History of Northumberland

634 Battle of Heavenfield

680 Synod of Heathfield

1388 Battle of Otterburn

1402 Battle of Homildon Hill

1464 Battle of Hedgeley Moor

1464 Battle of Hexham

1464 Suppressing the Northumbrian Resistance

1513 Battle of Flodden

1640 Battle of Newburn

1664 Suppressing the Lancastrian Northern Resistance

Northumberland is in North.

Allendale Town, Northumberland

The River East Allen rises near Allenheads from where it flows past Ropehaugh, Spartylea, Sinderhope, Allendale Town, Catton to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River West Allen to form the River Allen.

Allenheads, Northumberland

The River East Allen rises near Allenheads from where it flows past Ropehaugh, Spartylea, Sinderhope, Allendale Town, Catton to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River West Allen to form the River Allen.

Alnham, Northumberland

The River Aln rises near Alnham from where it flows past Whittingham, Bolton, Hulne Priory then passing around Alnwick Castle before passing Lesbury then at Alnwick it joins the North Sea.

Alnwick

Alwinton

Amble, Northumberland

Barrasford, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Barrow Burn, Northumberland

Bavington, Northumberland

In 1170 John Babington 1170-1220 was born at Bavington.

Around 1220 John Babington 1170-1220 (50) died at Bavington.

In 1245 William Babington 1245-1271 was born to Robert Babington 1220-1248 (25) at Bavington.

Around 1248 Robert Babington 1220-1248 (28) died at Bavington.

Around 1267 Bernard Babington 1267-1303 was born to William Babington 1245-1271 (22) at Bavington.

In 1271 William Babington 1245-1271 (26) died at Bavington.

In 1303 Bernard Babington 1267-1303 (36) died at Bavington.

Bamburgh, Northumberland

In 1849 John Charlton 1849-1917 was born to Samuel Charlton at Bamburgh.

Beadnell, Northumberland

Beadnell Hall, Northumberland

On 24 Jun 1908 Mary Joanna Hincks 1836-1908 (72) died at Beadnell Hall.

Bearsbridge, Northumberland

The River West Allen rises near Coldcleugh from where it flows past Carrshield, Ninebanks, Bearsbridge to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River East Allen to form the River Allen.

Bedlington, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Bellingham, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Belsay, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Berrington, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Berwick on Tweed

Blanchland, Northumberland

Blanchland Abbey, Northumberland

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 18 How the king of England made his first journey against the Scots. And thus they continued day by day the space of eight days, abiding every day the returning again of the Scots, who knew no more where the English host lay than they knew where they were; so each of them were ignorant of other. Thus three days and three nights they were in manner without bread, wine, candle or light, fodder or forage, or any manner of purveyance, either for horse or man: and after the space of four days a loaf of bread was sold for sixpence the which was worth but a penny, and a gallon of wine for six groats that was worth but sixpence. And yet for all that, there was such rage of famine that each took victuals out of other's hands, whereby there rose divers battles and strifes between sundry companions; and yet beside all these mischiefs it never ceased to rain all the whole week, whereby their saddles, panels and countersingles were all rotten and broken, and most part of their horses hurt on their backs: nor they had not wherewith to shoe them that were unshod, nor they had nothing to cover themselves withal from the rain and cold but green bushes and their armour, nor they had nothing to make fire withal but green boughs, the which would not burn because of the rain. In this great mischief they were all the week without hearing of any word of the Scots, upon trust they should repass again into their own countries the same way or near thereabout; whereby great noise and murmur began to rise in the host, for some said and laid it to others' charge that by their counsel the king and all they were brought into that danger, and that they had done it to betray the king and all his host. Wherefore it was ordained by the king and by his council that the next morning they should remove the host and repass again the river about seven mile thence, whereas they might pass more at their ease. Then it was cried throughout the host that every man should be ready apparelled to remove the next day betimes.: also there was a cry made that whosoever could bring to the king certain knowledge where the Scots were, he that brought first tidings thereof should have for his labour a hundred pounds [of] land to him and to his heirs for ever, and to be made a knight of the king's hand.

When this cry was made in the host, divers English knights and squires to the number of fifteen or sixteen, for covetise of winning of this promise, they passed the river in great peril and rode forth through the mountains, and departed each one from other, taking their adventure. The next morning the host dislodged and rode fair and easily all the day, for they were but evil apparelled, and did so much that they day till it was noon, and then they found some villages brent by the Scots, and thereabout was some champaign country with corn and meadows, and so that night the host lodged there. Again the third day they rode forth, so that the most part of the host wist not which way, for they knew not the country nor they could hear no tidings of the Scots. And again the fourth day they rode forth in like manner, till it was about the hour of three, [Note. Translation error. Should 9am] and there came a squire fast riding toward the king and said: 'An it like your grace, I have brought you perfect tidings of the Scots your enemies. Surely they be within three mile of you, lodged on a great mountain, abiding there for you; and there they have been all this eight days, nor they knew no more tidings of you than ye did of them. Sir, this that I skew you is of truth, for I approached so near to them that I was taken prisoner and brought before the lords of their host; and there I skewed them tidings of you, and how that ye seek for them to the intent to have battle. And the lords did quit me my ransom and prison, when I had skewed them how your grace had promised a hundred pounds sterling of rent to him that brought first tidings of them to you; and they made me to promise that I should not rest till I had skewed you this tidings, for they said they had as great desire to fight with you as ye had with them: and there shall ye find them without fault' And as soon as the king had heard this tidings, he assembled all his host in a fair meadow to pasture their horses; and beside there was a little abbey, the which was all brent, called in the days of king Arthur le Blanche Lande. There the king confessed him, and every man made him ready. The king caused many masses to be sung to housed all such as had devotion thereto; and incontinent he assigned a hundred pounds sterling of rent to the squire that had brought him tidings of the Scots, according to his promise, and made him knight [with] his own hands' before all the host.

Blaydon, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Blindburn, Northumberland

Blyth, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Bolton, Northumberland

The River Aln rises near Alnham from where it flows past Whittingham, Bolton, Hulne Priory then passing around Alnwick Castle before passing Lesbury then at Alnwick it joins the North Sea.

Bothal, Northumberland

On 07 Nov 1468 Ralph Ogle 3rd Baron Ogle 1468-1513 was born to Owen Ogle 2nd Baron Ogle 1440-1486 (28) in Bothal.

On 04 Apr 1617 Charles Cavendish 1553-1617 (63) died. On 18 Apr 1629 Catherine Ogle 8th Baroness Ogle 1570-1629 (59) died at Bothal. Monument to Charles Cavendish 1553-1617 (63) and Catherine Ogle 8th Baroness Ogle 1570-1629 (47) in Church of St Mary and St Laurence Bolsover. Jacobean Period. Bongrace. Rush Mat.

St Andrew's Church Bothal, Northumberland

St Andrew's Church Bothal. Lady Isabella de Vexi (1314) Ralph Lord Ogle (1513) & Lady Margaret Gascoigne. Alabaster. Bothal. Ray State. 1513. May be the same as Alnwick.

On 16 Jan 1513 Ralph Ogle 3rd Baron Ogle 1468-1513 (44) died in Morpeth. He was buried in St Andrew's Church Bothal. Robert Ogle 4th Baron Ogle 1490-1530 (23) succeeded 4th Baron Ogle.

Bradford, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Branxton, Northumberland

Site of the Battle of Flodden, Branxton, Northumberland

On 09 Sep 1513 at the Battle of Flodden was fought at the Branxton__Northumberland. the English army was commanded by Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (70), Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (40), Edmund Howard 1478-1539 (35), Thomas Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1467-1525 (45), Edward Stanley 1st Baron Monteagle 1462-1524 (51) and Marmaduke Constable 1457-1518 (56).

The English army included: Henry "Shepherd Lord" Clifford 10th Baron Clifford 1454-1523 (59), William Conyers 1st Baron Conyers 1468-1524 (44), Thomas Berkeley 5th Baron Berkeley 1472-1533 (41) and Richard Neville 2nd Baron Latimer of Snape 1468-1530 (45).

Randall Babington -1513, John Bigod 1475-1513 (38) and Thomas Fitzwilliam 1474-1513 (39) were killed.

