton.

In 1739 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779 (38). Portrait of Edward Vernon 1684-1757 (54).

Nayland

On 09 Oct 1609 Thomas Weston 4th Earl of Portland 1609-1688 was born to Richard Weston 1st Earl of Portland 1577-1635 (32) at Nayland.

Nettlestead

On 22 May 1298 Robert Tiptoft 1247-1298 (51) died at Nettlestead.

On 30 Aug 1300 Eva Chaworth 1252-1300 (48) died at Nettlestead.

On 02 Apr 1380 Margaret Deincourt Baroness Tibetot1344 -1380 (36) died at Nettlestead.

Around 1424 Philip Wentworth 1424-1464 was born to Roger Wentworth 1395-1462 (29) and Margery Despencer de jure 3rd Baroness Despencer Baroness Ros Helmsley 1397-1478 (27) at Nettlestead.

On 24 Oct 1462 Roger Wentworth 1395-1462 (67) died at Nettlestead.

Around 1470 Elizabeth Wentworth Countess Bath 1470-1545 was born to Henry Wentworth de jure 4th Baron Despencer 1448-1501 (22) and Anne Saye Baroness Despencer at Nettlestead.

In 1501 Thomas Wentworth 1st Baron Wentworth 1501-1551 was born to Richard Wentworth de jure 5th Baron Despencer 1480-1528 (21) and Anne Tyrrell Baroness Despencer at Nettlestead.

In 1520 Anne Wentworth 1520-1575 was born to Thomas Wentworth 1st Baron Wentworth 1501-1551 (19) and Margaret Fortescue Baroness Wentworth at Nettlestead.

Newmarket

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. Caroline, Duchess of Montrose, was a very well-known figure at Newmarket, but she was highly unpopular, and was once mobbed on the course for having Mr. Crawfurd's horse pulled as there was not enough money on it! She was very much in love with Mr. Crawfurd, whom she afterwards married.
Crawfurd owned a horse called "Corrie Roy," and as the Duchess was nicknamed "Carrie Red," these names were the subject of some amusing doggerel written by Lord Winchilsea ... "Corrie Roy and Carry Red, One for the course, the other for bed, Is not Craw a lucky boy, To have Carry Red and Corrie Roy ? ".

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. Poor Henry Blackwood, the highwayman of Cassiobury, met his death when he was riding to the course with Lord Cardigan and myself. A rope had been stretched across the road for some reason or other, and Henry Blackwood, who never saw it, rode right into it and was pitched off his horse. He was picked up insensible and carried back to Newmarket. He lingered in an unconscious state for three days and then died. It was a curious coincidence that Lord Cardigan was to die in almost exactly the same way through a fall from his horse, and that he also was to lie in a stupor for three days.
Lady Amelia Blackwood was with her husband until he died, but another lady whom he had dearly loved would not be denied admittance to the death-chamber. Lady Amelia did not object, so the dying man's mistress and his wife waited for the end together — truly a strange situation !.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. My uncle, Admiral Rous, was a great personage at Newmarket, and I cannot describe him better than by quoting what has been written by a well-known sporting judge.
" There was the old Admiral himself, the King of Sportsmen and good fellows. Horse or man-o'-war, it was all one to him ; and although sport may not be regarded as of the same importance with politics, who knows which has the more beneficial effect on man-kind .'* I would have backed Admiral Rous to save us from war, and if we drifted into it, to save us from the enemy against any men in the world.".
Mrs. Rous was very dictatorial, and I remember one day after her death calling to inquire how my uncle was. " Indeed, my Lady," said the servant, " I may say the Admiral is a deal better since Mrs. Rous's death." I believe the same answer was given to all callers, and how angry my aunt would have been could she have heard it !.
After I became a widow I often stayed with my uncle, and later on I bought the house associated with so many pleasant memories of the dear Admiral.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. After my marriage Lord Cardigan and I always went to the different meetings, and generally met all our friends ; among others, Lord and Baroness Westmorland, Lord and Baroness Hastings, the Duchess of Beaufort, Willie Craven, George Bruce, and Prince Batthyany. Newmarket was quite a charming rendezvous of society then, so different from the mixed crowd that goes there nowadays, and it could be easily re-christened "Jewmarket," for the Chosen are everywhere.

