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Biography of George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590

1562 News Years Day Gift Giving

1572 Ridolphi Plot

1586 Trial of Mary Queen of Scots

1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

1608 Death of Bess of Hardwick


Family Trees

Ancestry

On 30 Nov 1523 [his father] Francis Talbot 5th Earl Shrewsbury 5th Earl Waterford 1500-1560 (23) and Mary Dacre 1502-1538 (21) were married.

In 1528 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 was born to [his father] Francis Talbot 5th Earl Shrewsbury 5th Earl Waterford 1500-1560 (28) and Mary Dacre 1502-1538 (26).

On 26 Jul 1538 George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (70) died at Wingfield. He was buried at Sheffield Cathedral. His son [his father] Francis Talbot 5th Earl Shrewsbury 5th Earl Waterford 1500-1560 (38) succeeded 5th Earl Shrewsbury 2C 1442, 5th Earl Waterford, 10th Baron Furnivall 1C 1295, 14th Baron Strange Blackmere 1C 1309, 11th Baron Talbot 1C 1331.

On 28 Apr 1539 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (11) and [his wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567 (14) were married.

Before 1541 [his father] Francis Talbot 5th Earl Shrewsbury 5th Earl Waterford 1500-1560 and Grace Shakerley Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1500- were married. Grace Shakerley Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1500- by marriage Countess Shrewsbury 2C 1442 Countess Waterford.

In 1543 Robert Barlow -1544 (14) and [his future wife] Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (16) were married.

On 20 Aug 1547 William Cavendish 1505-1557 (42) and [his future wife] Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (20) were married.

Before Nov 1551 [his son] Francis Talbot 1551-1590 was born to George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 and [his wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567.

On 20 Nov 1552 [his son] Gilbert Talbot 7th Earl Shrewsbury 7th Earl Waterford 1552-1616 was born to George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (24) and [his wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567 (27).

Around 27 Aug 1559 William St Lo 1518-1565 (41) and [his future wife] Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (32) were married.

On 25 Sep 1560 [his father] Francis Talbot 5th Earl Shrewsbury 5th Earl Waterford 1500-1560 (60) died. His son George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (32) succeeded 6th Earl Shrewsbury 2C 1442, 6th Earl Waterford, 11th Baron Furnivall 1C 1295, 15th Baron Strange Blackmere 1C 1309, 12th Baron Talbot 1C 1331. [his wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567 (35) by marriage Countess Shrewsbury 2C 1442 Countess Waterford.

On 25 Sep 1560 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (32) was appointed Chamberlain of the Exchequer.

In 1561 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (33) was appointed 344th Knight of the Garter by Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (27).

Before 25 Feb 1561 [his son] Edward Talbot 8th Earl Shrewsbury 8th Earl Waterford 1561-1617 was born to George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 and [his wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567 at Sheffield.

