History of Surrey

786 Assassination of King Cynewulf

777 Battle of Bensington

851 Battle of Ockley

851 Battle of Oakley

1540 Marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine Howard

1543 Parr Family Ennobled

1591 Elizabeth's Royal Progress

1665 Great Plague of London

1735 Great Storm

1817 Death of Princess Charlotte

Surrey is in Home Counties.

In 1615 Charles Howard 1615-1672 was born to Francis Howard 1585-1651 (29) and Jane Monson 1588-1685 (27) at Surrey.

On 20 Mar 1672 Charles Howard 1615-1672 (57) died at Surrey.

Addington, Surrey

On 14 Mar 1612 Oliph Leigh 1559-1612 (52) died. He was buried the following day at Addington.

On or before 28 Jun 1631 Jane Browne of Betchworth Castle -1631 died. She was buried at Addington.

On 13 Dec 1644 Francis Leigh of Addington 1590-1644 (54) died. He was buried 17 Dec 1644 at Addington.

Albury, Surrey

Albury House, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 07 November 1641. 07 Nov 1641. After receiving the Sacrament at Wotton church, I visited my Lord Marshal (56) at Albury.

In 1618 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646. In 1630 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646 and wearing his Garter Collar. Around 1629 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646.

John Evelyn's Diary 28 September 1648. 28 Sep 1648. I went to Albury, to visit the Countess of Arundel (38), and returned to Wotton.

John Evelyn's Diary 26 February 1649. 26 Feb 1649. Came to see me Captain George Evelyn, my kinsman, the great traveler, and one who believed himself a better architect than really he was; witness the portico in the Garden at Wotton; yet the great room at Albury is somewhat better understood. He had a large mind, but over-built everything.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 August 1655. 10 Aug 1655. To Albury, to visit Mr. Howard (27), who had begun to build, and alter the gardens much. He showed me many rare pictures, particularly the Moor on horseback; Erasmus, as big as the life, by Holbein; a Madonna, in miniature, by Oliver (90); but, above all, the skull, carved in wood, by Albert Durer, for which his father was offered £100; also Albert's head, by himself, with divers rare agates, intaglios, and other curiosities.

Around 1672 Gilbert Soest Painter 1605-1681. Portrait of Henry Howard 6th Duke Norfolk 1628-1684. Around 1669 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Henry Howard 6th Duke Norfolk 1628-1684. Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Henry Howard 6th Duke Norfolk 1628-1684.

John Evelyn's Diary 19 September 1667. 19 Sep 1667. To London, with Mr. Henry Howard (39), of Norfolk, of whom I obtained the gift of his Arundelian marbles, those celebrated and famous inscriptions, Greek and Latin, gathered with so much cost and industry from Greece, by his illustrious grandfather (82), the magnificent Earl of Arundel, my noble friend while he lived. When I saw these precious. Monuments miserably neglected, and scattered up and down about the garden, and other parts of Arundel House, and how exceedingly the corrosive air of London impaired them, I procured him to bestow them on the University of Oxford. This he was pleased to grant me; and now gave me the key of the gallery, with leave to mark all those stones, urns, altars, etc., and whatever I found had inscriptions on them, that were not statues. This I did; and getting them removed and piled together, with those which were incrusted in the garden walls, I sent immediately letters to the Vice-Chancellor of what I had procured, and that if they esteemed it a service to the University (of which I had been a member), they should take order for their transportation.

This done 21st, I accompanied Mr. Howard (39) to his villa at Albury, where I designed for him the plot of his canal and garden, with a crypt through the hill.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 September 1670. 23 Sep 1670. To Albury, to see how that garden proceeded, which I found exactly done to the design and plot I had made, with the crypta through the mountain in the park, thirty perches in length. Such a Pausilippe [Note. A word created by Evelyn meaning an underground passage.] is nowhere in England. The canal was now digging, and the vineyard planted.

John Evelyn's Diary 05 August 1687. 05 Aug 1687. I went to see Albury, now purchased by Mr. Finch (38) (the King's (57) Solicitor and son to the late Lord Chancellor); I found the garden which I first designed for the Duke of Norfolk (59), nothing improved.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Alfodean Bridge, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Ashford, Surrey

On 28 Jul 1758 George Henry Hay 8th Earl Kinnoull 1689-1758 (69) died in Ashford. His son Thomas Hay 9th Earl Kinnoul 1710-1787 (48) succeeded 9th Earl Kinnoull.