On 12 Dec 1618 Francis Leigh of Addington 1590-1644 (28) was knighted at Newmarket.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. 31 Aug 1654. Through part of Huntingdonshire, we passed that town, fair and ancient, a river running by it. The country about it so abounds in wheat that, when any King of England passes through it, they have a custom to meet him with a hundred plows.
This evening, to Cambridge; and went first to St. John's College, well built of brick, and library, which I think is the fairest of that University. One Mr. Benlowes has given it all the ornaments of pietra commessa, whereof a table and one piece of perspective is very fine; other trifles there also be of no great value, besides a vast old song-book, or Service, and some fair manuscripts. There hangs in the library the picture of John Williams, Archbishop of York, sometime Lord Keeper, my kinsman, and their great benefactor.
Trinity College is said by some to be the fairest quadrangle of any university in Europe; but in truth is far inferior to that of Christ Church, in Oxford; the hall is ample and of stone, the fountain in the quadrangle is graceful, the chapel and library fair. There they showed us the prophetic manuscript of the famous Grebner, but the passage and emblem which they would apply to our late King, is manifestly relating to the Swedish; in truth, it seems to be a mere fantastic rhapsody, however the title may bespeak strange revelations. There is an office in manuscript with fine miniatures, and some other antiquities, given by the Countess of Richmond, mother of Henry VIII, and the before-mentioned Archbishop Williams, when Bishop of Lincoln. The library is pretty well stored. The Greek Professor had me into another large quadrangle cloistered and well built, and gave us a handsome collation in his own chamber.
Thence to Caius, and afterward to King's College, where I found the chapel altogether answered expectation, especially the roof, all of stone, which for the flatness of its laying and carving may, I conceive, vie with any in Christendom. The contignation of the roof (which I went upon), weight, and artificial joining of the stones is admirable. The lights are also very fair. In one aisle lies the famous Dr. Collins, so celebrated for his fluency in the Latin tongue. From this roof we could descry Ely, and the encampment of Sturbridge fair now beginning to set up their tents and booths; also Royston, Newmarket, etc., houses belonging to the King. The library is too narrow.
Clare-Hall is of a new and noble design, but not finished.
Peter-House, formerly under the government of my worthy friend, Dr. Joseph Cosin (59) [Note. Joseph appears to be a mistake for John?], Dean of Peterborough; a pretty neat college, having a delicate chapel. Next to Sidney, a fine college.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1499-1525 (10). Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535 (40). Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 July. 22 Jul 1670. We rode out to see the great mere, or level, of recovered fen land, not far off. In the way, we met Lord Arlington (52) going to his house in Suffolk, accompanied with Count Ogniati, the Spanish minister, and Sir Bernard Gascoigne (56); he was very importunate with me to go with him to Euston, being but fifteen miles distant; but, in regard of my company, I could not. So, passing through Newmarket, we alighted to see his Majesty's (40) house there, now new-building; the arches of the cellars beneath are well turned by Mr. Samuel, the architect, the rest mean enough, and hardly fit for a hunting house. Many of the rooms above had the chimneys in the angles and corners, a mode now introduced by his Majesty (40), which I do at no hand approve of. I predict it will spoil many noble houses and rooms, if followed. It does only well in very small and trifling rooms, but takes from the state of greater. Besides, this house is placed in a dirty street, without any court or avenue, like a common one, whereas it might and ought to have been built at either end of the town, upon the very carpet where the sports are celebrated; but, it being the purchase of an old wretched house of my Lord Thomond's, his Majesty (40) was persuaded to set it on that foundation, the most improper imaginable for a house of sport and pleasure.
We went to see the stables and fine horses, of which many were here kept at a vast expense, with all the art and tenderness imaginable.
Being arrived at some meres, we found Lord Wotton and Sir John Kiviet (43) about their draining engines, having, it seems, undertaken to do wonders on a vast piece of marsh-ground they had hired of Sir Thomas Chicheley (master of the ordnance). They much pleased themselves with the hopes of a rich harvest of hemp and coleseed, which was the crop expected.
Here we visited the engines and mills both for wind and water, draining it through two rivers or graffs, cut by hand, and capable of carrying considerable barges, which went thwart one the other, discharging the water into the sea. Such this spot had been the former winter; it was astonishing to see it now dry, and so rich that weeds grew on the banks, almost as high as a man and horse. Here, my Lord and his partner had built two or three rooms, with Flanders white bricks, very hard. One of the great engines was in the kitchen, where !I saw the fish swim up, even to the very chimney hearth, by a small cut through the room, and running within a foot of the very fire.
Having, after dinner, ridden about that vast level, pestered with heat and swarms of gnats, we returned over Newmarket Heath, the way being mostly a sweet turf and down, like Salisbury Plain, the jockeys breathing their fine barbs and racers and giving them their heats.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Woodcock and Flatfoot Race at Newmarket