1562 News Years Day Gift Giving

On 01 Jan 1562 the New Years Gift Giving was held. Those who gave gifts provide an interesting who's who of the Elizabethan Court soon after Elizabeth I's Coronation. Queen Elizabeth (28) was present since a number are described as "With the Qene her Majestie.".
For 'dimy' read 'demi' ie half-sovereigns.
Neweeyeur's Gyftes gevon to the Quene her Majestie by those Parsons whose Names hereafter ensue, the first of January, the Yere above wrytten.
By the Lady Margaret Strainge (22), a little round mounte of golde to conteyne a pomaunder in it. With the Qene her Majestie. Note. Lady Margaret Strange married Henry Stanley Lord Strange (30) on 07 Feb 1555. In 1561 he had not succeeded to Earldom of Derby and was known by the courtesy title Lord Strange. She is listed first since she was one of the few remaining direct descendants of Henry VII, being a great-granddaughter by his daughter Mary Tudor. Margaret Clifford (22) was first in line to succeed in 1568 but died in 1596 before Elizabeth I.
Dukes, Marquises and Earls.
By the Duke of Norfolke (25), in a purse of purple silke and golde knit, in sundry coynes of golde £20 0s 0d.
By the Marquis of Winchester (79), High Threasourer of Englande, in a purse of crymsen satten, in angells £20 0s 0d.
By the Marquis of Northampton (50), in a purse of crymsen silke and gold knit, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Arundell (49), Lord Steward, in a paper, in angels, £30 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Shrewesburye (34), in a red silke purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Darbye (52), in a purse of crymsen satten, embraudered with golde, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Pembroke (61), in a purse of black silk and silver knit, in new angells £30 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Bedforde (35), in a purse of black silk and golde knytt, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Rutlande (35), in a purse of red silk and golde knytt, in dimy soveraigns and angells £20 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Huntingdon, in a red silk purse, in angells £15 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Westmerlande (37), in a red silk purse, in dimy soveraigns £10 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Oxforde (46), in a red silk purse, in dimy soveraigns £10 0s 0d.
By the Earle of Northumberlande (34), in a purse of black silke and silver knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d. With the Quene her Highness.
By the Earle of Warwike (32), a smocke wrought with black silk, a peire of slevis, and a partelett wrought with gold, silver, and black silke. Delivered to the Baroness Cobham (23).
By the Viscounte Mountague (33), in a purse of cloth of golde, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.
Bishops. The list of Bishops ends with "With her said Majestie"; unclear whether this refers to all the Bishops listed.
By the Archbusshop of Caunterbury (57), in a red silk purse, in dimy soveraigns £40 0s 0d.
By the Archbusshop of York (61), in soveraigns £30 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Duresme (42), in a purse of crymson silk and gold knytt, in angells £30 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Ely (69), in a red vellat purse, in angells £30 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Wynchester (52), in a purse of crymsen silk and gold knytt and set with pearles, in angells £20 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of London (43), in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Salisbury (39), in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Worcester (43), in a black vellat purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Lyncoln (42), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Chychester (64), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Norwich (50), in a blew silk purse £13 6s 8d.
By the Busshop of Hereforde (52), in a green silk purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Lychfield and Coventry (48), in a red satten purse, in angells £13 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Rochester (48), in a red purse, in gold £13 6s 8d.
By the Busshop of Saint Davies (55), in a red silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Bathe, in a purse of red silk, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Exetour, in a blew silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Peterborowe, in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Busshop of Chester, in a red purse, in angells and soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
Duchesses and Countesses.
By the Duchess of Norfolke (22), in a prse of crymsen silk and gold knyt, in angells £20 0s 0d.
By the Duchess of Somerset (65), in a purse of silver and black silk, in royalls and ducketts £14 0s 0d. Probably the Dowager Duchess of Somerset since her husband Edward Seymour 1st Duke Somerset 1500-1552 had been executed in 1552, and their children disinherited as a result.
By the Countess of Surrey, in a purse of tawny silk and gold, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d. Dowager since her husband Henry Howard 1516-1547, by courtesy Earl Surrey, had been executed in 1547.
