Twenty Trees

email@twentytrees.co.uk

Biography of Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706

Family Trees

Ancestry

Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 was appointed 502nd Knight of the Garter by William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (57). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (13).

Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (30). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (23).

On 24 Jan 1643 Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 was born to [his father] Richard Sackville 5th Earl Dorset 1622-1677 (20) and Frances Cranfield 1622-1687 (21).

Before 17 Jun 1650 [his father] Richard Sackville 5th Earl Dorset 1622-1677 and Frances Cranfield 1622-1687 were married.

On 17 Jul 1652 Edward Sackville 4th Earl Dorset 1591-1652 (61) died. His son [his father] Richard Sackville 5th Earl Dorset 1622-1677 (29) succeeded 5th Earl Dorset 4C 1604. Frances Cranfield 1622-1687 (30) by marriage 5th Countess Dorset 4C 1604.

In 1663 Charles Sedley 5th Baronet 1639-1701 (23) was fined 2000 marks for an indecent frolic in Bow Street Covent Garden which made him notorious. From the balcony of Oxford Kate's Tavern he, Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (19) and Sir Thomas Ogle shocked and delighted a crowd of onlookers with their blasphemous and obscene antics.

In 1664 Charles Berkeley 1st Earl Falmouth 1630-1665 (33) and [his future wife] Mary Bagot Countess Falmouth Countess Dorset 1645-1679 (19) were married. [his future wife] Mary Bagot Countess Falmouth Countess Dorset 1645-1679 (19) by marriage Viscountess Fitzhardinge of Berehaven in Kerry.

In 1667 [his illegitimate daughter] Ann Sackville 1667-1738 was born illegitimately to Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (23).

On 19 Apr 1671 Alexander Home 4th Earl Home -1674 and [his sister] Anne Sackville Countess Home 1650-1672 (20) were married. [his sister] Anne Sackville Countess Home 1650-1672 (20) by marriage Countess Home.

On 22 Aug 1672 [his sister] Anne Sackville Countess Home 1650-1672 (22) died.

In Jun 1674 Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (31) and [his wife] Mary Bagot Countess Falmouth Countess Dorset 1645-1679 (29) were married. [his wife] Mary Bagot Countess Falmouth Countess Dorset 1645-1679 (29) by marriage Countess Dorset 4C 1604.

On 27 Aug 1677 [his father] Richard Sackville 5th Earl Dorset 1622-1677 (54) died. His son Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (34) succeeded 6th Earl Dorset 4C 1604.

In 1679 [his wife] Mary Bagot Countess Falmouth Countess Dorset 1645-1679 (34) died.

On 07 Mar 1685 Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (42) and [his wife] Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691 (16) were married. [his wife] Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691 (16) by marriage Countess Dorset 4C 1604.

On 18 Jan 1688 [his son] Lionel Cranfield Sackville 1st Duke Dorset 1688-1765 was born to Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (44) and [his wife] Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691 (19).

In 1689 [his daughter] Mary Sackville 2nd Duchess Beaufort 1689-1705 was born to Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (45) and [his wife] Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691 (20).

