History of Derbyshire

Derbyshire is in North.

In 1193 William Ferrers 5th Earl Derby 1193-1254 was born to William Ferrers 4th Earl Derby 1168-1247 (25) and Agnes Gernon Countess Derby at Derbyshire. He a great x 3 grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England 1068-1135.

In 1226 Isabel Ferrers 1226-1260 was born to William Ferrers 5th Earl Derby 1193-1254 (33) and Sibyl Marshal 1201-1275 (25) at Derbyshire.

In 1366 Elizabeth Fitzalan Duchess Norfolk 1366-1425 was born to Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey 11th Earl Arundel 1346-1397 (20) and Elizabeth Bohun Countess Arundel and Surrey 1350-1385 (16) at Derbyshire. She a great x 2 granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

In 1402 Elizabeth Hilton 1402-1455 was born to Robert Hilton and Joan Constable at Derbyshire.

Alfreton, Derbyshire

Around 1462 John Ormond 1462-1503 was born illegitimately to John Butler 6th Earl Ormonde 1422-1476 (40) and Reynalda Obrien at Alfreton.

James Ormond -1497 was born illegitimately to John Butler 6th Earl Ormonde 1422-1476 and Reynalda Obrien at Alfreton.

South Normanton Alfreton, Derbyshire

In 1726 Jedediah Strutt 1726-1797 was born in South Normanton Alfreton.

Around 1780 Joseph Wright of Derby Painter 1734-1797. Portrait of Jedediah Strutt 1726-1797.

Alport, Derbyshire

Lathkill Dale, in which the River Lath flows, extends from Monyash to Alport where the River Lath is joined by the River Bradford. After Alport the River Lath flows east to a point around 600m south of Haddon Hall where it joins the Derbyshire River Wye.

The River Bradford rises at Middleton-by-Youlgreave from where it flows to Alport where it joins the River Lath.

Alstonefield, Derbyshire

In 1847 Micah Salt Archaeologist 1847-1915 was born in Alstonefield.

Pea Low Bowl Barrow is a very large Bowl Barrow, possibly Chambered Tomb, at Alstonefield. Curiously difficult to see despite its size. It's original shape somewhat denuded by erosion. From the top there are extensive views north six or so miles including the whole of the Dove Valley. Footpaths make it accessible.

Historic England: https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1009603.

The monument includes Pea Low bowl barrow located on the crest of a ridge with higher ground to the northwest. It survives as an impressively large oval mound up to 3.5m high with maximum dimensions of 45.5m by 38m. A series of quarry pits measuring up to 20m diameter by 0.5m deep, and dug for construction of the mound, are visible on all sides except the south-east. The mound displays areas of disturbance, notably a stony hollow on it's southwestern side measuring 13m by 6m and 1.5m deep that is considered to have been the site of a former limekiln, and a shallow area of exposed rubble on the southeastern side that is the site of antiquarian investigations. These limited investigations revealed evidence of the barrow having been re-used during Roman times. Inhumations, cremations, faunal remains, flint, iron artefacts and Roman coins were all recovered during the course of these excavations. All fences and drystone walls are excluded from the scheduling. The ground beneath these features, however, is included.

Ambergate, Derbyshire

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

The River Amber rises near Ashover after which it travels broadly south passing Wooley before joining the River Derwent at Ambergate.

Ashbourne

Ashford in the Water, Derbyshire

Ashford Hall, Ashford in the Water, Derbyshire

On 23 Sep 1880 George Henry Cavendish 1810-1880 (70) died in Ashford Hall. He was buried in the Cavendish Plot St Peter's Church Edensor Chatsworth.

Ashover, Derbyshire

In 1464 Thomas Babington of Dethick 1376-1464 (88) died at Ashover.

Around 1490 Isabel Dethick 1401-1490 (89) died at Ashover.

On 13 Mar 1518 Thomas Babington 1449-1518 (69) died at Ashover. He was buried at All Saints Church Ashover.

Monument to Thomas Babington 1449-1518 (69) and Editha Fitzherbert 1457-1511 (61). Excellent painted alabaster monument of the Tudor Period with the colours much refreshed. Carved by Harpur and Moorecock of Burton on Trent. Chest with Angels with Rounded Wings.

She wearing a Gabled Headress with long lappets.

He in civilian clothes with a purse (aka scrip aka gypciere) hanging from his belt.

Dogs chewing at her dress suggests Harpur and Moorecock of Burton on Trent carved the monument.

The chest tomb of exceptional quality with the fifteen weepers under crocketed canopies broadly undamaged. The weepers on the sides are believed to represent Thomas and Editha's children, possibly fourteen, and their respective spouses. Those on the ends appear to be Saints and Angels with the one in the middle possible St Catherine. The chest tomb now abuts the south wall of the chancel meaning only three sides visible.

Babington impaled Fitzherbert.

The River Amber rises near Ashover after which it travels broadly south passing Wooley before joining the River Derwent at Ambergate.

Gladdins Mark Farm Ashover, Derbyshire

09 Dec 1868. Will of Frank Gee 1826-1869 (42).

I, Frank GEE of COTEFIELD (42) within Edale in the parish of Castleton in the County of Derby Farmer declare this to be my last Will and Testament

I DIRECT the payment of all my just debts (except the sum of one hundred pounds of which I owe upon my promissory note) my funeral and testamentary expenses by my Executors hereinafter carried out of my personal Estate and from and after payment and satisfaction thereof

I GIVE devise and Bequeath all my Real Estate and the residue unto my nephews John Thomas GEE (24) of Kinder in the Parrish of Glossop in the said County of Derby , Farmer, and James Albert GEE (20) Gladdins Mark near Ashover in the said county of Derby, Farmer, their heirs, executors and administrators and assigns according to the nature and tenure thereof respectively UPON TRUST to permit and suffer my dear wife, Elizabeth GEE (32), to have the use and enjoyment of all my household furniture, faming stock and other effects (except money or securities for money that shall or may be or not about the house and farm on which I reside at the time of my decease and also to permit and suffer my said wife to receive the rents and profits of all that my Estate called UPPER BOOTH Estate in Edale aforesaid until my youngest child shall obtain the age of twenty one years (provided she continue to live with my widow but not otherwise) she my said wife maintaining my children during their respective minorities or so long as they shall wish to reside with her during their respective minorities PROVIDED ALWAYS that if my said wife shall elect to reside on my said Estate called UPPER BOOTH

I DECLARE that she may do so until my youngest child shall obtain the age of twenty one years IN CASE she remarries my widow as aforesaid but not otherwise and as to for and concerning that my Estate called OOCLOW [JOW HOLE] Farm situated in Chinley in the Parrish of Glossop aforesaid and now in the occupation of Hannah FORD UPON TRUST that the said John Thomas GEE and James Albert GEE their heirs, executors and administrators or assigns (hereinafter called the trustee or trustees) do and shall do and shall receive the rents and profits thereof until my son, Edwin Arthur GEE, shall obtain the age of twenty one years or such other period as shall enable the said Trustees or Trustee to pay off the said Debt of one hundred pounds and the three several legacies of one hundred and fifty pounds each which I Bequeath to my Daughters – Emma, Jane, Alice Maria, and Eliza Frances – on their severally attaining the age of twenty one years AND I declare and direct until such period as aforesaid the said Trustees or Trustee shall invest the said rents and profits of my said Estate called OOCLOW [JOW HOLE] Farm in the names or name of the said Trustees or Trustee in any of the public stocks or funds or upon real securities in England and accumulate the same in the way of compound interest by investing the same and the resulting income thereof on or upon any such stocks, funds and securities as hereinbefore mentioned until thereby or therewith the said Trustees or Trustee shall be enabled to pay off and discharge the said debt and legacies AND FROM and after payment and satisfaction thereof I declare that the said Trustees or Trustee shall stand seized of my said Estate called OOCLOW [JOW HOLE] Farm To the use of my said son, Edwin Arthur GEE his heirs and assigns forever subject nevertheless to the payment of an annually or yearly rent of seven pounds ten shillings to my said wife and her assigns during so long as she shall continue my widow to be yearly incurring and payable out of and charged and chargeable upon my said Estate called OOCLOW [JOW HOLE] Farm THE SAID annually or yearly rent to be payable and paid to her my said wife or her assigns in equal half yearly portions in every year clear of all incidental expenses and deductions with a proportional sum for any functional portion of a half year which may happen immediately to forecast the determination thereof the first half yearly payment of the said annually or yearly rent charge to be made at the expiration of five calendar months after my youngest child shall attain the age of twenty one years AND THE said aforementioned share to be payable immediately after the demise or marriage of my said wife AND I hereby declare that in case the said annually or yearly rent charge of seven pounds ten shillings or the aforesaid proportional part thereof should be at any time be in arrears and unpaid in the whole or in part for the space of twenty one days and after any of the said days or times hereinafter appointed for the payment thereof then it shall go lawful for my said wife her executors administrators or assigns to enter and detain for the same and for the expenses occasioned by the non-payment thereof upon all or any part of the hereditaments hereby charged with the payment of the said annually or yearly rent charge in the same manner in all respects as Landlords are authorized to do for rents received on common leases for years and as to for and concerning all that my Estate called UPPER BOOTH I DECLARE that all the said Trustees or Trustee stand seized from and after my son Alfred Henry GEE shall have attained the age of twenty one years TO THE use of the said Alfred Henry GEE his heirs and assigns for-ever subject nevertheless to the payment of an annually or yearly rent charge of seven pounds ten shillings to my said wife and her assigns during so long as she shall continue my widow to be yearly issuing and payable out of and charged and chargeable upon my said Estate UPPER BOOTH THE SAID annually or yearly rent charge to be paid and payable to her my said wife at the like times and time and in the like manner and to be recovered and recoverable by the like ways and means as are hereinbefore mentioned and directed in the case of the annuity to my said wife charged upon and payable out of my said Estate called OOCLOW [JOW HOLE] Farm and from and after the decease or marriage of my said wife or the time when my youngest child shall have attained the age of twenty one years I DECLARE that the said Trustees or Trustee stand possessed of all residue of my said Personal Estate in trust for my said son Alfred Henry GEE his ancestors, administrators or assigns for his and their own use absolutely AND I devise all the freehold and copyhold hereditaments vested in me upon trust or mortgage unto the said John Thomas GEE and James GEE their heirs and assigns subject to the Equity of Redemption subsisting therein respectively but the money secured on such Mortgages shall be considered as part of my personal Estate AND I appoint my said wife Elizabeth GEE and the said John Thomas GEE and my said two sons Alfred Henry GEE and Edwin Arthur GEE Executors of this my Will and my said wife Guardian of my infant children AND I revoke all other Will or Wills by me heretofore made

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have to this my last Will and Testament written on these sheets of paper to the first two sheets thereof subscribed my name and to this third and last sheet thereof subscribed my name and set my seal this ninth day of December one thousand eight hundred and sixty eight — Frank Gee —

SIGNED SEALED PUBLISHED DECLARED by the said Testator Frank GEE as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us, who in his presence and at his request, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witness:

— Charles Augustus Bennett — Chapel-en-le-Frith

— William Shepley — Chapel-en-le-Frith

16 Apr 1869. Proved at Derby the 16th day of April 1869 by the Oaths of Elizabeth GEE, Widow, the Relict, and John Thomas GEE, the nephew, two of the Executors to whom administration was granted. Power reserved to Alfred Henry GEE and Edwin Arthur GEE (now respectively minors) the other Executors where they shall have attained the age of twenty one years. The Testator, Frank GEE, was late of Cotefield within Edale in the parish of Castleton, in the County of Derby, Farmer and died on the 1st day of January 1869 at Cotefield aforesaid. EFFECTS: under £200.