By the Countess of Pembroke (38), in a cherry bag of crymsen satten, in new angells £15 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Bedford (36), in a purse of crymsen silk and silver knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Darby, in a purse of crymson sattin embrodred with gold, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Oxford (36), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Shrewisbury, Dowager, in a purse of black silk knytt, in dimy soveraignes £12 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Shrewisbury (37), in a red silk purse knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Huntingdon, Dowager (51), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Huntingdon (24), in a red purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Northumberland (24), in a purse of black silk and silver knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Countess of Rutland (29), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £13 6s 8d.
Viscountesses.
By the Vicountess Hereford, Dowager (42), six hankercheffes edged with gold delivered to the said Baroness Cobham (23).
By the Vicountess Mountague (24), in a purse of cloth of gold, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
Lordes.
By the Lorde Keeper of the Great Seale, Bacon (51), in a purse of silver knytt, in angells £13 6s 8d.
By the Lorde William Howard, Lord Chamberlen (52), in a purse of crymsen silk and gold knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Pagett (56), in a greene purse in dimy soveraignes £13 6s 8d.
By the Lorde Clynton, Lord Admyrall (50), in gold £10 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Riche (65), in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Lorde North (66), in a purse of purple silk and silver, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Lumley (29), in a paper, in angells £20 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Hastings of Loughboro (41), in a red silk purse, in French crowns £13 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Stafford (60), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Windsor (30), in a purse of crymsn silk and gold knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.
By Lorde John Graye (38), a haunce pott of allabaster garnished with silver gilt. Delivered in charge to John Asteley, Esq Master and Threasourer of her Highnes Jewels and Plate. Lord John Grey assumed to be a courtesy title his father being Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset 1477-1530.
By the Lorde Barkeley (27), in a red purse, in gold £10 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Mountejoye (29), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Abergavennye (36), in a purse of red silke, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Scrowpe (28), in a purse of blak silk and silver knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Caree of Hundesdon (35), in a purse of crymsen silk, in double ducketts £13 6s 8d.
By the Lorde Strainge (30), in a purse of red silk and gold, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d. Lord Strange being the courtesy title for the Earldom of Derby. He wouldn't inherit until 1572.
By the Lorde Darcey of Chichey (30), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes, £10 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Shefild (24), in a red silk purse, in gold £10 0s 0d.
By the Lorde Shandowes, in a blak silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.
Ladyes.
By the Baroness Howarde (47), in a purse of crymsen silk and knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.
By the Baroness Clinton (35), a peire of sleevis of gold, pulled out with lawne. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham (23).
By the Baroness Genevillet, in gold £6 13s 4d.
By the Lady Barkeley (24), Lord Barkeley's wife, in gold £5 0s 0d.
By the Lady Mountejoye (30), in a red silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Lady Abergavenny, in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.
By the Lady Caree of Hundesdon (33), in a blak purse knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d.
By the Lady Taylboyes, Sir Peter Carewe's (48) wyfe, in a purse of blak silk and silver, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.
By the Baroness Cobham (23), a partelett and a peire of sleeves of sypers wrought with silver and blak silke. Re-delivered to herself.
By the Lady Dakers (21), a warming ball of gold, per oz. 3 oz. dim. With her said Majestie.
By the Lady Shefilde (20), a paire of sleeves wrought with fringe of blak silk and lozeng of gold. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham.
By the Margaret Baroness Scrope (18), in a purse of blak silk and silver, in angells £7 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.
By the Lady Shandowes (38), a peire of sleeves and a partlett of gold and silver knytt, cawle fashion. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham.
By the Lady Knowlles (38), a feyne carpett of needleworke, theverende frienged and buttoned with gold and silk. Delivered to John Torneworth, Groom of the Privy Chamber.
By the Lady Butler, in a little white purse, in French crowns £6 0s 0d. With her said Majestie. Unclear as to who Lady Butler refers to.
By the Lady Raclyef, a peire of sleeves of cameryk, all over sett with purle, and two sweet bags. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham.