Marmaduke Constable 1480-1545 (33), William Constable 1475-1551 (38), George Darcy 1st Baron Darcy Aston 1497-1558 (16), Edmund Walsingham 1480-1550 (33), Thomas Burgh 7th Baron Cobham Sternborough 5th Baron Strabolgi 1st Baron Burgh 1488-1550 (25) and Walter Stonor 1477-1551 (36) were knighted by Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (40).

Christopher Savage -1513, Thomas Venables 1469-1513 (44) and Brian Tunstall 1480-1513 (33) were killed.

Bryan Stapleton of Wighill 1458-1513 (55) was killed. (Some reports have him dying in 1518).

John Booth 1435-1513 (78) was killed.

The Scottish army suffered heavy casualties.

James IV King Scotland 1473-1513 (40) was killed. King James V of Scotland 1512-1542 (1) succeeded V King Scotland: Stewart.

Alexander Stewart Archbishop St Andrews 1493-1513 (20) was killed.

David Kennedy 1st Earl Cassilis 1470-1513 (43) was killed. Gilbert Kennedy 2nd Earl Cassilis 1494-1527 (18) succeeded 2nd Earl Cassilis. Isabel Campbell Countess Cassilis by marriage Countess Cassilis.

William Sinclair 2nd Earl Caithness 1459-1513 (54) was killed. John Sinclair 3rd Earl Caithness -1529 succeeded 3rd Earl Caithness.

Matthew Stewart 2nd Earl Lennox -1513 was killed. John Stewart 3rd Earl Lennox 1490-1526 (23) succeeded 3rd Earl Lennox 2C 1488.

William Hay 4th Earl Erroll -1513 was killed. William Hay 5th Earl Erroll 1495-1522 (18) succeeded 5th Earl Erroll.

John Douglas 2nd Earl Morton -1513 was killed. James Douglas 3rd Earl Morton -1553 succeeded 3rd Earl Morton, 6th Lord Dalkeith.

Adam Hepburn 2nd Earl Bothwell -1513 was killed. Patrick Hepburn 3rd Earl Bothwell 1512-1556 (1) succeeded 3rd Earl Bothwell.

Alexander Stewart 4th of Garlies 1481-1513 (32) was killed. Alexander Stewart 5th of Garlies 1507-1581 (6) succeeded 5th Lord Garlies.

Alexander Elphinstone 1st Lord Elphinstone -1513 was killed. Alexander Elphinstone 2nd Lord Elphinstone 1510-1547 (3) succeeded 2nd Lord Elphinstone.

Thomas Hay -1513, George Hepburn Bishop Isles 1454-1513 (59), Adam Hepburn Master 1457-1513 (56), Thomas "Younger of Cushnie" Lumsden -1513,.

William Douglas 6th Lord Drumlanrig -1513 was killed. William "Younger" Douglas 7th Lord Drumlanrig -1572 succeeded 7th Lord Drumlanrig.

George Seton 5th Lord Seton -1513 was killed. George Seton 6th Lord Seton -1549 succeeded 6th Lord Seton.

John Hay 2nd Lord Hay of Yester -1513 was killed. John Hay 3rd Lord Hay 1490-1543 (23) succeeded 3rd Lord Hay of Yester. Elizabeth Douglas Lady Hay by marriage Lord Hay of Yester.

Robert Keith Master of Marischal 1483-1525 (30), Guiscard Harbottle 1485-1513 (28), John Erskine -1513, David Home 1491-1513 (22), Andrew Stewart 1st Lord Avondale 1470-1513 (43), Archibald Campbell 2nd Earl Argyll 1449-1513 (64), Robert Douglas of Lochleven 1424-1513 (89) were killed.

Henry Sinclair 3rd Lord Sinclair 1465-1513 (48) was killed. William Sinclair 4th Lord Sinclair -1570 succeeded 4th Lord Sinclair.

James Stewart 1st Lord of Traquair 1480-1513 (33) was killed. William Stewart 2nd Lord Traquair 1506-1548 (7) succeeded 2nd Lord Traquair.

John Maxwell 4th Lord Maxwell 1456-1513 (57) was killed. Robert Maxwell 5th Lord Maxwell 1493-1552 (20) succeeded 5th Lord Maxwell.

William Murray 1470-1513 (43), Colin Oliphant 1487-1513 (26), William Ruthven 1480-1513 (33), George Douglas 1469-1513 (44) and William Douglas 1471-1513 (42) were killed.

George Home 4th Lord Home -1549 and John Stewart 2nd Earl Atholl 1475-1522 (38) fought.

Brothers David Lyon of Cossins -1513, William Lyon -1513 and George Lyon -1513 were killed.

William Graham 1st Earl Montrose 1464-1513 (49) was killed. William Graham 2nd Earl Montrose 1492-1571 (21) succeeded 2nd Earl Montrose.

Robert Erskine 4th Lord Erskine 16th Earl Mar -1513 was killed. John Erskine 17th Earl Mar 1487-1555 (26) de jure 17th Earl Mar 1C 1404, Lord Erskine.

Thomas Stewart 2nd Lord Innermeath 1461-1513 (52) was killed. Richard Stewart 3rd Lord Innermeath 1504-1532 succeeded 3rd Lord Innermeath.

Walter Lindsay of Arden -1513 and Walter Lindsay 1480-1513 (33) were killed.

William Keith of Inverugie 1470-1513 (43) was killed.

David Wemyss of Wemyss 1473-1513 (40) was killed.

John Somerville 1st of Cambusnethan 1458-1513 (55) was killed.

Robert Crichton 2nd Lord Crichton of Sanquhar 1472-1513 (41) was killed. Robert Crichton 3rd Lord Crichton of Sanquhar 1491-1520 (22) succeeded 3rd Lord Crichton of Sanquhar

Around 1535 Corneille de Lyon Painter 1520-1575. Portrait of King James V of Scotland 1512-1542. Around 1536 Corneille de Lyon Painter 1520-1575. Portrait of King James V of Scotland 1512-1542. Around 1575. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of George Seton 5th Lord Seton -1513. Wearing the clothes he wore at the wedding of Mary Queen of Scots and the French Dauphin on 24 Apr 1558.

Brinkburn Priory, Northumberland

Around 1135 Brinkburn Priory was founded as an Augustinian priory by William Bertram, Baron of Mitford.

Around 1180 Brinkburn Priory became an independent house, and the building of the monastic church was commenced.

After 29 Nov 1483 Bishop William Dudley 1425-1483 was buried at Brinkburn Priory. His gravestone was found during reconstruction work in the 19th Century.

In 1536 Brinkburn Priory was dissolved falling into the category of those with an income of less than £200 each year; in 1535 the priory's value had been recorded as £69. After the dissolution the estate was mainly owned by the Fenwick family.

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Bywell, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Cambois, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Carrshield, Northumberland

The River West Allen rises near Coldcleugh from where it flows past Carrshield, Ninebanks, Bearsbridge to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River East Allen to form the River Allen.

Carter Bar Boundary Marker, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Catcleugh, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Catton, Northumberland

The River East Allen rises near Allenheads from where it flows past Ropehaugh, Spartylea, Sinderhope, Allendale Town, Catton to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River West Allen to form the River Allen.

Chew Green, Northumberland

Chollerton, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Clara Vale, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Cockle Park, Northumberland

On 20 Nov 1597 Cuthbert Ogle 7th Baron Ogle 1540-1597 (57) died at Cockle Park. Baron Ogle abeyant between his two daughters Joane Ogle Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford 1566-1626 (31) and Catherine Ogle 8th Baroness Ogle 1570-1629 (27).

Coldcleugh, Northumberland

The River West Allen rises near Coldcleugh from where it flows past Carrshield, Ninebanks, Bearsbridge to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River East Allen to form the River Allen.

Corbridge, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Cornhill on Tweed, Northumberland

On 04 Aug 1804 Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804 (73) died suddenty at an inn Cornhill on Tweed on his way to Edinburgh.

1798 John Singleton Copley Painter 1738-1815. Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804. Before 1804 John Singleton Copley Painter 1738-1815. Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804. Around 1798 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804. Around 1800 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804.