Aston, Derbyshire

In 1367 John Melton 1367-1455 was born to William Ricardus Melton 1340-1399 (27) at Aston.

Aston upon Trent, Derbyshire

All Saints Church, Aston upon Trent, Derbyshire

On 04 Nov 1784 Thomas Gascoigne 8th Baronet 1745-1810 (39) and Mary Shuttleworth Lady Turner and Gascoigne 1751-1786 (33) were married at All Saints Church, Aston upon Trent. She by marriage Lady Gascoigne of Barnbow and Parlington in Yorkshire.

Around 1779 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of Thomas Gascoigne 8th Baronet 1745-1810.

Axe Edge Moor, Derbyshire

The Derbyshire River Wye rises at Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south-west through Buxton, Bakewell and Haddon Hall to Rowsley where it joins the River Derwent.

The River Dove rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Pilsbury, Hartington, Norbury, Rocester, Sudbury Hall and Tutbury Castle before joining the River Trent at Newton Solney.

The River Manifold rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Hulme End, Ecton, Thor's Cave, Beeston Tor and Ilam at which it joins the River Dove.

Bakewell, Derbyshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 919. This year, before midsummer, went King Edward (45) with an army to Nottingham; and ordered the town to be repaired on the south side of the river, opposite the other, and the bridge over the Trent betwixt the two towns. Thence he went to Bakewell in Peakland; and ordered a fort to be built as near as possible to it, and manned. And the King of Scotland, with all his people, chose him as father and lord; as did Reynold, and the son of Eadulf, and all that dwell in Northumbria, both English and Danish, both Northmen and others; also the king of the Strathclydwallians, and all his people.

Around 1100 William Peverell 1040-1115 (60) was granted Bakewell by King Henry I "Beauclerc" England 1068-1135 (32). The Anglo-Saxon Minster was demolished and a new church built.

Around 1370 Margaret Leeke 1370-1454 was born to Simon Leeke 1345-1428 (25) in Bakewell.

Around 1400 Anne Leche 1400- was born at Bakewell.

The Derbyshire River Wye rises at Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south-west through Buxton, Bakewell and Haddon Hall to Rowsley where it joins the River Derwent.

Bakewell Bridge, Derbyshire

1350. Bakewell Bridge is stone arch bridge spanning the Derbyshire River Wye. The bridge dates back to the 14th century and was constructed using ashlar gritstone.

Bamford, Derbyshire

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Barlow, Derbyshire

Around 1429 Robert Cockayne 1429-1530 was born to John Cockayne 1411-1504 (18) and Agnes Vernon 1427-1451 (2) at Barlow.

In 1433 Margaret Eyre 1433- was born to Robert Eyre at Barlow.

In 1433 Arthur Eyre 1433- was born to Robert Eyre at Barlow.

In 1433 Anne Eyre 1433- was born to Robert Eyre at Barlow.

Around 1455 Agnes Cockayne 1455-1479 was born to Robert Cockayne 1429-1530 (26) at Barlow.

Barrow On Trent, Derbyshire

Arleston, Barrow On Trent, Derbyshire

Around 1414 Alice Booth 1414-1453 was born to Henry Booth 1385-1476 (29) at Arleston.

Barton Blount, Derbyshire

Around 1478 William Blount 4th Baron Mountjoy 1478-1534 was born to John Blount 3rd Baron Mountjoy 1450-1485 (28) and Lora Berkeley Countess Ormonde at Barton Blount.

Baslow, Derbyshire

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Birch Vale, Derbyshire

Around 1852 Ellen m Hyde 1852- was born at Birch Vale.

Around 1881 Mary Hyde 1881- was born to James Hyde 1853- (28) and Ellen m Hyde 1852- (29) at Birch Vale.

On 06 Aug 1889 Sarah Ellen Hyde 1889-1954 was born to James Hyde 1853- (36) and Ellen m Hyde 1852- (37) at Birch Vale.

Around 1896 Elizabeth Ann Hyde 1896- was born to James Hyde 1853- (43) and Ellen m Hyde 1852- (44) at Birch Vale.

On 30 Apr 1896 James Waterhouse 1820-1896 (76) died at Birch Vale.

Around 1897 Norah Hyde 1897- was born to James Hyde 1853- (44) and Ellen m Hyde 1852- (45) at Birch Vale.

Spinnerbottom, Birch Vale, Derbyshire

In 1844 William Waterhouse 1844-1914 was born to James Waterhouse 1820-1896 (24) and Elizabeth Lomas 1819-1900 (25) at Spinnerbottom.

Bleaklow, Derbyshire

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Bolsover, Derbyshire

On 17 Apr 1643 Elizabeth Bassett Countess Newcastle upon Tyne 1592-1643 (51) died at Bolsover.

Around 1616 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of Elizabeth Bassett Countess Newcastle upon Tyne 1592-1643.

Church of St Mary and St Laurence Bolsover, Derbyshire

On 04 Apr 1617 Charles Cavendish 1553-1617 (63) died. On 18 Apr 1629 Catherine Ogle 8th Baroness Ogle 1570-1629 (59) died at Bothal. Monument to Charles Cavendish 1553-1617 (63) and Catherine Ogle 8th Baroness Ogle 1570-1629 (47) in Church of St Mary and St Laurence Bolsover. Jacobean Period. Bongrace. Rush Mat.

On 24 Dec 1716 Margaret Cavendish Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne 1661-1716 (55) died. She was buried in the Church of St Mary and St Laurence Bolsover.

1728. Church of St Mary and St Laurence Bolsover. Monument to Henry Cavendish 2nd Duke Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1691 (97), Frances Pierrepoint Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1695 (97) and their daughter Margaret Cavendish Duchess Newcastle upon Tyne 1661-1716 (66), and Charles Cavendish 1626-1659 and Charles Cavendish -1671 sculpted by Francis Bird Sculptor 1667-1731 (61).

In 1676 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699 (attributed). Portrait of Henry Cavendish 2nd Duke Newcastle upon Tyne 1630-1691 wearing the his Garter Collar.

Bonsall, Derbyshire

In Dec 1384 Thomas Wendesley 1344-1403 (40) was retained for life by John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster 1340-1399 (44) in peace and war at an annual fee of 20 marks, charged upon the township of Bensall in Derbyshire [Note. Possibly Bonsall]. The benefits were certainly not all one-sided, for Wensley was expected to use his own influence as a member of the local bench and crown commissioner on the duke's behalf when the occasion demanded.

On 03 Jan 1842 Samuel Moorcroft 1803-1842 (38) died at Bonsall.

Around 15 May 1852 John Moocroft 1768-1852 (84) died at Bonsall.

Boylestone, Derbyshire

Around May 1768 John Moocroft 1768-1852 was born at Boylestone.

Around May 1803 Samuel Moorcroft 1803-1842 was born to John Moocroft 1768-1852 (35) at Boylestone.

In 1834 Thomas Moorcroft 1834-1913 was born to Samuel Moorcroft 1803-1842 (30) at Boylestone.

Bradwell, Derbyshire

On 14 Jul 1822 Elizabeth Graham 1822-1881 was born at Bradwell.

Brassington, Derbyshire

Manystones Lane, Brassington, Derbyshire

After Buxton The Street continues south following the A515 past Brierlow Bar, Pomeroy, Parsley Hay where it turns towards Pikehall after which it passes Minning Low Chambered Tomb turning before Brassington onto Manystones Lane continuing east into Wirksworth.

Breadsall, Derbyshire

Breadsall Priory, Derbyshire

On 18 Apr 1802 Erasmus Darwin 1731-1802 (70) died at Breadsall Priory.

Around 1780 Joseph Wright of Derby Painter 1734-1797. Portrait of Erasmus Darwin 1731-1802.

Brierlow Bar, Derbyshire

After Buxton The Street continues south following the A515 past Brierlow Bar, Pomeroy, Parsley Hay where it turns towards Pikehall after which it passes Minning Low Chambered Tomb turning before Brassington onto Manystones Lane continuing east into Wirksworth.

Brownside, Derbyshire

In 1535 William Slack of Chapel en le Frith 1535-1592 was born at Brownside.

Godfrey SLACKE Glossop (Brownsyde): 17 May 1592.

In the name of god Amen the xixth daye of Aprill in the yeare of o[ur] Lorde god 1591 I Godfrey SLACKE of the preshe of Glossopp and countie derbe Weke in bodie but sounde in myned & of good and pfecte Remembrance prayse be to god almeightie make Herin my last will and testamt in man and fforme followinge:

ffirst I bequeth my soule to god almeigthie my maker savior and Redemr and my bodie to be buried in the church yarde of chapell le fryth,

Itm I do geve and bequeth unto my brother Thomas SLACKE xx sheepe in whethers sheepe so many as I have and to ffell & make ffourth the score in other sheepe at the dyscretion of my syster Elizabeth SLACKE. Itm I do bequeth to lytell Henry SLACKE an ewe lambe. Itm my will ys that after my ffunerall expenses, my dower and legacies beinge payed and dyscharged of my whole goods, my syster Elizabeth shall have the Restidew of my goods !Itm my will ys that my said syster shall have all my Houses lands & grounds wth my Reights tythe terme and interest in the Harbage of Chynley wth all and syngle ther apprtence to have and to holde occupie and [quyetley] to injoye ffor and duringe her naturall lyfe In as large beneficall and ample in an as I have now the same.

And after the decease of my said syster Eliz: my will ys that all my said Houses lands & grounds wth all my Reight tytle terme and Interest of the said Harbage of Chynley wth all and everie comoditie or [ fytt] belonging or in any wyse appertaninge unto the premysses or to any pte ther of I do geve and bequeth them and eberie pte and pcell therof to my said brother Thomas SLACKE his heires & assignes for ever in as large benificall and ample in an as I now injoye & occupie the same. Itm I do apointe my welbeloved syster Elizabeth SLACKE to be myne executor to execute pforme and ffulfill this my last will and testamt accordinge to the true meaning ther of as my ffull trust ys in her. And to be supervisor hereof I desyre my welbeloved cosen Richard BLYTHE

Sealed Read and published before these wytnesses Richard SLACK; Charles ASHETON; Robert SLACK and John BOLLER

Detts wch the said Godfre SLACK owethe.

Impri John WILDE viiid

Itm to Jannes FFRITH iiid

Itm to Peter SHORE gz

Itm to George YEVELEY ffor bes[ ] [ ]esses abouv vis viiid

Itm to Robert SLACK [ ]

Itm to CHESWELL ixd

Itm to Richard [ ] xii£

Itm to Thomas MELLOR of Cloughe head

Buxton, Derbyshire

The Derbyshire River Wye rises at Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south-west through Buxton, Bakewell and Haddon Hall to Rowsley where it joins the River Derwent.

Silverlands, Buxton, Derbyshire

After Townend The Street continues past Lower Eaves, Windy Walls Farm, Sittinglow, Martinside Cross and more or less through Dove Holes Railway Station where it makes a slight change in direction. Thereafter it intersects with another Roman Road from Batham Gate before reaching Brooke House Farm and continuing past St Peter's Church Buxton aka Aquae Arnemetiae aka Baths of the Grove Goddess.