After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Around 1575 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Henry Stanley 4th Earl Derby 1531-1593 (43).

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Paulet 1st Marquess Winchester 1483-1572 wearing his Garter Collar and Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

In 1550 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574 (30). Portrait of Henry Fitzalan 19th Earl Arundel 1512-1580 (37) with the motto Invidia Torquet Autorem meaning Let envy torment its author.

Around 1565 Unknown Painter. Anglo-Netherlandish. Portrait of Henry Fitzalan 19th Earl Arundel 1512-1580 (52).

In 1571 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Richard Cox Bishop of Ely 1493-1581 (78).

In 1577 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Richard Cox Bishop of Ely 1493-1581 (84).

In 1562 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574 (42). Portrait of Margaret Audley Duchess Norfolk 1540-1564 (22). The Arms top left not Audley. Neither is the motto partially showing.

In 1549 Unknown Painter. Flemish. Portrait of William Paget 1st Baron Paget Beaudasert 1506-1563 (43).

Around 1565 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Edward Clinton 1st Earl Lincoln 1512-1585 (53).

In 1583 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Edward Clinton 1st Earl Lincoln 1512-1585 (71) wearing his Garter Collar.

Before 1558 Gerlach Flicke Painter 1520-1558. Portrait of Peter Carew 1514-1575.

In 1563 [his son] Henry Talbot 1563-1596 was born to George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (35) and [his wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567 (38).

Before 16 Jan 1567 [his wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567 died. On 16 Jan 1567 she was buried in Sheffield Cathedral.

In 1568 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (40) and [his wife] Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (41) were married. [his wife] Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (41) by marriage Countess Shrewsbury 2C 1442 Countess Waterford.

On 26 Jan 1569 Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (26) moved to in the custody of George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (41) and his wife [his wife] Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (42) at Tutbury Castle.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (33).

On 02 Feb 1569 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (41) was keeper of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (26) at Tutbury Castle.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (33).

In Jun 1569 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (41) was keeper of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (26) at Wingfield Manor Alfreton.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (33).

In Sep 1569 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (41) was keeper of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (26) at Tutbury Castle.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (33).

In 1572 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (44) was appointed Earl Marshal.

Ridolphi Plot

In Jan 1572 Thomas Howard 4th Duke Norfolk 1536-1572 (35) was tried for high treason for his involvement in the Ridolphi Plot. Thomas Sackville 1st Earl Dorset 1536-1608 (36) acted as judge. !George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (44) was appointed Lord High Steward for the trial.
Walter Mildmay 1521-1589 (51) helped prepare evidence against Thomas Howard 4th Duke Norfolk 1536-1572 (35).

In 1582 Unknown Painter. Portrait of George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (54).

In 1583 [his son] Edward Talbot 8th Earl Shrewsbury 8th Earl Waterford 1561-1617 (21) and Joane Ogle Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1566-1626 (17) were married. Joane Ogle Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1566-1626 (17) by marriage Countess Shrewsbury 2C 1442 Countess Waterford.

Trial of Mary Queen of Scots

On 14 Oct 1586 Henry Compton 1st Baron Compton 1544-1589 (42), Lewis Mordaunt 3rd Baron Mordaunt 1538-1601 (48), Henry Wentworth 3rd Baron Wentworth 1558-1593 (28), Christopher Wray 1524-1592 (62), John Stourton 9th Baron Stourton 1553-1588 (33) and Edward Zouche 11th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1556-1625 (30) sat in judgement on Mary Queen of Scots (43) in the Presence Chamber Fotheringay Castle.
Anthony Browne 1st Viscount Montague 1528-1592 (57), George Clifford 3rd Earl Cumberland 1558-1605 (28), Henry Clinton 2nd Earl Lincoln 1539-1616 (47), Henry Grey 6th Earl Kent 1541-1615 (45), Edward Manners 3rd Earl Rutland 1549-1587 (37), Henry Stanley 4th Earl Derby 1531-1593 (55), Ambrose Dudley 3rd Earl Warwick 1530-1590 (56), George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (58), Edward Vere 17th Earl Oxford 1550-1604 (36), William Somerset 3rd Earl Worcester 1526-1589 (60), William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (66), Henry Herbert 2nd Earl Pembroke 1538-1601 (48) and Thomas Bromley Lord Chancellor 1530-1587 (56) were present on the side of the Presence Chamber Fotheringay Castle. .
John St John 2nd Baron St John Bletso -1596 was present on the left side of the Presence Chamber Fotheringay Castle.
John Stourton 9th Baron Stourton 1553-1588 (33) was a juror.

In 1568 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Henry Wentworth 3rd Baron Wentworth 1558-1593 (9).

In 1582 Seventtenth Century copy.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Christopher Wray 1524-1592 (58).

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (33).

Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Unknown Man. Possibly George Clifford 3rd Earl Cumberland 1558-1605 (31).