Ashtead, Surrey

Diary of Samuel Pepys 26 July 1663. 26 Jul 1663. Lord's Day. Up and to the Wells1, where great store of citizens, which was the greatest part of the company, though there were some others of better quality. I met many that I knew, and we drank each of us two pots and so walked away, it being very pleasant to see how everybody turns up his tail, here one and there another, in a bush, and the women in their quarters the like.

Thence I walked with Creed to Mr. Minnes's house, which has now a very good way made to it, and thence to Durdans and walked round it and within the Court Yard and to the Bowling-green, where I have seen so much mirth in my time; but now no family in it (my Lord Barkeley (61), whose it is, being with his family at London), and so up and down by Minnes's wood, with great pleasure viewing my old walks, and where Mrs. Hely and I did use to walk and talk, with whom I had the first sentiments of love and pleasure in woman's company, discourse, and taking her by the hand, she being a pretty woman.

So I led him to Ashted Church (by the place where Peter, my cozen's man, went blindfold and found a certain place we chose for him upon a wager), where we had a dull Doctor, one Downe, worse than I think even parson King was, of whom we made so much scorn, and after sermon home, and staid while our dinner, a couple of large chickens, were dressed, and a good mess of cream, which anon we had with good content, and after dinner (we taking no notice of other lodgers in the house, though there was one that I knew, and knew and spoke to me, one Mr. Rider, a merchant), he and I to walk, and I led him to the pretty little wood behind my cozens house, into which we got at last by clambering, and our little dog with us, but when we were among the hazel trees and bushes, Lord! what a course did we run for an hour together, losing ourselves, and indeed I despaired I should ever come to any path, but still from thicket to thicket, a thing I could hardly have believed a man could have been lost so long in so small a room. At last I found out a delicate walk in the middle that goes quite through the wood, and then went out of the wood, and holloed Mr. Creed, and made him hunt me from place to place, and at last went in and called him into my fine walk, the little dog still hunting with us through the wood. In this walk being all bewildered and weary and sweating, Creed he lay down upon the ground, which I did a little, but I durst not long, but walked from him in the fine green walk, which is half a mile long, there reading my vows as I used to on Sundays. And after that was done, and going and lying by Creed an hour, he and I rose and went to our lodging and paid our reckoning, and so mounted, whether to go toward London home or to find a new lodging, and so rode through Epsum, the whole town over, seeing the various companys that were there walking; which was very pleasant to see how they are there without knowing almost what to do, but only in the morning to drink waters. But, Lord! to see how many I met there of citizens, that I could not have thought to have seen there, or that they had ever had it in their heads or purses to go down thither.

We rode out of the town through Yowell beyond Nonesuch House a mile, and there our little dogg, as he used to do, fell a-running after a flock of sheep feeding on the common, till he was out of sight, and then endeavoured to come back again, and went to the last gate that he parted with us at, and there the poor thing mistakes our scent, instead of coming forward he hunts us backward, and runs as hard as he could drive back towards Nonesuch, Creed and I after him, and being by many told of his going that way and the haste he made, we rode still and passed him through Yowell, and there we lost any further information of him. However, we went as far as Epsum almost, hearing nothing of him, we went back to Yowell, and there was told that he did pass through the town. We rode back to Nonesuch to see whether he might be gone back again, but hearing nothing we with great trouble and discontent for the loss of our dogg came back once more to Yowell, and there set up our horses and selves for all night, employing people to look for the dogg in the town, but can hear nothing of him. However, we gave order for supper, and while that was dressing walked out through Nonesuch Park to the house, and there viewed as much as we could of the outside, and looked through the great gates, and found a noble court; and altogether believe it to have been a very noble house, and a delicate park about it, where just now there was a doe killed, for the King (33) to carry up to Court. So walked back again, and by and by our supper being ready, a good leg of mutton boiled, we supped and to bed, upon two beds in the same room, wherein we slept most excellently all night.

1. Epsom medicinal wells were discovered about 1618, but they did not become fashionable until the Restoration. John Toland, in his "Description of Epsom", says that he often counted seventy coaches in the Ring (the present racecourse on the Downs) on a Sunday evening; but by the end of the eighteenth century Epsom had entirely lost its vogue.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

John Evelyn's Diary 10 May 1684. 10 May 1684. I went to visite my brother in Surrey. Call'd by the way at Ashted, where Sr Rob Howard (58) (Auditor of the Exchequer) entertain'd me very civilly at his new built house, which stands in a Park on the Downe, the avenue South; tho' downe hill to the house, which is not greate, but with the outhouses very convenient. The stairecase is painted by Verrio (48) with the storie of Astrea; amongst other figures is the Picture of the Painter himselfe, and not unlike him; the rest is well done, onely the columns did not at all please me; there is also Sir Robert's own Picture in an oval; the whole in fresca. The place has this greate defect, that there is no water but what is drawn up by horses from a very deepe well.