Cottonshopeburnfoot, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Craster, Northumberland

In 1906 a plaque was placed on Craster Harbour recognising the contribution made in its construction by Captain John Charles Pulleine Craster 1871-1904 (34).

Cupola Bridge, Northumberland

Cupola Bridge is a stone bridge over the River Allen with three segmental arches, the central taller, with arch rings and double keystones, round-ended cutwaters topped by band.

The River West Allen rises near Coldcleugh from where it flows past Carrshield, Ninebanks, Bearsbridge to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River East Allen to form the River Allen.

The River East Allen rises near Allenheads from where it flows past Ropehaugh, Spartylea, Sinderhope, Allendale Town, Catton to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River West Allen to form the River Allen.

Dunstanburgh Castle, Northumberland

Dunstanburgh Castle.

Chronicle of Gregory 1464. Around Jul 1464. Alle so the same somer my Lorde of Warwycke (35) and hys brether the Lorde Mountegewe (33), that was made Erle of Northehumberlond by the kynge, they ij layde a sege unto the castelle of Anwyke a gate hyt by a-poyntement. And in the same wyse and forme they gate the castelle of Dunsterborowe by the same mene. And thenne they layd sege to the castelle of Bamborowe, and layde grete ordynans and gonnys [Note. guns] there too. And manly they gate hyt by fors, and toke there yn that fals traytur Syr Raffe Gray (32), and brought hym unto the kynge to the castelle of Pomfrete. And fro thens he was ladde to Dankester, and there hys hedde was smete of and sent to London, and hyt was sette a-pon Londyn Bryge.

Chronicle of Gregory 1462. Thys yere Quene Margarete com owt of Frauns with lij schyppys, with Freynysche men and sum Engelysche men in the schyppys. And they londyd in Northe Humberlonde, hyt was vij dayes be-fore Alle Halwyn tyde. And there sche toke the castelle of Anwyke and put hyt fulle of Fraynyschemen. And thenn she retornyd in to Schotlonde by water. And there rosse suche a tempaste uppon hyr that she for soke hyr schippe, and a schapyd with the bote of [t]e schyppe. And the schyppe was drownyd with moche of hyr stuffe and iij grete schippys moo. And iiij c and vj Fraynysche men were take in the chyrche of Hooly Ylond. Thenn Kyng Edward hyrde telle of thys, and made hym redy towarde the Northe with many lordys, gentellys, and comyns with hym. And there he layde a sege to Anwyke Castelle, and to the castelle of Bamborowe, and to Dunsterborowe. Bamborowe and Dunsterborowe was kepte by Syr Raffe Persy and Syr Harry Bewforde, late Duke of Somersett, and the castelle of Anwyke with the Lorde Hungerforde. And Bamborowe and Dunsterborowe were yoldyn be Syr Raffe Percy and Syr Harry Beuford, late Duke of Somersett, to the Kyngys wylle, whythe the condyscyons that the sayde Raffe Percy schulde have the kepynge of the ij castellys, Bamborowe and Dunstarborowe. The sayde Syr Raffe Percy and Syr Harry Beuforde, late Duke of Somersett, were sworne to be trewe and faythefulle as trewe lege men unto owre kynge and soverayne lorde Edwarde the iiijthe. And they com to Derham, and there they were sworne byfore owre kynge. And the kynge gaffe hem hys levery and grete rewardys. See 1664 Suppressing the Lancastrian Northern Resistance.

East Horton, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

East Woodburn, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Edlingham, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Elishaw, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Embleton, Northumberland

Church of the Holy Trinity Embleton, Northumberland

On 22 Jul 1772 John Craster 1669-1722 was buried at the Church of the Holy Trinity Embleton.

On 26 May 1871 Captain John Charles Pulleine Craster 1871-1904 was born to John Craster of Craster Tower 1823-1895 (47) and Charlotte Pulleine Roddam. He was baptised at Church of the Holy Trinity Embleton on 16 Jul 1871.

On 14 Dec 1895 Montagu Francis Finch Osborn 1824-1895 (71) died. He was buried at Church of the Holy Trinity Embleton.

Etal

Etal Chapel, Northumberland

In 1856 Augusta Boyle 1801-1876 (54) commissioned the building of Etal Chapel. It was consecrated for worship in 1859.

On 28 Jul 1876 Augusta Boyle 1801-1876 (74) died. She was buried at Etal Chapel. The remains of her husband Frederick Fitzclarence 1799-1854 (76), their daughter Augusta Fitzclarence 1824-1885 (51) were disinterred and buried next to her. Her son-in-law Captain Theodore Williams was subsequently buried at Etal Chapel.

Ewesley, Northumberland

The River Font rises near Ewesley from where it flows past Nunnykirk, Netherwitton, Newton Underwood to Mitford where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Fallodon, Northumberland

Fallodon Hall, Northumberland

On 10 Oct 1767 George Grey 1st Baronet 1767-1828 was born to Charles Grey 1st Earl Grey 1729-1807 (37) and Elizabeth Grey Countess Grey 1744-1822 (23) at Fallodon Hall.

On 09 Mar 1865 Alice Emma Grey 1865-1936 was born to Lieutenant Colonel George Henry Grey 1835-1874 (29) and Harriet Jane Pearson 1839-1905 (26) at Fallodon Hall.

On 14 Jul 1866 George Grey 1866-1911 was born to Lieutenant Colonel George Henry Grey 1835-1874 (31) and Harriet Jane Pearson 1839-1905 (27) at Fallodon Hall.

On 29 Oct 1868 Jane Grey 1868-1949 was born to Lieutenant Colonel George Henry Grey 1835-1874 (33) and Harriet Jane Pearson 1839-1905 (29) at Fallodon Hall.

On 10 Jun 1870 Alexander Harry Grey 1870-1914 was born to Lieutenant Colonel George Henry Grey 1835-1874 (35) and Harriet Jane Pearson 1839-1905 (31) at Fallodon Hall.

On 23 Aug 1873 Charles Grey 1873-1928 was born to Lieutenant Colonel George Henry Grey 1835-1874 (38) and Harriet Jane Pearson 1839-1905 (34) at Fallodon Hall.

Farne Islands, Northumberland

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 1 How Ethelwald successor to Cuthbert leading a hermit's life calmed a tempest by his prayers when the brethren were in danger at sea. [687 699 a.d.]. The venerable Ethelwald succeeded the man of God, Cuthbert, in the exercise of a solitary life, which he spent in the isle of Farne before he became a bishop. After he had received the priesthood, he consecrated his office by deeds worthy of that degree for many years in the monastery which is called Inhrypum. To the end that his merit and manner of life may be the more certainly made known, I will relate one miracle of his, which was told me by one of the brothers for and on whom the same was wrought; to wit, Guthfrid, the venerable servant and priest of Christ, who also, afterwards, as abbot, presided over the brethren of the same church of Lindisfarne, in which he was educated.

"I came," says he, "to the island of Farne, with two others of the brethren, desiring to speak with the most reverend father, Ethelwald. Having been refreshed with his discourse, and asked for his blessing, as we were returning home, behold on a sudden, when we were in the midst of the sea, the fair weather in which we were sailing, was broken, and there arose so great and terrible a tempest, that neither sails nor oars were of any use to us, nor had we anything to expect but death. After long struggling with the wind and waves to no effect, at last we looked back to see whether it was possible by any means at least to return to the island whence we came, but we found that we were on all sides alike cut off by the storm, and that there was no hope of escape by our own efforts. But looking further, we perceived, on the island of Farne, our father Ethelwald, beloved of God, come out of his retreat to watch our course; for, hearing the noise of the tempest and raging sea, he had come forth to see what would become of us. When he beheld us in distress and despair, he bowed his knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, in prayer for our life and safety; and as he finished his prayer, he calmed the swelling water, in such sort that the fierceness of the storm ceased on all sides, and fair winds attended us over a smooth sea to the very shore. When we had landed, and had pulled up our small vessel from the waves, the storm, which had ceased a short time for our sake, presently returned, and raged furiously during the whole day; so that it plainly appeared that the brief interval of calm had been granted by Heaven in answer to the prayers of the man of God, to the end that we might escape.".