Around 1575 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Henry Stanley 4th Earl Derby 1531-1593 (43).

Around 1650 based on a work of 1575.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Edward Vere 17th Earl Oxford 1550-1604.

Around 1574 George Gower Painter 1540-1596 (34). Portrait of Charles Somerset 1587-1665. Armorial top left quarterly 1&4  with a yellow band top and bottom 2  3 . The attribution here possibly incorrect since Charles Somerset was born in 1587 ie before the 1574 date when painted. A possible subject is William Somerset 3rd Earl Worcester 1526-1589 (48) who has the same armoiral in another

In 1569. Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Somerset 3rd Earl Worcester 1526-1589 (43).

Around 1565 Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (44). His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

After 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His left-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

On 08 Feb 1587 Mary Queen of Scots (44) was beheaded in the Great Hall in Fotheringhay Castle.
George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (59), Henry Grey 6th Earl Kent 1541-1615 (46), Richard Knightley 1532-1615 (55) and Henry Wriothesley 3rd Earl of Southampton 1573-1624 (13) witnessed her execution. .
There are few extant original sources describing Mary's execution. Those that do exist are somewhat contradictory. They include The letter-books of Sir Amias Poulet, Keeper of Mary Queen of Scots, the Calendar of State Papers, Spain (known as the Simancas), Volume 4, 1587-1603 and Beale's sketch of the execution. The most reliable primary source appears to be Jebb's De vita et rebus gestis serenissimæ principis Mariæ Scotorum Reginæ published in Paris in 1589 in French; there doesn't appear to be an extant translation.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (33).

08 Feb 1587.Robert Beale Clerk Painter 1541-1601 (46) was an eye-witness to the Execution of Mary Queen of Scots. Those indicted include 1 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (59), 2 Henry Grey 6th Earl Kent 1541-1615 (46), 3 Amyas Poulett 1457-1538. The drawing appears to show three event rather than a moment in time: her being led into the Hall, her being disrobed and being beheaded.

08 Feb 1587.Robert Beale Clerk Painter 1541-1601 (46) was an eye-witness to the Execution of Mary Queen of Scots. Those indicted include 1 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (59), 2 Henry Grey 6th Earl Kent 1541-1615 (46), 3 Amyas Poulett 1457-1538. The drawing appears to show three event rather than a moment in time: her being led into the Hall, her being disrobed and being beheaded.