Ashtead House Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 19 July 1687. 19 Jul 1687. I went to Wotton. In the way, I dined at Ashted, with my Baroness Mordaunt (65).

Bagshot, Surrey

Diary of Samuel Pepys 21 September 1667. 21 Sep 1667. All the morning at the office, dined at home, and expected Sheres again, but he did not come, so another dinner lost by the folly of Creed. After having done some business at the office, I out with my wife to Sheres's lodging and left an invitation for him to dine with me tomorrow, and so back and took up my wife at the Exchange, and then kissed Mrs. Smith's pretty hand, and so with my wife by coach to take some ayre (but the way very dirty) as far as Bow, and so drinking (as usual) at Mile End of Byde's ale, we home and there busy at my letters till late, and so to walk by moonshine with my wife, and so to bed. The King (37), Duke of York (33), and the men of the Court, have been these four or five days a-hunting at Bagshot.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 09 September 1668. 09 Sep 1668. Up, and to the office, and thence to the Duke of Richmond's (29) lodgings by his desire, by letter, yesterday. I find him at his lodgings in the little building in the bowling-green, at White Hall, that was begun to be built by Captain Rolt (39). They are fine rooms. I did hope to see his lady, the beautiful Mrs. Stuart (21), but she, I hear, is in the country. His business was about his yacht, and he seems a mighty good-natured man, and did presently write me a warrant for a doe from Cobham, when the season comes, bucks season being past. I shall make much of this acquaintance, that I may live to see his lady near.

Thence to Westminster, to Sir R. Longs (68) Office: and, going, met Mr. George Montagu (46), who talked and complimented me mightily; and long discourse I had with him, who, for news, tells me for certain that Trevor do come to be Secretary at Michaelmas, and that Morrice (65) goes out, and he believes, without any compensation. He tells me that now Buckingham (40) does rule all; and the other day, in the King's journey he is now on, at Bagshot, and that way, he caused Prince Rupert's (48) horses to be turned out of an inne, and caused his own to be kept there, which the Prince complained of to the King (38), and the Duke of York (34) seconded the complaint; but the King (38) did over-rule it for Buckingham (40), by which there are high displeasures among them; and Buckingham and Arlington (50) rule all.

Thence by water home and to dinner, and after dinner by water again to White Hall, where Brouncker (48), W. Pen (47), and I attended the Commissioners of the Treasury about the victualling-contract, where high words between Sir Thomas Clifford (38) and us, and myself more particularly, who told him that something, that he said was told him about this business, was a flat untruth. However, we went on to our business in, the examination of the draught, and so parted, and I vexed at what happened, and Brouncker (48) and W. Pen (47) and I home in a Hackney coach. And I all that night so vexed that I did not sleep almost all night, which shows how unfit I am for trouble. So, after a little supper, vexed, and spending a little time melancholy in making a base to the Lark's song, I to bed.

Around 1668 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Charles Stewart 6th Duke Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1639-1672. Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Frances Teresa Stewart Duchess Lennox and Richmond 1647-1702. One of the Windsor Beauties. Before 13 Jul 1673 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Robert Long 1st Baronet Long 1600-1673. Before 12 Dec 1676 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of William Morice 1602-1676. Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Villiers 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1628-1687 wearing his Garter Collar. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the Prince Rupert, Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 and Colonel William Murray. Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1672 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 wearing his Garter Robes. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685. Around 1672 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Thomas Clifford 1st Baron Clifford Chudleigh 1630-1673.

Bagshot Manor Bagshot, Surrey

Around 27 Mar 1534 Lucy Neville 1468-1534 (66) died at Bagshot Manor Bagshot.