The man of God remained in the isle of Farne twelve years, and died there; but was buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, in the isle of Lindisfarne, beside the bodies of the aforesaid bishops. These things happened in the days of King Aldfrid, who, after his brother Egfrid, ruled the nation of the Northumbrians for nineteen years.

Featherstone Bridge, Northumberland

1775. Featherstone Bridge is stone arch bridge completed in 1775.

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Featherstone Castle, Northumberland

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Felton, Northumberland

Ford, Northumberland

Ford Castle, Northumberland

Ford Castle is located at a ford across the River Till aka Breamish.

In 1338 William Heron was licensed to crenellate Ford Castle.

Before 09 Sep 1513 James IV King Scotland 1473-1513 based himself at Ford Castle before the Battle of Flodden.

In 1549 Ford Castle passed from the Heron family to the Carr family.

In 1906 James Joicey 1st Baron Joicey 1846-1936 (59) bought Ford Castle and its estates.

On 21 Nov 1936 James Joicey 1st Baron Joicey 1846-1936 (90) died at Ford Castle. He was buried at St Michael's and All Angels Church Ford. James Arthur Joicey 2nd Baron Joicey 1880-1940 (56) succeeded 2nd Baron Joicey of Chester le Street in County Durham and 2nd Baronet Joicey of Longhurst and Ulgham in Northumberland.

On 24 Jul 1940 James Arthur Joicey 2nd Baron Joicey 1880-1940 (60) died at Ford Castle. Hugh Edward Joicey 3rd Baron 1881-1966 (59) succeeded 3rd Baron Joicey of Chester le Street in County Durham and 3rd Baronet Joicey of Longhurst and Ulgham in Northumberland. Joan Katherine Lambton Baroness Joicey 1893-1967 (46) by marriage Baroness Joicey of Chester le Street in County Durham.

St Michael's and All Angels Church Ford, Northumberland

On 21 Nov 1936 James Joicey 1st Baron Joicey 1846-1936 (90) died at Ford Castle. He was buried at St Michael's and All Angels Church Ford. James Arthur Joicey 2nd Baron Joicey 1880-1940 (56) succeeded 2nd Baron Joicey of Chester le Street in County Durham and 2nd Baronet Joicey of Longhurst and Ulgham in Northumberland.

Gilsland

Glanton, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Hedgeley Moor, Glanton, Northumberland

On 25 Apr 1464 a Yorkist army commanded by John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 (33) defeated a Lancastrian army commanded by Henry Beaufort 2nd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) at Hedgeley Moor during the Battle of Hedgeley Moor.Hedgeley Moor

Of the Lancastrians ...

Thomas Ros 9th Baron Ros Helmsley 1427-1464 (36) was killed. Edmund Ros 10th Baron Ros Helmsley 1455-1508 (9) succeeded 10th Baron Ros Helmsley. Thomas' lands however, including Belvoir Castle was given by King Edward IV (21) to William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (33).

Ralph Percy 1425-1464 (39) was killed.

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Glendale, Northumberland

On 12 Mar 1344 Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (64) died at Glendale.

Great Whittingham, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Greystead, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Guidepost, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Guyzance, Northumberland

Haltwhistle, Northumberland

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Harbottle, Northumberland

Harbottle Castle, Northumberland

Between 1157 and 1174 Odinel Umfraville 1125-1182 (49) commissioned the building of Harbottle Castle. In 1174 it was captured by the Scots who lost it a year later after which it was rebuilt and improved.

In 1310 Robert the Bruce (35) captured Harbottle Castle.

In 1509 George Tailboys 9th Baron Kyme 1467-1538 (42) was Keeper of at Harbottle Castle.

In 1515 Harbottle Castle became the residence of Archibald Douglas 6th Earl Angus 1489-1557 (26) and Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (25) after they had been banished by John Stewart 2nd Duke Albany 1484-1536 (31).

Around 1525 Unknown Painter. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541.

On 08 Oct 1515 Margaret Douglas Countess Lennox 1515-1578 was born to Archibald Douglas 6th Earl Angus 1489-1557 (26) and Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (25) at Harbottle Castle. She a granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

In 1605 King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 (38) granted Harbottle Castle to George Home 1st Earl Dunbar 1556-1611 (49).

Around 1600 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 painted the portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. Around 1605 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 with Garter Collar and Leg Garter. In 1621 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter. Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. In 1583 Pieter Bronckhorst Painter -1583. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1623. Adam de Colone 1572-1651. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1580. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625.

2022. Photos of Harbottle Castle.

Hartburn, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

The Hart Burn rises near Harwood, Northumberland from where it flows past Hetherton House, Scots Gap, Hartburn to Meldon Park where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Harwood, Northumberland

Source of the Hart Burn, Harwood, Northumberland

The Hart Burn rises near Harwood, Northumberland from where it flows past Hetherton House, Scots Gap, Hartburn to Meldon Park where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Heaton Castle, Northumberland

On 18 Aug 1266 Thomas Grey 1266-1310 was born to John Grey 1230-1267 (36) at Heaton Castle.

Around 1280 Thomas Grey 1280-1344 was born to Thomas Grey 1266-1310 (13) at Heaton Castle.

Around 1328 Thomas Grey 1328-1369 was born to Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (48) and Agnes Bayles at Heaton Castle.

Hepple, Northumberland

Hexham, Northumberland

In 634 King Oswald of Northumberland 604-641 (30) won a decisive victory over the army of the Cadwallon ap Cadfan King Gwynedd -634 at the Battle of Heavenfield which was fought at Heavenfield Hexham around six miles north of Hexham.

St Oswald's Church Heavenfield Hexham is believed to mark the location where King Oswald of Northumberland 604-641 (30) raised his standard. The battle re-united Deira and Bernicia to form Northumbria and, according to Bede, restored Christianity to Northumbria.

Cadwallon ap Cadfan King Gwynedd -634 was killed.

In 1110 Aelred of Reivaulx Chronicler 1110-1167 was born in Hexham.

On 15 May 1464 a Yorkist army commanded by John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 (33) defeated a Lancastrian army commanded by Henry Beaufort 2nd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) at Hexham during the Battle of Hexham.

Those fighting for York included John Stafford 1st Earl Wiltshire 1427-1473 (36), John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (26) and Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (36).

Henry Beaufort 2nd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) was beheaded following the battle. Edmund Beaufort 3rd Duke Somerset 1439-1471 (25) succeeded 4th Duke Somerset 2C 1448. He Edmund is frequently referred as the 4th Duke. His father's (58) Dukedom was, however, a new creation.

Philip Wentworth 1424-1464 (40) was executed at Middleham.

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

St John's Lee Hexham, Northumberland

St John's Lee Hexham. Captain Simon William Richmond Mewburn (1916) Kia or Basra in Mesopotamia. His head rests on a saddle. Possibly McKennal.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 2 How Bishop John cured a dumb man by his blessing. [687 a.d.]. In the beginning of Aldfrid's reign, Bishop Eata died, and was succeeded in the bishopric of the church of Hagustald by the holy man John, of whom those that knew him well are wont to tell many miracles, and more particularly Berthun, a man worthy of all reverence and of undoubted truthfulness, and once his deacon, now abbot of the monastery called Inderauuda, that is, "In the wood of the Deiri": some of which miracles we have thought fit to hand on to posterity. There is a certain remote dwelling enclosed by a mound, among scattered trees, not far from the church of Hagustald, being about a mile and a half distant and separated from it by the River Tyne, having an oratory dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel, where the man of God used frequently, as occasion offered, and specially in Lent, to abide with a few companions and in quiet give himself to prayer and study. Having come hither once at the beginning of Lent to stay, he bade his followers find out some poor man labouring under any grievous infirmity, or want, whom they might keep with them during those days, to receive alms, for so he was always used to do.

