Twenty Trees

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History of Wiltshire

Wiltshire is in Studland

Amesbury

In 1187 Ela Salisbury Abbess Lacock 1187-1261 was born to William Salisbury 2nd Earl Salisbury 1150-1196 (37) and Eleanor Vitre Countess Salisbury 1158-1233 (29) in Amesbury.

On 24 Jun 1291 Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (68) died at Amesbury.

On 21 Mar 1316 Isabel Verdun Baroness Ferrers Groby 1316-1349 was born to Theobald Verdun 2nd Lord Verdun 1278-1316 (37) and Elizabeth Clare Lady Verdun 1295-1360 (20) at Amesbury.

Amesbury Abbey Amesbury

After 1279. Letter XXI. Eleanora Queen Dowager of England to her son Edward I. After 1279. Letter XXI. Eleanora Queen-Dowager of England to her son Edward I.
To the most noble prince and her very dear son, Edward, by God's grace king of England, lord of Ireland, and duke of Aquitaine, Eleanora, humble nun of the order of Fontevraud, of the convent of Amesbury, wishes health and her blessing.
Sweetest son, we know well how great is the desire that a mother has to see her child when she has been long away from him, and that dame Margaret de Nevile, companion of Master John Painter Giffard, has not seen for a long time past her child, who is in the keeping of dame Margaret de Weyland, and has a great desire to see him. We pray you, sweetest son, that you will command and pray the aforesaid Margaret de Weyland, that she will suffer that the mother may have the solace of her child for some time, after her desire. Dearest son, we commend you to God. Given at Amesbury, the 4th day of March.

1316. Letter XXII. Mary Daughter of Edward I a Nun at Amesbury to her Brother Edward II. 1316. Letter XXII. Mary Daughter of Edward I (36), a Nun at Amesbury to her Brother Edward II (31).
To the very high and noble prince, her very dear lord and brother, my lord Edward, by the grace of God king of England, his sister Mary sends health and all manner of honour and reverence.
Very dear sire as a long time has passed since God did his will upon our prioress Dambert, we immediately after her death sent to our very dear cousin, the lady-abbess of Fontevraud, both on my part and on that of the convent, asking for a lady from this our convent, to wit, for the Lady Isabella, whom we understand to be well able and sufficient for the office, that she might be granted to us for our prioress. And we thought, dear sire, that she (the abbess) would have willingly granted us our request, for she is bound to do so since she was brought up and veiled amongst us, and so she should neither wish nor permit that the church should be so long without prelates; but as yet we have had no answer, only we understand from certain people that she intends to send us a prioress from beyond the sea there, and a prior by her counsel out there. And know, certainly, my very dear brother, that should she send any other than one belonging to our own convent, it would prove matter of discord in the convent, and of the destruction of the goods of the church, which I know well, sire, that you would not suffer willingly and wittingly; wherefore I pray you, dearest lord and brother, and require you, both for the love of me and' of our convent, which after God trust surely in you, that you would please to send word to my said lady-abbess, that she do not undertake to burden our church with any prioress out of the convent, nor with prior other than the one we have now, but that she would.
Text Missing.

Boscombe Down Amesbury

Boscombe Bowmen is the remains of a shared burial of around 2300BC found at Boscombe Down Amesbury. The grave contained seven burials: three children, a teenager and three men. The teenager and men appear to have been related. The eldest man was buried in a crouched position with the bones of the others scattered around him, and their skulls resting at his feet. Several flint arrowheads, a boar tusk, flint tools and eight Beakler Ware vessels were found found with the remains. Lead isotope analysis indicates the men grew up in South Wales or the Lake District. The remains are on display at Salisbury Museum.

North Tidworth

On 28 Mar 1691 Thomas Pierce Dean 1622-1691 (69) died at North Tidworth where he had an estate.

Stonehenge

Barrows aka Tumuli are burial mounds under which a single burial or cremation is located. The appear to succeed Chambered Tombs in England. Sometimes they have more than one burial. Sometimes they are re-used. Sometimes they appear in large clusters, sometimes around earlier monuments eg Stonehenge.

Henge. A Henge is a prehistoric monument with a ditch enclosed by a bank. Some have entrances: one, two or four. Some have stone circles inside them. Confusingly Stonehenge is not a Henge. Henges are usually dated around 2400BC typically known as Late Neolithic Early Bronze Age. Examples of Henges include Avebury in Wiltshire, Arbor Low Henge in Derbyshire. Henges appear to be a peculiarly British monument.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 July. 22 Jul 1654. We departed and dined at a farm of my Uncle Hungerford's, called Darnford Magna, situated in a valley under the plain, most sweetly watered, abounding in trouts caught by spear in the night, when they come attracted by a light set in the stern of a boat.
After dinner, continuing our return, we passed over the goodly plain, or rather sea of carpet, which I think for evenness, extent, verdure, and innumerable flocks, to be one of the most delightful prospects in nature, and reminded me of the pleasant lives of shepherds we read of in romances.
Now we arrived at Stonehenge, indeed a stupendous. Monument, appearing at a distance like a castle; how so many and huge Pillars of stone should have been brought together, some erect, others transverse on the tops of them, in a circular area as rudely representing a cloister or heathen and more natural temple, is wonderful. The stone is so exceedingly hard, that all my strength with a hammer could not break a fragment; which hardness I impute to their so long exposure. To number them exactly is very difficult, they lie in such variety of postures and confusion, though they seemed not to exceed 100; we counted only 95. As to their being brought thither, there being no navigable river near, is by some admired; but for the stone, there seems to be the same kind about 20 miles distant, some of which appear above ground. About the same hills, are divers mounts raised, conceived to be ancient intrenchments, or places of burial, after bloody fights. We now went by Devizes, a reasonable large town, and came late to Cadenham.

Avebury

Henge. A Henge is a prehistoric monument with a ditch enclosed by a bank. Some have entrances: one, two or four. Some have stone circles inside them. Confusingly Stonehenge is not a Henge. Henges are usually dated around 2400BC typically known as Late Neolithic Early Bronze Age. Examples of Henges include Avebury in Wiltshire, Arbor Low Henge in Derbyshire. Henges appear to be a peculiarly British monument.

Blackland

On 16 May 1675 Thomas Hungerford 1602-1675 (73) died at Blackland.

Boyton

Around 1246 Hugh Giffard -1246 died at Boyton.

Before 20 May 1282 John Neville 1240-1282 died at Boyton.

Hugh Giffard -1246 was born to William Giffard 1192-1228 at Boyton.