Yattendon Castle Bagshot, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 22 October 1685. 22 Oct 1685. I accompanied my Lady Clarendon to her house at Swallowfield in Berks, dining by the way at Mr. Graham's (36) lodge at Bagshot; the house, new repair'd and capacious enough for a good family, stands in a Park. Hence we went to Swallowfield; this house is after the antient build ing of honourable gentlemen's houses, when they kept up antient hospitality, but the gardens and waters as elegant as 'tis possible to make a flat, by art and industrie, and no meane expence, my lady being so extraordinarily skill'd in ye flowery part, and my lord in diligence of planting; so that I have hardly seene a seate whrch shews more tokens of it than what is to be found here, not only in the delicious and rarest fruits of a garden, but in those innumerable timber trees in the ground about the seate, to the greatest ornament and benefit of the place. There is one orchard of 1000 golden, and other cider pippins; walks and groves of elms, limes, oaks, and other trees. The garden is so beset with all manner of sweete shrubbs, that it per fumes the aire. The distribution also of the quarters, walks, and parterres, is excellent. The nurseries, kitchin garden full of ye most desireable plants; two very noble Orangeries well furnished; but above all, the canall and fishponds, the one fed with a white, the other with a black running water, fed by a quick and swift river, so well and plen tifully stor'd with fish, that for pike, carp, breame and tench, I never saw any thing approching it. We had at every meale carp and pike of size fit for the table of a Prince, and what added to ye delight was to see the hundreds taken by the drag, out of which, the cooke standing by, we pointed out what we had most mind to, and had carp that would have ben worth at London twenty shillings a piece. The waters are flagg'd about with Calamus aromaticus, with wch my lady has hung a closet, that retains the smell very perfectly. There is also a certaine sweete willow and other exotics: also a very fine bowllng-greene, meadow, pasture, and wood; in a word, all that can render a country seate delightful. There is besides a well furnish'd library in ye house.

On 30 Nov 1834 William Frederick Hanover 2nd Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1776-1834 (58) died at Yattendon Castle Bagshot. He was buried at St George's Chapel Windsor Castle.

On 16 Jan 1942 Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (91) died at Yattendon Castle Bagshot. His grandson Alastair Windsor 2nd Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1914-1943 (27) succeeded 2nd Duke Connaught and Strathearn.

1937. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942. In 1908 John Singer Sargent 1856-1925. Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942.

Banstead, Surrey

Before 05 May 1243 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 died at Banstead. He was buried at Blackfriars Church Holborn.

Banstead Downs, Surrey

Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 May 1663. 27 May 1663. So I waked by 3 o'clock, my mind being troubled, and so took occasion by making water to wake my wife, and after having lain till past 4 o'clock seemed going to rise, though I did it only to see what she would do, and so going out of the bed she took hold of me and would know what ailed me, and after many kind and some cross words I began to tax her discretion in yesterday's business, but she quickly told me my own, knowing well enough that it was my old disease of jealousy, which I denied, but to no purpose. After an hour's discourse, sometimes high and sometimes kind, I found very good reason to think that her freedom with him is very great and more than was convenient, but with no evil intent, and so after awhile I caressed her and parted seeming friends, but she crying in a great discontent.

So I up and by water to the Temple, and thence with Commissioner Pett (52) to St. James's, where an hour with Mr. Coventry (35) talking of Mr. Pett's (52) proceedings lately in the forest of Sherwood, and thence with Pett to my Lord Ashley (41), Chancellor (54) of the Exchequer; where we met the auditors about settling the business of the accounts of persons to whom money is due before the King's time in the Navy, and the clearing of their imprests for what little of their debts they have received. I find my Lord, as he is reported, a very ready, quick, and diligent person.

Thence I to Westminster Hall, where Term and Parliament make the Hall full of people; no further news yet of the King of France (24), whether he be dead or not. Here I met with my cozen Roger Pepys (46), and walked a good while with him, and among other discourse as a secret he hath committed to nobody but myself, and he tells me that his sister Claxton now resolving to give over the keeping of his house at Impington, he thinks it fit to marry again, and would have me, by the help of my uncle Wight or others, to look him out a widow between thirty and forty years old, without children, and with a fortune, which he will answer in any degree with a joynture fit for her fortune. A woman sober, and no high-flyer, as he calls it. I demanded his estate. He tells me, which he says also he hath not done to any, that his estate is not full £800 per annum, but it is £780 per annum, of which £200 is by the death of his last wife, which he will allot for a joynture for a wife, but the rest, which lies in Cambridgeshire, he is resolved to leave entire for his eldest son. I undertook to do what I can in it, and so I shall. He tells me that the King (32) hath sent to them to hasten to make an end by midsummer, because of his going into the country; so they have set upon four bills to dispatch: the first of which is, he says, too devilish a severe act against conventicles; so beyond all moderation, that he is afeard it will ruin all: telling me that it is matter of the greatest grief to him in the world, that he should be put upon this trust of being a Parliament-man, because he says nothing is done, that he can see, out of any truth and sincerity, but mere envy and design.

Thence by water to Chelsey, all the way reading a little book I bought of "Improvement of Trade", a pretty book and many things useful in it. So walked to Little Chelsey, where I found my Lord Sandwich (37) with Mr. Becke, the master of the house, and Mr. Creed at dinner, and I sat down with them, and very merry.