In Buxton the route is unknown other than the discovery in Jun 1862 of a milstone at a property called Silverlands in Buxton: 'In June 1862, there was found in a garden, in the occupation of Mr. Matthew Lees, near the Silverlands in Higher Buxton, the lower part of an inscribed Roman milestone.' The milestone appears to mark twelve miles from the station Navio.1

In 1913 the son of Matthew Lees returned to Buxton from Canada and stated that he was the actual discoverer of the milestone and that he found it while digging deep in his father's garden near an old lane in 1856, not 1862. The stone was lying flat, some 18ins below the surface and the exact spot so far as he could tell was just inside the gateway leading to the Upper Buxton Railway Station. It is suggested that it was found close to its original position and must therefore indicate the line of the Roman road between Buxton and Brough.2

The milestone is now in Buxton Museum.

1. Article in serial: Watkin, W. 1885. 'The Roman Stations Of Derbyshire' Derbyshire Archaeology Journal. Volume 7. pp 79-80.

2. Article in serial: Tristram, E. 1916. 'Roman Buxton', in Derbyshire Archaeological Journal. Vol. 38, pp. 84-104. pp 87-91.

St Peter's Church Buxton, Derbyshire

After Townend The Street continues past Lower Eaves, Windy Walls Farm, Sittinglow, Martinside Cross and more or less through Dove Holes Railway Station where it makes a slight change in direction. Thereafter it intersects with another Roman Road from Batham Gate before reaching Brooke House Farm and continuing past St Peter's Church Buxton aka Aquae Arnemetiae aka Baths of the Grove Goddess.

In Buxton the route is unknown other than the discovery in Jun 1862 of a milstone at a property called Silverlands in Buxton: 'In June 1862, there was found in a garden, in the occupation of Mr. Matthew Lees, near the Silverlands in Higher Buxton, the lower part of an inscribed Roman milestone.' The milestone appears to mark twelve miles from the station Navio.1

In 1913 the son of Matthew Lees returned to Buxton from Canada and stated that he was the actual discoverer of the milestone and that he found it while digging deep in his father's garden near an old lane in 1856, not 1862. The stone was lying flat, some 18ins below the surface and the exact spot so far as he could tell was just inside the gateway leading to the Upper Buxton Railway Station. It is suggested that it was found close to its original position and must therefore indicate the line of the Roman road between Buxton and Brough.2

The milestone is now in Buxton Museum.

1. Article in serial: Watkin, W. 1885. 'The Roman Stations Of Derbyshire' Derbyshire Archaeology Journal. Volume 7. pp 79-80.

2. Article in serial: Tristram, E. 1916. 'Roman Buxton', in Derbyshire Archaeological Journal. Vol. 38, pp. 84-104. pp 87-91.

Carsington, Derbyshire

St Margaret's Church Carsington, Derbyshire

On 02 Jul 1593 John Gell 1st Baronet Gell 1593-1671 was baptised at St Margaret's Church Carsington.

Castleton, Derbyshire

Devil's Arse, Castleton, Derbyshire

Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 January 1663. 19 Jan 1663. He, the next day (of which the Duke was warned by somebody that saw the passion my Lord Chesterfield (29) was in the night before), went and told the Duke how much he did apprehend himself wronged, in his picking out his lady of the whole Court to be the subject of his dishonour; which the Duke (29) did answer with great calmness, not seeming to understand the reason of complaint, and that was all that passed but my Lord did presently pack his lady into the country in Derbyshire, near the Peake; which is become a proverb at Court, to send a man's wife to the Devil's arse a' Peake, when she vexes him.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

Chapel-en-le-Frith

Chatsworth

Chelmorton, Derbyshire

In 1370 Sir Godfrey Foljambe (26) the younger (son of the eminent lawyer and retainer of John of Gaunt (29)) confirmed him in possession of part of the manors of Over Haddon, Rowsley, Wardlow, Monyash and Chelmorton in Derbyshire, which were to Gaunt (29) himself.

Chesterfield

Chinley

Clay Cross, Derbyshire

Icknield Street 18d Derby to Chesterfield. From Derventio aka Derby Icknield Street takes a new alignment past Morley, Smithy Houses, Street Lane, Higham, Oakerthorpe, Clay Cross crossing the River Rother before arriving at Chesterfield.

The River Rother rises at Clay Cross then flows through Chesterfield and Sheffield after which it joins the River Don which then flows through Rotherham to which the River Rother gives its name.

Codnor

Crich, Derbyshire

In 1822 George Graham 1822-1909 was born at Crich.

Cromford, Derbyshire

Wirksworth is one of the placed that is possibly the Roman town Lutudarum. The other candidates are Carsington, Matlock and Cromford.

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Darley, Derbyshire

On 29 May 1376 Godfrey Foljambe "The Younger" 1344-1376 (32) died at Darley.

Darley Abbey, Derbyshire

After 23 Sep 1459 James Tuchet 5th Baron Audley of Heighley 1398-1459 was buried at Darley Abbey.

Denby, Derbyshire

On 19 Aug 1646 John Flamsteed Astronomer 1646-1719 was born in Denby.

Derby

Dethick, Derbyshire

Dove Holes

Drakelow, Derbyshire

On 03 Nov 1552 Thomas Gresley 1552-1610 was born to William Gresley 1525-1573 (27) and Catherine Aston at Drakelow.

On 05 Sep 1610 Thomas Gresley 1552-1610 (57) died at Drakelow.

Dronfield, Derbyshire

Around 1480 Henry Fanshawe of Fanshaw Gate 1480- was born at Dronfield.

Around 1505 Henry Fanshawe 1505-1568 was born to Henry Fanshawe of Fanshaw Gate 1480- (25) at Dronfield.

Eckington, Derbyshire

Renishaw Hall, Eckington, Derbyshire

On 31 Mar 2009 Sacheverell Reresby Sitwell 7th Baronet Sitwell 1927-2009 (81) died. His nephew George Reresby Sacheverell Sitwell 8th Baronet 1967- (41) succeeded 8th Baronet Sitwell of Renishaw Hall in Derbyshire. As a consequence of a falling out with his brother Francis Trajan Sacheverell Sitwell 1935-2004 (73) he left Renishaw Hall to his daughter Alexandra Sitwell -1958 (51).

Ecton, Derbyshire

The River Manifold rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Hulme End, Ecton, Thor's Cave, Beeston Tor and Ilam at which it joins the River Dove.

Edale

Egginton, Derbyshire

In 1197 Ermentrude Ferrers 1197-1257 was born to Robert Ferrers 1177-1227 (20) and Joan Boclande 1183- (14) at Egginton.

In 1253 Robert Stafford 1253-1303 was born to Robert Stafford 1216-1282 (37) and Alice Corbet 1225-1267 (28) at Egginton.

In 1278 Johanna Stafford 1278- was born to Robert Stafford 1253-1303 (25) and Gundreda Stafford 1252-1308 (26) at Egginton.

Elvaston

Etwall, Derbyshire

Around 1447 John Fitzherbert 1447-1502 was born to Nicholas Fitzherbert 1400-1473 (47) and Alice Booth 1414-1453 (33) at Etwall.

In 1455 Margaret Babington 1455-1502 was born to John Babington 1423-1485 (32) and Isabel Bradbourne 1427-1486 (28) at Etwall.

Higham, Derbyshire

Icknield Street 18d Derby to Chesterfield. From Derventio aka Derby Icknield Street takes a new alignment past Morley, Smithy Houses, Street Lane, Higham, Oakerthorpe, Clay Cross crossing the River Rother before arriving at Chesterfield.

Fairfield, Derbyshire

New High Street, Fairfield, Derbyshire

34 New High Street, Fairfield, Derbyshire

1891. 1891 Census Derbyshire Fairfield Page 22. 34 New High Street.

George Henry Moorcroft 1857-1931 (34). Head. 35. Carter. His name is given as George Havercroft?

Caroline Wood 1855-. Wife. 35.

Ada Louise Moorcroft 1883-1963 (7). Daughter. 6. Scholar.

Arthur Moorcroft 1887- (4). Son. 4.

DOCUMENTS/CENSUS/C1891/DERBYSHIRE/C1891_Derbyshire_Fairfield_Page_23.pngCaroline_Moorcroft_1890_. Daughter. 1.

Fenny Bentley, Derbyshire

In 1470 George Beresford 1470-1520 was born to Aden Beresford 1441-1495 (29) at Fenny Bentley.

In 1520 George Beresford 1470-1520 (50) died at Fenny Bentley.

In 1520 Benedicta Bradbourne 1495-1520 (25) died at Fenny Bentley.

Fernilee, Derbyshire

On 16 Jul 1883 Ada Louise Moorcroft 1883-1963 was born to George Henry Moorcroft 1857-1931 (26) and Caroline Wood 1855- at Fernilee.

Around 1887 Arthur Moorcroft 1887- was born to George Henry Moorcroft 1857-1931 (30) and Caroline Wood 1855- at Fernilee.

Around 1890 Caroline Moorcroft 1890- was born to George Henry Moorcroft 1857-1931 (33) and Caroline Wood 1855- at Fernilee.

Around 1892 George Henry Moorcroft 1892- was born to George Henry Moorcroft 1857-1931 (35) and Caroline Wood 1855- at Fernilee.

Around 1896 Thomas Willam Moorcroft -1896 was born to George Henry Moorcroft 1857-1931 (39) and Caroline Wood 1855- at Fernilee.

Foremark, Derbyshire

Around 1364 Robert Francis 1364-1419 was born to Robert Francis 1342-1370 (22) at Foremark.

Foremark Hall Foremark, Derbyshire

Around 1419 Robert Francis 1364-1419 (55) died at Foremark Hall Foremark.

Glossop

Great Cubley

Grindleford, Derbyshire

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Haddon Hall

Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire

In 1523 Thomas Leeke of Hasland 1458-1523 (65) died in Hardwick Hall.

On 18 Jan 1858 William Cavendish 6th Duke Devonshire 1790-1858 (67) died at Hardwick Hall. He was buried in the Cavendish Plot St Peter's Church Edensor Chatsworth. His first cousin once removed William Cavendish 7th Duke Devonshire 1808-1891 (49) succeeded 7th Duke Devonshire, 10th Earl Devonshire. Blanche Georgiana Howard Duchess Devonshire 1812-1840 (46) by marriage Duchess Devonshire.

In 1815. Thomas Lawrence 1769-1830. Portrait of William Cavendish 6th Duke Devonshire 1790-1858. Around 1828. George Hayter 1792-1871. Portrait of William Cavendish 7th Duke Devonshire 1808-1891. Before 1840. John Lindsay Lucas 1807-1874. Portrait of Blanche Georgiana Howard Duchess Devonshire 1812-1840.

Before 1868. Reuben Thomas William Sayers Painter 1815-1888 (52). Portrait of Harriet Elizabeth Georgiana Howard Duchess Sutherland 1806-1868 (61). An inscription on the back of this picture states that it was painted after a portrait by Sir Thomas Lawrence. However, the only portrait of the Duchess that has been recorded is a double portrait with her daughter Elizabeth (in the collection of the Duke of Sutherland). The picture is currently at Hardwick Hall.