09 Oct 1671. 09 Oct 1671 and 10 Oct 1671. I went, after evening service, to London, in order to a journey of refreshment with Mr. Treasurer (41), to Newmarket, where the King (41) then was, in his coach with six brave horses, which we changed thrice, first, at Bishop-Stortford, and last, at Chesterford; so, by night, we got to Newmarket, where Mr. Henry Jermain (35) (nephew to the Earl of St. Alban (66)) lodged me very civilly. We proceeded immediately to Court, the King (41) and all the English gallants being there at their autumnal sports. Supped at the Lord Chamberlain's; and, the next day, after dinner, I was on the heath, where I saw the great match run between Woodcock and Flatfoot, belonging to the King (41), and to Mr. Eliot, of the bedchamber, many thousands being spectators; a more signal race had not been run for many years.
This over, I went that night with Mr. Treasurer (41) to Euston, a palace of Lord Arlington's (53), where we found Monsieur Colbert (46) (the French Ambassador), and the famous new French Maid of Honor, Mademoiselle Querouaille (22), now coming to be in great favor with the King (41). Here was also the Countess of Sunderland (25), and several lords and ladies, who lodged in the house.
During my stay here with Lord Arlington (53), near a fortnight, his Majesty (41) came almost every second day with the Duke (37), who commonly returned to Newmarket, but the King (41) often lay here, during which time I had twice the honor to sit at dinner with him (41), with all freedom. It was universally reported that the fair lady —— [Note. Probably Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (22)], was bedded one of these nights, and the stocking flung, after the manner of a married bride; I acknowledge she was for the most part in her undress all day, and that there was fondness and toying with that young wanton; nay, it was said, I was at the former ceremony; but it is utterly false; I neither saw nor heard of any such thing while I was there, though I had been in her chamber, and all over that apartment late enough, and was myself observing all passages with much curiosity. However, it was with confidence believed she was first made a Miss, as they called these unhappy creatures, with solemnity at this time.
On Sunday, a young Cambridge divine preached an excellent sermon in the chapel, the King (41) and the Duke of York (37) being present.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

In 1670 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (35). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (20).

In 1673 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (38). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (23).

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 October continued. 16 Oct 1671. Came all the great men from Newmarket, and other parts both of Suffolk and Norfolk, to make their court, the whole house filled from one end to the other with lords, ladies, and gallants; there was such a furnished table, as I had seldom seen, nor anything more splendid and free, so that for fifteen days there were entertained at least 200 people, and half as many horses, besides servants and guards, at infinite expense.
In the morning, we went hunting and hawking; in the afternoon, till almost morning, to cards and dice, yet I must say without noise, swearing, quarrel, or confusion of any sort. I, who was no gamester, had often discourse with the French Ambassador, Colbert (46), and went sometimes abroad on horseback with the ladies to take the air, and now and then to hunting; thus idly passing the time, but not without more often recess to my pretty apartment, where I was quite out of all this hurry, and had leisure when I would, to converse with books, for there is no man more hospitably easy to be withal than my Lord Arlington (53), of whose particular friendship and kindness I had ever a more than ordinary share. His house is a very noble pile, consisting of four pavilions after the French, beside a body of a large house, and, though not built altogether, but formed of additions to an old house (purchased by his Lordship (53) of one Sir T. Rookwood) yet with a vast expense made not only capable and roomsome, but very magnificent and commodious, as well within as without, nor less splendidly furnished. The staircase is very elegant, the garden handsome, the canal beautiful, but the soil dry, barren, and miserably sandy, which flies in drifts as the wind sits. Here my Lord was pleased to advise with me about ordering his plantations of firs, elms, limes, etc., up his park, and in all other places and avenues. I persuaded him to bring his park so near as to comprehend his house within it; which he resolved upon, it being now near a mile to it. The water furnishing the fountains, is raised by a pretty engine, or very slight plain wheels, which likewise serve to grind his corn, from a small cascade of the canal, the invention of Sir Samuel Morland (46). In my Lord's (53) house, and especially above the staircase, in the great hall and some of the chambers and rooms of state, are paintings in fresco by Signor Verrio (35), being the first work which he did in England.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 October continued. 21 Oct 1671. Quitting Euston, I lodged this night at Newmarket, where I found the jolly blades racing, dancing, feasting, and reveling; more resembling a luxurious and abandoned rout, than a Christian Court. The Duke of Buckingham (43) was now in mighty favor, and had with him that impudent woman, the Countess of Shrewsbury (29), with his band of fiddlers, etc.
Next morning, in company with Sir Bernard Gascoyne (57), and Lord Hawley (63), I came in the Treasurer's coach to Bishop Stortford, where he gave us a noble supper. The following day, to London, and so home.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 13 Sep 1677. My Lord's coach conveyed me to Bury, and thence baiting at Newmarket, stepping in at Audley-End to see that house again, I slept at Bishop-Stortford, and, the next day, home. I was accompanied in my journey by Major Fairfax, of a younger house of the Lord Fairfax, a soldier, a traveler, an excellent musician, a good-natured, well-bred gentleman.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 October. 23 Oct 1679. Dined at my Lord Chamberlain's (61), the King (49) being now newly returned from his Newmarket recreations.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Rye House Plot