Original Letters Illustrative of English History Second Series Volume III. Ellis notes that "the present narrative is from the Lansdowne MS. 51. art. 46. It is indorsed in Lord Burghley's hand, "8 Feb. 1586. The Manner of the Q. of Scotts death at Fodrynghay, wr. by Ro. Wy.
A Reporte of the manner of the execution of the Sc. Q. performed the viijth. of February, Anno 1586 [modern dating 1587] in the great hall of Fotheringhay, with relacion of speeches uttered and accions happening in the said execution, from the delivery of the said Sc. Q. to Mr Thomas Androwes Esquire Sherife of the County of Northampton unto the end of said execution..
THE READER shall now be presented with the Execution of the Queen of Scots (44) which was to the Court or three Statements of this Transaction were There was a Short one copies of which are Manuscripts Jul F vi foll 246 266 b and b Another a Copy of the Account of the Earl to the Lords of the Council dated on the day is MS Calig C ix fol 163 And there is a Office somewhat longer said to have been drawn evidently one of her servants present Narrative is from the Lansdowne MS in Lord Burghley s hand 8 Feb 1586 of Scotts death at Fodrynghay wr by Ro Wy Queen s death have been dressed up from writers but it is here given accurate and entire.
First, the said Scottish Queen, being carried by two of Sir Amias Paulett's (54) gentlemen, and the Sheriff (46) going before her, came most willingly out of her chamber into an entry next the Hall, at which place the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), commissioners for the execution, with the two governors of her person, and divers knights and gentlemen did meet her, where they found one of the Scottish Queen's servants, named Melvin [NOTE. Possibly Andrew Melville of Garvock Steward], kneeling on his knees, who uttered these words with tears to the Queen of Scots (44), his mistress, "Madam, it will be the sorrowfullest message that ever I carried, when I shall report that my Queen (44) and dear mistress is dead." Then the Queen of Scots, shedding tears, answered him, "You ought to rejoice rather than weep for that the end of Mary Stuart's (44) troubles is now come. Thou knowest, Melvin, that all this world is but vanity, and full of troubles and sorrows; carry this message from me, and tell my friends that I die a true woman to my religion, and like a true Scottish woman and a true Frenchwoman. But God forgive them that have long desired my end; and He that is the true Judge of all secret thoughts knoweth my mind, how that it ever hath been my desire to have Scotland and England united together. Commend me to my son, and tell him that I have not done anything that may prejudice his kingdom of Scotland; and so, good Melvin, farewell;" and kissing him, she bade him pray for her.
Then she (44) turned to the Lords and told them that she had certain requests to make unto them. One was for a sum of money, which she said Sir Amyas Paulet (54) knew of, to be paid to one Curle her servant; next, that all her poor servants might enjoy that quietly which by her Will and Testament she had given unto them; and lastly, that they might be all well entreated, and sent home safely and honestly into their countries. "And this I do conjure you, my Lords, to do.".
Answer was made by Sir Amyas Paulet (54), "I do well remember the money your Grace speaketh of, and your Grace need not to make any doubt of the not performance of your requests, for I do surely think they shall be granted.".
"I have," said she, "one other request to make unto you, my Lords, that you will suffer my poor servants to be present about me, at my death, that they may report when they come into their countries how I died a true woman to my religion.".
Then the Earl of Kent (46), one of the commissioners, answered, "Madam, it cannot well be granted, for that it is feared lest some of them would with speeches both trouble and grieve your Grace, and disquiet the company, of which we have had already some experience, or seek to wipe their napkins in some of your blood, which were not convenient." "My Lord," said the Queen of Scots, "I will give my word and promise for them that they shall not do any such thing as your Lordship has named. Alas! poor souls, it would do them good to bid me farewell. And I hope your Mistress (53), being a maiden Queen, in regard of womanhood, will suffer me to have some of my own people about me at my death. And I know she hath not given you so straight a commission, but that you may grant me more than this, if I were a far meaner woman than I am." And then (seeming to be grieved) with some tears uttered these words: "You know that I am cousin to your Queen (53) [NOTE. They were first-cousin once-removed], and descended from the blood of Henry the Seventh [NOTE. She was a Great Granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509], a married Queen of France [NOTE. She had married Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560], and the anointed Queen of Scotland.".
Whereupon, after some consultation, they granted that she (44) might have some of her servants according to her Grace's request, and therefore desired her to make choice of half-a-dozen of her men and women: who presently said that of her men she would have Melvin, her apothecary, her surgeon, and one other old man beside; and of her women, those two that did use to lie in her chamber.
After this, she being supported by Sir Amias's (54) two gentlemen aforesaid, and Melvin carrying up her train, and also accompanied with the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen aforenamed, the Sheriff (46) going before her, she passed out of the entry into the Great Hall, with her countenance careless, importing thereby rather mirth than mournful cheer, and so she willingly stepped up to the scaffold which was prepared for her in the Hall, being two feet high and twelve feet broad, with rails round about, hung and covered with black, with a low stool, long cushion, and block, covered with black also. Then, having the stool brought her, she sat her down; by her, on the right hand, sat the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), and on the left hand stood the Sheriff (46), and before her the two executioners; round about the rails stood Knights, Gentlemen, and others.
Then, silence being made, the Queen's Majesty's Commission for the execution of the Queen of Scots (44) was openly read by Mr. Beale, clerk of the Council (46); and these words pronounced by the Assembly, "God save the Queen." During the reading of which Commission the Queen of Scots (44) was silent, listening unto it with as small regard as if it had not concerned her at all; and with as cheerful a countenance as if it had been a pardon from her Majesty (53) for her life; using as much strangeness in word and deed as if she had never known any of the Assembly, or had been ignorant of the English language.