Prodigy House. A large house built in the Tudor, Elizabethan and Jacobean periods defined by their use of glass. Prodigy houses include: Longford Castle, Wollaton Hall, Longleat House, Burghley House, Hatfield House and Hardwick Hall.

Hartington, Derbyshire

In 1510 John Pole of Hartington 1510- was born in Hartington.

The River Dove rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Pilsbury, Hartington, Norbury, Rocester, Sudbury Hall and Tutbury Castle before joining the River Trent at Newton Solney.

Beresford Hall Alstonefield, Hartington, Derbyshire

On 28 Apr 1630 Charles Cotton 1630-1687 was born to Charles Cotton -1658 at Beresford Hall Alstonefield.

Church of St Giles, Hartington, Derbyshire

Before 08 Sep 1561 Robert Bateman 1561-1644 was born to Richard Bateman of Hartington and Ellen Topleyes. He was baptised on 08 Sep 1561 at the Church of St Giles.

Hartshorn, Derbyshire

St Peter's Church Hartshorn, Derbyshire

Before 1799 Stebbing Shaw -1799 was appointed Rector of St Peter's Church Hartshorn.

On 27 Apr 1799 Stebbing Shaw Historian 1762-1802 (37) succeeded his father as Rector of St Peter's Church Hartshorn.

Hadfield, Derbyshire

On 27 Sep 1811 Hannah Hinchcliffe 1811-1848 was born to Thomas Hinchliffe 1791-1842 (20) and Hannah Langley 1791- (20) at Hadfield.

In Apr 1848 Hannah Hinchcliffe 1811-1848 (36) died at Lower Barn Hadfield.

1851. 1851 Census Derbyshire Hadfield Page 36. Lower Barn Hadfield.

Azariah Chadwick 1812-1860 (39). Head. 41.

George Chadwick 1839-1909 (11). Son. 12.

On or before 13 Feb 1876 Harry Chadwick 1876-1923 was born to George Chadwick 1839-1909 (36) and Sophia Smith 1843-1883 (32) at Hadfield.

In 1883 Sophia Smith 1843-1883 (39) died at Hadfield.

Hayfield

Hathersage, Derbyshire

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Heanor, Derbyshire

In Jul 1555 Henry Garnet Jesuit 1555-1606 was born in Heanor.

Around 18 Oct 1750 Edward Miller Mundy 1750-1822 was born to Edward Mundy 1706-1767 (44) at Heanor..

Highlane, Derbyshire

Icknield Street 18e Chesterfield to Templeborough. The route of Icknield Street from Chesterfield to Templeborough is unknown. Speculatively it passed through Old Whittington, Hundall, Highlane, Orgreave.

Hollingworth, Derbyshire

Nicholas WATERHOUSE of Sprayhouse: 1 August 1574

In the Name of god Amen, Anno Dom 1573 The xix daye of November in the xvj year of the Reign of our sovraign Ladie Elizabeth by the grace of god of England ffrance Ireland queen deffdr of the faithe I Nycholas WATRHOUSSE of Sprahousse in Heiffeld Sycke in Bodye hoole of mynde dreadynge the unctin houre of deyth do Ordane & make this my will & Testament in manr & fforme followynge ffyrst I gyfe & bequeath my Soole unto god Allmygthie and my Bodie to Buryed in the pysh church of all hallowes of glossopp whch I am a personer in suche A conveniente place as shalbe thought meate & [Con ]

By my Executors & Supervisors undr wrytten

Also I wyll that the pson or vicar have thre d [ ] after my Deythe Also I wyll & bequeth To Katheryn WATRHOUSSE my welbeloved wyffe my housse the wych I nowe dwell in wt all Lands wch Belonge unto the same durynge the Lyve of the same Katheryn

Also I wyll that the said Katheryn my wyffe shall have all my goods & [ ]s of grounds durynge her Lyffe and the said Katheryn [key]pynge my ffyve chyldren togyther wt meate drynke and apell intyll suche tyme as the yongeste chylde Be of the age of xxj yeres ffulln Thes Be the names of the chyldren Thoms WATRHOUSSE John WATRHOUSSE Rauffe WATRHOUSSE Jone WATRHOUSSE and Helen WATRHOUSSE my said wyff pformynge all thynge as heareafter followynge That is to wytte my wyffe paynge my detts & Legaces pformynge [ ] to Thoms WATRHOUSSE my Eldyste sone after his mothers deithe my housse & grond that I nowe dwellin to hym & his heres for ever

And also the same Thoms to have syxe ponds xiijs iiijd of [ ] mony to putte upe after wt all and hys mother to keepe hym wt meate dryncke & apell durynge his mothers Lyff & to doe his mothers worke and

Also hys mother to gyve to the said Thoms [T]en hoge Lambs that is to wytte the Best Brasse potts the Best pann the Best Bede wt all nessaries Belongynge unto the same and of all thynges Belongynge unto husbanddrye to have the Best pte Ham the Best Arke at the house [ ] [ ] to have vj£ xiijs iiijd to putt upe A stable wt all when He shall come to his ffull age of xxj

Also I gyve unto John WATRHOUSSE my Sone & his heres ffor ever my tenement in Heyffeilde wt the appurtenance Caulled [ bothomshousse] nowe Beynge in the occupacyon of John BOWDEN of Heyffelde to take ytt when ytt shall fall after the yongest chylde shall come unto his age of xxj yeres also I gyve unto Rauffe WATRHOUSSE my tenement Lyinge in Bowdenlane now the countie of Derby to have to the said Rauphe & his heres ffor ever & also the Said Rauffe to have too Cottages in Heyffelde & kyndr Bancke also I gyve to the said Rauphe Syxe ponds xiijs iiijd of [ ] mony to be paide unto the said Rauffe when he shall come to hs ffull age of xxj yeres

Also I gyve & bequeth unto Johan WATTRHOUSSE And Ellin WATRHOUSSE my too daughters eyther of them threscore ponds of [ ] mony to Be paid unto eyther of them when the shall come to ther ffull age of xxj yeres [Ey] ther [ ] after the said xxj yeares at the syghte of thre ffrends and Bothe the said too daughters to Be [ ] Bothe Bede & Ban[ ] of there ffathers goods

Also yt is my wyll that yf god do viseytt wt deythe any of my said daughters or Sonnes Then it shalle at the pleasure of my wytffe ether Landes & goods

Also I wyll that Elizabeth ARNEFFELDE wy[ ] That After his terme endid yf she [ ] for the [ ] it to occupie wch plasse shall have one [ ] caulled the Hollyngeworth C[ ] ^ payinge xs [ ] wethe houssynge no other houssynge nowe and A[ ] nowe in the occupacion of the said Elizabeth

And of this my last wyll & Testament I ordane & make my lawffull & true executors Katheryn my trustie & welbeloved wyffe And Thoms WATRHOUSSE my Eldeste Sone And of this my said said wyll & testamente I ordeyne & make the supervisors herof Thoms RAWLYNSON the yonger Robertt ARMEFFELDE of Brodsworthe & Rauffe BRADLEY of the haighe And I gyffe to evry of them xs apece to se that this my wyll Be pformed in all Causys as my syngular confydence & truste is in thym Thes wyttnes Ottywell FFERNYLEYOttywell ANDREW of gybhey Rauffe HYDE of Bulshawe & Thoms ARMEFFELDE of Heyfild wt others

detts owynge to me Nycolas WATRHOUSSE

Inprimis Roger WHYTILL viis viijd

Thoms WATRHOUSSE of Hasselhurst viijs viijd

detts wych the said Nycolas do owe

[ ] BRAMALL of thornesett xxvjs viijd

Inprimis Rauffe BRADLEY xls xj

Nycolas KYNDR

Itm to ottewell BAWDON of Heyffeld xliijs iiijd

John DOWNES of Kydr xxvs

to Thoms WATRHOUSSE (7) my Brother xxxiijs iiijd

Rauffe MELLER of All[ ]

Hope, Derbyshire

On 20 Oct 1846 Matilda Graham 1846-1933 was born to George Graham 1822-1909 (24) and Elizabeth Graham 1822-1881 (24) at Hope.

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Hopton Hall, Derbyshire

On 22 Jun 1593 John Gell 1st Baronet Gell 1593-1671 was born to Thomas Gell 1532-1594 (61) and Millicent Sacheverell in Hopton Hall.

Hopwell, Derbyshire

Around 1380 Robert Sacheverell 1380- was born at Hopwell.

Around 1400 John Sacheverell 1400-1485 was born to Robert Sacheverell 1380- (20) at Hopwell.

In 1412 Ralph Sacheverell 1412-1488 was born to John Sacheverell 1400-1485 (12) and Anne Leche 1400- (12) at Hopwell.

Hough, Derbyshire

In 1359 William Bradbourne 1359- was born at Hough.

In 1385 Roger Bradbourne 1385- was born to William Bradbourne 1359- (26) at Hough.

Around 1410 Henry Bradbourne 1410- was born to Roger Bradbourne 1385- (25) at Hough.

Around 1427 Isabel Bradbourne 1427-1486 was born to Henry Bradbourne 1410- (17) at Hough.

In 1465 Humphrey Bradbourne 1465-1495 was born to John Bradbourne 1425-1464 (40) at Hough.

In 1495 Humphrey Bradbourne 1465-1495 (30) died at Hough.

In 1495 Benedicta Bradbourne 1495-1520 was born to Humphrey Bradbourne 1465-1495 (30) and Margaret Longford 1480-1495 (15) at Hough.

Hulme End, Derbyshire

The River Manifold rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Hulme End, Ecton, Thor's Cave, Beeston Tor and Ilam at which it joins the River Dove.

Hundall, Derbyshire

Icknield Street 18e Chesterfield to Templeborough. The route of Icknield Street from Chesterfield to Templeborough is unknown. Speculatively it passed through Old Whittington, Hundall, Highlane, Orgreave.

Kedleston

Kirk Ireton, Derbyshire

On 14 Apr 1558 Thomas Gell 1532-1594 (26) and Millicent Sacheverell were married in Kirk Ireton.

Kirk Langley, Derbyshire

In 1507 Henry Pole 1507-1558 was born to Henry Pole 1470- (37) and Ursula Twyford at Kirk Langley.

In 1522 Thomas Twyford 1439-1522 (83) died at Kirk Langley.

Henry Pole 1470- died at Kirk Langley.

Lathkill Dale, Derbyshire

Lathkill Dale, in which the River Lath flows, extends from Monyash to Alport where the River Lath is joined by the River Bradford. After Alport the River Lath flows east to a point around 600m south of Haddon Hall where it joins the Derbyshire River Wye.

Little Hayfield

Longnor, Derbyshire

The River Dove rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Pilsbury, Hartington, Norbury, Rocester, Sudbury Hall and Tutbury Castle before joining the River Trent at Newton Solney.

The River Manifold rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Hulme End, Ecton, Thor's Cave, Beeston Tor and Ilam at which it joins the River Dove.

Matlock, Derbyshire

Wirksworth is one of the placed that is possibly the Roman town Lutudarum. The other candidates are Carsington, Matlock and Cromford.