Before 21 Mar 1683 the Rye House Plot was an attempt to assassinate Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 and his brother James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 as they passed Rye House Hoddesdon when were returning from the races at Newmarket on 01 Apr 1683. In the event a fire at Newmarket on the 22 Mar 1683 the races were cancelled.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 September. 23 Sep 1683. We had now the welcome tidings of the King (53) of Poland raising the siege of Vienna, which had given terror to all Europe, and utmost reproach to the French, who it is believed brought in the Turks for diversion, that the French King might the more easily swallow Flanders, and pursue his unjust conquest on the empire, while we sat unconcerned and under a deadly charm from somebody.
There was this day a collection for rebuilding Newmarket, consumed by an accidental fire, which removing his Majesty (53) thence sooner than was intended, put by the assassins, who were disappointed of their rendezvous and expectation by a wonderful providence. This made the King (53) more earnest to render Winchester the seat of his autumnal field diversions for the future, designing a palace there, where the ancient castle stood; infinitely indeed preferable to Newmarket for prospects, air, pleasure, and provisions. The surveyor has already begun the foundation for a palace, estimated to cost £35,000, and his Majesty (53) is purchasing ground about it to make a park, etc.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 March. 07 Mar 1684. Dr. Meggot, Deane of Winchester, preached an incomparable sermon, (the King (53) being now gone to Newmarket,) on 12 Heb. 15. shewing and pathetically pressing the care we ought to have least we come short of the grace of God. Afterwards I went to visite Dr. Tenison (47) at Kensington, whither he was retired to refresh after he had ben sick of the small pox.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

John Evelyn's Diary 1699. 30 Mar 1699. My deceased son was buried in the vault at Wotton, according to his desire.
The Duke of Devon (59) lost £1,900 at a horse race at Newmarket.
The King (48) preferring his young favorite Earl of Albemarle (29) to be first Commander of his Guard, the Duke of Ormond (33) laid down his commission. This of the Dutch Lord (29) passing over his head, was exceedingly resented by everybody.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. I made my first acquaintance with Newmarket when I was ten years old. I went there with my dear mother, and we stayed at the Rutland Arms Hotel, and I remember being very much interested at seeing handsome old Sir Henry Mildmay (46) lifted on his horse to ride to the course. People always rode or drove there, and there was only one stand, which was reserved for members of the Jockey Club and their friends.