St Mary's Church Boyton

Seventh Crusade

After 1262. St Mary's Church Boyton. Monument to Alexander Giffard -1262. Believed to represent Alexander Giffard; possibly his father Hugh Giffard 1195-1246. Early Medieval Period effigy. Alexander fought on the Seventh Crusade and may possibly have died at the Battle of Mansoura in 1250. The effigy notable for the Otter at his feet, biting his sword, and for the  on the shield with a label five points indicating the son, possibly grandson, of the current owner of the arms. Right Leg over Left.

Bradford on Avon

Battle of Bradford on Avon

Anglo Saxon Chronicle 650 699. 652. This year Kenwal fought at Bradford by the Avon. .

Bremhill

On 03 May 1602 Thomas Hungerford 1602-1675 was born to John Hungerford 1558-1636 (44) at Bremhill.

On 31 Mar 1636 John Hungerford 1558-1636 (78) died at Bremhill.

On 31 Mar 1636 John Hungerford 1620-1636 (16) died at Bremhill.

In 1637 George Hungerford 1637-1712 was born to Edward Hungerford -1667 at Bremhill.

In May 1712 George Hungerford 1637-1712 (75) died at Bremhill.

Britford

On 16 Nov 1739 Mary Clarke -1739 died. He was buried at Britford.

St Peter's Church Britford

Trial and Execution of the Duke of Buckingham

On 17 May 1521 Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham 1478-1521 (43) was executed at Tower Hill for no specific reason other than his having a significant amount of Plantagenet blood and was, therefore, considered a threat by Henry VIII (29). He was posthumously attainted by Act of Parliament on 31 July 1523, disinheriting his children. .
He was buried at St Peter's Church Britford.

Bronham

Around 1492 Edward Baynton 1492-1544 was born at Bronham.

Castle Combe

Around 1054 Reginald Dunstanville 1054-1129 was born at Castle Combe.

Around 1080 Alan Dunstanville 1080-1130 was born to Reginald Dunstanville 1054-1129 (26) at Castle Combe.

In 1130 Adeliza Dunstanville 1130-1186 was born to Alan Dunstanville 1080-1130 (50) at Castle Combe.

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 was born to John Writhe Garter King of Arms -1504 in Colatford. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe or Cricklade.

Charlton

Around 1558 Thomas Knyvet 1558-1594 was born to Henry Knyvet 1540-1598 (18) and Elizabeth Stumpe at Charlton.

Around 1560 Wroughton Knyvet 1560-1574 was born to Henry Knyvet 1540-1598 (20) and Elizabeth Stumpe at Charlton.

In 1564 Catherine Knyvet Countess Suffolk 1564-1638 was born to Henry Knyvet 1540-1598 (24) and Elizabeth Stumpe at Charlton.

Around 1566 Frances Knyvet 1566-1605 was born to Henry Knyvet 1540-1598 (26) and Elizabeth Stumpe at Charlton.

Around 1578 Elizabeth Knyvet Countess Lincoln 1578-1638 was born to Henry Knyvet 1540-1598 (38) and Elizabeth Stumpe at Charlton.

On 26 Sep 1594 Thomas Knyvet 1558-1594 (36) died at Charlton.

On 11 May 1638 Elizabeth Knyvet Countess Lincoln 1578-1638 (60) died at Charlton.

Charlton Park Charlton

In 1574 Catherine Knyvet Countess Suffolk 1564-1638 (10) inherited Charlton Park Charlton from her father which thereafter became the seat of the Earls of Suffolk.

Chilton Foliat

Chippenham

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1.

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9. Eodem quoque anno Ealhere comes, cum Cantuariis, et Huda, cum Suthriis, contra paganorum exercitum in insula, quae dicitur in Saxonica lingua Tenet, Britannico autem sermone Ruim, animose et acriter belligeraverunt, et primitus Christiani victoriam habuerunt, prolongatoque diu proelio ibidem ex utraque parte plurimi ceciderunt et in aqua mersi suffocati sunt, et comites illi ambo ibidem occubuerunt. Necnon et eodem anno Æthelwulfus, Occidentalium Saxonum rex, post Pascha filiam suam Burgredo Merciorum regi in villa regia, quae dicitur Cippanhamme, nuptiis regaliter factis, ad reginam dedit.
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9 The same year also, earl Ealhere, with the men of Kent, and Iluda with the men of Surrey, fought bravely and resolutely against an army of the pagans, in the island, which is called in the Saxon tongue, Tenet, but Ruim in the British language. The battle lasted a long time, and many fell on both sides, and also were drowned in the water; and both the earls were there slain. In the same year also, after Easter, Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, gave His daughter to Burhred, king of the Mercians, and the marriage was celebrated royally at the royal villa of Chippenham.
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Around May 853 Burgred King Mercia and Æthelswith Wessex Queen Consort Mercia 838-888 (15) were married at Chippenham.

On 15 Jan 1919 Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley 1866-1919 (53) died at Chippenham. His son Christian Arthur Wellesley 4th Earl Cowley 1890-1962 (28) succeeded 4th Earl Cowley 1C 1857, 4th Viscount Dangan of Meath 1C 1857, 5th Baron Cowley 1C 1828.

On 18 Jan 1919 Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley 1866-1919 was buried at Chippenham.

Draycott Cerne Chippenham

On 25 Jul 1863 William Richard Arthur Pole Tylney Long Wellesley 5th Earl Mornington 1813-1863 (49) died in Paris. He was buried at Draycott Cerne Chippenham. His first cousin once removed Arthur Wellesley 2nd Duke Wellington 1807-1884 (56) succeeded  6th Earl Mornington 1C 1760, 6th Viscount Wellesley of Dangan Castle. Elizabeth Hay Duchess Wellington 1820-1904 (42) by marriage Countess Mornington 1C 1760.

Around Oct 1921. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937 (52). Portrait of Mercedes Santamarina Gastañaga 1896-1972 (25). Painted in Paris.

Clarendon Palace

Colatford

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 was born to John Writhe Garter King of Arms -1504 in Colatford. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe or Cricklade.

Compton Chamberlayne

Corsham

Coulston

On 07 Mar 1685 Giles Hungerford 1614-1685 (70) died at Coulston. He was buried in Salisbury.

Cricklade

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 was born to John Writhe Garter King of Arms -1504 in Colatford. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe or Cricklade.

Dauntsey

Around 1488 Thomas Danvers 1488-1532 was born to John Danvers 1452-1514 (36) at Dauntsey.

On 09 Oct 1532 Thomas Danvers 1488-1532 (44) died at Dauntsey.

On 28 Jun 1573 Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 was born to John Danvers 1540-1594 (33) and Elizabeth Neville 1550-1630 (23) at Dauntsey.

