History of Northamptonshire

917 Battle of Tempsford

1290 Eleanor Crosses

1476 Reburial of Richard and Edmund of York

1503 Margaret Tudor's Journey to Scotland

1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

1645 Battle of Naseby

1817 Death of Princess Charlotte

Northamptonshire is in Midlands.

In 1230 Eudes Zouche 1230-1296 was born to William Zouche 1214-1271 (16) and Maud Trailly at Northamptonshire.

On 06 Apr 1492 Maud Green Lady in Waiting 1492-1531 was born to Thomas Green 1461-1506 (31) and Joan aka Jane Fogge at Northamptonshire.

Around 1532 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of an unknown lady. Possibly Maud Green Lady in Waiting 1492-1531.

In 1665 John Palmer 1612-1679 (53) was appointed Archdeacon of Northamptonshire.

William Tresham -1450 was born to Thomas Tresham at Northamptonshire.

Apethorpe, Northamptonshire

In Aug 1614 George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 (21) caught the eye of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 (48) at hunt at Apethorpe. Opponents of the king's favourite Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset (27), saw an opportunity to displace Somerset and began promoting Villiers. Money was raised to purchase Villiers a new wardrobe.

Before 1628 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. In 1616 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 wearing his Garter Robes and Leg Garter. Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. In 1619 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. Around 1625 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. Around 1600 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 painted the portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. Around 1605 John Critz 1551-1642. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 with Garter Collar and Leg Garter. In 1621 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter. Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. In 1583 Pieter Bronckhorst Painter -1583. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1623. Adam de Colone 1572-1651. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1580. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. Around 1628 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (copy from original). Portrait of Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset 1587-1645.

Apethorpe Hall Apethorpe, Northamptonshire

In 1552 Walter Mildmay 1521-1589 (31) was granted Apethorpe Hall Apethorpe.

In 1567 Anthony Mildmay -1617 and Grace Sharington 1552-1620 (15) were married. They lived at Apethorpe Hall Apethorpe.

Around 1585. Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Miniature Portrait of Anthony Mildmay -1617. Hilliard represents Mildmay standing in a luxurious tent filled with beautiful furniture preparing for a tournament surrounded by objects that allow the artist to feature a variety of rich textures including red velvet, blue ostrich feathers, and gleaming metal. Before 11 Sep 1617. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Anthony Mildmay -1617 at Emmanuel College which father Anthony Mildmay -1617 founded.

In 1633 Grace Fane Countess Home -1633 died at Apethorpe Hall Apethorpe.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter V: Country House Visits. After my dear mother's death I visited a great deal with my father (53), and one year we went for the shooting to Lord Huntingfield's place, Heveningham Hall. I slept in the bedroom once occupied by the famous Chevalier d'Éon, who had been a frequent guest at Heveningham, and about whom there were many stories told. It was said that the Chevalier was the one and only lover of cross-grained Queen Charlotte (98), and that her son, George IV (80), was the result of their intimacy, although his paternity was of course admitted by King George III. The animosity always displayed by the old Queen (98) to her grand-daughter, Princess Charlotte (46), was supposed to arise from the fact that as heiress to the throne she innocently dispossessed the other Royal Dukes from the succession. It is certainly a fact that the Princess's (46) untimely death in childbirth was attributed to foul play at the time, and when later the accoucheur Sir Richard Croft (80), committed suicide, all classes of society were loud in condemnation of the Queen (98) and the Prince Regent (80). I do not vouch for the accuracy of Queen Charlotte's (98) love affair. I only give the Heveningham gossip as I heard it.

As D'Eon was undoubtedly one of the most picturesque and mysterious personages ot the eighteenth century I was naturally interested in these somewhat scandalous stories.

The Chevalier died when he was eighty-three years of age, after a most extraordinary career. He was at one time aide-de-camp to the Comte de Broglie, and fought in the French army; but later on for some mysterious reason he discarded man's attire and passed as a woman for thirty-four years. Often when I went into my room I half expected to see a ghostly figure seated at the escritoire where the Chevalier wrote his secret cipher communications, and I wondered whether the brocade crowns and frills and furbelows that he wore as a woman had ever hung in the old wardrobe which I used.

My father and I also stayed with the Westmorlands at Apethorpe Hall; we visited the Earl (38) and Countess of Chichester (36) at Stanmer Park, and we were welcome guests at Cadlands, Silverlands, Chiswick House, West Park, and my uncle Lord Stradbroke's place, Henham Hall, which was afterwards burnt down.

I had visited Deene Park with my mother in 1842, but I must deal with my future home in the chapter devoted to Deene and its associations.

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany 1733-1810. Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818. Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance Holland Painter 1735-1811. Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818. 1777. Benjamin West 1738-1820. Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818. Around 1762. Allan Ramsay 1713-1784. Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818. Around 1792 Thomas Beach 1738-1806. Portrait of King George IV. In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of King George IV. Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence 1769-1830. Portrait of King George IV. In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of King George IV when Prince of Wales. In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of King George IV in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter. In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III. In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III. In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III. In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III. Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance Holland Painter 1735-1811. Portrait of King George III. In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817. Portrait of King George III. Around 1800. William Beechey 1753-1839. Portrait of King George III. Around 1762. Allan Ramsay 1713-1784. Portrait of King George III. In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789. Portrait of King George III.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter IX: Deene and its History. Lord Cardigan hated the idea of being put underground, so his coffin was placed immediately under his effigy inside the tomb and not in a vault. He had always intended to have a monument erected during his lifetime in the Rectory grounds, and actually had some stone brought from his Stanion quarries for this purpose. One day Lord Westmorland called, and noticing the quantity of stone, asked what it was to be used for. Cardigan told him. "Nonsense", said Lord Westmorland, "give the stone to me instead. I want to make an entrance-hall at Apethorpe, and it will be the very thing!" My husband very good-naturedly gave him the Stanion stone, and the low entrance-hall at Apethorpe was built of it.

The late Queen Victoria greatly admired the design for the monument, and I was told on good authority that she even had her own figure modelled in her lifetime for her memorial tomb but that when search was made after her death the figure had disappeared and nobody knew what had become of it.

1841 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of James Brudenell 7th Earl Cardigan 1797-1868. 1845 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901. 1833. George Hayter 1792-1871. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901. Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter 1792-1871. Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901. Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901. Note the Arm Garter as worn by Ladies of the Garter. Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 and Prince Albert Saxe Coburg Gotha 1819-1861 and their children. In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901. 1880. Henry Tanworth Wells Painter 1828-1903. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 being informed she was Queen by Francis Nathaniel Conyngham 2nd Marquess Conyngham 1797-1876 and Archbishop William Howley 1766-1848.Death of King William IV Succession of Queen Victoria

Ashby St Ledgers, Northamptonshire

In 1470 William Catesby 1408-1470 (62) died at Ashby St Ledgers.

In 1473 George Catesby 1473-1507 was born to William Catesby 1450-1485 (23) and Margaret Zouche 1459- (14) at Ashby St Ledgers.

Around 1500 Richard Catesby 1500-1553 was born to George Catesby 1473-1507 (27) and Elizabeth Empson at Ashby St Ledgers.

On 20 May 1507 George Catesby 1473-1507 (34) died at Ashby St Ledgers.

On 09 Jun 1566 William Catesby 1547-1598 (19) and Anne Throckmorton -1605 were married at Ashby St Ledgers.

Aston le Walls, Northamptonshire

In 1541 John Dudley 1461-1541 (80) died at Aston le Walls.

Astwel, Northamptonshire

On 29 Oct 1571 Dorothy Giffard 1490-1571 (80) died at Astwel.

Aynho, Northamptonshire

On or before 29 Mar 1634 William Cartwright of Aynho Northamptonshire 1634-1676 was born to John Cartwright of Bloxham in Oxfordshire. He was baptised on 29 Mar 1634 at Aynho.

On 11 Oct 1686 Rhoda Chapman 1616-1686 (70) died at Aynho.

St Michael's Church Aynho, Northamptonshire

St Michael's Church Aynho. Northamptonshire near to Banbury. Chest tomb to Cartwright family, erected 1654, black and white marble. Panelled sides with shields. Marble wall tablets to Matthew Hutton died 1711 by Edward Stanton, framed with baroque scrolls and draperies. To Thomas Chapman, died 1684, architectural frame with Corinthian columns, scroll pediment and urn and similar tablet to Rhoda Chapman, died 1686, both attributed to William Stanton..

Badby, Northamptonshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Barnwell, Northamptonshire

Richard Dudley 1378- was born at Barnwell.

Barrowden, Northamptonshire

Billing, Northamptonshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Blatherwycke, Northamptonshire

In or before 1500 Humphrey Stafford 1461-1545 (39) and Margaret Fogge 1470-1532 (29) were married at Blatherwycke.

Blatherwycke Hall, Northamptonshire

Before 17 Mar 1635 Thomas Randolph Poet 1605-1635 died at Blatherwycke Hall whilst visiting there.

In 1705 Edmund Stafford -1705 died. His estates were divided between his sisters Susannah Stafford -1747 who received Blatherwycke Hall and Anne Stafford Baroness Carbery 1684-1757 (21) who received Laxton Hall.

Boughton

Brackley

Brigstock, Northamptonshire

Brington, Northamptonshire

On 22 Jun 1532 William Spencer 1496-1532 (36) died at Brington. He was buried at Brington.

On or before 04 Jan 1591 William Spencer 2nd Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1591-1636 was born to Robert Spencer 1st Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1570-1627 (21) and Margaret Willoughby 1566-1597 (24) at Althorp House. He was baptised on 04 Jan 1591 at Brington.

On 17 Aug 1597 Margaret Willoughby 1566-1597 (30) died at Brington.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 October 1656. 02 Oct 1656. Came to visit me my cousin, Stephens, and Mr. Pierce (since head of Magdalen College, Oxford), a learned minister of Brington, in Northamptonshire, and Captain Cooke (40), both excellent musicians.

Cadnam, Northamptonshire

In 1510 Robert Hungerford 1510-1556 was born to Robert Hungerford 1485-1517 (25) and Eleanor Yorke 1489-1517 at Cadnam.

Around 1558 John Hungerford 1558-1636 was born to Walter Hungerford -1565 at Cadnam.

Around 1620 John Hungerford 1620-1636 was born to Thomas Hungerford 1602-1675 (17) at Cadnam.

Edward Hungerford -1667 was born to John Hungerford 1620-1636 at Cadnam.

Canon's Ashby, Northamptonshire

St Mary's Church Canon's Ashby, Northamptonshire

On or before 25 Jul 1682 Winwood Reade 3rd Baronet 1682-1692 was born to Edward Reade 2nd Baronet 1659-1691 (23) and Elizabeth Harby Baroness Reade 1661-1730 (21). He was baptised 25 Jul 1682 at St Mary's Church Canon's Ashby.

Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire

In 1280 Robert Peverell 1280-1318 was born to Richard Peverell 1250-1341 (30) at Castle Ashby.

On 29 Sep 1306 Edmund Peverell 1306-1331 was born to Robert Peverell 1280-1318 (26) at Castle Ashby.

Around 1339 John Pole 1339-1379 was born to William Pole 1302-1366 (37) and Katherine Norwich 1306-1381 (33) at Castle Ashby.