After dinner (Mr. Gibbons (47) being come in also before dinner done) to musique, they played a good Fancy, to which my Lord is fallen again, and says he cannot endure a merry tune, which is a strange turn of his humour, after he has for two or three years flung off the practice of Fancies and played only fidlers' tunes.

Then into the Great Garden up to the Banqueting_House; and there by his glass we drew in the species very pretty. Afterwards to ninepins, where I won a shilling, Creed and I playing against my Lord and Cooke. This day there was great thronging to Banstead Downs, upon a great horse-race and foot-race. I am sorry I could not go thither.

So home back as I came, to London Bridge, and so home, where I find my wife in a musty humour, and tells me before Ashwell that Pembleton had been there, and she would not have him come in unless I was there, which I was ashamed of; but however, I had rather it should be so than the other way.

So to my office, to put things in order there, and by and by comes Pembleton, and word is brought me from my wife thereof that I might come home. So I sent word that I would have her go dance, and I would come presently. So being at a great loss whether I should appear to Pembleton or no, and what would most proclaim my jealousy to him, I at last resolved to go home, and took Tom Hater with me, and staid a good while in my chamber, and there took occasion to tell him how I hear that Parliament is putting an act out against all sorts of conventicles1, and did give him good counsel, not only in his own behalf, but my own, that if he did hear or know anything that could be said to my prejudice, that he would tell me, for in this wicked age (specially Sir W. Batten (62) being so open to my reproaches, and Sir J. Minnes (64), for the neglect of their duty, and so will think themselves obliged to scandalize me all they can to right themselves if there shall be any inquiry into the matters of the Navy, as I doubt there will) a man ought to be prepared to answer for himself in all things that can be inquired concerning him. After much discourse of this nature to him I sent him away, and then went up, and there we danced country dances, and single, my wife and I; and my wife paid him off for this month also, and so he is cleared.

After dancing we took him down to supper, and were very merry, and I made myself so, and kind to him as much as I could, to prevent his discourse, though I perceive to my trouble that he knows all, and may do me the disgrace to publish it as much as he can. Which I take very ill, and if too much provoked shall witness it to her. After supper and he gone we to bed.

1. 16 Car. II, cap. 4, "An Act to prevent and suppresse seditious Conventicles". It was enacted that anyone of the age of sixteen or upwards present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle was to incur fine or imprisonment. A conventicle was defined as an assembly of more than five persons besides the members of a family met together for holding worship not according to the rites of the Church of England. The act was amended 22 Car. II, cap. i (1670), and practically repealed by the Toleration Act of 1689, but the act 22 Car. II, cap. i, was specially repealed 52 Geo. III, cap. 155, s. 1.

Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686. Around 1672 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Anthony Ashley-Cooper 1st Earl Shaftesbury 1621-1683. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Anthony Ashley-Cooper 1st Earl Shaftesbury 1621-1683. Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Around 1650 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 25 July 1663. 25 Jul 1663. Up and to my office setting papers in order for these two or three days, in which I have been hindered a little, and then having intended this day to go to Banstead Downs to see a famous race, I sent Will to get himself ready to go with me, and I also by and by home and put on my riding suit, and being ready came to the office to Sir J. Minnes (64) and Sir W. Batten (62), and did a little of course at the office this morning, and so by boat to White Hall, where I hear that the race is put off, because the Lords do sit in Parliament to-day. However, having appointed Mr. Creed to come to me to Fox Hall, I went over thither, and after some debate, Creed and I resolved to go to Clapham, to Mr. Gauden's, who had sent his coach to their place for me because I was to have my horse of him to go to the race. So I went thither by coach and my Will by horse with me; Mr. Creed he went over back again to Westminster to fetch his horse. When I came to Mr. Gauden's one first thing was to show me his house, which is almost built, wherein he and his family live. I find it very regular and finely contrived, and the gardens and offices about it as convenient and as full of good variety as ever I saw in my life. It is true he hath been censured for laying out so much money; but he tells me that he built it for his brother, who is since dead (the Bishop), who when he should come to be Bishop of Winchester, which he was promised (to which bishoprick at present there is no house), he did intend to dwell here. Besides, with the good husbandry in making his bricks and other things I do not think it costs him so much money as people think and discourse.