Exning Newmarket

Palace House

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 July. 22 Jul 1670. We rode out to see the great mere, or level, of recovered fen land, not far off. In the way, we met Lord Arlington (52) going to his house in Suffolk, accompanied with Count Ogniati, the Spanish minister, and Sir Bernard Gascoigne (56); he was very importunate with me to go with him to Euston, being but fifteen miles distant; but, in regard of my company, I could not. So, passing through Newmarket, we alighted to see his Majesty's (40) house there, now new-building; the arches of the cellars beneath are well turned by Mr. Samuel, the architect, the rest mean enough, and hardly fit for a hunting house. Many of the rooms above had the chimneys in the angles and corners, a mode now introduced by his Majesty (40), which I do at no hand approve of. I predict it will spoil many noble houses and rooms, if followed. It does only well in very small and trifling rooms, but takes from the state of greater. Besides, this house is placed in a dirty street, without any court or avenue, like a common one, whereas it might and ought to have been built at either end of the town, upon the very carpet where the sports are celebrated; but, it being the purchase of an old wretched house of my Lord Thomond's, his Majesty (40) was persuaded to set it on that foundation, the most improper imaginable for a house of sport and pleasure.
We went to see the stables and fine horses, of which many were here kept at a vast expense, with all the art and tenderness imaginable.
Being arrived at some meres, we found Lord Wotton and Sir John Kiviet (43) about their draining engines, having, it seems, undertaken to do wonders on a vast piece of marsh-ground they had hired of Sir Thomas Chicheley (master of the ordnance). They much pleased themselves with the hopes of a rich harvest of hemp and coleseed, which was the crop expected.
Here we visited the engines and mills both for wind and water, draining it through two rivers or graffs, cut by hand, and capable of carrying considerable barges, which went thwart one the other, discharging the water into the sea. Such this spot had been the former winter; it was astonishing to see it now dry, and so rich that weeds grew on the banks, almost as high as a man and horse. Here, my Lord and his partner had built two or three rooms, with Flanders white bricks, very hard. One of the great engines was in the kitchen, where !I saw the fish swim up, even to the very chimney hearth, by a small cut through the room, and running within a foot of the very fire.
Having, after dinner, ridden about that vast level, pestered with heat and swarms of gnats, we returned over Newmarket Heath, the way being mostly a sweet turf and down, like Salisbury Plain, the jockeys breathing their fine barbs and racers and giving them their heats.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Rutland Arms Hotel

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. I made my first acquaintance with Newmarket when I was ten years old. I went there with my dear mother, and we stayed at the Rutland Arms Hotel, and I remember being very much interested at seeing handsome old Sir Henry Mildmay (46) lifted on his horse to ride to the course. People always rode or drove there, and there was only one stand, which was reserved for members of the Jockey Club and their friends.

Oakley

Church of St Nicholas Oakley

In 1748 Edward Townshend Dean Norwich 1719-1765 (28) became Rector of Church of St Nicholas Oakley.

Orford

Richard I's Ransom

In Dec 1194 Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (72) left Orford with her son Richard's (37) ranson of 100,000 marks in silver and 200 hostages. She was accompanied by Walter de Coutances -1207 and William Longchamp Bishop of Ely -1197.!Hubert Walter Bishop of Salisbury (34) was Regent of England in her absence. .

Return of Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer

In Oct 1326 Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (31) landed at Orford with Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (39), John Maltravers 1st Baron Maltravers 1290-1365 (36) and Nicholas Abrichecourt 1290-.

In 1604 Michael Stanhope 1549-1621 (55) was elected MP Orford.

In 1621 Lionel Tollemache 2nd Baronet Talmash 1591-1640 (29) was elected MP Orford.

In 1628 Lionel Tollemache 2nd Baronet Talmash 1591-1640 (36) was elected MP Orford.

In 1747 John Waldegrave 3rd Earl Waldegrave 1718-1784 (28) was elected MP Orford.

Orford Castle Orford

Between 1165  and 1173 Orford Castle Orford was constructed on behalf of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (31)."One of the most remarkable keeps in England", is of a unique design possibly based on Byzantine architecture.

In 1216 Orford Castle Orford was captured by Prince Louis of France (28) who had invaded England in 1216 at the invitation of the English barons who were disillusioned with King John (49).

On 06 May 1494 Henry Wingfield 1434-1494 (60) died in Orford Castle Orford.

Pakenham

In 1460 John Cage 1460- was born in Pakenham.

Around 1479 Robert Strange 1479-1511 was born to Henry Strange 1432-1485 (47) at Pakenham.

On 18 Mar 1511 Robert Strange 1479-1511 (32) died at Pakenham.

On 07 Aug 1660 Hamon le Strange 1605-1660 (55) died. He was buried at Pakenham.

Parham

Around 1410 Robert Willoughby 1410-1465 was born to Thomas Willoughby of Parham 1387-1432 (23) and Joan Fitzalan 1407-1439 (3) at Parham. Date adjusted to from 1420 to 1410 to be consistent with birth of daughter Dorothy in 1425.