In 1512 William Compton Courtier 1482-1528 (30) aquired Castle Ashby.

On 23 Apr 1851 William George Spencer Scott Compton 5th Marquess Northampton 1851-1913 was born to William Compton 4th Marquess Northampton 1818-1897 (33) and Eliza Harriet Marchioness Northampton 1820-1877 (31) at Castle Ashby.

On 01 Jun 1902 Mary Florence Baring Marchioness Northampton 1860-1902 (41) died in Castle Ashby.

Castle Ashby House, Northamptonshire

John Evelyn's Diary 18 August 1688. 18 Aug 1688. Dr. Jeffryes, the minister of Althorpe, who was my Lord's chaplain when ambassador in France, preached the shortest discourse I ever heard; but what was defective in the amplitude of his sermon, he had supplied in the largeness and convenience of the parsonage house, which the doctor (who had at least £600 a year in spiritual advancement) had newly built, and made fit for a person of quality to live in, with gardens and all accommodation according therewith.

My lady (42) carried us to see Lord Northampton's (23) Seat, a very strong, large house, built with stone, not altogether modern. They were enlarging the garden, in which was nothing extraordinary, except the iron gate opening into the park, which indeed was very good work, wrought in flowers painted with blue and gilded. There is a noble walk of elms toward the front of the house by the bowling green. I was not in any room of the house besides a lobby looking into the garden, where my Lord (23) and his new Countess (19) (Sir Stephen Fox's (61) daughter, whom I had known from a child) entertained the Countess (42) and her daughter the Countess of Arran (21) (newly married to the son (30) of the Duke of Hamilton (53)), with so little good grace, and so dully, that our visit was very short, and so we returned to Althorpe, twelve miles distant.

The house, or rather palace, at Althorpe, is a noble uniform pile in form of a half H, built of brick and freestone, balustered and à la moderne; the hall is well, the staircase excellent; the rooms of state, galleries, offices and furniture, such as may become a great prince. It is situated in the midst of a garden, exquisitely planted and kept, and all this in a park walled in with hewn stone, planted with rows and walks of trees, canals and fish ponds, and stored with game. And, what is above all this, governed by a lady (42), who without any show of solicitude, keeps everything in such admirable order, both within and without, from the garret to the cellar, that I do not believe there is any in this nation, or in any other, that exceeds her (42) in such exact order, without ostentation, but substantially great and noble. The meanest servant is lodged so neat and cleanly; the service at the several tables, the good order and decency—in a word, the entire economy is perfectly becoming a wise and noble person. She is one who for her distinguished esteem of me from a long and worthy friendship, I must ever honor and celebrate. I wish from my soul the Lord (46), her husband (whose parts and abilities are otherwise conspicuous), was as worthy of her, as by a fatal apostasy and court-ambition he has made himself unworthy! This is what she deplores, and it renders her as much affliction as a lady of great soul and much prudence is capable of. The Countess of Bristol (68), her mother, a grave and honorable lady, has the comfort of seeing her daughter and grandchildren under the same economy, especially Mr. Charles Spencer (13), a youth of extraordinary hopes, very learned for his age, and ingenious, and under a Governor of great worth. Happy were it, could as much be said of the elder brother, the Lord Spencer (22), who, rambling about the world, dishonors both his name and his family, adding sorrow to sorrow to a mother, who has taken all imaginable care of his education. There is a daughter (17) very young married to the Earl of Clancarty (20), who has a great and fair estate in Ireland, but who yet gives no great presage of worth,—so universally contaminated is the youth of this corrupt and abandoned age! But this is again recompensed by my Lord Arran (30), a sober and worthy gentleman, who has espoused the Lady Ann Spencer (21), a young lady of admirable accomplishments and virtue.

Before 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Digby Countess Sunderland 1646-1715. One of the Windsor Beauties. Around 1758 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of George Compton 4th Earl of Northampton 1664-1727. Before 1725. John James Baker Painter -1725. Portrait of Stephen Fox Paymaster 1627-1716.

General photos of the Church of St Peter and St Paul Easton Maudit. The floor tiles Minton installed by donated by Alwyne Compton Bishop of Ely 1825-1906 son of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851 who lived at near by Castle Ashby House.

Around 1845. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851.

Chacombe Priory, Northamptonshire

On 04 Oct 1325 John Segrave 2nd Baron Segrave 1256-1325 (69) died at Chacombe Priory. His son Stephen Segrave 3rd Baron Segrave 1285-1325 (40) succeeded 3rd Baron Segrave 1C 1283.

Charwelton, Northamptonshire

The River Cherwell rises at Hellidon in Northamptonshire and travels broadly south passing through, or near, Charwelton, which gives the river its name, Woodford Halse, West Farndon, Cropredy Banbury, Twyford Wharf, Clifton, Somerton, Upper Heyford and Lower Heyford, Enslow, Shipton-on-Cherwell, Hampton Poyle and Islip after which it joins the River Thames south-west of Oxford

Chaucombe, Northamptonshire

On 12 Nov 1295 Nicholas Segrave 1st Baron Segrave 1238-1295 (57) died at Chaucombe. His son John Segrave 2nd Baron Segrave 1256-1325 (39) succeeded 2nd Baron Segrave 1C 1283. Christiana Plessey Baroness Segrave by marriage Baroness Segrave.

Collyweston, Northamptonshire

Around 1338 Hugh Despencer 1338-1374 was born to Edward Despencer 1310-1342 (28) and Anne Ferrers 1299- (39) at Collyweston. He a great x 2 grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Around 1475 John Stokesley Bishop of London 1475-1539 was born at Collyweston.

In 1499 Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 (55) took a vow of chastity in the presence of Richard FitzJames, Bishop of London with, apparently, the permission of her husband; it was always a marriage of convenience. Thereafter the Countess (55) lived at Collyweston.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525. Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535. Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

After 27 Jun 1503 Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 stayed at Collyweston.

Around 1525 Unknown Painter. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541.

Corby

Culworth, Northamptonshire

In 1449 Margery Danvers 1449-1510 was born to Richard Danvers 1428-1489 (21) at Culworth at Culworth.

Around 1452 John Danvers 1452-1514 was born to Richard Danvers 1428-1489 (24) at Culworth.

St Mary the Virgin Church Culworth, Northamptonshire

In 1790 Meriel Danvers erected a Monument to the D'Anvers Baronets including Samuel Danvers 1st Baronet D'Anvers 1611-1682 in St Mary the Virgin Church Culworth.

Daventry, Northamptonshire

Around 1090 Saer Quincy 1090-1158 was born at Daventry.

Althorp, Daventry, Northamptonshire

Wicken Manor, Althorp, Daventry, Northamptonshire

On 03 Aug 1588 Lawrence Washington 1565-1616 (23) and Margaret Butler 1568-1652 (20) were married at Wicken Manor.

Cottesbroke, Daventry, Northamptonshire

Cottesbrooke Hall, Cottesbroke, Daventry, Northamptonshire

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. The beautiful and unfortunate Empress Elizabeth of Austria (39) rented Cottesbroke from my cousins the Langhams, and her exploits in the hunting-field are well known. Bay Middleton was always staying at Cottesbroke, and used generally to give the Empress a "lead"..

The Empress found Sunday rather a dull day at Cottesbroke, so she had jumps made all round the park, and at 6 o'clock every Sunday morning she and Bay Middleton used to ride together, and taking the jumps became her unvarying Sunday amusement.

Her biographers have not flattered her when they describe her as being singularly handsome, for she was indeed a queenly figure, and I think her only personal defects were her hands and feet, which were large and ungainly. It is said that when Elizabeth (39) first met the Empress Eugenie (50) she was very jealous of her tiny extremities, for Eugenie's hands and feet were exceptionally small.

Around 1865. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873. Portrait of Empress Elisabeth of Austria 1837-1898. Around 1854. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873. Portrait of Empress Eugénie of France 1826-1920. In 1853. Franz Xaver Winterhalter 1805-1873. Portrait of Empress Eugénie of France 1826-1920.

Deene, Northamptonshire

In 1461 Robert Brudenell 1461-1531 was born at Deene.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter V: Country House Visits. I frequently went to Wittley, Lord Ward's (26) place, and I remember his eccentric brother, Dudley Ward (23), once getting up at dinner and hitting him without any provocation.

Lord Ward (26) had very curly hair, which could never be induced to lie smoothly on his head. I remember when he stayed at Deene after I married Cardigan (46) that his valet suddenly left, giving as his reason for so doing that he thought his Lordship (26) was going mad. It appears that the man had gone unexpectedly into his master's bedroom, and found him sitting in his bath with his HAT on. This seemed such an odd proceeding that the valet, who was a new servant, decided to leave at once and seek employment with a less eccentric master.

The reason Lord Ward wore his hat was solely to try and keep his rebellious curls in order !

1841 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of James Brudenell 7th Earl Cardigan 1797-1868.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. Deene is in the midst of the best hunting country, so I hunted for thirty years with the Quorn, the Belvoir, the Pytchley, the Cottesmore, the Fitzwilliams, and the Woodland.

I was particularly proud of my mounts, and always rode splendid horses.

Drayton, Northamptonshire

On 16 Jun 1601 Lewis Mordaunt 3rd Baron Mordaunt 1538-1601 (62) died at Drayton. His son Henry Mordaunt 4th Baron Mordaunt 1567-1608 (34) succeeded 4th Baron Mordaunt.

Duddington, Northamptonshire

Dunsmore Hill, Northamptonshire

Easton Maudit, Northamptonshire

On 31 Oct 1612 Christopher Yelverton Speaker of the House of Commons 1536-1612 (76) died at his seventy room house in Easton Maudit.

After 1647 Thomas Morton Bishop 1564-1659 became tutor to Henry Yelverton Baron Grey of Ruthyn 1633-1670 the son of Christopher Yelverton 1st Baronet Easton Maudit 1602-1654 at Easton Maudit.

On 20 Sep 1659 Thomas Morton Bishop 1564-1659 (95) died at Easton Maudit.

Ecton, Northamptonshire

On 23 Dec 1657 Josiah Franklin 1657-1745 was born to Thomas Franklin 1598- (59) at Ecton.

In 1707 Samuel Freeman Dean of Peterborough -1707 died at Ecton whilst visiting. He was buried at the Church of St Mary Magdalene Ecton.

On 26 Sep 1825 Elizabeth Percy 1765-1825 (60) died at Ecton.

Farmingwood or Farming Woods, Northamptonshire

On 14 Dec 1841 Anne Fitzpatrick -1841 (72) died at Farmingwood or Farming Woods. Monument in St James the Apostle Church Grafton Underwood sculpted by Richard "The Younger" Westmacott Sculptor 1799-1892 (42).

Farthinghoe, Northamptonshire

Before 03 Oct 1646 Roland Egerton 1st Baronet Egerton and Oulton 1594-1646 died. On 03 Oct 1646 he was buried at Farthinghoe. His son John Egerton 2nd Baronet Egerton and Oulton -1674 succeeded 2nd Baronet Egerton and Oulton.

On 28 Jul 1648 Bridget Grey Lady Egerton and Oulton -1648 died. She was buried at Farthinghoe.