John Evelyn's Diary 1689 February. 21 Feb 1689. Dr. Burnet (45) preached at St. James's on the obligation to walk worthy of God's particular and signal deliverance of the nation and church.
I saw the new Queen (26) and King (38), with great acclamation and general good reception. Bonfires, bells, guns, etc. It was believed that both, especially the Princess (26), would have shown some (seeming) reluctance at least, of assuming her father's (55) crown, and made some apology, testifying by her regret that he should by his mismanagement necessitate the nation to so extraordinary a proceeding, which would have shown very handsomely to the world, and according to the character given of her piety; consonant also to her husband's (38) first declaration, that there was no intention of deposing the King (55), but of succoring the nation; but nothing of all this appeared; she (26) came into Whitehall laughing and jolly, as to a wedding, so as to seem quite transported. She (26) rose early the next morning, and in her undress, as it was reported, before her women were up, went about from room to room to see the convenience of Whitehall; lay in the same bed and apartment where the late Queen (30) lay, and within a night or two sat down to play at basset, as the Queen (30), her predecessor used to do. She smiled upon and talked to everybody, so that no change seemed to have taken place at Court since her last going away, save that infinite crowds of people thronged to see her, and that she went to our prayers. This carriage was censured by many. She seems to be of a good nature, and that she takes nothing to heart: while the Prince (38), her husband, has a thoughtful countenance, is wonderfully serious and silent, and seems to treat all persons alike gravely, and to be very intent on affairs: Holland, Ireland, and France calling for his care.
Divers Bishops and Noblemen are not at all satisfied with this so sudden assumption of the Crown, without any previous sending, and offering some conditions to the absent King; or on his not returning, or not assenting to those conditions, to have proclaimed him Regent; but the major part of both Houses prevailed to make them King and Queen immediately, and a crown was tempting. This was opposed and spoken against with such vehemence by Lord Clarendon (her own uncle), that it put him by all preferment, which must doubtless have been as great as could have been given him. My Lord of Rochester (46), his brother, overshot himself, by the same carriage and stiffness, which their friends thought they might have well spared when they saw how it was like to be overruled, and that it had been sufficient to have declared their dissent with less passion, acquiescing in due time.
The Archbishop of Canterbury (72) and some of the rest, on scruple of conscience and to salve the oaths they had taken, entered their protests and hung off, especially the Archbishop, who had not all this while so much as appeared out of Lambeth. This occasioned the wonder of many who observed with what zeal they contributed to the Prince's (38) expedition, and all the while also rejecting any proposals of sending again to the absent King (55); that they should now raise scruples, and such as created much division among the people, greatly rejoicing the old courtiers, and especially the Papists.
Another objection was, the invalidity of what was done by a convention only, and the as yet unabrogated laws; this drew them to make themselves on the 22d a Parliament, the new King (38) passing the act with the crown on his head. The lawyers disputed, but necessity prevailed, the government requiring a speedy settlement.
Innumerable were the crowds, who solicited for, and expected offices; most of the old ones were turned out. Two or three white staves were disposed of some days before, as Lord Steward, to the Earl of Devonshire (49); Treasurer of the household, to Lord Newport; Lord Chamberlain to the King, to my Lord of Dorset (46); but there were as yet none in offices of the civil government save the Marquis of Halifax (55) as Privy Seal. A council of thirty was chosen, Lord Derby (34) president, but neither Chancellor nor Judges were yet declared, the new Great Seal not yet finished.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (57). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (13).

Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (30). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (23).

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27).

Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.

Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701 (37). Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (38).

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. Francois de Troy Painter 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710 (36). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

Around 1655. Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707 (14).

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (11).

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (21). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (34) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694 (43). Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) in his coronation robes.

Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

On 06 Aug 1691 [his wife] Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691 (22) died of smallpox.

John Evelyn's Diary 1695 May. 05 May 1695. I came to Deptford from Wotton, in order to the first meeting of the Commissioners for endowing an hospital for seamen at Greenwich; it was at the Guildhall, London. Present, the Archbishop of Canterbury (58), Lord Keeper, Lord Privy Seal, Lord Godolphin (49), Duke of Shrewsbury (34), Duke of Leeds (63), Earls of Dorset (52) and Monmouth (37), Commissioners of the Admiralty and Navy, Sir Robert Clayton, Sir Christopher Wren (71), and several more. The Commission was read by Mr. Lowndes, Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, Surveyor-General.

On 07 Jul 1702 Henry Somerset 2nd Duke Beaufort 1684-1714 (18) and [his daughter] Mary Sackville 2nd Duchess Beaufort 1689-1705 (13) were married. [his daughter] Mary Sackville 2nd Duchess Beaufort 1689-1705 (13) by marriage 2nd Duchess Beaufort 1C 1682.

In 1705 [his daughter] Mary Sackville 2nd Duchess Beaufort 1689-1705 (16) died.

On 29 Jan 1706 Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (63) died at Bath. His son Lionel Cranfield Sackville 1st Duke Dorset 1688-1765 (18) succeeded 7th Earl Dorset 4C 1604.

Roger Boyle 2nd Earl Orrery 1646-1692 and [his sister] Mary Sackville Countess Orrery 1648-1710 were married.

Lionel Boyle 3rd Earl Orrery 1671-1703 and [his illegitimate daughter] Mary Sackville Countess Orrery -1714 were married.

[his illegitimate daughter] Mary Sackville Countess Orrery -1714 was born illegitimately to Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706.

Family Trees

Paternal Family Tree: Sackville

Ancestry

Father: Richard Sackville 5th Earl Dorset 1622-1677

GrandFather: Edward Sackville 4th Earl Dorset 1591-1652

Great GrandFather: Robert Sackville 2nd Earl Dorset 1561-1609

Great x 2 GrandFather: Thomas Sackville 1st Earl Dorset 1536-1608

Great x 3 GrandFather: Richard Sackville 1507-1566