On 19 Oct 1526 William Willoughby 11th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1482-1526 (44) died at Parham. He was buried at All Saints Church Mettingham Bungay. His daughter Catherine Willoughby Duchess Suffolk 1519-1580 (7) succeeded 12th Baron Willoughby Eresby. Catherine Willoughby Duchess Suffolk 1519-1580 (7) became a ward of Henry VIII (35).

Parham Old Hall Parham

On 22 Mar 1519 Catherine Willoughby Duchess Suffolk 1519-1580 was born to William Willoughby 11th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1482-1526 (37) and Maria Salinas Baroness Willoughby Eresby at Parham Old Hall Parham.

On 26 Mar 1519 Catherine Willoughby Duchess Suffolk 1519-1580 was christened at Parham Old Hall Parham.

Pelham

In 1546 Elizabeth Tailboys 1490-1546 (56) died at Pelham.

Redgrave

Around 1538 Nicholas Bacon 1510-1579 (27) was given the manors of Redgrave, Botesdale and Gislingham in Suffolk, and Gorhambury by Henry VIII (46).

Rendlesham

Around 1522 James Spencer 1522-1567 was born to Leonard Spencer 1494-1568 (28) at Rendlesham.

In 1556 Leonard Spencer 1556-1600 was born to James Spencer 1522-1567 (34) at Rendlesham.

Around 1567 James Spencer 1522-1567 (45) died at Rendlesham.

Around 1582 Robert Spencer 1582-1633 was born to Leonard Spencer 1556-1600 (26) at Rendlesham.

In 1600 Leonard Spencer 1556-1600 (44) died at Rendlesham.

In 1609 Edward Spencer 1609-1670 was born to Robert Spencer 1582-1633 (27) at Rendlesham.

Around 1633 Robert Spencer 1582-1633 (51) died at Rendlesham.

In 1638 John Spencer 1638-1709 was born to Edward Spencer 1609-1670 (29) at Rendlesham.

In 1669 Edward Spencer 1669-1728 was born to John Spencer 1638-1709 (31) at Rendlesham.

In 1670 Edward Spencer 1609-1670 (61) died at Rendlesham.

In 1709 John Spencer 1638-1709 (71) died at Rendlesham.

In 1710 Anne Spencer Duchess Hamilton Duchess Brandon 1710-1771 was born to Edward Spencer 1669-1728 (41) at Rendlesham.

In 1716 Elizabeth Spencer Lady Dashwood 1716-1798 was born to Edward Spencer 1669-1728 (47) at Rendlesham.

On 25 Mar 1728 Edward Spencer 1669-1728 (59) died at Rendlesham.

Naunton Hall Rendlesham

Rushbrooke

St Nicholas' Church Rushbrooke

On 04 Jun 1806 Charles Davers 6th Baronet Davers 1737-1806 (69) died without legitimate issue. Baronet Davers of Rougham in Suffolk extinct. He was buried in St Nicholas' Church Rushbrooke.

Saxham

In 1425 Elizabeth Crofts 1425-1470 was born to Thomas Crofts 1385-1425 (40) in Saxham.

Saxmundham

Stratford St Andrew Saxmundham

Around 1112 Ranulf Glanville 1112-1190 was born at Stratford St Andrew Saxmundham.

Shelley Hall

Southwold

Solebay Southwold

1672 Battle of Solebay

On 28 May 1672 Philip Carteret 1628-1672 (44) and Winston Churchill -1672 were killed at Solebay Southwold.
Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672 (46) was killed. His son Edward Montagu 2nd Earl Sandwich 1648-1688 (24) succeeded 2nd Earl Sandwich.
George Legge 1st Baron Dartmouth 1647-1691 (25) fought.
Charles Harbord 1640-1672 (32) died. The inscription on his. Monument in Westminster Abbey reads ... Sr. Charles Harbord Knt. his Majesties Surveyor General, and First Lieutenant of the Royall James, under the most noble and illustrious captain Edward, Earle of Sandwich (46), Vice Admirall of England, which after a terrible fight maintained to admiration against a squadron of the Holland fleet for above six houres, neere the Suffolk coast, having put off two fireships, at last being utterly disSabled and few of her men remaining unhurt, was by a third unfortunately set on fire: but he (though he swam well) neglected to save himselfe as some did, and out of the perfect love to that worthy lord (whom for many yeares he had constantly accompanyed in all his honourable imployments, and in all the engagements of the former warr) dyed with him at the age of XXXIII, much bewailed of his father whom he never offended, and much beloved of all for his knowne piety, vertue, loyalty, fortitude and fidelity.
Captain John Cox -1672 was killed in action.
Admiral John Holmes 1640-1683 (32) fought as commander of HMS Rupert.