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Diary of Mrs Philip Lybbe-Powys aka Caroline Girle 1757. After having spent our time most agreeably with our Derbyshire, as we had before done with our York- shire friends, our London party set out on our return to the Metropolis, but in our way back was to stay a few days at Matlock and see Chatsworth; the latter we did the morning we left Mr. Slater's, it being about ten miles distant. This celebrated seat in the Peak of Derbyshire of his Grace of Devon- shire I must own does not quite answer what report had taught me to expect, tho' undoubtedly striking; but I was told it would appear less so to us than to strangers in general by the Slaters having a key to go through his Grace's grounds, a better and much shorter road than the public one, but that did not give one near so picturesque a view of Chatsworth's situation as if we had gone down to it all at once from the barren moors. The house is of stone, and the architecture thought very fine, twenty-two rooms on a floor; the windows of the principal storey, seventeen feet in height, are all looking-glass, of panes two feet wide, the frames double gilt; the door, and window-frames, and staircases of marble; ceilings and some apartments painted by Verrio and other celebrated artists; there is some fine tapestry, and in one chamber a most elegant bed, and furniture of fine old print set upon Nankeen, which has a very pretty effect, as the colour of the ground sets off the work. There are many fine pictures; one range of rooms they still style Mary, Queen of Scots, as she was some time here, as well as at his Grace's other seat of Hardwick; there is a very elegant chapel, the altar and font fine marble, seats and gallery cedar, the walls and ceiling painted. The front towards the garden is esteemed a most regular piece of architecture. The frieze under the cornice has the family motto upon it, in gilt letters so large as to take up the whole length, tho' only two words, "Cavendo Tutos," which are as appli- cable to the situation of the house as the name of the family. The waterworks, which are reckoned the finest in England, were all played off, may be said to be more grand than pleasing, as there is a formality in them, particularly the grand cascade, which takes off every idea of the rural scene they are supposed to afford one, and a kind of triflingness (if I may make a word), in the copper1 willow-tree, and other contrivances beneath the dignity of the place. The gardens are fine. The very disadvan- tages of the situation contriving to their beauty. On the east side, not far distant, rises a prodigious mountain, so thick planted with beautiful trees that you only see a wood gradually ascending, as if the trees crowded one above the other to admire the stately pile before them. 'Tis said that Marshal Tallard when he returned to his own country, when he reckoned up the days of his captivity, said he should always leave out those he spent at Chatsworth; and I must own this magnificent (tho' at the same time gloomy), place may justly be stiled one of the won- ders of the Peake.... In speaking of the waterworks, I forgot to mention the length of the great cascade, 220 yards long with twenty-three falls. In prose- cuting our journey of about eleven miles, 'tis hardly possible to describe the variety of beauties; some- times we were like Don Quixote, almost imagining ourselves enchanted, at another terrified by the huge rocks, which by their stupendous height seemed to threaten every minute to crush us by their fall. In the greatest of our terrors (when in a very narrow road, the above-mention'd rocks on one side, and an immense precipice down to the river on the other), we could not help laughing at the calm answer of one of the postillions, who by often going, I suppose, had not an idea of the danger we apprehended, for only calling out to beg he'd let us walk, and saying, "Where, friend, are you going?" "Only to Matlock Baths, ladies." So indeed we knew, but at that moment doubted the wisdom of our driver, who, however conveyed us very safe to the destined spot. Ceremony seems banished from this agreeable place,. as on entering the long room strangers as well as acquaintances most politely made inquiries about the terrors of the way, &c, which themselves had before experienced. The very early hour of rising at Matlock, gave us the next morning a still finer idea of the uncommon beauties of the place, as a most glorious day gave it additional lustre. The time of bathing is between six and seven, the water warm, and the pleasantest to drink that can be; at eight the company meet in the long room to breakfast in parties. This room and baths were built in 1734 by Stephen Egglinton. 'Tis a very good one, fifty feet long, windows all the way on each side, commanded the most romantic views, one way a fine terrace, beyond that a lawn extended to the river Derwent, which latter is a continual pleasing murmur by the current forcing itself over large pieces of rock; over this rises a most picturesque and natural shrubbery, to an immense and perpendicular height on the crag of rocks. On the left is seen Matlock High Torr, a rocky mountain which, from the surface of the water 1757 to the top, is 445 feet. As there is always a cool spot among the woods, walking seems the particular amuse- ment of the place. At two the bell rings for dinner, and, as before said, ease without unnecessary cere- mony reigns here. Every one sits down without any form, those who come first by the rule taking the uppermost seats at the long table. There is a gallery for a band of music, who play the whole time of meals, The fatigue of dress, too, is at this public place quite avoided, as hats are general, as the company walk again till evening, when there is a ball in the long room till supper, and sometimes after. Every one retires very early, as few card-tables are seen, gaming not having yet reached this rural spot. The Boat- house, as 'tis call'd, we went one afternoon to drink tea at, where we bought curiosities of spars, &c, of the miners, men employed to the number of above ten thousand about Matlock only. We went, too, one morning to see them melt lead at a village near, call'd Cumford, but the heat was so intense we did not stay long among them; and the poor souls told us was often very prejudicial to them. That evening we went in a barge on the river, but it being not navi- gable, 'tis but in few places the stones and craginess of the rocks will allow of boats. Every evening almost we found new company on our return to supper. Tho' the numbers perhaps were lessn'd, as most likely as many were gone off the same morning, about a hundred generally assembled at dinner. I heard Miss Slater, who sometimes makes a stay there, say that two or three days has made a total change of inhabitants. We tried one evening to ascend the prodigious rock I before spoke of, call'd Matlock High Torr. Many do, it seems, perform it, but I own I was frighted before I had got a quarter of the way up, and each object below began to appear so diminutive that I, even with some others, consented to be ridi- culed for my fears, and with vast joy got down again as soon as possible, and even thought I felt giddy for hours after, and thought myself most happy when I got into the grove, one of the sweetest walks in Matlock.

1. On pulling a string this sham tree deluges the stranger with a shower-bath.

Matlock High Torr, Derbyshire

Diary of Mrs Philip Lybbe-Powys aka Caroline Girle 1757. After having spent our time most agreeably with our Derbyshire, as we had before done with our York- shire friends, our London party set out on our return to the Metropolis, but in our way back was to stay a few days at Matlock and see Chatsworth; the latter we did the morning we left Mr. Slater's, it being about ten miles distant. This celebrated seat in the Peak of Derbyshire of his Grace of Devon- shire I must own does not quite answer what report had taught me to expect, tho' undoubtedly striking; but I was told it would appear less so to us than to strangers in general by the Slaters having a key to go through his Grace's grounds, a better and much shorter road than the public one, but that did not give one near so picturesque a view of Chatsworth's situation as if we had gone down to it all at once from the barren moors. The house is of stone, and the architecture thought very fine, twenty-two rooms on a floor; the windows of the principal storey, seventeen feet in height, are all looking-glass, of panes two feet wide, the frames double gilt; the door, and window-frames, and staircases of marble; ceilings and some apartments painted by Verrio and other celebrated artists; there is some fine tapestry, and in one chamber a most elegant bed, and furniture of fine old print set upon Nankeen, which has a very pretty effect, as the colour of the ground sets off the work. There are many fine pictures; one range of rooms they still style Mary, Queen of Scots, as she was some time here, as well as at his Grace's other seat of Hardwick; there is a very elegant chapel, the altar and font fine marble, seats and gallery cedar, the walls and ceiling painted. The front towards the garden is esteemed a most regular piece of architecture. The frieze under the cornice has the family motto upon it, in gilt letters so large as to take up the whole length, tho' only two words, "Cavendo Tutos," which are as appli- cable to the situation of the house as the name of the family. The waterworks, which are reckoned the finest in England, were all played off, may be said to be more grand than pleasing, as there is a formality in them, particularly the grand cascade, which takes off every idea of the rural scene they are supposed to afford one, and a kind of triflingness (if I may make a word), in the copper1 willow-tree, and other contrivances beneath the dignity of the place. The gardens are fine. The very disadvan- tages of the situation contriving to their beauty. On the east side, not far distant, rises a prodigious mountain, so thick planted with beautiful trees that you only see a wood gradually ascending, as if the trees crowded one above the other to admire the stately pile before them. 'Tis said that Marshal Tallard when he returned to his own country, when he reckoned up the days of his captivity, said he should always leave out those he spent at Chatsworth; and I must own this magnificent (tho' at the same time gloomy), place may justly be stiled one of the won- ders of the Peake.... In speaking of the waterworks, I forgot to mention the length of the great cascade, 220 yards long with twenty-three falls. In prose- cuting our journey of about eleven miles, 'tis hardly possible to describe the variety of beauties; some- times we were like Don Quixote, almost imagining ourselves enchanted, at another terrified by the huge rocks, which by their stupendous height seemed to threaten every minute to crush us by their fall. In the greatest of our terrors (when in a very narrow road, the above-mention'd rocks on one side, and an immense precipice down to the river on the other), we could not help laughing at the calm answer of one of the postillions, who by often going, I suppose, had not an idea of the danger we apprehended, for only calling out to beg he'd let us walk, and saying, "Where, friend, are you going?" "Only to Matlock Baths, ladies." So indeed we knew, but at that moment doubted the wisdom of our driver, who, however conveyed us very safe to the destined spot. Ceremony seems banished from this agreeable place,. as on entering the long room strangers as well as acquaintances most politely made inquiries about the terrors of the way, &c, which themselves had before experienced. The very early hour of rising at Matlock, gave us the next morning a still finer idea of the uncommon beauties of the place, as a most glorious day gave it additional lustre. The time of bathing is between six and seven, the water warm, and the pleasantest to drink that can be; at eight the company meet in the long room to breakfast in parties. This room and baths were built in 1734 by Stephen Egglinton. 'Tis a very good one, fifty feet long, windows all the way on each side, commanded the most romantic views, one way a fine terrace, beyond that a lawn extended to the river Derwent, which latter is a continual pleasing murmur by the current forcing itself over large pieces of rock; over this rises a most picturesque and natural shrubbery, to an immense and perpendicular height on the crag of rocks. On the left is seen Matlock High Torr, a rocky mountain which, from the surface of the water 1757 to the top, is 445 feet. As there is always a cool spot among the woods, walking seems the particular amuse- ment of the place. At two the bell rings for dinner, and, as before said, ease without unnecessary cere- mony reigns here. Every one sits down without any form, those who come first by the rule taking the uppermost seats at the long table. There is a gallery for a band of music, who play the whole time of meals, The fatigue of dress, too, is at this public place quite avoided, as hats are general, as the company walk again till evening, when there is a ball in the long room till supper, and sometimes after. Every one retires very early, as few card-tables are seen, gaming not having yet reached this rural spot. The Boat- house, as 'tis call'd, we went one afternoon to drink tea at, where we bought curiosities of spars, &c, of the miners, men employed to the number of above ten thousand about Matlock only. We went, too, one morning to see them melt lead at a village near, call'd Cumford, but the heat was so intense we did not stay long among them; and the poor souls told us was often very prejudicial to them. That evening we went in a barge on the river, but it being not navi- gable, 'tis but in few places the stones and craginess of the rocks will allow of boats. Every evening almost we found new company on our return to supper. Tho' the numbers perhaps were lessn'd, as most likely as many were gone off the same morning, about a hundred generally assembled at dinner. I heard Miss Slater, who sometimes makes a stay there, say that two or three days has made a total change of inhabitants. We tried one evening to ascend the prodigious rock I before spoke of, call'd Matlock High Torr. Many do, it seems, perform it, but I own I was frighted before I had got a quarter of the way up, and each object below began to appear so diminutive that I, even with some others, consented to be ridi- culed for my fears, and with vast joy got down again as soon as possible, and even thought I felt giddy for hours after, and thought myself most happy when I got into the grove, one of the sweetest walks in Matlock.