Devizes

Around May 1144 Roger Fitzmiles 2nd Earl Hereford 1124-1155 (19) and Empress Matilda Duchess Normandy 1102-1167 (42) were in Devizes.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 July. 22 Jul 1654. We departed and dined at a farm of my Uncle Hungerford's, called Darnford Magna, situated in a valley under the plain, most sweetly watered, abounding in trouts caught by spear in the night, when they come attracted by a light set in the stern of a boat.
After dinner, continuing our return, we passed over the goodly plain, or rather sea of carpet, which I think for evenness, extent, verdure, and innumerable flocks, to be one of the most delightful prospects in nature, and reminded me of the pleasant lives of shepherds we read of in romances.
Now we arrived at Stonehenge, indeed a stupendous. Monument, appearing at a distance like a castle; how so many and huge Pillars of stone should have been brought together, some erect, others transverse on the tops of them, in a circular area as rudely representing a cloister or heathen and more natural temple, is wonderful. The stone is so exceedingly hard, that all my strength with a hammer could not break a fragment; which hardness I impute to their so long exposure. To number them exactly is very difficult, they lie in such variety of postures and confusion, though they seemed not to exceed 100; we counted only 95. As to their being brought thither, there being no navigable river near, is by some admired; but for the stone, there seems to be the same kind about 20 miles distant, some of which appear above ground. About the same hills, are divers mounts raised, conceived to be ancient intrenchments, or places of burial, after bloody fights. We now went by Devizes, a reasonable large town, and came late to Cadenham.

Devizes Castle

Richard Grey 1202-1271 was appointed Constable Devizes Castle.

After 28 Sep 1106 Robert Curthose Normandy III Duke Normandy 1051-1134 was imprisoned at Devizes Castle.

In 1232 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 (62) was imprisoned at Devizes Castle.

Devizes Museum

Long Stones Long Barrow. Historic England:.
The monument includes a Neolithic long barrow aligned north east to south west and situated on a gentle east-facing slope, 300m south west of the South Street long barrow.The barrow mound has been slightly disturbed by cultivation in the past butsurvives as an impressive earthwork which measures 84m long and 35m wide. The mound stands up to 6m high and is flanked to the north and south by quarry ditches which provided material for the construction of the mound. These have become partially infilled over the years owing to cultivation but survive as slight earthworks c.24m wide and 84m long with a depth of c.0.6m. The barrow was partially excavated by Merewether between 1820 and 1850. He discovered evidence of a Bronze Age cremation burial contained in a 'Deverel Rimbury' style pottery urn and a piece of bronze which was probably part of a dagger. The urn is now located in the Devizes Museum.

Knap Hill. Historic England 1005704.
Summary : The site of Knap Hill, a Causewayed Enclosure. It encompasses an area of circa 2.4 hectares and consists of a single circuit of sub-triangular plan, conforming to the contours of the hill and possibly incomplete on the steepest, southern side. Exceptionally compared to other enclosures, the causeways seem to correspond precisely to gaps in the bank. It is unclear if the earthworks ever formed a complete enclosure. Excavations by the Cunningtons in 1908-9 first demonstrated the causewayed nature of the earthworks, as well as recovering pottery which they felt to be Neolithic in date. Further excavations in 1961 confirmed the Cunningtons' observations. Romano British pottery and an extended inhumation probably relates to the adjacent, later earthwork enclosure. The site and its archaeological history were re-investigated as part of the RCHME project focusing on enclosure and industry in the Neolithic period in 1995. Knap Hill was also subsequently included in a research programme into the dating of the early Causewayed Enclosures of southern Britain and of Ireland. The results suggested that Knap Hill was probably constructed in the 35th century cal BC, (that is to say between 3500-4001cal BC) probably more than a century later than Windmill Hill and the West Kennet long barrow. It is unclear, however, for how long activity continued. On the basis that the ditch was left to infill naturally, that there is no sign of recutting, and because there is a scarcity of sherds and bones, a short duration, probably of well under a century and perhaps only a generation or two, is possible.
More information : (SU 12106368) Neolithic Camp (NR) Knap Hill (NAT).
A causewayed camp on Knap Hill (see plan), excavated by BH and ME Cunnington in 1908-9 and G Connah in 1961. The excavations revealed Windmill Hill sherds in the silting of the ditches, Beaker sherds on the surface of the ditches and Romano-British sherds, probably associated with the plateau enclosure (see SU 16 SW 13). Other finds nearly all from within a few feet of the bottom of the ditch include fragments of red deer antlers, a human jawbone, flint flakes and a few sarsen chips. The finds are now in Devizes Museum. Connah concludes from his excavations that the causewayed ditches undoubtedly belong to the Windmill Hill culture and that the scarcity of the pottery and occupation material may suggest that the camp was of a defensive character and abandoned at an early stage - perhaps before completion.
Radiocarbon dating of antler fragments from the primary rubble of the ditch - 4710+- 115 BP or 2760BC. Charcoal from the upper silting of the ditch - 3790+- 130BP or 1840BC.
SU 12106365 Knap Hill causewayed camp occupies a hill top position overlooking the Pewsey Vale to the S. The causewayed bank can be traced only on the N and W sides, but accepting the natural gradient of the hill for the eastern and southern extent, then the area enclosed would have been approximately 1.7 hectares. There is a bowl barrow (see SU 16 SW 23) and some flint digging disturbance within the camp, and in the E the perimeter of the IA/RB "plateau" enclosure obscures the terminal on the causewayed bank. Resurveyed in conjunction with RCHM manuscript plan at 1:2500.
The Neolithic causwayed enclosure and associated features described by the previous authorities have been mapped at 1:10,000 scale from aerial photographs and the 1:1000 plan produced as part of the industry and Enclosure in the Neolithic Project (Event UID 923509).
Surveyed by the RCHME as part of the above project.
Knap Hill encloses an area of 2.4 hectares and consists of a single circuit of sub-triangular plan, conforming to the contours of the hill and possibly incomplete on the steepest, southern side. Exceptionally to other enclosures, the causeways seem to correspond precisely to gaps in the bank.
Two radiocarbon dates were obtained by Connah following his 1961 excavations (Table 3.3: BM-205, -208; Connah 1969). They bracket the infilling of the ditch, the sample for BM-205 coming from near the base and that for BM-208 from the topmost fill. BM-205 was measured on an antler implement which had arguably been used to dig the ditch and would have been contemporary with that event. BM-208 was measured on an unidentified bulk charcoal sample which may have included material of diverse ages, and can hence provide only a terminus post quem for its context.
Knap Hill was included in a research programme into the dating of the early Causewayed Enclosures of southern Britain and of Ireland, using chronological estimates produced by Bayesian statistical analysis of radiocarbon dates. In addition to attempting to establish a construction date and duration for the monument, the proximity of the site to Windmill Hill and to a concentration of long barrows posed the question of its chronological relation to them. Six further radiocarbon measurements were therefore obtained. A model which incorporates this interpretation of the archaeological sequence with the radiocarbon dates was constructed. The model suggested that Knap Hill was probably constructed in the 35th century cal BC, probably rather more than a century later than both Windmill Hill Enclosure and the West Kennet long barrow. It is unclear, however, for how long activity continued at this enclosure. On the basis that the ditch was left to infill naturally and there is no sign of recutting, and because there is a scarcity of sherds and bones, a short duration, probably of well under a century and perhaps only a generation or two, is plausible.