Hetherton House, Northumberland

The Hart Burn rises near Harwood, Northumberland from where it flows past Hetherton House, Scots Gap, Hartburn to Meldon Park where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Holystone, Northumberland

Lady's Well, Holystone, Northumberland

Lady's Well was once a watering place beside a Roman Road from Bremenium in Redesdale to the coast. Reconstructed in 1788 when statue brought from Alnwick Castle erected in centre of tank. Statue moved to south of well in 19th Century and replaced with Ceeltic Cross. Statue fell over in the storms of Nov 2021. Possibly scene of mass conversions by Archbishop Paulinus of York -644 on Easter Day A.D. 627, more likely preaching place of St Ninian.

Homildon Hill, Northumberland

On 14 Sep 1402 Henry Percy 1st Earl of Northumberland 1341-1408 (60) and his son Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (38) lay in wait at Homildon Hill for the Scots to return from their laying waste to Northumberland. The Battle of Homildon Hill was a victory for the English forces whose longbowmen decimated the Scottish schiltrons. Henry Fitzhugh 3rd Baron Fitzhugh 1358-1425 (44) fought for the English.

John Swinton -1402 was killed.

Thomas Dunbar 2nd Earl Moray 1371-1422 (31) and Henry Sinclair 2nd Earl Orkney 1375-1420 (27) were captured.

Archibald Douglas 1st Duke Touraine 1372-1424 (30) was wounded. Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (35) forbade the ransoming of Scottish prisoners so that he could concentrate on the Welsh. By doing so he created a rift with the Percy family who subsequently defected to Owain ap Gruffudd Glyndŵr (43).

William Stewart of Jedworth and Teviotdale 1356-1402 (46) was executed by Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (38) having been captured.

John Stewart 1st of Dalswinton and Garlies 1370-1420 (32) fought at the Battle of Homildon Hill.

Horsley, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Horton Grange, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Horton Castle, Northumberland

On 20 Dec 1292 King Edward I (53) stayed at Horton Castle for one night when returning from adjudicating the claim to the Scottish throne. The landholder, Sir Guiscard de Charron, had used the occasion of Edwards's visit to ask for the necessary permission to fortify his manor house, that Edward was currently a guest in. The license to crenelate was granted one week later in Newcastle.

On 27 Jun 1301 King Edward I (62) visited Horton Castle.

Betwee 31 Aug 1304 or 01 Sep 1304 to 06 Sep 1304 King Edward I (65) stayed at Horton Castle.

Around 1509 Thomas Grey of Horton 1509-1570 was born to Roger Grey of Horton 1475-1542 (34) and Isabel Darcy 1469-1540 (40) at Horton Castle.

Around 1531 Ann Grey 1531-1616 was born to Thomas Grey of Horton 1509-1570 (22) and Dorothy Ogle -1550 at Horton Castle.

On 11 Jul 1532 Isabel Grey 1532-1581 was born to Thomas Grey of Horton 1509-1570 (23) and Dorothy Ogle -1550 at Horton Castle.

On 06 Oct 1581 Isabel Grey 1532-1581 (49) died at Horton Castle.

Howick, Northumberland

Howick Hall, Northumberland

On 09 Dec 1816 John "Radical Jack" Lambton 1st Earl Durham 1792-1840 (24) and Louisa Elizabeth Grey Countess Durham 1797-1841 (19) were married at Howick Hall.

1820. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of John

St Michael and All Angels Howick, Northumberland

After 17 Jul 1845 Charles Grey 2nd Earl Grey 1764-1845 was buried at St Michael and All Angels Howick.

Before 01 Jun 1831. John Jackson Painter 1778-1831. Portrait of Charles Grey 2nd Earl Grey 1764-1845. 1820. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Charles Grey 2nd Earl Grey 1764-1845.

Hulne Priory, Northumberland

The River Aln rises near Alnham from where it flows past Whittingham, Bolton, Hulne Priory then passing around Alnwick Castle before passing Lesbury then at Alnwick it joins the North Sea.

Kielder Water, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Kirkhaugh, Northumberland

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Kirkheaton, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Kirkley, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Kirkley Castle, Northumberland

On 22 Feb 1368 John Eure 1303-1368 (65) died at Kirkley Castle.

Around 1410 Joan Ogle 1410-1462 was born to Robert Ogle 1370-1436 (40) and Matilda Grey 1382-1451 (28) at Kirkley Castle.

Kirkwhelpington, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Knarsdale, Northumberland

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Lambley, Northumberland

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Lesbury, Northumberland

The River Aln rises near Alnham from where it flows past Whittingham, Bolton, Hulne Priory then passing around Alnwick Castle before passing Lesbury then at Alnwick it joins the North Sea.

Lindisfarne, Northumberland

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 19 How Coinred king of the Mercians and Offa king of the East Saxons ended their days at Rome in the monastic habit; and of the life and death of Bishop Wilfrid. [709 a.d.]. In the fourth year of the reign of Osred (12), Coenred, who had for some time nobly governed the kingdom of the Mercians, much more nobly quitted the sceptre of his kingdom. For he went to Rome, and there receiving the tonsure and becoming a monk, when Constantine (45) was pope, he continued to his last hour in prayer and fasting and alms-deeds at the threshold of the Apostles. He was succeeded in the throne by Ceolred, the son of Ethelred, who had governed the kingdom before Coenred. With him went the son of Sighere, the king of the East Saxons whom we mentioned before, by name Offa, a youth of a most pleasing age and comeliness, and greatly desired by all his nation to have and to hold the sceptre of the kingdom. He, with like devotion, quitted wife, and lands, and kindred and country, for Christ and for the Gospel, that he might "receive an hundred-fold in this life, and in the world to come life everlasting." He also, when they came to the holy places at Rome, received the tonsure, and ending his life in the monastic habit, attained to the vision of the blessed Apostles in Heaven, as he had long desired.

The same year that they departed from Britain, the great bishop, Wilfrid, ended his days in the province called Inundalum, after he had been bishop forty-five years. His body, being laid in a coffin, was carried to his monastery, which is called Inhrypum, and buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, with the honour due to so great a prelate. Concerning whose manner of life, let us now turn back, and briefly make mention of the things which were done. Being a boy of a good disposition, and virtuous beyond his years, he conducted himself so modestly and discreetly in all points, that he was deservedly beloved, respected, and cherished by his elders as one of themselves. At fourteen years of age he chose rather the monastic than the secular life; which, when he had signified to his father, for his mother was dead, he readily consented to his godly wishes and desires, and advised him to persist in that wholesome purpose. Wherefore he came to the isle of Lindisfarne, and there giving himself to the service of the monks, he strove diligently to learn and to practise those things which belong to monastic purity and piety; and being of a ready wit, he speedily learned the psalms and some other books, having not yet received the tonsure, but being in no small measure marked by those virtues of humility and obedience which are more important than the tonsure; for which reason he was justly loved by his elders and his equals. Having served God some years in that monastery, and being a youth of a good understanding, he perceived that the way of virtue delivered by the Scots was in no wise perfect, and he resolved to go to Rome, to see what ecclesiastical or monastic rites were in use at the Apostolic see. When he told the brethren, they commended his design, and advised him to carry out that which he purposed. He forthwith went to Queen Eanfled (82), for he was known to her, and it was by her counsel and support that he had been admitted into the aforesaid monastery, and he told her of his desire to visit the threshold of the blessed Apostles. She, being pleased with the youth's good purpose, sent him into Kent, to King Earconbert,8 who was her uncle's son, requesting that he would send him to Rome in an honourable manner. At that time, Honorius, one of the disciples of the blessed Pope Gregory (40), a man very highly instructed in ecclesiastical learning, was archbishop there. When he had tarried there for a space, and, being a youth of an active spirit, was diligently applying himself to learn those things which came under his notice, another youth, called Biscop, surnamed Benedict (81), of the English nobility, arrived there, being likewise desirous to go to Rome, of whom we have before made mention.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 1 How Ethelwald successor to Cuthbert leading a hermit's life calmed a tempest by his prayers when the brethren were in danger at sea. [687 699 a.d.]. The venerable Ethelwald succeeded the man of God, Cuthbert, in the exercise of a solitary life, which he spent in the isle of Farne before he became a bishop. After he had received the priesthood, he consecrated his office by deeds worthy of that degree for many years in the monastery which is called Inhrypum. To the end that his merit and manner of life may be the more certainly made known, I will relate one miracle of his, which was told me by one of the brothers for and on whom the same was wrought; to wit, Guthfrid, the venerable servant and priest of Christ, who also, afterwards, as abbot, presided over the brethren of the same church of Lindisfarne, in which he was educated.

