Twenty Trees

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Armour

Aillettes

Aillettes are an early form of shoulder protection being flat pieces of, typically, boiled leather.

Around 1325. Monument to an unknown member of the de Vere Family in St Michael & All Angels Church Great Tew notable for the armour having Aillettes. Right Leg over Left. Early Medieval Period.

Bascinet

Camail

Camail. Sometimes 'aventail'. A camail is chain-mail that hangs from a bascinet.

Around  1340 the Camail and Jupon Period starts; around the time of the commencement of the Hundred Years War. Knights wear a bascinet with camail and a jupon. The Camail and Jupon Period is also characterised by the heavy belts slung low on the hips from which the sword was slung. Effigies of this period are characterised by having facial hair, and their hands clasped in prayer on the chest. Male effigies of this period have their head resting on Great Helms usually surmounted by their Crest.

On 10 Jul 1359 William Greystoke 2nd Baron Greystoke 1321-1359 (38) died at Brancepeth Castle Brancepeth. His son Ralph Greystoke 3rd Baron Greystoke 1353-1418 (5) succeeded 3rd Baron Greystoke. Monument in St Andrew's Church Greystoke. Camail and Jupon Period. On his head he wears the bascinet with a camail. The jupon under which his coat of chain mail may be seen. His sword belt is low on his jupon, horizontal.

In 1436 John Greystoke 4th Baron Greystoke 1389-1436 (47) died. He was buried at St Andrew's Church Greystoke. His son Ralph Greystoke 5th Baron Greystoke 1414-1487 (22) succeeded 5th Baron Greystoke. Monument in St Andrew's Church Greystoke. Fluted Period. His Pauldrons are unusual in their style. His arms are fully encased in plate with a couter (or coude) protecting the elbow joint. Fine detail of the straps that held the armour in place may be seen on the underarms. A gorget, has replaced the camail. His head is, very unusually, bare as is his face, his hair cut in the style so typical of portraits of Henry V. Gardner1 states It is a remarkable fact that before 1440 the bare-headed warrior is almost unknown, while after 1455 the helmeted knight is almost equally rare. This may suggest the effigy was made somewhat After John's death or, possibly, that the effigy has been incorrectly assigned. His head rests on the decorated tournament helm. He wears the Lancastrian Esses Collar. John had supported the usurpation of Richard II by Henry IV in the 1390s; staunch Lancastrians. John had married, in 1407, Elizabeth Ferrers, daughter of Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, son of King Edward III. Two sword belts: diagonal (bawdric) and horizontal. The jupon, beneath the waist has been replaced by a fauld; horizontal strips of metal that wrap around.

Couter

Faulds

Gorget

Jupon

Jupon aka surcoat. A heavily padded jacket affording additional protection to the shoulders, upper arms, torso and upper legs. The bottom of the jupon was often decorated, sometimes roundels, sometimes scallops. The jupon was sometimes decoated with Knight's Arms becoming, literally, a Coat of Arms

Around  1340 the Camail and Jupon Period starts; around the time of the commencement of the Hundred Years War. Knights wear a bascinet with camail and a jupon. The Camail and Jupon Period is also characterised by the heavy belts slung low on the hips from which the sword was slung. Effigies of this period are characterised by having facial hair, and their hands clasped in prayer on the chest. Male effigies of this period have their head resting on Great Helms usually surmounted by their Crest.

On 10 Jul 1359 William Greystoke 2nd Baron Greystoke 1321-1359 (38) died at Brancepeth Castle Brancepeth. His son Ralph Greystoke 3rd Baron Greystoke 1353-1418 (5) succeeded 3rd Baron Greystoke. Monument in St Andrew's Church Greystoke. Camail and Jupon Period. On his head he wears the bascinet with a camail. The jupon under which his coat of chain mail may be seen. His sword belt is low on his jupon, horizontal.

On 26 Jul 1375 Richard Pembridge 1320-1375 (55) died. Hereford Cathedral. Alabaster altar-tomb and effigy, altar-tomb with moulded base and capping, sides and ends panelled with alternate quatrefoils enclosing shields of his arms and trefoil-headed panels; effigy in bascinet, Camail and Jupon Period. His jupon with same arms as his shield. Hip Belt, Leg Garter, right leg modern, head on helm crested with a Feathered Crest, feet on hound.

In 1436 John Greystoke 4th Baron Greystoke 1389-1436 (47) died. He was buried at St Andrew's Church Greystoke. His son Ralph Greystoke 5th Baron Greystoke 1414-1487 (22) succeeded 5th Baron Greystoke. Monument in St Andrew's Church Greystoke. Fluted Period. His Pauldrons are unusual in their style. His arms are fully encased in plate with a couter (or coude) protecting the elbow joint. Fine detail of the straps that held the armour in place may be seen on the underarms. A gorget, has replaced the camail. His head is, very unusually, bare as is his face, his hair cut in the style so typical of portraits of Henry V. Gardner1 states It is a remarkable fact that before 1440 the bare-headed warrior is almost unknown, while after 1455 the helmeted knight is almost equally rare. This may suggest the effigy was made somewhat After John's death or, possibly, that the effigy has been incorrectly assigned. His head rests on the decorated tournament helm. He wears the Lancastrian Esses Collar. John had supported the usurpation of Richard II by Henry IV in the 1390s; staunch Lancastrians. John had married, in 1407, Elizabeth Ferrers, daughter of Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, son of King Edward III. Two sword belts: diagonal (bawdric) and horizontal. The jupon, beneath the waist has been replaced by a fauld; horizontal strips of metal that wrap around.

Lames

Orle

Pauldrons

Sabatons

Tassets