Fawsley

Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire

St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire

After 25 Oct 1415 Edward York 1st Duke Albemarle aka Aumale 2nd Duke York 1373-1415 was buried at St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay.

In 1453 Richard Sapcote -1453 died. He was buried at St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay.

On 29 Jul 1476 Edward I's paternal grand-father Edward of York, his father Richard of York (64) and and his younger brother Edmund (33) were reburied at St Mary and All Saints in Fotheringhay in a ceremony attended by King Edward IV (34), George York 1st Duke Clarence 1449-1478 (26), Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (21), William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (45), Anthony Woodville 2nd Earl Rivers 1440-1483 (36).

On 01 Apr 1495 Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (79) made her last will. It was proved 27 Aug 1495.

Source: A Selection From the Wills of Eminent Persons by Camden Society (Great Britain). Published 1838. Transcribed by John Gough Nichols and John Bruce.

IN the name of allmyghty God, the blessed Trinite, fader and son and the holigost, trusting in the meanes and mediacions of oure blessed Lady Moder, of oure most blessed Saviour Jh'u Crist, and by the intercession of holy Saint John Baptist, and all the saintes of heven: I, CECILLE, wife unto the right noble prince Richard late Duke of Yorke (83), fader unto the most cristen prince my Lord and son King Edward the iiij th (52), the first day of Aprill the yere of our Lord M.CCCC.lxxxxv. after the computacion of the Church of Englond, of hole mynde and body, loving therfore be it to Jh'u, make and ordeigne my testament in fourme and maner ensuyng.

Furst, I bequeath and surrendour my soule in to the mercifull handes of allmyghty God my maker, and in to protecion of the blessed yrgin our lady Saint Mary, and suffrage of Saint John Baptist, and of all other saintes of heven. Also my body to be buried beside the body of my moost entierly best beloved Lord and housbond, fader unto my said lorde and son, and in his tumbe within the collegiate church of Fodringhay, a if myn executours by the sufferaunce of the King (38) finde goode sufficient therto; and elles at the Kinges (38) pleasure. And I will that after my deceasse all my dettes sufficiently appering and proved be paid, thanking oure Lord at this tyme of making of this my testament to the knolege of my conscience I am not muche in dett; and if it happen, as I trust to God it shalnot, that there be not found sufficient money aswell to pay my dettes as to enture my body, than in advoiding such charges as myght growe for the same, the whiche God defende, I lymytte and assigne all such parcelles of plate as belongith to my chapell, pantry, cellour, ewry, and squillery, to the perfourmyng of the same, as apperith in the inventary, except such plate as I have bequeithed. Also I geve and bequeith to the Kinges noble grace all such money as is owing to me of the customes, and two cuppes of gold.

Also I geve and bequeith to the Quene (29) a crosse croslette of diamantes, a sawter with claspes of silver and guilte enameled covered with grene clothe of golde, and a pix with the fleshe of Saint Cristofer.

Also I bequeith to my lady the Kinges moder (51) a portuos with claspes of gold covered with blacke cloth of golde.

Also I geve to my lord Prince (8) a bedde of arres of the Whele of Fortune and testour of the same, a counterpoint of arras and a tappett of arres with the pope.

Also I geve to my lord Henry Duke of Yorke (3) b three tappettes of arres, oon of them of the life of Saint John Baptist, another of Mary Maudeleyn, and the thirde of the passion of our Lord and Saint George.

And if my body be buried at Fodringhay in the colege there with my most entierly best beloved lord and housbond (83), than I geve to the said colege a square canapie of crymeson clothe of gold with iiij. staves, twoo auter clothes of crymeson clothe of gold, twoo copes of crymeson cloth of gold, a chesibull and twoo tenucles of cryinyson clothe of golcrvith iij. abes, c twoo auter clothes of crymeson damaske browdered, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and iij. copes of blewe velwett brodered, with iij. abes, thre masse bokes, thre grayles, and vij. processioners.

Also I geve to the colege of Stoke Clare a chesibull and twoo tenucles of playn crymyson cloth of gold with iij. abes, twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and fyve coopes of white damaske browdered, with iij. abes, twoo awter clothes of crymeson velwett upon the velwete (sic), a vestement of crymeson playne velvet, iiij. antiphoners, iiij. grayles, and sixe processioners.

Also I geve to the house of Sion two of the best coopes of crymyson clothe of gold.

Note. These next four people refer to her grand-daughters, children of Edward IV.

Also I geve to my doughter Brigitte (14) the boke of Legenda Aurea in velem, a boke of the life of Saint Kateryn of Sene, a boke of Saint Matilde.

Also I geve to my doughter Cecill (26) a portuous with claspes silver and gilte covered with purple velvet, and a grete portuous without note.

Also I geve to my doughter Anne (19) the largest bedde of bawdekyn, withe countrepoint of the same, the barge with bailies, tilde, and ores belonging to the same.

Also I geve to my doughter Kateryn (15) a traves of blewe satten.

Also I geve to my doughter of Suffolke (50) a the chare with the coveryng, all the quoshons, horses, and harneys belonging to the same, and all my palfreys.

Note. The next people are her grand-children, children of her daughter Elizabeth York Duchess Suffolk 1444-1503 (50).

Also I geve to my son of Suffolke (24) b a clothe of estate and iij. quoschons of purpull damaske cloth of gold.

Also I geve to my son Humfrey (21) c two awter clothes of blewe damaske brawdered and a vestyment of crymeson satten for Jh'us masse.

Also I geve to my son William (17) d a traves of white sarcenet, twoo beddes of downe, and twoo bolsters to the same.

Also I geve to my doughter Anne priores of Sion (19), a boke of Bonaventure and Hilton in the same in Englishe, and a boke of the Revelacions of Saint Burgitte.

Also I woll that all my plate not bequeithed be sold, and the money thereof be putte to the use of my burying, that is to sey, in discharging of suche costes and expensis as shalbe for carying of my body from the castell of Barkehampstede unto the colege of Fodringhey. And if any of the said plate be lefte unexpended I woll the said colege have it.

Also I geve to the colege of saint Antonies in London an antiphoner with the ruelles of musik in the later ynd.

Also I geve unto Master Richard Lessy all suche money as is owing unto me by obligations what soever they be, and also all such money as is owing unto me by the Shirfe of Yorkeshire, to helpe to bere his charges which he has to pay to the Kinges grace, trusting he shall the rather nyghe the said dettes by the help and socour of his said grace.

Also I geve to Master William Croxston a chesibull, stoles, and fanons of blake velwett, with an abe.

Also I geve to Master Eichard Henmershe a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of crymyson damaske, with an abe; and a chesibill, stoles and fanons of crymeson saten, with an abe.

Also I geve to Sir John More a frontell of purpull cloth of gold, a legend boke, and a colett boke.

Also I give to Sir Kandall Brantingham a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymson velvet, with an abe, the better of bothe.

Also I geve to Sir William Grave a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymeson velvett, with an abe; a masse-boke that servith for the closett, a prymour with claspes silver and gilt, covered with blewe velvett, and a sawter that servith for the closett covered with white ledder.

Also I geve to Sir John Blotte a gospell boke, a pistill covered with ledder, and a case for a corporax of grene playne velvett. Also I geve to Sir Thomas Clerk a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, fanons, of rede bawdeken, with iij. abes.

Also I geve to Sir William Tiler twoo coopes of rede bawdekyn.

Also I geve to Robert Claver iij. copes of white damaske brawdered, and a gowne of the Duchie b facion of playne blake velvett furred with ermyns.

Also I geve to John Bury twoo old copes of crymysyn satten cloth of gold, a frontell of white bawdekyn, twoo curteyns of rede sarcenett fringed, twoo curteyns of whit sarcenet fringed, a feder bed, a bolstour to the same, the best of feders, and two whit spervers of lynyn.

Also I geve to John Poule twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of white bawdekyn, with iij. abes; a short gowne of purple playne velvett furred with ermyns, the better of ij. and a kirtill of damaske with andelettes of silver and gilt furred.

Also I geve to John Smyth twoo auter clothes, a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of blew bawdekyn, with iij. abes. Also I geve to John Bury twoo copes of crymysyn clothe of gold that servith for Sondays.

Also I geve to John Walter a case for corporax of purple playne velvett, twoo cases for corporax of blewe bawdekyn, twoo auter clothes, a chesibill of rede and grene bawdekyn, a canapie of white sarcenett, iij. abes for children, and iiij. pair of parrours of white bawdekyn, twoo pair parrours of crymsyn velvett, twoo pair parrours of rede bawdekyn, a housling towell that servith for my selfe, twoo corteyns of blewe sarcenett fringed, a sudory of crymy-syn and white, the egges blak, a crose cloth and a cloth of Saint John Baptist of sarcenett painted, a long lantorn, a dext standing doble, twoo grete stondardes and ij. litill cofers.

Also I geve to John Peit-wynne twoo vestimentes of white damaske, a white bedde of lynnyn, a federbedde and a bolstour, and a short gowne of purple playne velvet furred with sabilles. Also I geve to Thomas Lentall six auter clothes of white sarcenett, with crosses of crymsyn velvet.

Also I geve to John Long iij. peces of bawdekyn of the lengur sorte. Also I geve to Sir [John] Verney knighte and Margarett his wiffe a a crosse [of] silver and guilte and berall, and in the same a pece of the holy crosse and other diverse reliques.

Also I geve to Dame Jane Pesemershe, widue, myne Inne that is called the George in Grauntham, during terme of her life; and after her decesse I woll that the reversion therof be unto the college of Fodringhay for evermore, to find a prest to pray for my Lord my housbond (83) and me.

Also I geve to Nicholas Talbott and Jane his wife a spone of gold with a sharp diamount in the ende, a dymy-sent of gold with a collumbine and a diamont in the same, a guirdill of blewe tissue harnessed with gold, a guirdill of gold with a bokull and a pendaunt and iiij. barres of gold, a hoke of gold with iij. roses, a pomeamber of gold garnesshed with a diamont, sex rubies and sex perles, and the surnap and towell to the same.

Also I geve to Richard Boyvile and Gresild his wife my charrett and the horses with the harnes that belongith therunto, a gowne with a dymy trayn of purpull saten furred with ermyns, a shorte gowne of purple saten furred with jennetes, a kirtill of white damaske with aunde lettes silver and gilte, a spone of gold, a dymysynt of gold with a columbyne garnesshed with a diainant, a saphour, an amatist, and viij. perles, a pomeamber of gold enameled, a litell boxe with a cover of gold and a diamant in the toppe.

Also I geve to Richard Brocas and Jane his wife a long gown of purpull velvett upon velvet furred with ermyns, a greate Agnus of gold with the Trinite, Saint Erasmus, and the Salutacion of our Lady; an Agnus of gold with our Lady and Saint Barbara; a litell goblett with a cover silver and part guild; a pair of bedes of white amber gauded with vj. grete stones of gold, part aneled, with a pair of bedes of x. stones of gold and v. of corall; a cofor with a rounde lidde bonde with iron, which the said Jane hath in her keping, and all other thinges that she hath in charge of keping.