Stoke by Nayland

In 1385 Robert Howard 1385-1437 was born to John Howard 1366-1437 (19) and Alice Tendring 1365-1426 (20) at Stoke by Nayland.

On 01 Apr 1437 Robert Howard 1385-1437 (52) died at Stoke by Nayland.

In 1443 Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 was born to John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (18) and Katherine Moleyns -1465 at Stoke by Nayland.

On 18 Oct 1459 Margaret Mowbray Baroness Grey Ruthyn 1388-1459 (71) died at Stoke by Nayland.

In 1476 Thomasine Sidney 1476-1570 was born to William IV Sidney 1417-1477 (59) at Stoke by Nayland.

Around 1478 Dorothy Tendering 1478-1520 was born to William Tendering and Thomasine Sidney 1476-1570 (2) at Stoke by Nayland.

In 1512 Francis Southwell 1476-1512 (36) died at Stoke by Nayland.

William Tendering was born to William Tendering 1452- at Stoke by Nayland. Often quoted as around 1472; adjusted to be consistent with daughter's birth.

Stow

In 1203 Robert Cheney 1163-1203 (40) died at Stow.

Sudbourne

All Saints Church Sudbourne

Sudbury

Around 1316 Simon Sudbury Archbishop of Canterbury 1316-1381 was born at Sudbury.

Around 1572 Cordelia Alington 1572-1612 was born to Richard Alington 1535-1571 in Sudbury.

On 09 Feb 1709 George Venables Vernon 1st Baron Vernon of Kinderton in Cheshire 1709-1780 was born to Henry Vernon 1686-1719 (22) and Anne Pigot at Sudbury.

Assington

In 1536 John Gurdon 1536-1623 was born to Robert Gurdon of Assington and Rose Sexton at Assington Hall.

Around 1565 Elizabeth Gurdon 1565-1582 was born to John Gurdon 1536-1623 (29) and Amy Brampton -1608.

In 1571 John Gurdon 1536-1623 (35) was elected MP Sudbury.

In 1579 John Gurdon 1536-1623 (43) and Amy Brampton -1608 were married.

In 1582 Elizabeth Gurdon 1565-1582 (17) died.

In 1585 John Gurdon 1536-1623 (49) was appointed Sheriff of Suffolk. His will was proved on 10 Oct 1623.

On 21 Sep 1623 John Gurdon 1536-1623 (87) died. He was buried on 25 Sep 1623 at Assington.

Robert Gurdon of Assington and Rose Sexton were married.

Amy Brampton -1608 was born to William Brampton of Letton at Assington.

Assington Hall

In 1536 John Gurdon 1536-1623 was born to Robert Gurdon of Assington and Rose Sexton at Assington Hall.

St Gregory's Church Sudbury

After 14 Jun 1381 Simon Sudbury Archbishop of Canterbury 1316-1381 head kept at St Gregory's Church Sudbury.

Thorpe

Harbord Morden Thorpe

On 26 Jan 1734 Harbord Harbord 1st Baron Suffield 1734-1810 was born to William Morden 1st Baronet Harbord 1696-1770 (38) and Elizabeth Britiffe Lady Harbord at Harbord Morden Thorpe.

Thurston

Around 1302 Ralph Ufford 1302-1346 was born to Robert Ufford 1st Baron Ufford 1279-1316 (22) and Cecily Valoignes Baroness Ufford 1284-1325 (18) at Thurston.

Around 1305 Eve Clavering 1305-1369 was born to John Clavering 1266-1332 (39) and Hawise Tiptoft 1270-1345 (35) at Thurston.

Ubbeston

Before 25 Jun 1667 Robert Kemp 3rd Baronet Kemp 1667-1734 was born to Robert Kemp 2nd Baronet Kemp 1628-1710 and Mary Sone Lady Kemp -1705 at Ubbeston. On 25 Jun 1667 Robert Kemp 3rd Baronet Kemp 1667-1734 was baptised at Ubbeston.

On 29 Jul 1705 Mary Sone Lady Kemp -1705 died at Ubbeston. She was buried at Gissing.