Roundway Down Devizes

Battle of Roundway Down

On 13 Jul 1643 a Royalist cavalry force under Lord Wilmot (30) won a crushing victory over the Parliamentarian Army of the West under Sir William Waller (46) at Roundway Down Devizes.
Maurice Palatinate Simmern 1621-1652 fought.

Downton

Draycott

On 15 Jul 1884 Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl Cowley 1804-1884 (80) died at 20 Albermarle Street Albermarle Street. He was buried at Draycott. His son William Henry Wellesley 2nd Earl Cowley 1834-1895 (49) succeeded 2nd Earl Cowley 1C 1857, 2nd Viscount Dangan of Meath 1C 1857, 3rd Baron Cowley 1C 1828.

Easton Royal

On 17 Jan 1695 Edward Seymour 8th Duke Somerset 1695-1757 was born to Edward Seymour 5th Baronet Seymour 1661-1740 (34) and Laetitia Popham Baroness Seymour -1738. He was christened the same day at Easton Royal.

Edington

Battle of Edington

Around 12 May 878 Alfred "The Great" King England 849-899 (29) defeated the Viking army led by Guthrum Viking -890 at the Battle of Edington at Edington (the location is subject to dispute).

Elecumbe

Around 1222 John Lovell 1222-1287 was born to John Lovell 1190-1252 (32) and Catherine Basset 1196-1253 (26) at Elecumbe.

Everley

In 1371 Thomas Astley 1371-1438 was born to Thomas Astley 1343-1383 (28) in Everley.

In 1501 Thomas Astley 1501-1558 was born to Richard Astley 1475-1531 (26) in Everley.

Garesden

In 1578 Lawrence Washington 1578-1643 was born to Lawrence Washington 1545-1619 (33) at Garesden.

Great Bedwyn

On 29 Oct 1567 Anthony Hungerford of Black Bourton 1567-1627 was born to Anthony Hungerford 1540-1594 (27) at Great Bedwyn.

Around 25 Sep 1614 Giles Hungerford 1614-1685 was born to Anthony Hungerford of Black Bourton 1567-1627 (46) and Sarah Crouch 1574-1627 (40) at Great Bedwyn.

On 20 Jan 1836 Henrietta Louisa Elizabeth Danneskiold Samsøe Countess Strafford 1836-1880 was born to Christian Danneskiold Samsøe and Elizabeth Brudenell 1807-1847 (29) in Great Bedwyn.

Bedwyn Magna Great Bedwyn

On 30 Mar 1654 Henry Seymour 1626-1654 (28) died. He was buried at Bedwyn Magna Great Bedwyn.

Great Bedwyn Church Great Bedwyn

After 21 Dec 1536. All Saints Church Maiden Bradley. Monument to John Seymour 1474-1536.  differenced with a Crescent impaled with unknown arms quartered 1 Argent a fess between 3 martlets Gules in chief three fox heads erased 2 per pale Azure three fleur de lys Or 3 Or three talbots courant 4 Or a chevrom Limine between 3 stags heads caboshed. The note below states ... The above tablet (a copy of the original in Great Bedwyn) is placed here by Algernon 15th Duke of Somerset Sep 1899.

Chancel Great Bedwyn Church Great Bedwyn

On 12 Jul 1664 Francis Seymour 1st Baron Seymour Trowbridge 1590-1664 (74) died. He was buried in the Chancel Great Bedwyn Church Great Bedwyn.

Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn

Around 1400 John Seymour 1400-1464 was born to Roger Seymour 1370-1420 (30) and Maud Esturney at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1425 John Seymour 1425-1463 was born to John Seymour 1400-1464 (25) and Isabel Williams at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

In 1439 Margaret Seymour 1439- was born to John Seymour 1400-1464 (39) and Isabel Williams at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1450 John Seymour 1450-1491 was born to John Seymour 1425-1463 (25) and Elizabeth Coker at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1468 Margaret Seymour 1468- was born to John Seymour 1450-1491 (18) and Elizabeth Darell (14) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1469 Jane Seymour 1469- was born to John Seymour 1450-1491 (19) and Elizabeth Darell (15) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1471 Elizabeth Seymour 1471- was born to John Seymour 1450-1491 (21) and Elizabeth Darell (17) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1474 John Seymour 1474-1536 was born to John Seymour 1450-1491 (24) and Elizabeth Darell (20) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1508 Thomas Seymour 1st Baron Seymour Sudeley 1508-1549 was born to John Seymour 1474-1536 (34) and Margery Wentworth at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1509 Jane Seymour Queen Consort England 1509-1537 was born to John Seymour 1474-1536 (35) and Margery Wentworth at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1518 Elizabeth Seymour Baroness Cromwell Oakham 1518-1556 was born to John Seymour 1474-1536 (44) and Margery Wentworth at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

In 1527 John Seymour 1527-1552 was born to Edward Seymour 1st Duke Somerset 1500-1552 (27) and Catherine Filliol 1507-1535 (20) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn. Paternity was questioned by Edward after it was alleged that Catherine had had an affairwith her father-in-law John Seymour 1474-1536. He and his brother were excluded in 1540 from their paternal and maternal inheritances and all their claims to their father's dignities being postponed to his children by his second wife.

In 1529 Edward Seymour 1529-1593 was born to Edward Seymour 1st Duke Somerset 1500-1552 (29) and Catherine Filliol 1507-1535 (22) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn. Paternity was questioned by Edward after it was alleged that Catherine had had an affairwith her father-in-law John Seymour 1474-1536. He and his brother were excluded in 1540 from their paternal and maternal inheritances and all their claims to their father's dignities being postponed to his children by his second wife.

On 22 May 1539 Edward Seymour 1st Earl Hertford 1539-1621 was born to Edward Seymour 1st Duke Somerset 1500-1552 (39) and Anne Stanhope Duchess Somerset 1497-1587 (42) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Around 1540 Henry Seymour 1540-1588 was born to Edward Seymour 1st Duke Somerset 1500-1552 (40) and Anne Stanhope Duchess Somerset 1497-1587 (43) at Wulf Hall Great Bedwyn.