Also I geve to Anne Pinchbeke all other myne Agnus unbequeithed, that is to sey, ten of the Trinite, a litell malmesey pott with a cover silver and parte guilte, a possenett with a cover of silver, a short gowne of playne russett velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of playne blewe velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of purple playn velvet furred with grey, a tester, a siler, and a countrepoint of bawdekyn, the lesser of ij.

Also I geve to Jane Lessy a dymysent of gold with a roos, garnisshed with twoo rubies, a guirdell of purple tissue with a broken bokull, and a broken pendaunt silver and guilte, a guirdill of white riband with twoo claspes of gold with a columbyne, a guirdell of blewe riband with a bokell and a pendaunt of gold, a litell pair of bedes of white amber gaudied with vij. stones of gold, an haliwater stope with a strynkkill silver and gilte, and a laier silver and part guilte.

Also I geve to John Metcalfe and Alice his wife all the ringes that I have, except such as hang by my bedes and Agnus, and also except my signet, a litell boxe of golde with a cover of golde, a pair of bedes of Ixj. rounde stones of golde gaudied with sex square stones of golde enemeled, with a crosse of golde, twoo other stones, and a scalop shele of geete honging by.

Also I geve to Anne Lownde a litell bokull and a litell pendaunt of golde for a guirdill, a litell guirdell of golde and silke with a bokill and a pendaunt of golde, a guirdell of white riband with aggelettes of golde enameled, a hoke of golde playne, a broken hoke of golde enameled, and a litell rounde bottumed basyn of silver.

Also I geve to the house of Asshe-rugge a chesibull and ij. tenucles of crymysyn damaske embrawdered, with thre abes.

Also I geve to the house of Saint Margaretes twoo auter clothes with a crucifix and a vestiment of grete velvet.

Also I geve to the parish church of Stoundon a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.

Also I geve to the parishe church of Much Barkehampstede a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.

Also I geve to the parish church of Compton by sides Guilford a eorporax case of blake cloth of gold and iiij. auter clothes of white sarcenett embrawdered with garters.

Also I geve to Alisaunder Cressener my best bedde of downe and a bolster to the same.

Also I geve to Sir Henry Haidon knyght a tablett and a cristall garnesshed with ix. stones and xxvij. perles, lacking a stone and iij. perles.

Also I geve to Gervase Cressy a long gown of playn blewe velvet furred with sabilles.

Also I geve to Edward Delahay twoo gownes of musterdevilers furred with mynckes, and iiij u of money.

Also I geve to Thomas Manory a short gowne of crymesyn playn velvet lyned, purfilled with blake velvet, and iiij ll in money.

Also I geve to John Broune all such stuf as belongith to the kechyn in his keping at my place at Baynardcastell in London, and iiij u in money.

Also I geve to William Whitington a short gown of russett cloth furred with matrons and calabour wombes, a kirtill of purpull silke chamblett with awndelettes silver and gilte, all such floures of brawdery werke and the cofer that they be kept in, and xls. in money.

Also I geve to all other gentilmen that be daily a waiting in my houshold with Mr. Richard Cressy and Robert Lichingham everich of theime iiij u in money.

Also I geve to every yoman that be daily ad waiting in my houshold with John Otley xls. in money.

Also I geve to every grome of myne xxvj s. viij d. in money. And to every page of myne xiij s. iiij d. in money.

Also I geve to Robert Harison xls. in money and all the gootes.

And if ther be no money founde in my cofers to perfourme this my will and bequest, than I will that myne executours, that is to sey the reverend fader in God Master Olyver King bisshop of Bath (63), Sir Reignolde Bray (55) knight, Sir Thomas Lovell, councellours to the Kinges grace, Master William Pikinham doctour in degrees dean of the colege of Stoke Clare, Master William Felde master of the colege of Fodringhey, and Master Richard Lessy dean of my chapell, havyng God in reverence and drede, unto whome I geve full power and auctorite to execute this my will and testament, make money of such goodes as I have not geven and bequeithed, and with the same to content my dettes and perfourme this my will and testament.

And the foresaid reverend fader in God, Sir Rignold Bray knyght, Sir Thomas Lovell knyght, Master William Pikenham, and Master William Felde, to be rewarded of suche thinges as shalbe delivered unto theme by my commaundement by the hondes of Sir Henry Haidon knyght stieward of my houshold and Master Richard Lessy, humbly beseching the Kinges habundant grace in whome is my singuler trust to name such supervisour as shalbe willing and favorabull diligently to se that this my present testament and will be perfittely executed and perfourmyd, gevyng full power also to my said executours to levey and receyve all my dettes due and owing unto me at the day of my dethe, as well of my receyvours as of all other officers, except such dettes as I have geven and bequeathed unto Master Richard Lessy aforesaid, as is above specified in this present will and testament.

And if that Master Richard Lessy cannot recover such money as I have geven to hym of the Shirffes of Yorkeshire and of my obligacions, than I will he be recompensed of the revenues of my landes to the sume of v c. marcs at the leest.

IN WITTENESSE HEROF I have setto my signet and signemanuell at my castell of Berkehamstede the last day of May the yere of our Lord abovesaid, being present Master Richard Lessy, Sir William Grant my confessour, Richard Brocas clerc of my kechyn, and Gervays Cressy. Proved at "Lamehithe" the 27 th day of August, A.D. 1495, and commission granted to Master Richard Lessy the executor in the said will mentioned to administer, &c. &c.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1675 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503. From a work of 1500. Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525. Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535. Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck. Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502. 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547.

On 31 May 1495 Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (80) died. She was buried at St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay.

In 1566 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (32) visited St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay.

Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

On 30 Jun 1577 Frances Vere Countess Surrey 1517-1577 (60) died at Soham. She was buried at St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay.

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Frances Vere Countess Surrey 1517-1577.

On 08 Nov 1586 John Spencer 1524-1586 (62) died. He was buried at St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay.

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Foxley, Northamptonshire

On 16 Nov 1608 Newdigate Poyntz 1608-1643 was born to John Poyntz 1577-1617 (30) at Foxley.

Grafton Regis

Grafton Underwood, Northamptonshire

Geddington, Northamptonshire

Eleanor Cross Geddington, Northamptonshire

After 28 Nov 1290 Eleanor of Castile's body was taken from Harby to Westminster Abbey. At each of the locations at which her body rested overnight Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 commissioned the building of an Eleanor Cross. Three remain. The best example being at Geddington__Northamptonshire.

On 06 Dec 1290 and/or 06 Dec 1290 Eleanor of Castile (49) body rested at Geddington__Northamptonshire.

Great Doddinton, Northamptonshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Great Brington, Northamptonshire

St Mary the Virgin Church Great Brington, Northamptonshire

On 14 Apr 1522 John Spencer 1455-1522 (67) died at Kenilworth. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Great Brington.

On 23 Nov 1620 Henry Spencer 1st Earl of Sunderland 1620-1643 was christened at St Mary the Virgin Church Great Brington.

On 16 Feb 1655 Edward Spencer 1594-1655 (60) died. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Great Brington.

On 31 Oct 1783 John Spencer 1st Earl Spencer 1734-1783 (48) died at Bath. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Great Brington. His son George John Spencer 2nd Earl Spencer 1758-1834 (25) succeeded 2nd Earl Spencer, 2nd Viscount Althorp, 2nd Viscount Spencer, 2nd Baron Spencer Althorp. Lavinia Bingham Countess Spencer 1762-1831 (21) by marriage Countess Spencer.

Before 02 Aug 1788 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of John Spencer 1st Earl Spencer 1734-1783. In 1833 Henry William Pickersgill Painter 1782-1875. Portrait of George John Spencer 2nd Earl Spencer 1758-1834. Around 1800 John Singleton Copley 1738-1815. Portrait of George John Spencer 2nd Earl Spencer 1758-1834. In 1781 Joshua Reynolds 1723-1788. Portrait of Lavinia Bingham Countess Spencer 1762-1831.

Great Creaton, Northamptonshire

In 1555 William Dickens 1555-1585 was born at Great Creaton.

In 1582 Anne Dickens 1582-1637 was born to William Dickens 1555-1585 (27) at Great Creaton.

In 1585 William Dickens 1555-1585 (30) died at Great Creaton.

Great Harrowden, Northamptonshire

Before 1616 Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 and Catherine Vaux Baroness Bergavenny 1592-1649 were married at Great Harrowden.

Greatworth, Northamptonshire

Greatworth Church Greatworth, Northamptonshire

On 25 Jul 1696 Eleanor Pargiter -1696 died. She was buried at Greatworth Church Greatworth.

On 17 Feb 1742 Charles Howe 1661-1742 (81) died. He was buried at Greatworth Church Greatworth.

Greens Norton, Northamptonshire

In 1345 Thomas Green 1345-1391 was born to Henry Green -1369 and Katherine Drayton 1319-1387 at Greens Norton.

On 10 Feb 1369 Thomas Green 1369-1417 was born to Thomas Green 1345-1391 (24) at Greens Norton.

On 14 Dec 1417 Thomas Green 1369-1417 (48) died at Greens Norton.

On 13 Apr 1433 Mary Talbot 1383-1433 (49) died at Greens Norton.

On 18 Jan 1462 Thomas Green 1400-1462 (61) died at Greens Norton.

St Bartholomew's Church Greens Norton, Northamptonshire

On 09 Sep 1462 Thomas Green 1421-1462 (41) died. He was buried at St Bartholomew's Church Greens Norton.

Grendon, Northamptonshire

Times Newspaper Court Circulars. 04 Feb 1905.

We have to announce the death of Florence, Marchioness of Hastings (62), wife of Sir George Chetwynd, Bart. (62), which took place on Sunday morning at Long Walk House, Windsor, after a few days' illness. The funeral will take place at Grendon, Atherstone, on Thursday next, at 2 o'clock.

NOTE. On 03 Feb 1907 Florence Cecilia Paget Marchioness Hastings 1842-1907 (64) died.

Grendon Hall, Northamptonshire

On 24 May 1850 George Chetwynd 2nd Baronet 1783-1850 (66) died at Grendon Hall. His son George Chetwynd 3rd Baronet 1809-1869 (40) succeeded 3rd Baronet Chetwynd of Brocton Hall in Staffordshire. Charlotte Augusta Hill Lady Chetwynd -1861 by marriage Lady Chetwynd of Brocton Hall in Staffordshire.

Before 1825. William Owen 1769-1825. Portrait of George Chetwynd 2nd Baronet 1783-1850.

Gretton, Northamptonshire

In 1610 Robert Abbott Scrivener 1610-1653 was born to Thomas Abbott -1652 in Gretton.

Kirby Hall Gretton, Northamptonshire

John Evelyn's Diary 25 August 1654. 25 Aug 1654. To see Kirby, a very noble house of my Lord Hatton's (49), in Northamptonshire, built à la moderne; the garden and stables agreeable, but the avenue ungraceful, and the seat naked: returned that evening.

On 19 May 1791 George Finch Hatton 5th Earl Nottingham 10th Earl Winchilsea 1791-1858 was born to George Finch Hatton 1747-1823 (43) and Elizabeth Finch-Hatton 1760-1825 (31) and at Kirby Hall Gretton.