Then one Doctor Fletcher, Dean of Peterborough (42), standing directly before her, without the rail, bending his body with great reverence, began to utter this exhortation following: "Madam, the Queen's most excellent Majesty," &c, and iterating these words three or four times, she told him, "Mr. Dean (42), I am settled in the ancient Catholic Roman religion, and mind to spend my blood in defence of it." Then Mr. Dean (42) said: "Madam, change your opinion, and repent you of your former wickedness, and settle your faith only in Jesus Christ, by Him to be saved." Then she (44) answered again and again, "Mr. Dean (42), trouble not yourself any more, for I am settled and resolved in this my religion, and am purposed therein to die." Then the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), perceiving her (44) so obstinate, told her that since she would not hear the exhortation begun by Mr. Dean (42), "We will pray for your Grace, that it stand with God's will you may have your heart lightened, even at the last hour, with the true knowledge of God, and so die therein." Then she answered, "If you will pray for me, my Lords, I will thank you; but to join in prayer with you I will not, for that you and I are not of one religion.".
Then the Lords called for Mr. Dean (42), who, kneeling on the scaffold stairs, began this prayer, "O most gracious God and merciful Father," &c, all the Assembly, saving the Queen of Scots (44) and her servants, saying after him. During the saying of which prayer, the Queen of Scots (44), sitting upon a stool, having about her neck an Agnus Dei, in her hand a crucifix, at her girdle a pair of beads with a golden cross at the end of them, a Latin book in her hand, began with tears and with loud and fast voice to pray in Latin; and in the midst of her prayers she slided off from her stool, and kneeling, said divers Latin prayers; and after the end of Mr. Dean's (42) prayer, she kneeling, prayed in English to this effect: "For Christ His afflicted Church, and for an end of their troubles; for her son; and for the Queen's Majesty (53), that she might prosper and serve God aright." She conFessed that she hoped to be saved "by and in the blood of Christ, at the foot of whose Crucifix she would shed her blood." Then said the Earl of Kent (46), "Madam, settle Christ Jesus in your heart, and leave those trumperies." Then she little regarding, or nothing at all, his good counsel, went forward with her prayers, desiring that "God would avert His wrath from this Island, and that He would give her grief and forgiveness for her sins." These, with other prayers she made in English, saying she forgave her enemies with all her heart that had long sought her blood, and desired God to convert them to the truth; and in the end of the prayer she desired all saints to make intercession for her to Jesus Christ, and so kissing the crucifix, and crossing of her also, said these words: "Even as Thy arms, O Jesus, were spread here upon the Cross, so receive me into Thy arms of mercy, and forgive me all my sins.".
Her (44) prayer being ended, the executioners, kneeling, desired her Grace to forgive them her death; who answered, "I forgive you with all my heart, for now, I hope, you shall make an end of all my troubles." Then they, with her two women, helping of her up, began to disrobe her of her apparel; she never changed her countenance, but with smiling cheer she uttered these words, "that she never had such grooms to make her unready, and that she never put off her clothes before such a company.".
Then she (44), being stripped of all her apparel saving her petticoat and kirtle, her two women beholding her made great lamentation, and crying and crossing themselves prayed in Latin; she (44), turning herself to them, embracing them, said these words in French, "Ne criez vous; j'ay promis pour vous;" and so crossing and kissing them, bade them pray for her, and rejoice and not weep, for that now they should see an end of all their mistress's (44) troubles. Then she, with a smiling countenance, turning to her men servants, as Melvin and the rest, standing upon a bench nigh the scaffold, who sometime weeping, sometime crying out aloud, and continually crossing themselves, prayed in Latin, crossing them with her hand bade them farewell; and wishing them to pray for her even until the last hour.
This done, one of the women having a Corpus Christi cloth lapped up three-corner ways, kissing it, put it over the Queen of Scots' (44) face, and pinned it fast to the caul of her head. Then the two women departed from her, and she (44) kneeling down upon the cushion most resolutely, and without any token or fear of death, she spake aloud this Psalm in Latin, "In te, Domine, confido, non confundar in eternum," &c. [Ps. xxv.]. Then, groping for the block, she laid down her head, Putting her chin over the block with both her hands, which holding there, still had been cut off, had they not been espied. Then lying upon the block most quietly, and stretching out her arms, cried, "In manus tuas, Domine," &c, three or four times. Then she (44) lying very still on the block, one of the executioners holding of her slightly with one of his hands, she (44) endured two strokes of the other executioner with an axe, she making very small noise or none at all, and not stirring any part of her from the place where she lay; and so the executioner cut off her head, saving one little grisle, which being cut asunder, he lifted up her head to the view of all the assembly, and bade "God save the Queen." Then her dressing of lawn falling off from her head, it appeared as grey as one of threescore and ten years old, polled very short, her face in a moment being so much altered from the form she had when she was alive, as few could remember her by her dead face. Her lips stirred up and down a quarter of an hour after her head was cut off.
Then Mr. Dean (42) said with a loud voice, "So perish all the Queen's enemies;" and afterwards the Earl of Kent (46) came to the dead body, and standing over it, with a loud voice said, "Such end of all the Queen's and the Gospel's enemies.".
Then one of the executioners pulling off her (44) garters, espied her little dog which was crept under her clothes, which could not be gotten forth but by force, yet afterward would not depart from the dead corpse, but came and lay between her head and her shoulders, which being imbrued with her blood, was carried away and washed, as all things else were that had any blood was either burned or clean washed; and the executioners sent away with money for their fees, not having any one thing that belonged unto her. And so, every man being commanded out of the Hall, except the Sheriff (46) and his men, she was carried by them up into a great chamber lying ready for the surgeons to embalm her.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587 (33).