"I came," says he, "to the island of Farne, with two others of the brethren, desiring to speak with the most reverend father, Ethelwald. Having been refreshed with his discourse, and asked for his blessing, as we were returning home, behold on a sudden, when we were in the midst of the sea, the fair weather in which we were sailing, was broken, and there arose so great and terrible a tempest, that neither sails nor oars were of any use to us, nor had we anything to expect but death. After long struggling with the wind and waves to no effect, at last we looked back to see whether it was possible by any means at least to return to the island whence we came, but we found that we were on all sides alike cut off by the storm, and that there was no hope of escape by our own efforts. But looking further, we perceived, on the island of Farne, our father Ethelwald, beloved of God, come out of his retreat to watch our course; for, hearing the noise of the tempest and raging sea, he had come forth to see what would become of us. When he beheld us in distress and despair, he bowed his knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, in prayer for our life and safety; and as he finished his prayer, he calmed the swelling water, in such sort that the fierceness of the storm ceased on all sides, and fair winds attended us over a smooth sea to the very shore. When we had landed, and had pulled up our small vessel from the waves, the storm, which had ceased a short time for our sake, presently returned, and raged furiously during the whole day; so that it plainly appeared that the brief interval of calm had been granted by Heaven in answer to the prayers of the man of God, to the end that we might escape.".

The man of God remained in the isle of Farne twelve years, and died there; but was buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, in the isle of Lindisfarne, beside the bodies of the aforesaid bishops. These things happened in the days of King Aldfrid, who, after his brother Egfrid, ruled the nation of the Northumbrians for nineteen years.

Chronicle of Gregory 1462. Thys yere Quene Margarete com owt of Frauns with lij schyppys, with Freynysche men and sum Engelysche men in the schyppys. And they londyd in Northe Humberlonde, hyt was vij dayes be-fore Alle Halwyn tyde. And there sche toke the castelle of Anwyke and put hyt fulle of Fraynyschemen. And thenn she retornyd in to Schotlonde by water. And there rosse suche a tempaste uppon hyr that she for soke hyr schippe, and a schapyd with the bote of [t]e schyppe. And the schyppe was drownyd with moche of hyr stuffe and iij grete schippys moo. And iiij c and vj Fraynysche men were take in the chyrche of Hooly Ylond. Thenn Kyng Edward hyrde telle of thys, and made hym redy towarde the Northe with many lordys, gentellys, and comyns with hym. And there he layde a sege to Anwyke Castelle, and to the castelle of Bamborowe, and to Dunsterborowe. Bamborowe and Dunsterborowe was kepte by Syr Raffe Persy and Syr Harry Bewforde, late Duke of Somersett, and the castelle of Anwyke with the Lorde Hungerforde. And Bamborowe and Dunsterborowe were yoldyn be Syr Raffe Percy and Syr Harry Beuford, late Duke of Somersett, to the Kyngys wylle, whythe the condyscyons that the sayde Raffe Percy schulde have the kepynge of the ij castellys, Bamborowe and Dunstarborowe. The sayde Syr Raffe Percy and Syr Harry Beuforde, late Duke of Somersett, were sworne to be trewe and faythefulle as trewe lege men unto owre kynge and soverayne lorde Edwarde the iiijthe. And they com to Derham, and there they were sworne byfore owre kynge. And the kynge gaffe hem hys levery and grete rewardys. See 1664 Suppressing the Lancastrian Northern Resistance.

Linshiels, Northumberland

Longframlington, Northumberland

North End, Longframlington, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Longhorsley, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Low Angerton, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Lowick, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Makendon Northumberland

Meldon Park, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

The Hart Burn rises near Harwood, Northumberland from where it flows past Hetherton House, Scots Gap, Hartburn to Meldon Park where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Melkridge, Northumberland

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Mitford, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

The River Font rises near Ewesley from where it flows past Nunnykirk, Netherwitton, Newton Underwood to Mitford where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Mitford Castle, Northumberland

In 1334 Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (54) granted at Mitford Castle.

Church of St Mary Magadalene Mitford, Northumberland

Church of St Mary Magadalene Mitford. Revely monument of 1622 in chancel with wall tablet: '... REST BARTRAM IN THIS HOUSE OF CLAY/REVELEY UNTO THE LATTER DAY', in elaborate surround, above effigy on altar tomb. Romanesque wall monument in south transept to Bertram Osbaldeston Mitford d.1842.

Monkwearmouth, Northumberland

Monkwearmouth Abbey, Northumberland

Around 675 Monkwearmouth Abbey was built at the request of Benedict Biscop 628-690 (47).

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 4 Chapter 18. Among those who were present at this synod, was the venerable John, archchanter of the church of the holy Apostle Peter, and abbot of the monastery of St. Martin, who came lately from Rome, by order of Pope Agatho, together with the most reverend Abbot Biscop, surnamed Benedict, of whom mention has been made above, and this John, with the rest, signed the declaration of the Catholic faith. For the said Benedict, having built a monastery in Britain, in honour of the most blessed prince ot the apostles, at the mouth of the river Were went to Rome with Ceolfrid, his companion and fellow labourer in that work, who was after him abbot of the same monastery ; he had been several times before at Rome, and was now honourably received by Pope Agatho of blessed memory ; from whom he also obtained the confirmation of the immunities of this monastery, being a bull of privilege signed by apostolical authority, pursuant to what he knew to be the will and grant of King Egfrid, by whose consent and gift of land he had built that monastery.

Morpeth, Northumberland

On 16 Jan 1513 Ralph Ogle 3rd Baron Ogle 1468-1513 (44) died in Morpeth. He was buried in St Andrew's Church Bothal. Robert Ogle 4th Baron Ogle 1490-1530 (23) succeeded 4th Baron Ogle.

14 Jun 1913. The Central News reported:

Emily Wilding Davison's (40) funeral procession passing Piccadilly Circus, 14th June 1913. Following her tragic death, Davison was instantly embraced as a martyr to the cause. On 14 June 1913 her body was borne on an open hearse through London to a memoroial service at St George's Church, Bloomsbury before being taken by train to Morpeth, Northumberland for a family funeral. The funeral procession (the last great suffrage march) was organised by fellow suffragette Grace Roe, and the memorial service was presided over by clergy from the Church League for Women's Suffrage.

14 Jun 1913. Funeral Procession of Emily Wilding Davison 1872-1913 (40) at Morpeth.

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Netherwitton, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

The River Font rises near Ewesley from where it flows past Nunnykirk, Netherwitton, Newton Underwood to Mitford where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Newburn, Northumberland

On 28 Aug 1640 the Battle of Newburn was fought at the Newburn ford over the River Tyne between the Scottish army of 20,000 men commanded by Alexander Leslie 1st Earl Leven 1580-1661 (60) and the English army of 5000 commanded by Edward Conway 2nd Viscount Conway 1594-1655 (46). The Scottish army was successful.

On or before 18 Mar 1695 George Delaval of North Dissington 1616-1695 (79) died. He was buried on 18 Mar 1695 at Newburn.

On 03 Aug 1744 Edward Delaval of South Dissington 1664-1744 (80) died. He was buried at Newburn.

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newminster Abbey, Northumberland

On 14 Jul 1323 Ralph Greystoke 1st Baron Greystoke 1299-1323 (23) died at Gateshead. Possibly poisoned by a rebel knight. He was buried at Newminster Abbey. William Greystoke 2nd Baron Greystoke 1321-1359 (2) succeeded 2nd Baron Greystoke.

In 1325 Robert Umfraville 8th Earl Angus 1277-1325 (48) died. He was buried at Newminster Abbey. Gilbert Umfraville 9th Earl Angus 1310-1381 (15) succeeded 9th Earl Angus.

On 16 Jul 1350 Joan Willoughby Countess Angus -1350 died. She was buried at Newminster Abbey.