1778. David Martin Painter 1737-1797. Portrait of cousins Elizabeth Finch-Hatton 1760-1825 and Dido Elizabeth Belle 1761-1804.

Grimsbury, Northamptonshire

In 1450 William Cope 1450-1513 was born at Grimsbury.

Hardingstone, Northamptonshire

On 08 Dec 1290 or 07 Dec 1290 Eleanor of Castile (49) body rested at Hardingstone.

Harleston, Northamptonshire

On 20 Jan 1861 Assheton Edward Harbord 1861-1929 was born to Charles Harbord 5th Baron Suffield 1830-1914 (31) and Cecilia Annetta Baring Baroness Suffield 1834-1911 (27) at Harleston.

Harringworth

Harrowden, Northamptonshire

Around 1473 Florence Hastings Baroness Grey Wilton 1473-1536 was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (34) at Harrowden.

Hellidon, Northamptonshire

The River Leam rises near Hellidon from where it flows past Lower Catesby,

Source of the River Cherwell, Hellidon, Northamptonshire

The River Cherwell rises at Hellidon in Northamptonshire and travels broadly south passing through, or near, Charwelton, which gives the river its name, Woodford Halse, West Farndon, Cropredy Banbury, Twyford Wharf, Clifton, Somerton, Upper Heyford and Lower Heyford, Enslow, Shipton-on-Cherwell, Hampton Poyle and Islip after which it joins the River Thames south-west of Oxford

Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire

In 1363 or 1364 Archbishop Henry Chichele 1364-1443 (1) was born at Higham Ferrers.

In 1547 Richard Throckmorton of Higher Ferrers 1482-1547 (65) died at Higham Ferrers.

Holdenby, Northamptonshire

Holdenby House, Northamptonshire

After Jan 1647 John Coke 1607-1650 was one of the nine commissioners appointed to take charge of King Charles I at Holdenby House.

In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

Horton, Northamptonshire

On 10 Sep 1547 William Parr 1st Baron Parr Horton 1483-1547 (64) died. He was buried at Horton.

On 16 Apr 1661 Christopher Montagu 1661- was born to George Montagu 1622-1681 (38) and Elizabeth Irby at Horton.

On 16 Apr 1661 Charles Montagu 1st Earl Halifax 1661-1715 was born to George Montagu 1622-1681 (38) and Elizabeth Irby at Horton.

In 1714. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Charles Montagu 1st Earl Halifax 1661-1715.

Hothorpe, Northamptonshire

In 1620 Dr Ralph Bathurst 1620-1704 was born in Hothorpe.

Hunsbury Meadows, Northamptonshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Isham, Northamptonshire

In 1508 Cecilia Durance 1508-1538 was born to John Durance -1539 at Isham.

Kings Cliffe, Northamptonshire

On 11 Nov 1718 Edward Irby 1st Baronet Irby 1676-1718 (42) died intestate at Kings Cliffe. His son William Irby 1st Baron Boston 1707-1775 (11) succeeded 2nd Baronet Irby of Whaplode and Boston.

Kingsthorpe, Northamptonshire

In 1601 Robert Bernard 1st Baronet 1601-1666 was born to Francis Bernard and Mary Woodhouse at Kingsthorpe.

Kinslingbury, Northamptonshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Lamport, Northamptonshire

Church of All Saints Lamport, Northamptonshire

On 02 Mar 1675 Justinian Isham 2nd Baronet Isham 1610-1675 (65) died of smallpox at Oxford. He was buried at Church of All Saints Lamport. His son Thomas Isham 3rd Baronet Isham 1657-1681 (17) succeeded 3rd Baronet Isham of Lamport in Northamptonshire.

Laxton, Northamptonshire

Laxton Hall, Northamptonshire

In 1705 Edmund Stafford -1705 died. His estates were divided between his sisters Susannah Stafford -1747 who received Blatherwycke Hall and Anne Stafford Baroness Carbery 1684-1757 (21) who received Laxton Hall.

On 23 May 1732 George Evans 2nd Baron Carbery 1703-1759 (29) and Frances Fitzwilliam Baroness Carbery -1789 were married. He was given the Laxton Hall estate by his mother, worth £1100 per year, and an annuity on the family's Irish estates worth £1,400 per year.

Little Creston, Northamptonshire

In 1570 John Twigden 1570-1611 was born at Little Creston.

In 1611 John Twigden 1570-1611 (41) died at Little Creston.

Lower Catesby, Northamptonshire

The River Leam rises near Hellidon from where it flows past Lower Catesby,

Lowick, Northamptonshire

On 18 Jun 1626 John Mordaunt 1st Viscount Mordaunt 1626-1675 was born to John Mordaunt 1st Earl Peterborough -1642 and Elizabeth Howard Countess Peterborough 1603-1671 (23) at Lowick.

Drayton Lowick, Northamptonshire

Drayton House, Drayton Lowick, Northamptonshire

On 06 Aug 1369 Henry Green -1369 died at Boughton. He was buried at Church of St John the Baptist Boughton. Henry Green 1347-1399 (22) inherited at Drayton House.

On 11 Sep 1498 Edward Stafford 2nd Earl Wiltshire 1470-1499 (28) entertained Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (41) at Drayton House.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

On 24 Mar 1499 Edward Stafford 2nd Earl Wiltshire 1470-1499 (28) died at Drayton House. He was buried at St Peter's Church Lowick.

St Peter's Church Lowick, Northamptonshire

On 24 Mar 1499 Edward Stafford 2nd Earl Wiltshire 1470-1499 (28) died at Drayton House. He was buried at St Peter's Church Lowick.

On 29 Jul 1843 Charles Sackville 5th Duke Dorset 1767-1843 (75) died unmarried. He was buried in St Peter's Church Lowick. Duke Dorset 1C 1720, Earl Dorset 4C 1604, Viscount Sackville of Drayton in Sussex and Baron Bolebrooke in Sussex extinct.

Lubenham, Northamptonshire

Marston Trussell, Northamptonshire

Hothorpe Hall, Marston Trussell, Northamptonshire

On 28 May 1901 Richard Everard Augustine Elwes 1901-1968 was born to Gervase Elwes Singer 1866-1921 (34) and Winefride Mary Elizabeth Feilding 1868-1959 (32) at Hothorpe Hall.

On 29 Jun 1902 Simon Elwes Painter 1902-1975 was born to Gervase Elwes Singer 1866-1921 (35) and Winefride Mary Elizabeth Feilding 1868-1959 (33) at Hothorpe Hall.

Melton, Northamptonshire

Around 1520 Ellen Helena Fitzwilliam 1520-1575 was born to William Fitzwilliam Sheriff of London 1460-1534 (60) at Melton.

Milton, Northamptonshire

Around 16 Sep 1526 William Fitzwilliam 1526-1599 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1490-1552 (36) in Milton.

Around 1544 Philippa Fitzwilliam 1544-1596 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1526-1599 (17) in Milton.

Around 1555 William Fitzwilliam 1555-1618 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1526-1599 (28) in Milton.

In 1578 William Fitzwilliam 1st Baron Fitzwilliam 1578-1643 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1555-1618 (23) in Milton.

Naseby, Northamptonshire

On 14 Jun 1645 Maurice Palatinate Simmern 1621-1652 (24) fought at Naseby during the Battle of Naseby for the Royalist army.

John Lucas 1st Baron Lucas Shenfield 1606-1671 (38) fought for the King.

Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (25) was wounded.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the Prince Rupert, Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 and Colonel William Murray. In 1659 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Colonel John Russell 1620-1687.

The River Avon rises at Naseby after which it passes Rugby, Stoneleigh, Warwick, Stratford upon Avon, Evesham and Pershore before joining the River Severn at Tewkesbury.

Nether Heyford, Northamptonshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Nether Boddington, Northamptonshire

In 1619 Robert Washington 1544-1619 (75) died at Nether Boddington. He was buried at Church of St James the Less Sulgrave.

Newnham, Northamptonshire

On 15 Jun 1605 Thomas Randolph Poet 1605-1635 was born to William Randolph 1572-1660 at Newnham. He was baptised on 18 Jun 1605.

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Northampton

Norton, Northamptonshire

On 03 Feb 1271 William Zouche 1214-1271 (57) died at Norton.

In Jun 1602 Dudley Knightley 1583-1602 (19) died in Norton. He had been shot in the neck whilst in the defense of Ostend. Having returned home he "fell down wherwith a fever took him whereof he died".

On 01 Sep 1615 Richard Knightley 1533-1615 (82) died in Norton. He was buried in St Mary's Church Fawsley.

In 1567 attrbuted to Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Richard Knightley 1533-1615.

Oundle, Northamptonshire

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 19 How Coinred king of the Mercians and Offa king of the East Saxons ended their days at Rome in the monastic habit; and of the life and death of Bishop Wilfrid. [709 a.d.]. In the fourth year of the reign of Osred (12), Coenred, who had for some time nobly governed the kingdom of the Mercians, much more nobly quitted the sceptre of his kingdom. For he went to Rome, and there receiving the tonsure and becoming a monk, when Constantine (45) was pope, he continued to his last hour in prayer and fasting and alms-deeds at the threshold of the Apostles. He was succeeded in the throne by Ceolred, the son of Ethelred, who had governed the kingdom before Coenred. With him went the son of Sighere, the king of the East Saxons whom we mentioned before, by name Offa, a youth of a most pleasing age and comeliness, and greatly desired by all his nation to have and to hold the sceptre of the kingdom. He, with like devotion, quitted wife, and lands, and kindred and country, for Christ and for the Gospel, that he might "receive an hundred-fold in this life, and in the world to come life everlasting." He also, when they came to the holy places at Rome, received the tonsure, and ending his life in the monastic habit, attained to the vision of the blessed Apostles in Heaven, as he had long desired.

The same year that they departed from Britain, the great bishop, Wilfrid, ended his days in the province called Inundalum, after he had been bishop forty-five years. His body, being laid in a coffin, was carried to his monastery, which is called Inhrypum, and buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, with the honour due to so great a prelate. Concerning whose manner of life, let us now turn back, and briefly make mention of the things which were done. Being a boy of a good disposition, and virtuous beyond his years, he conducted himself so modestly and discreetly in all points, that he was deservedly beloved, respected, and cherished by his elders as one of themselves. At fourteen years of age he chose rather the monastic than the secular life; which, when he had signified to his father, for his mother was dead, he readily consented to his godly wishes and desires, and advised him to persist in that wholesome purpose. Wherefore he came to the isle of Lindisfarne, and there giving himself to the service of the monks, he strove diligently to learn and to practise those things which belong to monastic purity and piety; and being of a ready wit, he speedily learned the psalms and some other books, having not yet received the tonsure, but being in no small measure marked by those virtues of humility and obedience which are more important than the tonsure; for which reason he was justly loved by his elders and his equals. Having served God some years in that monastery, and being a youth of a good understanding, he perceived that the way of virtue delivered by the Scots was in no wise perfect, and he resolved to go to Rome, to see what ecclesiastical or monastic rites were in use at the Apostolic see. When he told the brethren, they commended his design, and advised him to carry out that which he purposed. He forthwith went to Queen Eanfled (82), for he was known to her, and it was by her counsel and support that he had been admitted into the aforesaid monastery, and he told her of his desire to visit the threshold of the blessed Apostles. She, being pleased with the youth's good purpose, sent him into Kent, to King Earconbert,8 who was her uncle's son, requesting that he would send him to Rome in an honourable manner. At that time, Honorius, one of the disciples of the blessed Pope Gregory (40), a man very highly instructed in ecclesiastical learning, was archbishop there. When he had tarried there for a space, and, being a youth of an active spirit, was diligently applying himself to learn those things which came under his notice, another youth, called Biscop, surnamed Benedict (81), of the English nobility, arrived there, being likewise desirous to go to Rome, of whom we have before made mention.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 700-749. 709. This year died Aldhelm (70), who was bishop by Westwood. The land of the West-Saxons was divided into two bishoprics in the first days of Bishop Daniel; who held one whilst Aldhelm (70) held the other. Before this it was only one. Forthere succeeded to Aldhelm; and Ceolred succeeded to the kingdom of Mercia. And Cenred went to Rome; and Offa with him. And Cenred was there to the end of his life. The same year died Bishop Wilferth, at Oundle, but his body was carried to Ripon. He was the bishop whom King Everth (64) compelled to go to Rome.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 956. This year died Wulfstan, Archbishop of York, on the seventeenth day before the calends of January; and he was buried at Oundle; and in the same year was Abbot Dunstan (47) driven out of this land over sea.