Ufford

In 1345 Maud Ufford Countess Oxford 1345-1413 was born to Ralph Ufford 1302-1346 (43) and Maud Plantagenet Countess Ulster 1310-1377 (35) at Ufford.

On 31 May 1671 Henry Wood 1st Baronet 1597-1671 was buried at Ufford.

On 18 Dec 1734 Robert Kemp 3rd Baronet Kemp 1667-1734 (67) died at Ufford. His son Robert Kemp 4th Baronet Kemp 1699-1752 (35) succeeded 4th Baronet Kemp of Gissing in Norfolk.

Wangford Brandon

Around 1425 William Brandon 1425-1491 was born to Robert Brandon 1410-1485 (15) and Ada Calthorpe at Wangford Brandon.

Westhorpe

On 06 Jul 1489 George Hopton 1461-1489 (28) died in Westhorpe.

On 25 Jun 1533 Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533 (37) died at Westhorpe.

In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533.

Wetherden

Around 1540 Thomas Tyrrell 1540-1592 was born to Henry Tyrrell -1588 at Wetherden.

Wigsell

Willisham

Around 1373 Robert Ferrers 2nd Baron Ferrers Wem 1373-1393 was born to Robert Ferrers 1st Baron Ferrers Wem 1341-1380 (32) and Elizabeth Boteler Baroness Ferrers Wem 1345-1411 (28) at Willisham.

Wingfield

Around 1328 Thomas Wingfield 1328- was born to John Wingfield 1275-1327 at Wingfield.

Around 1460 John Pole 1460- was born to John Pole 1439- at Wingfield.

Around 1468 Elizabeth Pole Baroness Marshal Baroness Morley 1468-1489 was born to John Pole 2nd Duke Suffolk 1442-1492 (25) and Elizabeth York Duchess Suffolk 1444-1503 (23) in Wingfield.

Before 27 Oct 1492 John Pole 2nd Duke Suffolk 1442-1492 died. He was buried at Wingfield. Before 27 Oct 1492 His son Edmund Pole 3rd Duke Suffolk 1471-1513 succeeded 3rd Duke Suffolk 1C 1448, 3rd Marquess Suffolk 1C, 6th Earl Suffolk 3C 1385.

After Jan 1503 Elizabeth York Duchess Suffolk 1444-1503 died at Wingfield.

On 26 Jul 1538 George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (70) died at Wingfield. He was buried at Sheffield Cathedral. His son Francis Talbot 5th Earl Shrewsbury 5th Earl Waterford 1500-1560 (38) succeeded 5th Earl Shrewsbury 2C 1442, 5th Earl Waterford, 10th Baron Furnivall 1C 1295, 14th Baron Strange Blackmere 1C 1309, 11th Baron Talbot 1C 1331.

St Andrew's Church Wingfield

Woodbridge

On 19 Apr 1798 Elizabeth Spencer Lady Dashwood 1716-1798 (82) died at Grosvenor Square Belgravia. She was buried at Woodbridge.

Great Bealings Woodbridge

Before 09 Jul 1212 Gilbert Peche 1145-1212 died at Great Bealings Woodbridge.

Westerfield Woodbridge

On 07 Nov 1361 Ida Fitzwalter Baroness Neville Essex 1292-1361 (69) died at Westerfield Woodbridge.

Worlingham

Worlingham Hall Worlingham

On 02 Aug 1841 Archibald Brabazon Sparrow Acheson 4th Earl Gosford 1841-1922 was born to Archibald Acheson 3rd Earl Gosford 1806-1864 (34) and Theodosia Brabazon Countess Gosford at Worlingham Hall Worlingham.

Wrentham

In Sep 1231 Luke Poynings 1231-1294 was born to Thomas Poynings 1202-1275 (29) in Wrentham.

Yoxford

In 1570 Thomasine Sidney 1476-1570 (94) died at Yoxford.

Cockfield Hall Yoxford

On 06 Apr 1621 Edward Seymour 1st Earl Hertford 1539-1621 (81) died. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral. His grandson William Seymour 2nd Duke Somerset 1588-1660 (33) succeeded 2nd Earl Hertford 3C 1559. Frances Devereux Duchess Somerset by marriage Countess Hertford 3C 1559. On 26 Jan 1568 Catherine Grey Countess Hertford 1540-1568 died at Cockfield Hall Yoxford. She placed higher than her husband given her Royal descent.