After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1560 François Clouet Painter 1510-1572 (50). Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560 (15).

1572. After François Clouet Painter 1510-1572 (62). Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560.

On 18 Nov 1590 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (62) died. He was buried at Sheffield Cathedral. His son Gilbert Talbot 7th Earl Shrewsbury 7th Earl Waterford 1552-1616 (37) succeeded 7th Earl Shrewsbury 2C 1442, 7th Earl Waterford, 12th Baron Furnivall 1C 1295, 16th Baron Strange Blackmere 1C 1309, 13th Baron Talbot 1C 1331.

Death of Bess of Hardwick

On 13 Feb 1608 [his former wife] Bess of Hardwick Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1527-1608 (81) died. She was buried in Derby Cathedral Derby. Henry Cavendish 1550-1616 (57) inherited Chatsworth House.

[his son] Gilbert Talbot 7th Earl Shrewsbury 7th Earl Waterford 1552-1616 and Mary Cavendish Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1556-1632 were married. Mary Cavendish Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1556-1632 by marriage Countess Shrewsbury 2C 1442 Countess Waterford.

[his daughter] Grace Talbot was born to George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 and [his former wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567.

[his daughter] Mary Talbot was born to George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 and [his former wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567.

[his daughter] Catherine Talbot Countess Pembroke was born to George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 and [his former wife] Gertrude Manners Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1525-1567.

Family Trees

Paternal Family Tree: Talbot

Ancestry

Father: Francis Talbot 5th Earl Shrewsbury 5th Earl Waterford 1500-1560

GrandFather: George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538

Great GrandFather: John Talbot 3rd Earl Shrewsbury 3rd Earl Waterford 1448-1473

Great x 2 GrandFather: John Talbot 2nd Earl Shrewsbury 2nd Earl Waterford 1417-1460

Great x 3 GrandFather: John "Old Talbot" Talbot 1st Earl Shrewsbury 1st Earl Waterford 1383-1453