Great Chalfield

On 24 Aug 1629 John Eyre 1580-1639 (49) inherited Great Chalfield from his father but sold it two years later to Richard Gurney 1st Baronet 1578-1647 (51).

Grinstead

Heytesbury

In 1503 Walter Hungerford 1st Baron Hungerford Heytesbury 1503-1540 was born to Edward Hungerford -1522 and Jane Zouche 1480-1521 (23) at Heytesbury.

On 26 Jul 1518 Edward Hungerford -1522 was strangled by his wife Agnes Cotell 1485-1523 (33) at Farleigh Hungreford Castle with the aid of William Mathewe and William Inges, yeomen of Heytesbury.

In Jun 1541 William Sharington 1495-1553 (46) leased the manor of Heytesbury.

On 13 Feb 1809 William Eliot 2nd Earl St Germans 1767-1845 (41) and Letitia Acourt were married at Heytesbury.

Hill Deverell

Around 1505 George Ludlow 1505-1580 was born to William Ludlow 1478-1533 in Hill Deverell.

On 25 May 1580 George Ludlow 1505-1580 (75) died in Hill Deverell.

Hindon

Around 1677 Henrietta Hyde Countess Dalkeith 1677-1730 was born to Lawrence Hyde 1st Earl Rochester 1642-1711 (34) and Henrietta Boyle Countess Rochester 1646-1687 (31) at Hindon.

Kingston

Around 1500 John St Lo 1500-1559 was born to Nicholas St Lo 1480-1508 (20) and Eleanor Arundell 1472-1516 (28) at Kingston.

On 01 Sep 1508 Nicholas St Lo 1480-1508 (28) died at Kingston.

Around 1519 Edward St Lo 1519-1578 was born to John St Lo 1500-1559 (19) and Margaret Kingston at Kingston.

Lacock

Lacock Abbey

In 1229 Ela Salisbury Abbess Lacock 1187-1261 (42) founded Lacock Abbey as a nunnery of the Augustinian order.

In 1240 Ela Salisbury Abbess Lacock 1187-1261 (53) was appointed Abbot Lacock.

In 1243 Ela Salisbury Abbess Lacock 1187-1261 (56) resigned as Abbot Lacock due to ill health.

On 24 Aug 1261 Ela Salisbury Abbess Lacock 1187-1261 (74) died. She was buried in Lacock Abbey. Her inscription reads ... Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works.

In 1540 William Sharington 1495-1553 (45) paid £783 for Lacock Abbey which had been dissolved.

Before 06 Jul 1553 William Sharington 1495-1553 died. His brother Henry Sharington of Lacock in Wiltshire 1532-1581 inherited Lacock Abbey.

Before 20 Oct 1743 Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Mary Mansel. Lacock Abbey.

Laverstock

Battle of the Mareth Line

On 17 Mar 1943 Nicholas Townshend Durham -1943 was killed in action at the Battle of the Mareth Line. Memorial in the Church of St Mary East Raynham.
On 27 Jan 1877 Elizabeth Jane Stuart 1803–1877 died.
On 06 Oct 1899 John Villiers Stuart Townshend 5th Marquess Townshend 1831-1899 died at his home in Laverstock. His son John Townshend 6th Marquess Townshend 1866-1921 succeeded 6th Marquess Townshend, 9th Viscount Townsend, 20th Baron Ferrers Chartley, 21st Baron Compton of Compton in Warwickshire.

Littlecote

Littlecote House Littlecote

On 10 Jan 1419 George Darell of Littlecote 1419-1474 was born to William Darell 1384-1461 (35) at Littlecote House Littlecote.

In 1429 Richard Darell 1429-1489 was born to William Darell 1384-1461 (45) at Littlecote House Littlecote.

In 1605 Alexander Popham 1605-1669 was born to Francis Popham 1573-1644 (32) at Littlecote House Littlecote.

Longleat

Longleat House Longleat

In 1691 Thomas Ken Bishop 1637-1711 (53) was deprived of his See by William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (40) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (28). He was given lodgings at Longleat House Longleat by Thomas Thynne 1st Viscount Weymouth 1640-1714 (51) with whom he was at Oxford. He resided at Longleat for some twenty years.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (57). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (13).

Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (30). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (23).

Before 1714 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas Thynne 1st Viscount Weymouth 1640-1714.

On 17 Oct 1710 John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville 1690-1763 (20) and Frances Worsley Countess Granville 1693-1743 (17) were married at Longleat House Longleat. Frances Worsley Countess Granville 1693-1743 (17) by marriage Countess Granville 1C 1715.

Ludgershall

On 29 Sep 1593 Jane Spencer 1519-1593 (74) died at Ludgershall.

Lydiard Tregoze

Around 1428 Oliver St John 1428-1497 was born to Oliver St John 1400-1437 (27) and Margaret Beauchamp Duchess Somerset 1410-1482 (18) at Lydiard Tregoze.

Around 1473 John St John 1473-1512 was born to Oliver St John 1428-1497 (45) and Elizabeth Scrope 1439-1503 (34) at Lydiard Tregoze.

Around 1505 John St John 1505-1576 was born to John St John 1473-1512 (32) and Joan Iwardby 1485-1553 (20) at Lydiard Tregoze.

On 05 Apr 1576 John St John 1505-1576 (71) died at Lydiard Tregoze.

On 08 Nov 1589 Nicholas St John 1525-1589 (63) died at Lydiard Tregoze.

In 1593 Lucy St John 1593-1658 was born to John St John 1552-1594 (41) and Lucy Hungerford at Lydiard Tregoze.

Maiden Bradley

On 22 Oct 1923 Algernon St Maur 15th Duke Somerset 1846-1923 (77) died at Maiden Bradley. He was buried at Brimble Hill Clump Bradley House Maiden Bradley. His third cousin once removed Edward Hamilton Seymour 16th Duke Somerset 1860-1931 (63) succeeded 16th Duke Somerset 4C 1547.