1. On pulling a string this sham tree deluges the stranger with a shower-bath.

Matlock Bath, Derbyshire

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

Diary of Mrs Philip Lybbe-Powys aka Caroline Girle 1757. After having spent our time most agreeably with our Derbyshire, as we had before done with our York- shire friends, our London party set out on our return to the Metropolis, but in our way back was to stay a few days at Matlock and see Chatsworth; the latter we did the morning we left Mr. Slater's, it being about ten miles distant. This celebrated seat in the Peak of Derbyshire of his Grace of Devon- shire I must own does not quite answer what report had taught me to expect, tho' undoubtedly striking; but I was told it would appear less so to us than to strangers in general by the Slaters having a key to go through his Grace's grounds, a better and much shorter road than the public one, but that did not give one near so picturesque a view of Chatsworth's situation as if we had gone down to it all at once from the barren moors. The house is of stone, and the architecture thought very fine, twenty-two rooms on a floor; the windows of the principal storey, seventeen feet in height, are all looking-glass, of panes two feet wide, the frames double gilt; the door, and window-frames, and staircases of marble; ceilings and some apartments painted by Verrio and other celebrated artists; there is some fine tapestry, and in one chamber a most elegant bed, and furniture of fine old print set upon Nankeen, which has a very pretty effect, as the colour of the ground sets off the work. There are many fine pictures; one range of rooms they still style Mary, Queen of Scots, as she was some time here, as well as at his Grace's other seat of Hardwick; there is a very elegant chapel, the altar and font fine marble, seats and gallery cedar, the walls and ceiling painted. The front towards the garden is esteemed a most regular piece of architecture. The frieze under the cornice has the family motto upon it, in gilt letters so large as to take up the whole length, tho' only two words, "Cavendo Tutos," which are as appli- cable to the situation of the house as the name of the family. The waterworks, which are reckoned the finest in England, were all played off, may be said to be more grand than pleasing, as there is a formality in them, particularly the grand cascade, which takes off every idea of the rural scene they are supposed to afford one, and a kind of triflingness (if I may make a word), in the copper1 willow-tree, and other contrivances beneath the dignity of the place. The gardens are fine. The very disadvan- tages of the situation contriving to their beauty. On the east side, not far distant, rises a prodigious mountain, so thick planted with beautiful trees that you only see a wood gradually ascending, as if the trees crowded one above the other to admire the stately pile before them. 'Tis said that Marshal Tallard when he returned to his own country, when he reckoned up the days of his captivity, said he should always leave out those he spent at Chatsworth; and I must own this magnificent (tho' at the same time gloomy), place may justly be stiled one of the won- ders of the Peake.... In speaking of the waterworks, I forgot to mention the length of the great cascade, 220 yards long with twenty-three falls. In prose- cuting our journey of about eleven miles, 'tis hardly possible to describe the variety of beauties; some- times we were like Don Quixote, almost imagining ourselves enchanted, at another terrified by the huge rocks, which by their stupendous height seemed to threaten every minute to crush us by their fall. In the greatest of our terrors (when in a very narrow road, the above-mention'd rocks on one side, and an immense precipice down to the river on the other), we could not help laughing at the calm answer of one of the postillions, who by often going, I suppose, had not an idea of the danger we apprehended, for only calling out to beg he'd let us walk, and saying, "Where, friend, are you going?" "Only to Matlock Baths, ladies." So indeed we knew, but at that moment doubted the wisdom of our driver, who, however conveyed us very safe to the destined spot. Ceremony seems banished from this agreeable place,. as on entering the long room strangers as well as acquaintances most politely made inquiries about the terrors of the way, &c, which themselves had before experienced. The very early hour of rising at Matlock, gave us the next morning a still finer idea of the uncommon beauties of the place, as a most glorious day gave it additional lustre. The time of bathing is between six and seven, the water warm, and the pleasantest to drink that can be; at eight the company meet in the long room to breakfast in parties. This room and baths were built in 1734 by Stephen Egglinton. 'Tis a very good one, fifty feet long, windows all the way on each side, commanded the most romantic views, one way a fine terrace, beyond that a lawn extended to the river Derwent, which latter is a continual pleasing murmur by the current forcing itself over large pieces of rock; over this rises a most picturesque and natural shrubbery, to an immense and perpendicular height on the crag of rocks. On the left is seen Matlock High Torr, a rocky mountain which, from the surface of the water 1757 to the top, is 445 feet. As there is always a cool spot among the woods, walking seems the particular amuse- ment of the place. At two the bell rings for dinner, and, as before said, ease without unnecessary cere- mony reigns here. Every one sits down without any form, those who come first by the rule taking the uppermost seats at the long table. There is a gallery for a band of music, who play the whole time of meals, The fatigue of dress, too, is at this public place quite avoided, as hats are general, as the company walk again till evening, when there is a ball in the long room till supper, and sometimes after. Every one retires very early, as few card-tables are seen, gaming not having yet reached this rural spot. The Boat- house, as 'tis call'd, we went one afternoon to drink tea at, where we bought curiosities of spars, &c, of the miners, men employed to the number of above ten thousand about Matlock only. We went, too, one morning to see them melt lead at a village near, call'd Cumford, but the heat was so intense we did not stay long among them; and the poor souls told us was often very prejudicial to them. That evening we went in a barge on the river, but it being not navi- gable, 'tis but in few places the stones and craginess of the rocks will allow of boats. Every evening almost we found new company on our return to supper. Tho' the numbers perhaps were lessn'd, as most likely as many were gone off the same morning, about a hundred generally assembled at dinner. I heard Miss Slater, who sometimes makes a stay there, say that two or three days has made a total change of inhabitants. We tried one evening to ascend the prodigious rock I before spoke of, call'd Matlock High Torr. Many do, it seems, perform it, but I own I was frighted before I had got a quarter of the way up, and each object below began to appear so diminutive that I, even with some others, consented to be ridi- culed for my fears, and with vast joy got down again as soon as possible, and even thought I felt giddy for hours after, and thought myself most happy when I got into the grove, one of the sweetest walks in Matlock.

1. On pulling a string this sham tree deluges the stranger with a shower-bath.

Melbourne, Derbyshire

After 1640 John Coke 1563-1644 retired to his estates in Melbourne.

Around 1623. Unknown Painter. Portrait of John Coke 1563-1644.

Around 1653 John Coke 1653-1692 was born to Thomas Coke 1610-1656 (43) in Melbourne.

In 1674 Mary Coke 1674-1713 was born to John Coke 1653-1692 (21) in Melbourne.

Around 1695. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Mary Coke 1674-1713.

On 19 Feb 1674 Thomas Coke 1674-1727 was born to John Coke 1653-1692 (21) in Melbourne. He was baptised on the same day.

Before 1727. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Thomas Coke 1674-1727.

On 12 Dec 1877 Susan Millicent Reeve 1823-1877 (61) died at Melbourne.

Melbourne Hall, Derbyshire

In or before 1743 Matthew Lamb 1st Baronet 1705-1768 (38) and Charlotte Coke were married. She brought Melbourne Hall to the Lamb family.

On 29 Jan 1853 Frederick Lamb 3rd Viscount Melbourne 1782-1853 (70) died without issue. Viscount Melbourne and Baron Beauvale of Beauvale in Nottinghamshire extinct. Melbourne Hall was inherited by his sister Emily Lamb Countess Cowper 1787-1869 (65).

1833. John Lindsay Lucas 1807-1874. Portrait of Emily Lamb Countess Cowper 1787-1869.

Melbourne Cemetery, Derbyshire

After 18 Jan 1867. Melbourne Cemetery. Grave of Ensign Henry Edward Gooch of the Coldstream Guards, one of four men responsble for the pivotal closing of the gate at Hougomont Chateau during the Battle of Waterloo.

Mellor

Melton, Derbyshire

Melton Hall, Derbyshire

In 1398 John Melton 1398-1455 was born to John Melton 1367-1455 (31) and Margaret Clifford 1367-1455 (31) at Melton Hall.

Around 1424 Thomasine Melton 1424-1458 was born to John Melton 1367-1455 (57) and Margaret Clifford 1367-1455 (57) at Melton Hall.

In 1455 Elizabeth Hilton 1402-1455 (53) died at Melton Hall.

In 1455 John Melton 1398-1455 (57) died at Melton Hall.

In 1455 John Melton 1422-1458 (33) died at Melton Hall.

In 1455 Margaret Clifford 1367-1455 (88) died at Melton Hall.

On 24 May 1455 John Melton 1367-1455 (88) died at Melton Hall.

Middleton-by-Youlgreave, Derbyshire

The River Bradford rises at Middleton-by-Youlgreave from where it flows to Alport where it joins the River Lath.

Thomas Bateman's Grave, Middleton-by-Youlgreave, Derbyshire

On 28 Aug 1861 Thomas Bateman Antiquary 1821-1861 (39) died. He was buried in unconsecrated ground at his request at Middleton-by-Youlgreave.

Monyash, Derbyshire

In 1370 Sir Godfrey Foljambe (26) the younger (son of the eminent lawyer and retainer of John of Gaunt (29)) confirmed him in possession of part of the manors of Over Haddon, Rowsley, Wardlow, Monyash and Chelmorton in Derbyshire, which were to Gaunt (29) himself.

One-Ash Grange Farm, Monyash, Derbyshire

1147. One-Ash Grange Farm was originally settled in 1147 as a farm for Roche Abbey. In 1700 the farm was owned by the Bowman family who were granted a license to hold Quaker meetings there. The Grange has an unusual row of pigstyes.

Morley, Derbyshire

In 1448 Henry Statham 1448-1480 was born to John Statham 1408-1453 (40) at Morley.

On 30 Apr 1480 Henry Statham 1448-1480 (32) died at Morley.

In 1566 Henry Sacheverell 1566-1625 was born to Henry Sacheverell 1547-1580 (19) and Jane Ireton 1540-1582 (26) at Morley.

Icknield Street 18d Derby to Chesterfield. From Derventio aka Derby Icknield Street takes a new alignment past Morley, Smithy Houses, Street Lane, Higham, Oakerthorpe, Clay Cross crossing the River Rother before arriving at Chesterfield.

Jane Statham -1525 was born to Henry Statham 1448-1480 at Morley.

Longford

Nether Haddon, Derbyshire

On 29 Sep 1679 John Manners 8th Earl Rutland 1604-1679 (75) died at Nether Haddon. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Bottesford. His son John Manners 1st Duke Rutland 1638-1711 (41) succeeded 9th Earl Rutland 3C 1525. Catherine Noel Duchess Rutland 1657-1733 (22) by marriage Countess Rutland.

Before 1733. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Catherine Noel Duchess Rutland 1657-1733.

New Mills

Newton Solney, Derbyshire

The River Dove rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Pilsbury, Hartington, Norbury, Rocester, Sudbury Hall and Tutbury Castle before joining the River Trent at Newton Solney.

Norton, Derbyshire

In 1470 Bishop Robert Blyth 1470-1547 was born at Norton.