By and by to dinner, and in comes Mr. Creed. I saluted Mr. Gauden's lady, and the young ladies, he having many pretty children, and his sister, the Bishop's widow (53); who was, it seems, Sir W. Russel's (88) daughter, the Treasurer of the Navy; who by her discourse at dinner I find to be very well-bred, and a woman of excellent discourse, even so much as to have my attention all dinner with much more pleasure than I did give to Mr. Creed, whose discourse was mighty merry in inveighing at Mr. Gauden's victuals that they had at sea the last voyage that he prosecuted, till methought the woman began to take it seriously.

After dinner by Mr. Gauden's motion we got Mrs. Gauden and her sister to sing to a viall, on which Mr. Gauden's eldest son (a pretty man, but a simple one methinks) played but very poorly, and the musique bad, but yet I commended it. Only I do find that the ladies have been taught to sing and do sing well now, but that the viall puts them out. I took the viall and played some things from one of their books, Lyra lessons, which they seemed to like well. Thus we pass an hour or two after dinner and towards the evening we bade them Adieu! and took horse; being resolved that, instead of the race which fails us, we would go to Epsum.

So we set out, and being gone a little way I sent home Will to look to the house, and Creed and I rode forward; the road being full of citizens going and coming toward Epsum, where, when we came, we could hear of no lodging, the town so full; but which was better, I went towards Ashted, my old place of pleasure; and there by direction of one goodman Arthur, whom we met on the way, we went to Farmer Page's, at which direction he and I made good sport, and there we got a lodging in a little hole we could not stand upright in, but rather than go further to look we staid there, and while supper was getting ready I took him to walk up and down behind my cozen Pepys's house that was, which I find comes little short of what I took it to be when I was a little boy, as things use commonly to appear greater than then when one comes to be a man and knows more, and so up and down in the closes, which I know so well methinks, and account it good fortune that I lie here that I may have opportunity to renew my old walks. It seems there is one Mr. Rouse, they call him the Queen's (24) Tailor, that lives there now.

So to our lodging to supper, and among other meats had a brave dish of cream, the best I ever eat in my life, and with which we pleased ourselves much, and by and by to bed, where, with much ado yet good sport, we made shift to lie, but with little ease, and a little spaniel by us, which has followed us all the way, a pretty dogg, and we believe that follows my horse, and do belong to Mrs. Gauden, which we, therefore, are very careful of.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza. Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Battersea, Surrey

On 09 Apr 1632 Robert Rich 3rd Earl Warwick 1611-1659 (20) and Anne Cavendish Countess Warwick 1611-1638 (21) were married at Battersea. She by marriage Countess Warwick.

In 1850 Thomas Denman Sculptor 1790-1861 (60) was living in Battersea in reduced circumstances.

Battersea Bridge, Surrey

Battersea Bridge is a bridge over the River Thames.

St Mary's Church Battersea, Surrey

On 08 Apr 1742 Henry St John 1st Viscount St John 1652-1742 (89) died. He was buried at St Mary's Church Battersea. His son John St John 2nd Viscount St John 1702-1748 (39) succeeded 2nd Viscount St John.

Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Henry St John 1st Viscount St John 1652-1742. 1745. Joseph Highmore Painter 1692-1780. Portrait of John St John 2nd Viscount St John 1702-1748 in Coronation Robes. Before 07 Jun 1731 William Aikman Painter 1682-1731. Portrait of John St John 2nd Viscount St John 1702-1748.

Beddington

Bletchingley

Box Hill, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 27 August 1655. 27 Aug 1655. I went to Boxhill, to see those rare natural bowers, cabinets, and shady walks in the box copses: hence we walked to Mickleham, and saw Sir F. Stidolph's seat, environed with elm trees and walnuts innumerable, and of which last he told us they received a considerable revenue. Here are such goodly walks and hills shaded with yew and box, as render the place extremely agreeable, it seeming from these evergreens to be summer all the winter.

Brockham, Surrey

Byfleet, Surrey

On 06 May 1548 Anthony Browne 1500-1548 (48) died at Byfleet. He was buried at Senlac Hill Hastings.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 August 1678. 24 Aug 1678. I went to see my Lord of St. Alban's (73) house, at Byfleet, an old, large building. Thence, to the papermills, where I found them making a coarse white paper. They cull the rags which are linen for white paper, woolen for brown; then they stamp them in troughs to a pap, with pestles, or hammers, like the powder mills, then put it into a vessel of water, in which they dip a frame closely wired with wire as small as a hair and as close as a weaver's reed; on this they take up the pap, the superfluous water draining through the wire; this they dexterously turning, shake out like a pancake on a smooth board between two pieces of flannel, then press it between a great press, the flannel sucking out the moisture; then, taking it out, they ply and dry it on strings, as they dry linen in the laundry; then dip it in alum water, lastly, polish and make it up in quires. They put some gum in the water in which they macerate the rags. The mark we find on the sheets is formed in the wire.