On 16 Dec 956 or 26 Dec 956 Archbishop Wulfstan -956 died at Oundle.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 963. This year died Wulfstan, the deacon, on Childermass-day; (42) and afterwards died Gyric, the mass-priest. In the same year took Abbot Athelwold (59) to the bishopric of Winchester; and he was consecrated on the vigil of St. Andrew, which happened on a Sunday. On the second year after he was consecrated, he made many minsters; and drove out the clerks (43) from the bishopric, because they would hold no rule, and set monks therein. He made there two abbacies; one of monks, another of nuns. That was all within Winchester. Then came he afterwards to King Edgar (20), and requested that he would give him all the minsters that heathen men had before destroyed; for that he would renew them. This the king cheerfully granted; and the bishop came then first to Ely, where St. Etheldritha lies, and ordered the minster to be repaired; which he gave to a monk of his, whose name was Britnoth, whom he consecrated abbot: and there he set monks to serve God, where formerly were nuns. He then bought many villages of the king, and made it very rich. Afterwards came Bishop Athelwold (59) to the minster called Medhamsted, which was formerly ruined by heathen folk; but he found there nothing but old walls, and wild woods. In the old walls at length he found hid writings which Abbot Hedda (59) had formerly written;—how King Wulfhere and Ethelred his brother had wrought it, and how they freed it against king and against bishop, and against all worldly service; and how Pope Agatho confirmed it with his writ, as also Archbishop Deusdedit. He then ordered the minster to be rebuilt; and set there an abbot, who was called Aldulf; and made monks, where before was nothing. He then came to the king, and let him look at the writings which before were found; and the king then answered and said: "I Edgar grant and give to-day, before God and before Archbishop Dunstan (54), freedom to St. Peter's minster at Medhamsted, from king and from bishop; and all the thorps that thereto lie; that is, Eastfield, and Dodthorp, and Eye, and Paston. And so I free it, that no bishop have any jurisdiction there, but the abbot of the minster alone. And I give the town called Oundle, with all that thereto lieth, called Eyot-hundred, with market and toll; so freely, that neither king, nor bishop, nor earl, nor sheriff, have there any jurisdiction; nor any man but the abbot alone, and whom he may set thereto. And I give to Christ and St. Peter, and that too with the advice of Bishop Athelwold (59), these lands;—that is, Barrow, Warmington, Ashton, Kettering, Castor, Eylesworth, Walton, Witherington, Eye, Thorp, and a minster at Stamford. These lands and al the others that belong to the minster I bequeath clear; that is, with sack and sock, toll and team, and infangthief; these privileges and all others bequeath I clear to Christ and St. Peter. And I give the two parts of Whittlesey-mere, with waters and with wears and fens; and so through Meerlade along to the water that is called Nen; and so eastward to Kingsdelf. And I will that there be a market in the town itself, and that no other be betwixt Stamford and Huntingdon. And I will that thus be given the toll;—first, from Whittlesey-mere to the king's toll of Norman-cross hundred; then backward again from Whittlesey-mere through Meerlade along to the Nen, and as that river runs to Crowland; and from Crowland to Must, and from Must to Kingsdelf and to Whittlesey-mere. And I will that all the freedom, and all the privileges, that my predecessors gave, should remain; and I write and confirm this with the rood-token of Christ." (+)—Then answered Dunstan, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and said: "I grant, that all the things that here are given and spoken, and all the things that thy predecessors and mine have given, shall remain firm; and whosoever breaketh it, then give I him God's curse, and that of all saints, and of all hooded heads, and mine, unless he come to repentance. And I give expressly to St. Peter my mass-hackle, and my stole, and my reef, to serve Christ." "I Oswald, Archbishop of York, confirm all these words through the holy rood on which Christ was crucified." (+) "I Bishop Athelwold (59) bless all that maintain this, and I excommunicate all that break it, unless they come to repentance."—Here was Bishop Ellstan, Bishop Athulf, and Abbot Eskwy, and Abbot Osgar, and Abbot Ethelgar, and Alderman Elfere; Alderman Ethelwin, Britnoth and Oslac aldermen, and many other rich men; and all confirmed it and subscribed it with the cross of Christ. (+) This was done in the year after our Lord's Nativity 972, the sixteenth year of this king. Then bought the Abbot Aldulf lands rich and many, and much endowed the minster withal; and was there until Oswald, Archbishop of York, was dead; and then he was chosen to be archbishop. Soon after another abbot was chosen of the same monastery, whose name was Kenulf, who was afterwards Bishop of Winchester. He first made the wall about the minster, and gave it then the name of Peterborough, which before was Medhamsted. He was there till he was appointed Bishop of Winchester, when another abbot was chosen of the same monastery, whose name was Elfsy, who continued abbot fifty winters afterwards. It was he who took up St. Kyneburga and St. Kyneswitha, that lay at Castor, and St. Tibba, that lay at Ryhall; and brought them to Peterborough, and offered them all to St. Peter in one day, and preserved them all the while he was there.

i.e. the secular clergy, who observed no rule; opposed to the regulars, or monks.

Around 1500 William Laxton Lord Mayor of London 1500-1556 was born to John Laxton Merchant at Oundle.

Around 1605 Peter Hausted Playwright 1605-1644 was born at Oundle.

John Creed of Oundle in Cambridgeshire -1701 was born at Oundle.

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Paulerspury, Northamptonshire

Church of St James the Great Paulerspury, Northamptonshire

Church of St James the Great Paulerspury. Nick Faris. A brief visit yesterday to the Church of St James the great at Paulersbury Northants mainly to see the tomb and wooden effigies of Sir Lawrence de Paveley and his wife, from around 1340 to 1350, though sadly in not such great shape, some restoration work has been done to them and parts are missing, I am sure they were rather splendid in their day and still well worth viewing today.

Nick Faris. Early 17th century tomb to Sir Arthur Throckmorton and his wife Anne at The church of st James the great Paulersbury Northants.

Passenham, Northamptonshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 917. This year, before Easter, King Edward (43) ordered his men to go to the town of Towcester, and to rebuild it. Then again, after that, in the same year, during the gang-days, he ordered the town of Wigmore to be repaired. The same summer, betwixt Lammas and midsummer, the army broke their parole from Northampton and from Leicester; and went thence northward to Towcester, and fought against the town all day, and thought that they should break into it; but the people that were therein defended it, till more aid came to them; and the enemy then abandoned the town, and went away. Then again, very soon after this, they went out at night for plunder, and came upon men unaware, and seized not a little, both in men and cattle, betwixt Burnham-wood and Aylesbury. At the same time went the army from Huntington and East-Anglia, and constructed that work at Ternsford which they inhabited and fortified; and abandoned the other at Huntingdon; and thought that they should thence oft with war and contention recover a good deal of this land. Thence they advanced till they came to Bedford; where the men who were within came out against them, and fought with them, and put them to flight, and slew a good number of them. Then again, after this, a great army yet collected itself from East-Anglia and from Mercia, and went to the town of Wigmore; which they besieged without, and fought against long in the day; and took the cattle about it; but the men defended the town, who were within; and the enemy left the town, and went away. After this, the same summer, a large force collected itself in King Edward's dominions, from the nighest towns that could go thither, and went to Temsford; and they beset the town, and fought thereon; until they broke into it, and slew the king, and Earl Toglos, and Earl Mann his son, and his brother, and all them that were therein, and who were resolved to defend it; and they took the others, and all that was therein. After this, a great force collected soon in harvest, from Kent, from Surrey, from Essex, and everywhere from the nighest towns; and went to Colchester, and beset the town, and fought thereon till they took it, and slew all the people, and seized all that was therein; except those men who escaped therefrom over the wall. After this again, this same harvest, a great army collected itself from East-Anglia, both of the land-forces and of the pirates, which they had enticed to their assistance, and thought that they should wreak their vengeance. They went to Maldon, and beset the town, and fought thereon, until more aid came to the townsmen from without to help. The enemy then abandoned the town, and went from it. And the men went after, out of the town, and also those that came from without to their aid; and put the army to flight, and slew many hundreds of them, both of the pirates and of the others. Soon after this, the same harvest, went King Edward (43) with the West-Saxon army to Passham; and sat there the while that men fortified the town of Towcester with a stone wall. And there returned to him Earl Thurferth, and the captains, and all the army that belonged to Northampton northward to the Welland, and sought him for their lord and protector. When this division of the army went home, then went another out, and marched to the town of Huntingdon; and repaired and renewed it, where it was broken down before, by command of King Edward (43). And all the people of the country that were left submitted to King Edward (43), and sought his peace and protection. After this, the same year, before Martinmas, went King Edward (43) with the West-Saxon army to Colchester; and repaired and renewed the town, where it was broken down before. And much people turned to him, both in East-Anglia and in Essex, that were before under the power of the Danes. And all the army in East-Anglia swore union with him; that they would all that he would, and would protect all that he protected, either by sea or land. And the army that belonged to Cambridge chose him separately for their lord and protector, and confirmed the same with oaths, as he had advised. This year King Edward (43) repaired the town of Gladmouth; and the same year King Sihtric slew Neil his brother.

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Pottersbury, Northamptonshire

Wakefield Lodge Pottersbury, Northamptonshire

On 26 Mar 1863 Henry Fitzroy 5th Duke Grafton 1790-1863 (73) died at Wakefield Lodge Pottersbury. His son William Henry Fitzroy 6th Duke Grafton 1819-1882 (43) succeeded 6th Duke Grafton 1C 1675, 6th Earl Euston, 6th Viscount Ipswich, 6th Baron Sudbury, 7th Earl Arlington, 7th Viscount Thetford, 7th Baron Arlington of Arlington in Middlesex 1C 1665 and 7th Baron Arlington of Arlington in Middlesex 1C 1672. Marie Anne Louise Baring Duchess Grafton 1833-1928 (30) by marriage Duchess Grafton.