Bishop Geoffrey Blythe -1530 was born to William Blythe -1520 and Unknown Rotherham at Norton.

Memorials of Francis Chantrey RA Sculptor in Hallamshire and Elsewhere Part IV The Sculptor in Sheffield. To Norton, as the birth-place of Chantrey, I have already adverted at length, and to that village, as his selected burial-place, I shall return hereafter; meanwhile, it has been shown that Hallamshire had a parental claim on the Painter — as the facts of this chapter will prove it had on the Sculptor also.

1831. Henry Pierce Bone Painter 1779-1855 after John Jackson 1778-1831. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841 in black morning suit, blue waistcoat with gold fob-seal, standing beside the bust of William Hyde Wollaston, F.R.S. (1766-1828) on a plinth signed, dated and inscribed on the counter-enamel 'Francis Chantrey Sculptor. R.A. London 1831. Painted in Enamel Around 1834. Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841. Around 1834. Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841. 1818. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841. Half-length aged 37, holding a modelling tool, his left arm on a marble head; bald head with dark hair at sides, hazel eyes, dark complexion; voluminous grey coat, white filled shirt open at neck and fastened with brooch; statuette of Lady Louisa Russell in left background.

Jordanthorpe Hall Farm Norton, Derbyshire

On 07 Apr 1781 Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841 was born to Francis Chantrey 1748-1793 (33) and Sarah Leggatt 1745-1826 (36) in Jordanthorpe Hall Farm Norton.

1831. Henry Pierce Bone Painter 1779-1855 after John Jackson 1778-1831. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841 in black morning suit, blue waistcoat with gold fob-seal, standing beside the bust of William Hyde Wollaston, F.R.S. (1766-1828) on a plinth signed, dated and inscribed on the counter-enamel 'Francis Chantrey Sculptor. R.A. London 1831. Painted in Enamel Around 1834. Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841. Around 1834. Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841. 1818. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841. Half-length aged 37, holding a modelling tool, his left arm on a marble head; bald head with dark hair at sides, hazel eyes, dark complexion; voluminous grey coat, white filled shirt open at neck and fastened with brooch; statuette of Lady Louisa Russell in left background.

Oakerthorpe, Derbyshire

Icknield Street 18d Derby to Chesterfield. From Derventio aka Derby Icknield Street takes a new alignment past Morley, Smithy Houses, Street Lane, Higham, Oakerthorpe, Clay Cross crossing the River Rother before arriving at Chesterfield.

Over Haddon, Derbyshire

In 1370 Sir Godfrey Foljambe (26) the younger (son of the eminent lawyer and retainer of John of Gaunt (29)) confirmed him in possession of part of the manors of Over Haddon, Rowsley, Wardlow, Monyash and Chelmorton in Derbyshire, which were to Gaunt (29) himself.

Peak Forest, Derbyshire

On 30 Oct 1753 Robert Slack 1719-1803 (34) and Ann Pickford were married at Peak Forest.

In 1770 Edward Fletcher 1770- was born at Peak Forest.

In 1830 Joseph Fletcher 1830-1911 was born to John Fletcher 1795-1840 (35) at Peak Forest.

Pilsbury, Derbyshire

Pilsbury is a Norman motte-and-bailey castle occupying an area of high ground around 160m by 137m overlooking the River Dove commissioned by Henry Ferrers -1100.

The River Dove rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Pilsbury, Hartington, Norbury, Rocester, Sudbury Hall and Tutbury Castle before joining the River Trent at Newton Solney.

Parsley Hay, Derbyshire

After Buxton The Street continues south following the A515 past Brierlow Bar, Pomeroy, Parsley Hay where it turns towards Pikehall after which it passes Minning Low Chambered Tomb turning before Brassington onto Manystones Lane continuing east into Wirksworth.

Pikehall, Derbyshire

After Buxton The Street continues south following the A515 past Brierlow Bar, Pomeroy, Parsley Hay where it turns towards Pikehall after which it passes Minning Low Chambered Tomb turning before Brassington onto Manystones Lane continuing east into Wirksworth.

Pleasley, Derbyshire

After 22 May 1330 Alice Corbet 1276-1330 died at Pleasley.

In 1484 Thomas Astley 1415-1484 (69) died in Pleasley.

Pomeroy, Derbyshire

After Buxton The Street continues south following the A515 past Brierlow Bar, Pomeroy, Parsley Hay where it turns towards Pikehall after which it passes Minning Low Chambered Tomb turning before Brassington onto Manystones Lane continuing east into Wirksworth.

Radbourne, Derbyshire

Around 1499 Eleanor Pole 1499- was born to German Pole of Radbourne 1480- (19) in Radbourne.

Radbourne Hall, Derbyshire

Around 1320 John Chandos 1320-1369 was born at Radbourne Hall.

Repton

Risley, Derbyshire

In 1555 John Willoughby 1555-1602 was born to George Willoughby 1520- (35) and Elizabeth Neale at Risley.

On 14 Sep 1579 Henry Willoughby 1st Baronet 1579-1649 was born to John Willoughby of Risley 1555-1602 (24) at Risley.

In 1602 John Willoughby 1555-1602 (47) died at Risley.

Risley Hall, Derbyshire

On 08 Jul 1702 Anchitell Grey 1624-1702 (78) died at Risley Hall.

Rowarth, Derbyshire

On 02 Aug 1619 Henry Heward of Raworth -1619 made his will:

In the name of God Amen: The Second Day of August in the yeare of oure Lord God one Thousande Six Hundred and Nineteene.

And in the yeare of the raigne of our [So ] Lorde Kinge James of Englande [ ] the Sebenteenth. And of Scottlande The Three & [ ]. I Henry HEWARDE of Roworthe in the Countie of Derbie yoman Sicke in bodie but of good And perfecte Remembrance praysede be God therefore: Do constitute ordayne and make this my Last Will and Testament in Manner and fforme ffolowinge: that is to witt:

ffirst I comende my Soule in to the hands of Allmightie God my maker: And to Jesus Chryste my Sabior and Redemer by whose [ ] bloude I [asuridly] trust to be sabede: And my bodye to be buried in the [ he] Churche of Glossopp

And for the dispossinge of my worldly goods I gibe as ffolloweth to witt:

I give and bequeathe to [ ] one of my children Thomas HEWARD my oldest son onely [ex ] the some of [ii] shillings [eight] pence:

Item I give to [everie] chylde that I am grandfather unto two shillings.

Item it is my will that all my debts and funerall expences shall be [Dischargede] out of my whole goods:

Item it is my will also that all my debts beinge paid and funerall expences [Dischargede] then all the rest of my goods cattels and chattels moveable and unmoveable I give and bequeath to Barbara my loving wyef & Thomas HEWARD my Sonn and here [aparante] to be equallie debydede betweene them:

Item I give to [everie] one I [stande] godfather unto twelve pence: [ ] Henry STAFFORDE – sii Robert ROWBOTHAM – sii James ALLEYNE – sii Elizabeth BRAMALL– sii Henry MELLOR – sii Gilbert HIBERTE sii

Item I give unto my two Daughters Elizabeth HEWARDE & Margarett GODDARD to [ether] of them A bedde such to be as John STAFFORDE of the Shawe yoman John STAFFORDE his brother & Thomas WALKLATE or two of them shall thinke to be decente and fittinge.

Item I give to Margarett HOUFFE two shillings:

Item I give to Robert HEWARD my Serbante one shipe.

Item I ordayne and Apoynt Barbara HEWARD my welbeloved wyef & Thomas HEWARD my Sonn and here Appont my true and lawfull Executors Reposinge my Truste in them to see my will [hereformede] These beinge wittnesses Thomas HEWARD: John HEWARD and John BEARDE.

Around 1824 James Redford Farmer 1824-1904 was born at Rowarth.

1861. 1861 Census Thornsett Rowarth. Rowarth. Cottage.

Joseph Hyde 1828- (33). Head. 33. Cotton Bleacher.

Mary Ann m Hyde 1828- (33). Wife. 33.

James Hyde 1853- (8). Son. 8.

DOCUMENTS/CENSUS/C1861/DERBYSHIRE/1861_Derbyshire_Thornsett.pngSamuel_Hyde_1855_. Son. 6.

1871. 1871 Census Thornsett Rowarth. Rowarth. Cottage.

Mary Ann m Hyde 1828- (43). Wife. 42.

James Hyde 1853- (18). Son. 17.

Samuel Hyde 1855- (16). Son. 15.

Anne Hyde 1861- (10). Daughter. 10.

DOCUMENTS/CENSUS/C1871/DERBYSHIRE/1871_Derbyshire_Thornset_Rowarth_Hyde.pngJohn_Hyde_1863_. Son. 8.

1881. 1881 Census Derbyshire Rowarth. Rowarth. Cottage.

Joseph Hyde 1828- (53). Head. 52. Carter.

Mary Ann m Hyde 1828- (53). Wife. 52.

Robert Hyde 1859- (22). Son. 22.

John Hyde 1863- (18). Son. 18.

John Johnson 1855- (26). Son-in-law.

DOCUMENTS/CENSUS/C1871/DERBYSHIRE/1871_Derbyshire_Thornset_Rowarth_Hyde.pngAnne_Hyde_1861_ Daughter-in-law. 20. Note. Listed as daughter-in-law but more likely his daughter who married the above John Johnson 1855- (26).

Rowsley, Derbyshire

In 1370 Sir Godfrey Foljambe (26) the younger (son of the eminent lawyer and retainer of John of Gaunt (29)) confirmed him in possession of part of the manors of Over Haddon, Rowsley, Wardlow, Monyash and Chelmorton in Derbyshire, which were to Gaunt (29) himself.

On or before 08 Nov 1821 Thomas Bateman Antiquary 1821-1861 was born to William Bateman Antiquary -1835 in Rowsley. He was baptised 08 Nov 1821.

The River Derwent rises on Bleaklow after which it passes Bamford, Hope, Hathersage, Grindleford, Baslow, Chatsworth House passing under Chatsworth Bridge, Rowsley which it is joined by the Derbyshire River Wye, Matlock, Matlock Bath, Cromford, Ambergate where it is joined by the River Amber.

The Derbyshire River Wye rises at Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south-west through Buxton, Bakewell and Haddon Hall to Rowsley where it joins the River Derwent.

Sandiacre, Derbyshire

In 1269 William Grey 1204-1269 (65) died at Sandiacre.

Sawley, Derbyshire

Around 1457 Isabel Booth 1457-1478 was born to Roger Booth 1396-1497 (61) at Sawley.

On 18 Aug 1497 Roger Booth 1396-1497 died at Sawley.

Shardlow, Derbyshire

Around 28 Oct 1364 Ralph Cromwell 1325-1364 (39) died at West Hallam in Shardlow.

Shirland, Derbyshire

Shirley, Derbyshire

Around 1351 Hugh Shirley 1351-1403 was born at Shirley.

In 1413 Ralph Shirley 1413-1466 was born at Shirley.

On 24 Jul 1828 Walter Waddington Shirley 1828-1866 was born to Walter Augustus Shirley Bishop of Sodor and Man 1797-1847 (31) at Shirley.

Smithy Houses, Derbyshire

Icknield Street 18d Derby to Chesterfield. From Derventio aka Derby Icknield Street takes a new alignment past Morley, Smithy Houses, Street Lane, Higham, Oakerthorpe, Clay Cross crossing the River Rother before arriving at Chesterfield.