Camberwell, Surrey

In 1653 William Parr Vicar 1617-1691 (36) was appointed Vicar of Camberwell.

John Evelyn's Diary 01 September 1657. 01 Sep 1657. I visited Sir Edmund Bowyer, at his melancholy seat at Camberwell. He has a very pretty grove of oaks, and hedges of yew in his garden, and a handsome row of tall elms before his court.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 October 1681. 02 Oct 1681. I went to Camberwell, where that good man Dr. Parr (late chaplain to Archbishop Usher) preached on Acts xvi. 30.

John Evelyn's Diary 27 October 1685. 27 Oct 1685. At the Royal Society an Urn full of bones was presented, dug up in an highway, whilst repairing it, in a field in Camberwell in Surrey; it was found intire with its cover, amongst many others, be liev'd to be truly Roman and antient. Sir Richd Bulkeley described to us a model of a charriot he had invented, wch it was not possible to overthrow in whatever uneven way it was drawn, giving us a wonderfull relation of what it had perform'd in that kind, for ease, expedition, and safety; there were some incon veniencies yet to be remedied — it would not contain more than one person; was ready to take fire every 10 miles, and being plac'd, and playing on no fewer than 10 rollers, it made a most prodigious noise, almost intolerable. A remedy was to be sought for these inconveniencies.

John Evelyn's Diary 18 April 1686. 18 Apr 1686. In the afternoone I went to Camberwell to visit Dr. Parr (69). After sermon I accompanied him (69) to his house, where he shew'd me the Life and Letters of the late learned Primate of Armagh (Usher), and among them that letter of Bp. Bramhal's (92) to the Primate, giving notice of the Popish practices to pervert this Nation, by sending an hundred priests into England, who were to conforme themselves to all sectaries and conditions for the more easily dispersing their doctrine amongst us. This letter was the cause of yfc whole impression being seiz'd, upon pretence that it was a political or historical account of things not re lating to theology, tho' it had ben licens'd by ye Bishop; which plainely shew'd what an interest the Papists now had, that a Protestant booke, containing the life and le'tters of so eminent a man, was not to be pub lish'd. There were also many letters to and from most of ye learned persons his correspondents in Europe. The book will, I doubt not, struggle through this unjust impediment. Several Judges were put out, and new complying ones put in.

Watling Street 1c Rochester to London. From Durobrivae the road continues through Park Pale, Vagniacis, Dartford, Noviomagus, Bexley, down Shooter's Hill past Eltham Common to Greenwich Park where the road either (or both):

1. went along the Old Kent Road and crossed the River Thames at either the London Bridge or a ford near Westminster Bridge after which it continued north past St Mary le Bow Church Cheapside, Newgate Gate, Ludgate Hill and over the River Fleet at Fleet Bridge to Marble Arch.

2. continued north-west through Camberwell crossing the River Thames near Vauxhall Bridge after which it continued north to Marble Arch.

Saint Giles Church, Camberwell, Surrey

On or before 03 Jun 1685 Thomas Bond 1st Baronet 1620-1685 (65) died. He was buried 03 Jun 1685 at Saint Giles Church.

Cheam, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 26 September 1658. 26 Sep 1658. Mr. King preached at Ashted, on Proverbs xv. 24; a Quaker would have disputed with him. In the afternoon, we heard Dr. Hacket (66) (since Bishop of Litchfield) at Cheam, where the family of the Lumleys lie buried.

Lumley Chapel Cheam, Surrey

On 27 Jul 1578 Jane Fitzalan Baroness Lumley 1537-1578 (41) died. She was buried at Lumley Chapel Cheam.

Nonsuch Park Cheam, Surrey

Chertsey, Surrey

Chertsey Abbey, Surrey

In 666 Bishop Earconwald 630-693 founded Chertsey Abbey for men and Barking Abbey for women. He served as Abbot Chertsey Abbey whilst his sister Æthelburh of Barking -686 served as Abbess of Barking.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 4 Chapter 6. 674. This man, before he was made bishop, had built two famous monasteries, the one for himself, and the other for his sister Ethelberga, and established them both in regular discipline of the best kind. That for himself was in the county of Surrey, by the river Thames, at a place called Ceortesei, that is, the Island of Ceorot; that for his sister in the province of the East Saxons, at the place called Bercingum, wherein she might be a mother and nurse of devout women. Being put into the government of that monastery, she behaved herself in all respects as became the sister of such a brother, living herself regularly, and piously, and orderly, providing for those under her, as was also manifested by heavenly miracles.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 964. This year drove King Edgar (21) the priests of Winchester out of the old minster, and also out of the new minster; and from Chertsey; and from Milton; and replaced them with monks. And he appointed Ethelgar abbot to the new minster, and Ordbert to Chertsey, and Cyneward to Milton.