Rushden, Northamptonshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Rushton, Northamptonshire

On 11 Aug 1604 Anne Cockayne 1604-1668 was born to William Cockayne 1561-1626 (43) and Mary Morris Countess Dover 1565-1648 (39) in Rushton.

On 25 May 1668 Anne Cockayne 1604-1668 (63) died in Rushton.

All Saints Church Rushton, Northamptonshire

On 16 Mar 1559 Thomas Tresham 1500-1559 (59) was buried at All Saints Church Rushton.

Rushton Hall Rushton, Northamptonshire

In 1439 William Tresham -1450 bought at Rushton Hall Rushton.

St Peter's Church Rushton, Northamptonshire

On 19 Jun 1661 Charles Cockayne 1st Viscount Cullen 1602-1661 (58) died. He was buried at St Peter's Church Rushton. His son Brien Cockayne 2nd Viscount Cullen 1631-1687 (29) succeeded 2nd Viscount Cullen.

In Jun 1687 Brien Cockayne 2nd Viscount Cullen 1631-1687 (55) died. He was buried at St Peter's Church Rushton. His son Charles Cockayne 3rd Viscount Cullen 1658-1688 (28) succeeded 3rd Viscount Cullen.

Salcey Lawn, Northamptonshire

Selcey Forest, Northamptonshire

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 12 Dec 1461. Westminster Palace. Grant for life to Richard Wydevill (56), lord of Ryvers, of the office of chief rider of the king's forest of Saucy. co Northampton, with all trees and profits, viz dry trees, dead trees, blown down, old hedges or copice-hedges, boughs fallen without date, cahettels, waifs, strays, pannage of swine, 'derefall wode', 'draenes' brushwood and brambles, prerquisites of courts, swainmote and other issues within the forest, from the time when he had he same by letters patent of Henry VI.

Sibbertoft, Northamptonshire

In 1519 Laurence Saunders Martyr 1519-1555 was born to Thomas Saunders -1528 and Margaret Cave 1465-1538 (54) at Sibbertoft.

After 1544 Mary Ferrers 1487-1544 died at Sibbertoft.

Southwick, Northamptonshire

Spatton, Northamptonshire

Around 1609 Amphilis Twigden 1609-1654 was born to John Twigden 1570-1611 (39) and Anne Dickens 1582-1637 (27) at Spatton.

Stoke Albany, Northamptonshire

Around 1370 William Ros 6th Baron Ros Helmsley 1370-1414 was born to Thomas Ros 4th Baron Ros Helmsley 1335-1384 (34) and Beatrice Stafford Countess Desmond 1341-1415 (29) at Stoke Albany. He a great x 3 grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Stoke Brunerne, Northamptonshire

Around 1252 Eva Chaworth 1252-1300 was born at Stoke Brunerne.

Stoke Doyle, Northamptonshire

Stowe, Northamptonshire

On 09 Jun 1360 Gerard Lisle 1st Baron Lisle 1304-1360 (56) died at Stowe. His son Warin Lisle 2nd Baron Lisle 1330-1382 (30) succeeded 2nd Baron Lisle of Kingston Lisle in Oxfordshire 3C 1357. Margaret Pipard Baroness Lisle 1323-1375 (37) by marriage Baroness Lisle of Kingston Lisle in Oxfordshire.

Stowe Nine Churches, Northamptonshire

Sulby, Northamptonshire

In 1398 Ralph Hastings 1340-1398 (58) died at York Castle York. He was buried at Sulby.

Sulgrave, Northamptonshire

On 31 Jul 1621 Mary Washington 1555-1621 (66) died at Sulgrave.

Church of St James the Less Sulgrave, Northamptonshire

In 1619 Robert Washington 1544-1619 (75) died at Nether Boddington. He was buried at Church of St James the Less Sulgrave.

Sulgrave Manor Sulgrave, Northamptonshire

In 1544 Robert Washington 1544-1619 was born to Lawrence Washington 1500-1583 (44) at Sulgrave Manor Sulgrave.

On 19 Feb 1583 Lawrence Washington 1500-1583 (83) died at Sulgrave Manor Sulgrave.

Sutton, Northamptonshire

On 23 Jan 1260 Stephen Longespée 1216-1260 (44) died at Sutton.

Syresham, Northamptonshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Thenford, Northamptonshire

Around 1372 Katherine Pavenham 1372-1436 was born to Laurence Pavenham 1335-1399 (37) at Thenford.

On 10 Jul 1399 Laurence Pavenham 1335-1399 (64) died at Thenford.

Thrapston, Northamptonshire

Before 27 Sep 1287 John Lovell 1222-1287 died at Thrapston.

On 16 Mar 1652 Margaret Butler 1568-1652 (84) died at Thrapston.

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

The Rectory Aldwincle Thrapston, Northamptonshire

On or before 19 Jun 1608 Thomas Fuller Author 1608-1661 was born at The Rectory Aldwincle Thrapston. He was baptised 19 Jun 1608.

Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire

Around 1230 Maud Sydenham 1230-1288 was born to William Sydenham 1200-1233 (30) at Titchmarsh.

In 1289 John Lovell 2nd Baron Lovel 1289-1314 was born to John Lovell 1st Baron Lovel 1254-1311 (35) and Joan Ros Baroness Lovel 1260-1348 (29) at Titchmarsh.

Around 1310 Isabel Lovell 1310-1338 was born to John Lovell 2nd Baron Lovel 1289-1314 (21) and Maud Burnell Baroness Lovel 1290-1341 (20) at Titchmarsh.

In 1397 William Lovell 7th Baron Lovel 4th Baron Holand 1397-1455 was born to John Lovell 6th Baron Lovel 1375-1414 (22) at Titchmarsh.

On 01 Sep 1429 Eleanor Zouche Baroness Lovel 1365-1429 (64) died at Titchmarsh.

On 05 Aug 1466 Joan Beaumont Baroness Lovel 1435-1466 (31) died at Titchmarsh.

On 10 Feb 1474 Alice Deincourt Baroness Lovel Baroness Sudeley 1404-1474 (69) died at Titchmarsh. Her grandson Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (18) succeeded 7th Baron Deincourt 2C 1322, Baron Grey Rotherfield and the feudal baorny of Bedale.

In 1585 John Pickering 1585-1628 was born at Titchmarsh.

On 29 Jan 1628 John Pickering 1585-1628 (43) died at Titchmarsh.

Tixover, Northamptonshire

Towcester

Wakerley, Northamptonshire

On 04 Sep 1633 Richard Cecil 1570-1633 (62) died. He was buried at Wakerley.

Walton, Northamptonshire

On 31 Jan 1785 Henry Pelham Clinton 4th Duke Newcastle under Lyme 1785-1851 was born to Thomas Pelham Clinton 3rd Duke Newcastle under Lyme 1752-1795 (32) and Anna Maria Stanhope Countess Lincoln -1834 in Walton. He a great x 3 grandson of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Warkton, Northamptonshire

Watford Gap, Northamptonshire

Weedon, Northamptonshire

Watling Street 1f Towcester to High Cross. From Lactodorum Watling Street continues north-west through Weedon, Bannaventa, Watford Gap, Dunsmore Hill, Tripontium to Venonae.

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Weekley, Northamptonshire

On 21 Sep 1585 Edward Montagu 1st Baron Montagu 1563-1644 (22) and Elizabeth Jeffrey 1568-1611 (17) were married at Weekley.

On 24 Feb 1612 Edward Montagu 1st Baron Montagu 1563-1644 (49) and Frances Cotton 1578-1620 (34) were married at Weekley.

In 1616 Robert

Weldon, Northamptonshire

In 1135 Osmund Basset 1104-1135 (31) died at Weldon.

Welford, Northamptonshire

Church of St Mary the Virgin Welford, Northamptonshire

On 10 Nov 1709 Richard Hastings 1645-1714 (64) and Goodith Smith 1659-1731 (50) were married at Church of St Mary the Virgin Welford.

Around Oct 1714 Richard Hastings 1645-1714 (69) was buried at Church of St Mary the Virgin Welford.

West Farndon, Northamptonshire

The River Cherwell rises at Hellidon in Northamptonshire and travels broadly south passing through, or near, Charwelton, which gives the river its name, Woodford Halse, West Farndon, Cropredy Banbury, Twyford Wharf, Clifton, Somerton, Upper Heyford and Lower Heyford, Enslow, Shipton-on-Cherwell, Hampton Poyle and Islip after which it joins the River Thames south-west of Oxford

Whilton, Northamptonshire

Bannaventa, Whilton, Northamptonshire

Whiston, Northamptonshire

Around 1376 William Catesby 1376- was born to John Catesby 1352-1405 (24) at Whiston.

Around 1402 John Catesby 1402-1479 was born to John Catesby 1378-1437 (24) at Whiston.

Around 1406 Edmund Catesby 1406-1474 was born to John Catesby 1378-1437 (28) at Whiston.

Around 1433 John Catesby 1433-1486 was born to Edmund Catesby 1406-1474 (27) at Whiston.

Around 1458 Humphrey Catesby 1458-1504 was born to John Catesby 1433-1486 (25) at Whiston.

Around 1527 Dorothy Catesby 1527-1613 was born to Anthony Catesby of Whiston 1500-1544 (27) and Isabel Pigot -1550 at Whiston.

In 1528 Wilburga Catesby 1528-1558 was born to Anthony Catesby of Whiston 1500-1544 (28) and Isabel Pigot -1550 in Whiston.

Isabel Pigot -1550 was born to Thomas Pigot 1478-1518 at Whiston.

Wigsthorpe, Northamptonshire

On 21 May 1559 Edmund Quincy 1559-1628 was born to John Quincy 1528-1597 (31) in Wigsthorpe.

In 1602 Edmund "The Puritan" Quincy 1602-1636 was born to Edmund Quincy 1559-1628 (42) at Wigsthorpe.

Winwick Manor, Northamptonshire

In 1541 Thomas Andrew of Winwick Manor Sheriff of 1541-1594 was born.

Original Letters Illustrative of English History Second Series Volume III. Ellis notes that "the present narrative is from the Lansdowne MS. 51. art. 46. It is indorsed in Lord Burghley's hand, "8 Feb. 1586. The Manner of the Q. of Scotts death at Fodrynghay, wr. by Ro. Wy.

A Reporte of the manner of the execution of the Sc. Q. performed the viijth. of February, Anno 1586 [modern dating 1587] in the great hall at Fotheringhay, with relacion of speeches uttered and accions happening in the said execution, from the delivery of the said Sc. Q. to Mr Thomas Androwes Esquire Sherife of the County of Northampton unto the end of said execution..

THE READER shall now be presented with the Execution of the Queen of Scots (44) which was to the Court or three Statements of this Transaction were There was a Short one copies of which are Manuscripts Jul F vi foll 246 266 b and b Another a Copy of the Account of the Earl to the Lords of the Council dated on the day is MS Calig C ix fol 163 And there is a Office somewhat longer said to have been drawn evidently one of her servants present Narrative is from the Lansdowne MS in Lord Burghley s hand 8 Feb 1586 of Scotts death at Fodrynghay wr by Ro Wy Queen s death have been dressed up from writers but it is here given accurate and entire.