South Wingfield, Derbyshire

On 04 Jan 1456 Ralph Cromwell 3rd Baron Cromwell 1403-1456 (53) died at South Wingfield. He was buried at the Collegiate Church Tattershall. Baron Cromwell 2C 1375 became abeyant.

Wingfield Manor, South Wingfield, Derbyshire

In Jun 1569 George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (41) was Keeper of Mary Queen of Scots (26) at Wingfield Manor.

In 1582 Unknown Painter. Portrait of George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590. Around 1559 François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. In 1576. After Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. Around 1575. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of George Seton 5th Lord Seton -1513. Wearing the clothes he wore at the wedding of Mary Queen of Scots and the French Dauphin on 24 Apr 1558.

Snelston, Derbyshire

In 1525 Nicholas Browne 1525-1587 was born at Snelston.

On 18 Jan 1587 Nicholas Browne 1525-1587 (62) died at Snelston.

Stanley, Derbyshire

In 1430 Katherine Stanley 1430-1498 was born to Thomas Stanley 1st Baron Stanley 1405-1459 (25) and Jane Goushill Baroness Stanley 1401- (29) at Stanley.

Stanton, Derbyshire

On or before 16 May 1819 Ann Goodwin 1819-1901 was born to Thomas Goodwin and Ann Hollis at Stanton. She was baptised on 16 May 1819. Her mother's name was Anne. Her father's profession was Miner.

Staveley, Derbyshire

Around 1555 Elizabeth Freschville 1555-1600 was born to Peter Freschville -1582 and Elizabeth Clifton 1535-1570 (20) at Staveley.

Street Lane, Derbyshire

Icknield Street 18d Derby to Chesterfield. From Derventio aka Derby Icknield Street takes a new alignment past Morley, Smithy Houses, Street Lane, Higham, Oakerthorpe, Clay Cross crossing the River Rother before arriving at Chesterfield.

Sudbury

Swarkestone Bridge, Derbyshire

Thor's Cave, Derbyshire

The River Manifold rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Hulme End, Ecton, Thor's Cave, Beeston Tor and Ilam at which it joins the River Dove.

Thornsett, Derbyshire

On 25 Apr 1594 John Bawdon of Aspinshaw -1594 made his will:

In the name of god Amen the xxv day of Aprill in the xxxvi yeare of the raigne of our Soveraigne Lady Elizabeth that now is I John BAWDON of the Aspenshawe in the county of Derby [being] sicke in body, but in mynde of good and perfect remembrance praysed be god knowinge the certenty of Death, and the uncerten tye of the houre and tyme thereof doe make this my last will and testament in maner

And forme followinge first I comitt my soule to almighty god my maker, trustinge through the meryts of Christs passion to be one of gods elect and my body to be buryed in the church of Glossop where I am a parishonere.

Item whereas I have taken by lease of Indenture to me and myne assignes of Richarde HAYES and margret his wife one farm called Oxe hey lyinge and beinge in the parishe of Glossopp the sayde farme I give and assigne to Alles BOWDON my wife and to her assignes for and Dureinge all the tearme of yeares yet to come contayned in the lease of the Demised premises

Item I give and assigne to Alles BOWDON my sayde wife her assignes all my interest and tytle of the thyrde part of a chase called the Great Aspenshawe, Duringe the tearme of yeares con tayned in a lease, taken of me Rowland GYERof Hassopp and others

Item I give and bequeath to Robert HAFIELD of the nether cliffe the yonger, iiij£

Item I give and bequeath to Alles HADFIELD of the nether cliffe my sister my great pann & to John HADFIELD her sonn my great pott and to [ ] of her thre Daughters viz viii£

Item I give to Ottiwell BRAMALL of the thornesetfieldes the yonger xxs

Item I give to John BRAMALL brother to the sayde Ottiwell xiis iiijd

Item I give to Anne BRAMALL and Elizabeth BRAMALL systers to the sayd Ottiwell and John ether of them xs

Item I give to five children of Peter Haughe of Lyme to whom I stand uncle [ ] of them viz viiid

Item I give to Margret RYDGWAY iiis vid if she remain with my wife her mother Dureing her mothers lyfe if not her mother to bestowe some what uppon her according to her discretion

Item I give to Thomas BEARDE of the Phosyde xs

Item I give to Raphe GARRAT and Nicholas BEARDE of the Ohosyde ether of them xiid

Item I give to Robert RYDGWAY xs Item I give to Margret RYDGWAY Daughter of the sayde Robert one lamb the rest of my goods after my funerall expences and Legacies contayned in this my lat will Discharged !I give to Alles BOWDEN my sayde wife

And of this my last will and testament I make and ordayne Mr Thomas RAWLINSON of the Highgate to whom I give xs And alles BOWDON my sayde wife myne executors, and Raphe GARRAGE, Nicholas BEARD, Thomas BEARDE and Robert RYDGWAY myne overseers, trusting the will see this my last will in all poyntes Discharge to the health of my soule: and all the wills executors & overseers by here before made I utterly disanull and this to stand in effect

X John BOWDON his marke

Theise wittnesses Gualther NORMANSELL; Ottiwell BRAMALL; John HADFEELD

Around 1820 James Waterhouse 1820-1896 was born to Thomas Waterhouse 1786-1846 (34) and Sarah Slack 1786-1849 (33) at Thornsett.

Ticknall, Derbyshire

Calke Abbey, Ticknall, Derbyshire

Before 28 May 1745 Johnathan "The Elder" Richardson Painter 1667-1745 (78). Portrait of John Manners 3rd Duke Rutland 1696-1779 (48). Calke Abbey.

On 01 Jan 1844 George Crewe 8th Baronet 1795-1844 (48) died at Calke Abbey. His son John Harpur Crewe 9th Baronet 1824-1886 (20) succeeded 9th Baronet Harpur of Calke Abbey in Derbyshire.

1828. Ramsay Richard Reinagle Painter 1775-1862. Portrait of George Crewe 8th Baronet 1795-1844 and his son John Harpur Crewe 9th Baronet 1824-1886.

Tideswell, Derbyshire

Around 1344 Godfrey Foljambe "The Younger" 1344-1376 was born to Godfrey Foljambe 1317-1376 (27) at Tideswell.

In 1410 Thomas Foljambe 1410-1452 was born to Thomas Foljambe 1360-1433 (50) and Margaret Loudham at Tideswell.

In 1433 Thomas Foljambe 1360-1433 (73) died at Tideswell.

In 1503 Henry Foljambe 1433-1503 (70) died at Tideswell. He was buried at Chesterfield.

Walton, Derbyshire

Around 1360 Thomas Foljambe 1360-1433 was born to Godfrey Foljambe "The Younger" 1344-1376 (16) and Margaret Villiers 1347-1398 (13) at Walton.

On 27 Oct 1499 John Foljambe 1491-1499 (8) died at Walton.

In 1511 James Foljambe 1511-1558 was born to Godfrey Foljambe 1472- (38) and Catherine Leeke 1476-1529 (35) at Walton.

On 04 Mar 1527 Godfrey Foljambe 1527-1584 was born to James Foljambe 1511-1558 (16) and Alice Fitzwilliam 1501-1536 (26) at Walton.

In 1534 Troth Tyrwhitt 1534-1617 was born to William Tyrwhitt 1500-1541 (34) and Isabel Girlington 1495-1560 (39) at Walton.

On 21 Nov 1558 Godfrey Foljambe 1558-1595 was born to Godfrey Foljambe 1527-1584 (31) at Walton.

Wardlow, Derbyshire

In 1370 Sir Godfrey Foljambe (26) the younger (son of the eminent lawyer and retainer of John of Gaunt (29)) confirmed him in possession of part of the manors of Over Haddon, Rowsley, Wardlow, Monyash and Chelmorton in Derbyshire, which were to Gaunt (29) himself.

Whittle, Derbyshire

Staffords Row, Whittle, Derbyshire

1841. 1841 Census Derbyshire New Mills District 15 Whittle. Household 12 Staffords Row.

Johnathan Hadfield 1771-. Head. 70. Cotton Manufacturer.

Mary m Hadfield 1771- (70). 70.

Thomas Hadfield 1821-. 20. Cotton Manufacturer.

Martha Hadfield 1821-. 20.

William Hafield 1828-. 13.

Alice Hadfield 1838-. 3.

Elizabeth Hadfield 1841-. 4 Months. Shown as separate household.

Wilne, Derbyshire

On 20 Nov 1649 Henry Willoughby 1st Baronet 1579-1649 (70) died at Lavenham. He was buried at Wilne. Baronet Willoughby of Risley in Derbyshire extinct.

Wingfield, Derbyshire

Around 1317 Margaret Pierrepoint 1317-1346 was born to Robert Pierrepoint -1334 at Wingfield.

Wirksworth, Derbyshire

Wirksworth is one of the placed that is possibly the Roman town Lutudarum. The other candidates are Carsington, Matlock and Cromford.

In Jun 1754 Hugo Meynell 1735-1808 (19) and Anne Gell -1757 were married at Wirksworth.

Around 1789 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Hugo Meynell 1735-1808.

The Street is a Roman Road that travels broadly south from Melandra aka Ardotalia to Wirksworth where it joined another road which crossed the Derwent at Milford and ran on the east bank of the Derwent and to Derventio aka Derby.

For the early stages of the road information had been obtained from P. Wroe and P. Mellor (1971). "A Roman Road between Buxton and Melandra Castle, Glossop (Derbyshire Archaeological Journal 1971, Volume 91).

From Melandra aka Ardotalia the road heads broadly south through Simmondley, Higher Plainsteads Farm, Abbots Chair, Brookhouses, through Little Hayfield, Bank Vale. In Hayfield it appears to have followed Kinder Road until it reached Spring Vale Road where it could cross the River Sett where the steep river cliff has ended. It continued more or less straight past Highgate Head Farm, Peep o Day following the A624 until East Meats where it heads towards Gorsty Low then Breckend and Townend

After Buxton The Street continues south following the A515 past Brierlow Bar, Pomeroy, Parsley Hay where it turns towards Pikehall after which it passes Minning Low Chambered Tomb turning before Brassington onto Manystones Lane continuing east into Wirksworth.

Wooley, Derbyshire

The River Amber rises near Ashover after which it travels broadly south passing Wooley before joining the River Derwent at Ambergate.

Wormhill, Derbyshire

1871. Census. Wormhill.

Joseph Fletcher 1830-1911 (41). 35. Quarryman.

Sarah Yates 1836-1923 (35). Wife. 35.

DOCUMENTS/CENSUS/C1871/DERBYSHIRE/Wormhill_Page_14.pngJohn_Fletcher_1862_1924. Son. 9.

On 31 Dec 1883 John Fletcher 1862-1924 (21) and Emma Stafford 1865-1952 were married at Church of St Thomas Becket. He was resident at Dove Holes, she at Wormhill.

Higher Bibbington, Wormhill, Derbyshire

1891. Census. Higher Bibbington. No. 3. Second Row.

John Fletcher 1862-1924 (29). Head. 29. Quarryman.

DOCUMENTS/CENSUS/C1891/DERBYSHIRE/Wormhill_Page_9.pngEmma_Stafford_1865_1952. Wife. 26.

Youlgreave, Derbyshire