On 06 Apr 1418 Ralph Greystoke 3rd Baron Greystoke 1353-1418 (64) died. He was buried at Newminster Abbey. John Greystoke 4th Baron Greystoke 1389-1436 (29) succeeded 4th Baron Greystoke.

In 1437 Robert Umfraville 1363-1437 (74) died. He was buried at Newminster Abbey.

William Greystoke died at Dunbar Castle, Dunbar. He was buried at Dunbar Castle then reburied at Newminster Abbey.

Newsham on Tyne, Northumberland

In 1249 Constance Gille 1249- was born to Thomas Gille at Newsham on Tyne.

Newton Underwood, Northumberland

The River Font rises near Ewesley from where it flows past Nunnykirk, Netherwitton, Newton Underwood to Mitford where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Newtown, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Ninebanks, Northumberland

The River West Allen rises near Coldcleugh from where it flows past Carrshield, Ninebanks, Bearsbridge to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River East Allen to form the River Allen.

Norham, Northumberland

St Cuthberts Church Norham

North Shields, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Nunwick, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Nunnykirk, Northumberland

The River Font rises near Ewesley from where it flows past Nunnykirk, Netherwitton, Newton Underwood to Mitford where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Ogle, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

Ogle Castle, Northumberland

On 08 Dec 1351 Robert Ogle of Ogle and Bothal 1351-1409 was born at Ogle Castle.

In 1566 John Ogle 1477-1566 (89) died at Ogle Castle.

Otterburn, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Otterburn Castle, Northumberland

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 3 Unknown Chapter 1 The Battle of Otterburn. The next day the Scots dislodged and returned towards their own country, and so came to a castle and a town called Pontland, whereof sir Edmund of Alphel was lord, who was a right good knight. There the Scots rested, for they came thither betimes, and understood that the knight was in his castle. Then they ordained to assail the castle, and gave a great assault, so that by force of arms they won it and the knight within it. Then the town and castle was brent; and from thence the Scots went to the town and castle of Otterburn, an eight English mile from Newcastle1 and there lodged. That day they made none assault, but the next morning they blew their horns and made ready to assail the castle, which was strong, for it stood in the marish. That day they assaulted till they were weary, and did nothing. Then they sowned the retreat and returned to their lodgings. Then the lords drew to council to determine what they should do. The most part were of the accord that the next day they should dislodge without giving of any assault and to draw fair and easily towards Carlisle. But the earl Douglas brake that counsel and said: ‘In despite of sir Henry Percy, who said he would come and win again his pennon, let us not depart hence for two or three days. Let us assail this castle: it is pregnable: we shall have double honour. And then let us see if he will come and fetch his pennon: he shall be well defended2.’ Every man accorded to his saying, what for their honour and for the love of him. Also they lodged there at their ease, for there was none that troubled them: they made many lodgings of boughs and great herbs and fortified their camp sagely with the marish that was thereby, and their carriages were set at the entry into the marishes and had all their beasts within the marish. Then they apparelled for to assault the next day: this was their intention.

1. Froissart says ‘eight English leagues.’ In the next chapter the distanch becomes ‘seven little leagues,’ and later on, ‘a six English miles,’ where the original is ‘lieues.’ The actual distance is about thirty miles. The translator gives the form ‘Combur’ here, but ‘Ottenburge’ in the next chapter, as the name of the place. It is remarkable indeed how little trouble he seems to have taken generally to give English names correctly. In this chapter we have ‘Nymyche’ for ‘Alnwick’ and ‘Pouclan’ for ‘Pontland,’ forms rather less like the real names than those which he found in the French text, viz. Nynich and Ponclau.

2. Froissart says, ‘if he comes, it shall be defended.’ The translator perhaps means ‘he shall be prevented.’

Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Northumberland

Site of the Battle of Otterburn.

On either 05 Aug 1388 or 19 Aug 1388 a Scottish army commanded by John Swinton -1402 defeated an English army commanded by Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (24) during the Battle of Otterburn at Otterburn. Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (24) and his brother Ralph Percy 1359-1397 (29) were captured as was Matthew Redman 1328-1389 (60). The English suffered 1000 killed, 2000 captured. The Scottish 100 killed, 200 captured.

On the Scottish side James Douglas 2nd Earl Douglas 1358-1388 (30) was killed. Isabel Douglas Countess Mar 1360-1408 (28) succeeded Earl Mar 1C 1404.

John Dunbar 1st Earl Moray 1342-1391 (46) fought.

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Ovingham, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Pauperhaugh, Northumberland

Ponteland, Northumberland

Ponteland Castle, Northumberland

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 3 Unknown Chapter 1 The Battle of Otterburn. The next day the Scots dislodged and returned towards their own country, and so came to a castle and a town called Pontland, whereof sir Edmund of Alphel was lord, who was a right good knight. There the Scots rested, for they came thither betimes, and understood that the knight was in his castle. Then they ordained to assail the castle, and gave a great assault, so that by force of arms they won it and the knight within it. Then the town and castle was brent; and from thence the Scots went to the town and castle of Otterburn, an eight English mile from Newcastle1 and there lodged. That day they made none assault, but the next morning they blew their horns and made ready to assail the castle, which was strong, for it stood in the marish. That day they assaulted till they were weary, and did nothing. Then they sowned the retreat and returned to their lodgings. Then the lords drew to council to determine what they should do. The most part were of the accord that the next day they should dislodge without giving of any assault and to draw fair and easily towards Carlisle. But the earl Douglas brake that counsel and said: ‘In despite of sir Henry Percy, who said he would come and win again his pennon, let us not depart hence for two or three days. Let us assail this castle: it is pregnable: we shall have double honour. And then let us see if he will come and fetch his pennon: he shall be well defended2.’ Every man accorded to his saying, what for their honour and for the love of him. Also they lodged there at their ease, for there was none that troubled them: they made many lodgings of boughs and great herbs and fortified their camp sagely with the marish that was thereby, and their carriages were set at the entry into the marishes and had all their beasts within the marish. Then they apparelled for to assault the next day: this was their intention.

1. Froissart says ‘eight English leagues.’ In the next chapter the distanch becomes ‘seven little leagues,’ and later on, ‘a six English miles,’ where the original is ‘lieues.’ The actual distance is about thirty miles. The translator gives the form ‘Combur’ here, but ‘Ottenburge’ in the next chapter, as the name of the place. It is remarkable indeed how little trouble he seems to have taken generally to give English names correctly. In this chapter we have ‘Nymyche’ for ‘Alnwick’ and ‘Pouclan’ for ‘Pontland,’ forms rather less like the real names than those which he found in the French text, viz. Nynich and Ponclau.

2. Froissart says, ‘if he comes, it shall be defended.’ The translator perhaps means ‘he shall be prevented.’

St Mary's Church Ponteland, Northumberland

St Mary's Church Ponteland. Many wall monuments, including:- Richard Newton Ogle, 1794 by Coade; John Dixon, 1716 - extremely rustic; Anne Byne,mother, and Anne Byne, daughter 1769 and no date,with interesting inscriptions. Memorial tablets were added, for example to William Weallens, one of Robert Stephenson’s engineers, and to a member of the Ogle family who mapped the coast of the Americas.

Portgate, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Powburn, Northumberland

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Preston, Northumberland

Preston Tower, Northumberland

On 26 Sep 1836 Colonel William Robert Craster 1836-1922 was born to Thomas Wood Craster 1786-1867 (50) at Preston Tower.

Redesmouth, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

Riding Mill, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Ridley, Northumberland

The River South Tyne rises on Cross Fell, Westmoreland from where it flows past Garrigill Westmoreland, Alston where it is joined by the River Nent.

Thereafter it flows past Kirkhaugh, Knarsdale, Lambley, Featherstone Castle, under Featherstone Bridge, Haltwhistle, Melkridge, Ridley after which it is joined by the River Allen

Ridsdale, Northumberland

Source of the River Wansbeck, Ridsdale, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Rochester, Northumberland

The River Rede rises near the border of Scotland and England by the Carter Bar Boundary Marker from where it flows past Catcleugh, Cottonshopeburnfoot, Rochester near the Bremenium Roman Fort, past Horsley, Elishaw, past Percy's Cross at the Site of the Battle of Otterburn, Otterburn, East and West Woodburn to Redesmouth where it joins the River North Tyne.