First, the said Scottish Queen, being carried by two of Sir Amias Paulett's (54) gentlemen, and the Sheriff (46) going before her, came most willingly out of her chamber into an entry next the Hall, at which place the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), commissioners for the execution, with the two governors of her person, and divers knights and gentlemen did meet her, where they found one of the Scottish Queen's servants, named Melvin [NOTE. Possibly Andrew Melville of Garvock Steward], kneeling on his knees, who uttered these words with tears to the Queen of Scots (44), his mistress, "Madam, it will be the sorrowfullest message that ever I carried, when I shall report that my Queen (44) and dear mistress is dead." Then the Queen of Scots, shedding tears, answered him, "You ought to rejoice rather than weep for that the end of Mary Stuart's (44) troubles is now come. Thou knowest, Melvin, that all this world is but vanity, and full of troubles and sorrows; carry this message from me, and tell my friends that I die a true woman to my religion, and like a true Scottish woman and a true Frenchwoman. But God forgive them that have long desired my end; and He that is the true Judge of all secret thoughts knoweth my mind, how that it ever hath been my desire to have Scotland and England united together. Commend me to my son, and tell him that I have not done anything that may prejudice his kingdom of Scotland; and so, good Melvin, farewell;" and kissing him, she bade him pray for her.

Then she turned to the Lords and told them that she had certain requests to make unto them. One was for a sum of money, which she said Sir Amyas Paulet (54) knew of, to be paid to one Curle her servant; next, that all her poor servants might enjoy that quietly which by her Will and Testament she had given unto them; and lastly, that they might be all well entreated, and sent home safely and honestly into their countries. "And this I do conjure you, my Lords, to do.".

Answer was made by Sir Amyas Paulet (54), "I do well remember the money your Grace speaketh of, and your Grace need not to make any doubt of the not performance of your requests, for I do surely think they shall be granted.".

"I have," said she, "one other request to make unto you, my Lords, that you will suffer my poor servants to be present about me, at my death, that they may report when they come into their countries how I died a true woman to my religion.".

Then the Earl of Kent (46), one of the commissioners, answered, "Madam, it cannot well be granted, for that it is feared lest some of them would with speeches both trouble and grieve your Grace, and disquiet the company, of which we have had already some experience, or seek to wipe their napkins in some of your blood, which were not convenient." "My Lord," said the Queen of Scots, "I will give my word and promise for them that they shall not do any such thing as your Lordship has named. Alas! poor souls, it would do them good to bid me farewell. And I hope your Mistress (53), being a maiden Queen, in regard of womanhood, will suffer me to have some of my own people about me at my death. And I know she hath not given you so straight a commission, but that you may grant me more than this, if I were a far meaner woman than I am." And then (seeming to be grieved) with some tears uttered these words: "You know that I am cousin to your Queen (53) [NOTE. They were first-cousin once-removed], and descended from the blood of Henry the Seventh [NOTE. She was a Great Granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509], a married Queen of France [NOTE. She had married Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560 (43)], and the anointed Queen of Scotland.".

Whereupon, after some consultation, they granted that she might have some of her servants according to her Grace's request, and therefore desired her to make choice of half-a-dozen of her men and women: who presently said that of her men she would have Melvin, her apothecary, her surgeon, and one other old man beside; and of her women, those two that did use to lie in her chamber.

After this, she being supported by Sir Amias's (54) two gentlemen aforesaid, and Melvin carrying up her train, and also accompanied with the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen aforenamed, the Sheriff (46) going before her, she passed out of the entry into the Great Hall, with her countenance careless, importing thereby rather mirth than mournful cheer, and so she willingly stepped up to the scaffold which was prepared for her in the Hall, being two feet high and twelve feet broad, with rails round about, hung and covered with black, with a low stool, long cushion, and block, covered with black also. Then, having the stool brought her, she sat her down; by her, on the right hand, sat the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), and on the left hand stood the Sheriff (46), and before her the two executioners; round about the rails stood Knights, Gentlemen, and others.

Then, silence being made, the Queen's Majesty's Commission for the execution of the Queen of Scots (44) was openly read by Mr. Beale, clerk of the Council (46); and these words pronounced by the Assembly, "God save the Queen." During the reading of which Commission the Queen of Scots (44) was silent, listening unto it with as small regard as if it had not concerned her at all; and with as cheerful a countenance as if it had been a pardon from her Majesty (53) for her life; using as much strangeness in word and deed as if she had never known any of the Assembly, or had been ignorant of the English language.

Then one Doctor Fletcher, Dean of Peterborough (42), standing directly before her, without the rail, bending his body with great reverence, began to utter this exhortation following: "Madam, the Queen's most excellent Majesty," &c, and iterating these words three or four times, she told him, "Mr. Dean (42), I am settled in the ancient Catholic Roman religion, and mind to spend my blood in defence of it." Then Mr. Dean (42) said: "Madam, change your opinion, and repent you of your former wickedness, and settle your faith only in Jesus Christ, by Him to be saved." Then she answered again and again, "Mr. Dean (42), trouble not yourself any more, for I am settled and resolved in this my religion, and am purposed therein to die." Then the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), perceiving her (44) so obstinate, told her that since she would not hear the exhortation begun by Mr. Dean (42), "We will pray for your Grace, that it stand with God's will you may have your heart lightened, even at the last hour, with the true knowledge of God, and so die therein." Then she answered, "If you will pray for me, my Lords, I will thank you; but to join in prayer with you I will not, for that you and I are not of one religion.".

Then the Lords called for Mr. Dean (42), who, kneeling on the scaffold stairs, began this prayer, "O most gracious God and merciful Father," &c, all the Assembly, saving the Queen of Scots (44) and her servants, saying after him. During the saying of which prayer, the Queen of Scots (44), sitting upon a stool, having about her neck an Agnus Dei, in her hand a crucifix, at her girdle a pair of beads with a golden cross at the end of them, a Latin book in her hand, began with tears and with loud and fast voice to pray in Latin; and in the midst of her prayers she slided off from her stool, and kneeling, said divers Latin prayers; and after the end of Mr. Dean's (42) prayer, she kneeling, prayed in English to this effect: "For Christ His afflicted Church, and for an end of their troubles; for her son; and for the Queen's Majesty (53), that she might prosper and serve God aright." She confessed that she hoped to be saved "by and in the blood of Christ, at the foot of whose Crucifix she would shed her blood." Then said the Earl of Kent (46), "Madam, settle Christ Jesus in your heart, and leave those trumperies." Then she little regarding, or nothing at all, his good counsel, went forward with her prayers, desiring that "God would avert His wrath from this Island, and that He would give her grief and forgiveness for her sins." These, with other prayers she made in English, saying she forgave her enemies with all her heart that had long sought her blood, and desired God to convert them to the truth; and in the end of the prayer she desired all saints to make intercession for her to Jesus Christ, and so kissing the crucifix, and crossing of her also, said these words: "Even as Thy arms, O Jesus, were spread here upon the Cross, so receive me into Thy arms of mercy, and forgive me all my sins.".

Her (44) prayer being ended, the executioners, kneeling, desired her Grace to forgive them her death; who answered, "I forgive you with all my heart, for now, I hope, you shall make an end of all my troubles." Then they, with her two women, helping of her up, began to disrobe her of her apparel; she never changed her countenance, but with smiling cheer she uttered these words, "that she never had such grooms to make her unready, and that she never put off her clothes before such a company.".

Then she, being stripped of all her apparel saving her petticoat and kirtle, her two women beholding her made great lamentation, and crying and crossing themselves prayed in Latin; she, turning herself to them, embracing them, said these words in French, "Ne criez vous; j'ay promis pour vous;" and so crossing and kissing them, bade them pray for her, and rejoice and not weep, for that now they should see an end of all their mistress's (44) troubles. Then she, with a smiling countenance, turning to her men servants, as Melvin and the rest, standing upon a bench nigh the scaffold, who sometime weeping, sometime crying out aloud, and continually crossing themselves, prayed in Latin, crossing them with her hand bade them farewell; and wishing them to pray for her even until the last hour.

This done, one of the women having a Corpus Christi cloth lapped up three-corner ways, kissing it, put it over the Queen of Scots' (44) face, and pinned it fast to the caul of her head. Then the two women departed from her, and she kneeling down upon the cushion most resolutely, and without any token or fear of death, she spake aloud this Psalm in Latin, "In te, Domine, confido, non confundar in eternum," &c. [Ps. xxv.]. Then, groping for the block, she laid down her head, Putting her chin over the block with both her hands, which holding there, still had been cut off, had they not been espied. Then lying upon the block most quietly, and stretching out her arms, cried, "In manus tuas, Domine," &c, three or four times. Then she lying very still on the block, one of the executioners holding of her slightly with one of his hands, she endured two strokes of the other executioner with an axe, she making very small noise or none at all, and not stirring any part of her from the place where she lay; and so the executioner cut off her head, saving one little grisle, which being cut asunder, he lifted up her head to the view of all the assembly, and bade "God save the Queen." Then her dressing of lawn falling off from her head, it appeared as grey as one of threescore and ten years old, polled very short, her face in a moment being so much altered from the form she had when she was alive, as few could remember her by her dead face. Her lips stirred up and down a quarter of an hour after her head was cut off.

Then Mr. Dean (42) said with a loud voice, "So perish all the Queen's enemies;" and afterwards the Earl of Kent (46) came to the dead body, and standing over it, with a loud voice said, "Such end of all the Queen's and the Gospel's enemies.".

Then one of the executioners pulling off her (44) garters, espied her little dog which was crept under her clothes, which could not be gotten forth but by force, yet afterward would not depart from the dead corpse, but came and lay between her head and her shoulders, which being imbrued with her blood, was carried away and washed, as all things else were that had any blood was either burned or clean washed; and the executioners sent away with money for their fees, not having any one thing that belonged unto her. And so, every man being commanded out of the Hall, except the Sheriff (46) and his men, she was carried by them up into a great chamber lying ready for the surgeons to embalm her.

Around 1559 François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. In 1576. After Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. Around 1575. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of George Seton 5th Lord Seton -1513. Wearing the clothes he wore at the wedding of Mary Queen of Scots and the French Dauphin on 24 Apr 1558. In 1582 Unknown Painter. Portrait of George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590. Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1560 François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560. 1572. After François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560.

On 23 May 1594 Thomas Andrew of Winwick Manor Sheriff of 1541-1594 (53) died at Winwick Manor.

Wollaston, Northamptonshire

In 1426 Benedicta Babington 1368-1426 (58) died at Wollaston.

Woodford Halse, Northamptonshire

The River Cherwell rises at Hellidon in Northamptonshire and travels broadly south passing through, or near, Charwelton, which gives the river its name, Woodford Halse, West Farndon, Cropredy Banbury, Twyford Wharf, Clifton, Somerton, Upper Heyford and Lower Heyford, Enslow, Shipton-on-Cherwell, Hampton Poyle and Islip after which it joins the River Thames south-west of Oxford

Woodford, Northamptonshire

On 22 Aug 1759 Andrew St John 14th Baron St John Bletso 1759-1817 was born to John St John 12th Baron St John Bletso 1725-1767 (33) at Woodford.