All Saints Church Maiden Bradley

Bradley House Maiden Bradley

Malmesbury

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 18 How the South Saxons received Eadbert and Eolla and the West Saxons Daniel and Aldhelm for their bishops; and of the writings of the same Aldhelm. [705 a.d.]. 705. In the year of our Lord 705, Aldfrid, king of the Northumbrians, died before the end of the twentieth year of his reign. His son Osred (8), a boy about eight years of age, succeeding him in the throne, reigned eleven years. In the beginning of his reign, Haedde, bishop of the West Saxons, departed to the heavenly life; for he was a good man and a just, and his life and doctrine as a bishop were guided rather by his innate love of virtue, than by what he had gained from books. The most reverend bishop, Pechthelm, of whom we shall speak hereafter in the proper place, and who while still deacon or monk was for a long time with his successor Aldhelm (66), was wont to relate that many miracles of healing have been wrought in the place where he died, through the merit of his sanctity; and that the men of that province used to carry the dust thence for the sick, and put it into water, and the drinking thereof, or sprinkling with it, brought health to many sick men and beasts; so that the holy dust being frequently carried away, a great hole was made there.
Upon his death, the bishopric of that province was divided into two dioceses. One of them was given to Daniel, which he governs to this day; the other to Aldhelm (66), wherein he presided most vigorously four years; both of them were fully instructed, as well in matters touching the Church as in the knowledge of the Scriptures. Aldhelm (66), when he was as yet only a priest and abbot of the monastery which is called the city of Maildufus, by order of a synod of his own nation, wrote a notable book against the error of the Britons, in not celebrating Easter at the due time, and in doing divers other things contrary to the purity of doctrine and the peace of the church; and through the reading of this book many of the Britons, who were subject to the West Saxons, were led by him to adopt the Catholic celebration of our Lord's Paschal Feast. He likewise wrote a famous book on Virginity, which, after the example of Sedulius, he composed in twofold form, in hexameters and in prose. He wrote some other books, being a man most instructed in all respects, for he had a polished style, and was, as I have said, of marvellous learning both in liberal and ecclesiastical studies. On his death, Forthere was made bishop in his stead, and is living at this time, being likewise a man very learned in the Holy Scriptures.
Whilst they administered the bishopric, it was determined by a synodal decree, that the province of the South Saxons, which till that time belonged to the diocese of the city of Winchester, where Daniel then presided, should itself have an episcopal see, and a bishop of its own. Eadbert, at that time abbot of the monastery of Bishop Wilfrid, of blessed memory, called Selaeseu, was consecrated their first bishop. On his death, Eolla succeeded to the office of bishop. He also died some years ago, and the bishopric has been vacant to this day.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637 1639 University. 20 May 1639. Accompanied with one Mr. J. Crafford (who afterward being my fellow-traveler in Italy, there changed his religion), I took a journey of pleasure to see the Somersetshire baths, Bristol, Cirencester, Malmesbury, Abington, and divers other towns of lesser note; and returned the 25th.

John Evelyn's Diary 1651 September. 07 Sep 1651. I went to visit Mr. Hobbes (63), the famous philosopher of Malmesbury, with whom I had long acquaintance. From his window we saw the whole equipage and glorious cavalcade of the young French Monarch, Louis XIV (13), passing to Parliament, when first he took the kingly government on him, now being in his 14th year, out of his minority and the Queen Regent's (49) pupilage. First came the captain of the King's Aids, at the head of 50, richly liveried; next, the Queen-Mother's Light Horse, 100, the lieutenant being all over covered with embroidery and ribbons, having before him four trumpets habited in black velvet, full of lace, and casques of the same. Then, the King's Light Horse, 200, richly habited, with four trumpets in blue velvet embroidered with gold, before whom rode the Count d'Olonne coronet [cornet], whose belt was set with pearl. Next went the grand Prévôt's company on foot, with the Prévôt on horseback; after them, the Swiss in black velvet toques, led by two gallant cavaliers habited in scarlet-colored satin, after their country fashion, which is very fantastic; he had in his cap a pennach of heron, with a band of diamonds, and about him twelve little Swiss boys, with halberds. Then, came the Aide des Cérémonies; next, the grandees of court, governors of places and lieutenants-general of provinces, magnificently habited and mounted; among whom I must not forget the Chevalier Paul, famous for many sea-fights and signal exploits there, because it is said he had never been an Academist, and yet governed a very unruly horse, and besides his rich suit his Malta Cross was esteemed at 10,000 crowns. These were headed by two trumpets, and the whole troop, covered with gold, jewels, and rich caparisons, were followed by six trumpets in blue velvet also, preceding as many heralds in blue velvet semée with fleurs-de-lis, caduces in their hands, and velvet caps on their heads; behind them, came one of the masters of the ceremonies; then, divers marshals and many of the nobility, exceeding splendid; behind them Count d'Harcourt, grand Ecuyer, alone, carrying the King's sword in a scarf, which he held up in a blue sheath studded with fleurs-de-lis; his horse had for reins two scarfs of black taffeta.
Then came abundance of footmen and pages of the King, new-liveried with white and red feathers; next, the garde du corps and other officers; and lastly, appeared the King himself on an Isabella barb, on which a housing semee, with crosses of the Order of the Holy Ghost, and fleurs-de-lis; the King himself, like a young Apollo, was in a suit so covered with rich embroidery, that one could perceive nothing of the stuff under it; he went almost the whole way with his hat in hand, saluting the ladies and acclamators, who had filled the windows with their beauty, and the air with Vive le Roi. He seemed a prince of a grave yet sweet countenance. After the King, followed divers great persons of the Court, exceeding splendid, also his esquires; masters of horse, on foot; then the company of Exempts des Gardes, and six guards of Scotch. Between their files were divers princes of the blood, dukes, and lords; after all these, the Queen's guard of Swiss, pages, and footmen; then, the Queen-Mother (49) herself, in a rich coach, with Monsieur the King's brother, the Duke of Orleans, and some other lords and ladies of honor. About the coach, marched her Exempts des Gardes: then the company of the King's Gens d'armes, well mounted, 150, with four trumpets, and as many of the Queen's (49); lastly, an innumerable company of coaches full of ladies and gallants. In this equipage, passed the monarch to the Parliament, henceforth exercising his kingly government.

1616. Frans Pourbus the Younger Painter 1569-1622 (47). Portrait of Anne Habsburg Spain Queen Consort France 1601-1666 (14).

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 December. 14 Dec 1655. I visited Mr. Hobbes (67), the famous philosopher of Malmesbury, with whom I had been long acquainted in France.
Now were the Jews admitted.

Malmesbury Abbey

In 675 Saint Aldhelm 639-709 (36) was appointed Abbot Malmesbury.

Around 937 Æthelwine Wessex -937 was buried at Malmesbury Abbey.

Around 937 Aelfwine Wessex -937 was buried at Malmesbury Abbey.

Manningford Bruce

In 1352 Beatrice Brewes Baroness Say 1352-1383 was born to Thomas Brewes 1301-1361 (50) at Manningford Bruce.

Marden

Battle of Marton

Around 22 Mar 871 Halfdan Ragnarsson -877 defeated the Wessex army led by Æthelred King Wessex 847-871 (24) and Alfred "The Great" King England 849-899 (22) at the Battle of Marton. The location of 'Marton' is not known; suggestions include Marden in Wiltshire and Winterborne St Martin in Dorset. Heahmund Wessex Bishop Sherborne -871 was killed.