High Rochester, Northumberland

Bremenium aka High Rochester is one of a number of defensive structures built along Dere Street. The name Bremenium means 'The Place of the Roaring Stream'. The site is in a strong position, occupying the end of a ridge with the ground falling away steeply to the north and west, and giving a clear view over the Rede Valley and beyond.

The fort is oblong in shape, and measures 148m north to south and 136m. Defensive ditches can still be seen to the north and east, outside which Dere Street passes. Early temporary marching camps at Redesdale are visible across the Sills Burn from the fort.

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Ropehaugh, Northumberland

The River East Allen rises near Allenheads from where it flows past Ropehaugh, Spartylea, Sinderhope, Allendale Town, Catton to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River West Allen to form the River Allen.

Rothbury, Northumberland

Scots Gap, Northumberland

The Hart Burn rises near Harwood, Northumberland from where it flows past Hetherton House, Scots Gap, Hartburn to Meldon Park where it joins the River Wansbeck.

Seaton Delavall, Northumberland

Sharperton, Northumberland

Shillmoor, Northumberland

Simonburn, Northumberland

Sinderhope, Northumberland

The River East Allen rises near Allenheads from where it flows past Ropehaugh, Spartylea, Sinderhope, Allendale Town, Catton to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River West Allen to form the River Allen.

Spartylea, Northumberland

The River East Allen rises near Allenheads from where it flows past Ropehaugh, Spartylea, Sinderhope, Allendale Town, Catton to just before Cupola Bridge where it converges with the River West Allen to form the River Allen.

Stakeford, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Stannington, Northumberland

The River Blyth rises near Kirkheaton from where it flows past Bradford, Belsay, Ogle, Kirkley, Horton Grange, Stannington, Bedlington to Blyth where it reaches the North Sea.

St Mary's Church Stannington, Northumberland

St Mary's Church Stannington. Sir Mathew White Ridley (1904) by Sir Mathew White Ridley; bronze effigy with marble base by Detmar Blow

Thropton, Northumberland

Tynemouth, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

Balcony House, Tynemouth, Northumberland

1864. Alice Boyd Painter 14th Lord Penkill 1825-1897 (39). View from the Window of Balcony House, Tynemouth.

Tynemouth Castle, Northumberland

On 27 Apr 1564 Henry "Wizard Earl" Percy 9th Earl of Northumberland 1564-1632 was born to Henry Percy 8th Earl of Northumberland 1532-1585 (32) and Katherine Neville Countess Northumberland 1545-1596 (19) at Tynemouth Castle.

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Percy 8th Earl of Northumberland 1532-1585.

Wall, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Wallington, Northumberland

The River Wansbeck rises near Risdale, Northumberland from where it flows past Kirkwhelpington, Wallington, Low Angerton to Meldon Park where it is joined by the Hart Burn.

The River Wansbeck continues through Mitford where it is joined by the River Font.

After Mitford the River Wansbeck flows past Morpeth, Guidepost and Stakeford before joining the North Sea at Cambois.

Warden, Northumberland

The River Tyne is formed from the River North Tyne and River South Tyne which converge at Warden. From Warden it flows past Hexham, Corbridge, Riding Mill, Bywell, Ovingham, Clara Vale, Blaydon, Newcastle upon Tyne and Wallsend and North Shields and South Shields after which it joins the North Sea at Tynemouth.

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Wark, Northumberland

The River North Tyne flows from Kielder Water past Greystead, Bellingham to Redesmouth where it is joined by the River Rede.

It continues past Wark, Nunwick, Barrasford, Chollerton, Wall to Warden where it joins the River South Tyne to become the River Tyne.

Wark on Tweed, Northumberland

Wark Castle, Wark on Tweed, Northumberland

In 1269 Robert Ros 1st Baron Ros Werke 1206-1269 (63) died at Wark Castle.

Before 23 Apr 1344 King Edward III England formed the Order of the Garter. The date is somewhat unclear. The first reliable record occurs in autumn of 1348 when the King's wardrobe account shows Garter habits being issued. The Order may have been formed before then with some traditions such as the mantle, and the garter and motto, possibly being introduced later. The Garter refers to an event at Wark Castle at which King Edward III England picked up the Countess of Salisbury's fallen garter and saying to the crowd "Honi soit qui mal y pense" ie Shame on him who thinks badly of it, or possibly, he brings shame on himself who thinks badly of it. The Countess of Salisbury could refer to his future daughter-in-law Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Princess Wales 1328-1385 or her former mother-in-law Catherine Grandison Countess Salisbury 1304-1349. The event has also been drescribed as taking place at Calias.

Warkworth, Northumberland

In 1329 Euphemia Clavering Baroness Neville Raby 1267-1329 (62) died at Warkworth. She was buried at St Mary's Church Staindrop.

On 10 Jul 1555 Mary Salisbury 1473-1555 (82) died in Warkworth.

Acklington Park Warkworth, Northumberland

Around 1612 John Rushworth 1612-1690 was born to Lawrence Rushworth at Acklington Park Warkworth.

Weldon Bridge, Northumberland

Whittingham, Northumberland

The River Aln rises near Alnham from where it flows past Whittingham, Bolton, Hulne Priory then passing around Alnwick Castle before passing Lesbury then at Alnwick it joins the North Sea.

Learchild Roman Fort, Whittingham, Northumberland

Learchild Roman Fort fort is preserved as a cropmark or very low earthwork. Partial excavation has shown that the remnant ramparts and below ground features such as ditches will contain important archaeological deposits relating to the construction, development, use and abandonment of the monument. The fort contains two constructional phases and therefore provides insight into the development in Roman military fortifications between the 1st and 2nd centuries AD. More widely the monument also provides insight into the Roman conquest of northern England.

The Devil's Causeway is a Roman Road from the Portgate, where it crossed Dere Street, to Berwick on Tweed. It passes through Great Whittingham, Hartburn, where it crosses the Hart Burn, Netherwitton, Longhorsley, Brinkburn Priory, whereit crosses the River Coquet, north of North End, Edlingham to Learchild Roman Fort where another road headed west to meet Dere Street at Bremenium aka High Rochester. The road then continues north passing Glanton, Powburn, where it crosses the River Till aka Breamish, the site of the Battle of Hedgeley Moor, Newtown, East Horton, Lowick, Berrington before reaching Berwick on Tweed.

Wooler, Northumberland

Fenton Wooler, Northumberland

Times Newspaper Funerals. 05 Feb 1929. The funeral of the Earl of Durham (73) took place yesterday at Burnmoor. The Countess of Durham who was unable to attend owing to illness, received the following telegram from the Queen (61):- " I send you and your family my sincere sympathy in your great sorrow.".

The cortege left Fenton at 11.30, and, as followed by 25 coaches, three of which conveyed wreaths. The chief mourners included Viscount Lambton (44) and Captain the Hon. Claud Lambton (45) (sons). Captain the Hon. D'Arcv Lambton (62), the Hon. George Lambton (68), and the Hon. Charles Lambton (71) (brothers). Viscount Cecil (brother-in-law), the Earl (56) and Countess of Ellesmnere (48) (son-in-law and daughter), the Earl of Home (son-in-law). The officiating clergy were the Rev. Ralph Watson. the Rev. A. J. Gadd, the rector. and the Rev, G. F. Eolme. Tenants from Lord Durham's Fenton Estate were the bearers. A memorial eervice for Lord Durham was held vesterday at St. Peter's. Eaton-square, the Rev. Austin Thompson officiating. Among those present were:- The Hon. Mrs. Charles Lambton. the Bon. Mrs. Claud Lambton, Air. D'Arcy [?]. the Earl and Countess of Pembroke. Colonel the Hon. George Herhert also represented the Dowager Countess of Pembroke. Mr Arthur Lambton, the Duke and Duchess of Abereorn the Dowager Marchioness of Lansdowne Alberta Marchioness of Blanford.

1938 to 1939. Simon Elwes Painter 1902-1975. Portrait of Victoria Mary Teck Queen Consort England 1867-1953.