Marlborough

Prehistoric Avebury describes a number of Prehistoric monuments including the largest Neolithic enclosure in Britain, Windmill Hill Enclosure, the largest stone circle in Britain, Avebury Henge and Stone Circles, the two largest prehistoric mounds in Europe Silbury Hill and Marlborough Mound, the longest long barrows, West and East and the West Kennet Avenue. Avebury was an important area in Prehistory; it isn't clear why. Perhaps something to do with the proximity of the Ridgeway Path, or being at the headwaters of the River Kennet which joins the River Thames at Reading after flowing through Marlborough and Newbury. Stonehenge, built around the same time as the Avebury Henge and Stone Circles, is only seventeen miles away, more or less, south, almost exactly. Possibly because Avebury is at the centre of a chalk upland region that is very clearly defined by the scarp slopes.

In Dec 1164 Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (31) and Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (42) held Christmas Court at Marlborough.

On 24 May 1612 Robert Cecil 1st Earl Salisbury 1563-1612 (48) died at Marlborough. His son William Cecil 2nd Earl Salisbury 1591-1668 (21) succeeded 2nd Earl Salisbury 5C 1605. Catherine Howard Countess Salisbury by marriage Countess Salisbury 5C 1605.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 June. 09 Jun 1654. Dined at Marlborough, which having been lately fired, was now new built. At one end of this town, we saw my Lord Seymour's (64) house, but nothing observable save the Mount, to which we ascended by windings for near half a mile. It seems to have been cast up by hand. We passed by Colonel Popham's (49), a noble seat, park, and river. Thence, to Newbury, a considerable town, and Donnington, famous for its battle, siege, and castle, this last had been in the possession of old Geoffrey Chaucer. Then to Aldermaston, a house of Sir Humphrey Forster's, built à la moderne. Also, that exceedingly beautiful seat of my Lord Pembroke (33), on the ascent of hill, flanked with wood, and regarding the river, and so, at night, to Cadenham, the mansion of Edward Hungerford (21), Esq, uncle to my wife (19), where we made some stay. The rest of the week we did nothing but feast and make good cheer, to welcome my wife (19).

Marlborough Castle Marlborough

On 29 Aug 1189 John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 (22) and Isabella Fitzrobert 3rd Countess Gloucester and Essex 1173-1217 (16) were married (he was her half second cousin) at Marlborough Castle Marlborough. John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 (22) by marriage 3rd Earl Gloucester 1C 1121.

Death of Queen Consort Margaret of France

On 14 Feb 1318 Margaret of France Queen Consort England 1279-1318 (39) died at Marlborough Castle Marlborough. She was buried at Christ Church Greyfriars. Her tomb was destroyed during the Reformation.

Melksham

Seend Melksham

Around 1697 Mary Webb Duchess Somerset 1697-1768 was born to Daniel Webb of Monkton Farleigh 1661-1716 (35) in Seend Melksham.

Mere

St Mary's Church Mere

On 18 Feb 1478 William Stourton 2nd Baron Stourton 1426-1478 (52) died. He was buried in St Mary's Church Mere. His son John Stourton 3rd Baron Stourton 1454-1485 (24) succeeded 4th Baron Stourton.

Monkton Farleigh

On 08 Mar 1716 Edward Seymour 8th Duke Somerset 1695-1757 (21) and Mary Webb Duchess Somerset 1697-1768 (19) were married at Monkton Farleigh.

On 20 May 1771 Edward Seymour 1771-1774 was christened at Monkton Farleigh.

On 08 Jun 1772 Webb Seymour 1772- was christened at Monkton Farleigh.

Newton Toney

Wilbury House Newton Toney

Odstock

Pewsey

Salisbury

Salisbury Cathedral

Savernake

Lockeridge House Savernake

On 06 Jan 1878 George William Frederick Brudenell 2nd Marquess Ailesbury 1804-1878 (73) died at Lockeridge House Savernake. His brother Ernest Brudenell Bruce 3rd Marquess Ailesbury 1811-1886 (66) succeeded 3rd Marquess Ailesbury 1C. Louisa Elizabeth Horsley Beresford Marchioness Ailesbury 1814-1891 (63) by marriage Marchioness Ailesbury 1C.

Stoke

Ham Stoke

On 04 Oct 1301 Thomas Monthermer 2nd Baron Monthermer 1301-1340 was born to Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer 1270-1325 (31) and Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (29) at Ham Stoke.

Stourton

Church of St Peter Stourton

On 17 Feb 1523 William Stourton 5th Baron Stourton 1457-1523 (66) died without issue. He was buried in the Church of St Peter Stourton. His brother Edward Stourton 6th Baron Stourton 1463-1535 (60) succeeded 6th Baron Stourton.

Swindon

Lydiard Park Swindon

Battle of Ellendun

In Sep 825 Beornwulf King Mercia -852 defeated Ecgberht, King of Wessex, at the Battle of Ellendun replacing Mercian with Wessex dominance over the Saxon Heptarchy. Sir Frank Stenton described it as 'one of the most decisive battles of English history'. The location of the battle is not known although a number of locations have been suggested: Wroughton, Lydiard Park Swindon and Wilton.

Lydiard House Lydiard Park Swindon

Tisbury

On 07 Jun 1590 Lawrence Hyde 1521-1590 (69) died at Tisbury.

On 24 Dec 1598 Matthew Arundell 1533-1598 (65) died. He was buried at Tisbury.

St John's Church Tisbury

On 23 Jul 1649 Ann Arundell Baroness Baltimore 1616-1649 (33) died. She was buried at St John's Church Tisbury.

Trowbridge

Trowbridge Grammar School Trowbridge

Around 1602 Edward Rodney 1590-1657 (11) educated at Trowbridge Grammar School Trowbridge.

Wardour

Warminster

Around 1195 Hugh Giffard 1195-1246 was born to Walter Giffard 1133-1226 (62) at Warminster.

Around 1246 Hugh Giffard 1195-1246 (51) died at Warminster.

Longbridge Deverill Warminster

Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster

On 21 May 1580 John Thynne 1515-1580 (65) died. He was buried at Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster.

On 03 Jan 1709 Henry Thynne 1675-1708 was buried at Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster.

On 17 Apr 1712 Frances Finch Viscountess Weymouth 1650-1712 (62) died. On 03 May 1712 Frances Finch Viscountess Weymouth 1650-1712 (62) was buried at Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster.

On 19 Nov 1796 Thomas Thynne 1st Marquess Bath 1734-1796 (62) died. His son Thomas Thynne 2nd Marquess Bath 1765-1837 (31) succeeded 2nd Marquess Bath, 4th Viscount Weymouth. Isabella Elizabeth Byng Marchioness Bath 1773-1830 (23) by marriage Marchioness Bath. Memorial in Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster.

On 12 Dec 1825 Elizabeth Bentinck Marchioness Bath 1735-1825 (90) died. Memorial in Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster.

On 01 May 1830 Isabella Elizabeth Byng Marchioness Bath 1773-1830 (56) died. Monument in Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster.

On 27 Mar 1837 Thomas Thynne 2nd Marquess Bath 1765-1837 (72) died. His son Henry Frederick Thynne 3rd Marquess Bath 1797-1837 (39) succeeded 3rd Marquess Bath, 5th Viscount Weymouth. Harriet Baring Marchioness Bath 1804-1892 (32) by marriage Marchioness Bath. Monument in Church of Saints Peter and Paul Longbridge Deverill Warminster sculpted by Francis Leggatt Chantrey Sculptor 1781-1841 (55).

West Dean

On 17 Apr 1627 John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (72) died at West Dean. On 21 May 1627 he was buried in the Chancel of St Mary's Church.

Around 1662 William Pierrepoint 4th Earl Kingston 1662-1690 was born to Robert Pierrepoint -1666 and Elizabeth Evelyn -1699 at West Dean.

St Mary's Church

On 17 Apr 1627 John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (72) died at West Dean. On 21 May 1627 he was buried in the Chancel of St Mary's Church.

Westbury

Broke Westbury

Around 1452 Robert Willoughby 1st Baron Willoughby Broke 1452-1502 was born to John Willoughby 1421-1477 (31) and Anne Cheney at Broke Westbury.

In 1491 Edward Willoughby 1491-1517 was born to Robert Willoughby 2nd Baron Willoughby Broke 10th Baron Latimer 1472-1521 (19) and Elizabeth Beauchamp Baroness Willoughby Broke at Broke Westbury.

Whaddon

On 15 Nov 1672 Walter Long 1st Baronet Long 1603-1672 (69) died at Whaddon. His son Walter Long 2nd Baronet Long 1627-1710 (45) succeeded 2nd Baronet Long of Whaddon in Wiltshire.

Wilton

Battle of Ellendun

In Sep 825 Beornwulf King Mercia -852 defeated Ecgberht, King of Wessex, at the Battle of Ellendun replacing Mercian with Wessex dominance over the Saxon Heptarchy. Sir Frank Stenton described it as 'one of the most decisive battles of English history'. The location of the battle is not known although a number of locations have been suggested: Wroughton, Lydiard Park Swindon and Wilton.

In 1514 Anne Grey Baroness Grey Wilton 1450-1514 in Wilton.

Wilton Abbey Wilton

Around 963 Edgar "Peaceful" I King England 943-975 (20) abducted Wulfthryth of Wilton 937-1000 (26) from the nunnery at Wilton Abbey Wilton.

On 16 Sep 984  (or possibly, 985, 986 or 987) Edith of Wilton 963-987 (21) died at Wilton Abbey Wilton.

Wilton House Wilton

John Evelyn's Diary 1704. 11_Mar, 1704. An exceedingly dry season. Great loss by fire, burning the outhouses and famous stable of the Earl of Nottingham, at Burleigh [Rutlandshire], full of rich goods and furniture, by the carelessness of a servant. A little before, the same happened at Lord Pembroke's, at Wilton. The old Countess of Northumberland, Dowager of Algernon Percy, Admiral of the fleet to King Charles I., died in the 83d year of her age. She was sister to the Earl of Suffolk, and left a great estate, her jointure to descend to the Duke of Somerset.

In 1583 Anne Herbert 1583-1640 was born to Henry Herbert 2nd Earl Pembroke 1538-1601 (44) and Mary Sidney Countess Pembroke 1561-1621 (21) at Wilton House Wilton.

On 10 Oct 1584 Philip Herbert 4th Earl Pembroke 1st Earl Montgomery 1584-1650 was born to Henry Herbert 2nd Earl Pembroke 1538-1601 (46) and Mary Sidney Countess Pembroke 1561-1621 (22) at Wilton House Wilton.

In 1640 Anne Herbert 1583-1640 (57) died at Wilton House Wilton.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 July. 20 Jul 1654. We proceeded to Salisbury; the cathedral I take to be the most complete piece of Gothic work in Europe, taken in all its uniformity. The Pillars, reputed to be cast, are of stone manifestly cut out of the quarry; most observable are those in the chapter house. There are some remarkable. Monuments, particularly the ancient Bishops, founders of the Church, Knights Templars, the Marquis of Hertford's, the cloisters of the palace and garden, and the great mural dial.
In the afternoon we went to Wilton, a fine house of the Earl of Pembroke, in which the most observable are the dining room in the modern-built part toward the garden, richly gilded and painted with story, by De Crete; also some other apartments, as that of hunting landscapes, by Pierce; some magnificent chimney-pieces, after the best French manner; a pair of artificial winding stairs of stone, and divers rare pictures. The garden, heretofore esteemed the noblest in England, is a large handsome plain, with a grotto and waterworks, which might be made much more pleasant, were the river that passes through cleansed and raised; for all is effected by a mere force. It has a flower garden, not inelegant. But, after all, that which renders the seat delightful is, its being so near the downs and noble plains about the country contiguous to it. The stables are well ordered and yield a graceful front, by reason of the walks of lime trees, with the court and fountain of the stables adorned with the Cæsars' heads.
We returned this evening by the plain, and fourteen-mile race, where out of my lord's hare warren we were entertained with a long course of a hare for near two miles in sight. Near this, is a pergola, or stand, built to view the sports; and so we came to Salisbury, and saw the most considerable parts of the city. The market place, with most of the streets, are watered by a quick current and pure stream running through the middle of them, but are negligently kept, when with a small charge they might be purged and rendered infinitely agreeable, and this made one of the sweetest towns, but now the common buildings are despicable, and the streets dirty.

On 10 Sep 1759 George Augustus Herbert 11th Earl Pembroke 8th Earl Montgomery 1759-1827 was born to Henry Herbert 10th Earl Pembroke 7th Earl Montgomery 1734-1794 (25) and Elizabeth Spencer Countess Pembroke Countess Montgomery 1737-1831 (22) at Wilton House Wilton.

Wootton Bassett

After 1147 Philip Fitzrobert 1122-1147 died at Wootton Bassett.

Wroughton

Battle of Ellendun

In Sep 825 Beornwulf King Mercia -852 defeated Ecgberht, King of Wessex, at the Battle of Ellendun replacing Mercian with Wessex dominance over the Saxon Heptarchy. Sir Frank Stenton described it as 'one of the most decisive battles of English history'. The location of the battle is not known although a number of locations have been suggested: Wroughton, Lydiard Park Swindon and Wilton.