In 989 Archibishop Ælfstan aka Lyfing -1020 was appointed Abbot Chertsey Abbey.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Henry I Beauclerc 1110. 1110. This year also died Earl Elias, who held Maine in fee-tail (140) of King Henry (42); and after his death the Earl of Anjou (21) succeeded to it, and held it against the king (42). This was a very calamitous year in this land, through the contributions which the king (42) received for his daughter's (7) portion, and through the badness of the weather, by which the fruits of the earth were very much marred, and the produce of the trees over all this land almost entirely perished. This year men began first to work at the new minster at Chertsey.

140. That is, the territory was not a "fee simple", but subject to "taillage" or taxation; and that particular species is probably here intended which is called in old French "en queuage", an expression not very different from that in the text above.

Chertsey Bridge, Surrey

Porch House, Chertsey, Surrey

On 28 Jul 1667 Abraham Cowley Poet 1618-1667 (49) died in Porch House. He was buried in Westminster Abbey where John Sheffield 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normandby 1648-1721 (19) subsequently commissioned a monument.

Around 1667 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Abraham Cowley Poet 1618-1667. Around 1704 Johnathan

Clacket Lane Services, Surrey

The Kent River Eden rises just north of Clacket Lane Services from where it flows past Limsfield, Oxted, Dormansbridge, Edenbridge, Hever Castle where it forms the moat, past Chiddingstone to Penshurst where it joins the River Medway.

Clapham

Colliers Wood, Surrey

Merton Priory, Colliers Wood, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Croydon

Dorking

East Clandon, Surrey

Hatchlands East Clandon, Surrey

In 1628 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661 (34). Portrait of Sarah Harrington 1565-1629 (63). Hatchlands East Clandon.

East Horsley, Surrey

On 30 Mar 1547 Henry Knyvet of Charlton Wiltshire 1510-1547 (37) died at East Horsley.

On 25 Aug 1559 Thomas Cawarden of Bletchingly and Nonsuch -1559 died at East Horsley or Nonsuch Palace.

After 02 Aug 1591 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland arrived at East Horsley where she stayed with Thomas Cornwallis 1518-1604.

Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

East Molesey, Surrey

In 1886 Esmond Burton Sculptor 1886-1964 was born at East Molesey.

On 14 Jan 1952 Florence Elisabeth "Anthi" Laing 1854-1952 (98) died at East Molesey.

1925. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Florence Elisabeth

Effingham, Surrey

On 03 Mar 1564 Elizabeth Howard Countess Carrick 1564-1646 was born to Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624 (28) and Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 (14) at Effingham. Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (30) was her Godmother.

1576. Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Miniature Portrait of Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624. Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624. In 1590 Robert Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Epsom

Esher, Surrey

On 06 Jan 1782 Louisa Maria La Coast Hanover 1782-1835 was born illegitimately to William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (38) and Almeria Carpenter 1745-1809 (37) at Esher. She a great granddaughter of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

In 1775 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805. Around 1804. John Opie Painter 1761-1807. Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805.

Claremont House Esher, Surrey

On 06 Nov 1817 Princess Charlotte Augusta Hanover 1796-1817 (21) died in childbirth at Claremont House Esher. She buried at St George's Chapel Windsor Castle.

On 19 Jul 1884 Charles Edward Saxe Coburg Gotha 1884-1954 was born to Leopold Saxe Coburg Gotha 1st Duke Albany 1853-1884 (31) and Helena Waldeck Duchess Albany at Claremont House Esher. He a grandson of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.

On 23 Jan 1906 Princess May of Teck 1906-1994 was born to Alexander Teck 1st Earl Athlone 1874-1957 (32) and Princess Alice Countess Athlone 1883-1981 (22) at Claremont House Esher. She a great granddaughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.

St George's Church Esher, Surrey

On 31 Jan 1603 the will of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (68) was proved. He asked to be buried in St George's Church Esher. He appointed his son Francis Drake -1634 as his executor. He left his widow Ursula Stafford 1553- (50) the lease on the manor of Walton on Thames, as well as a house on Fetter Lane and his coach and horses.

Ewell, Surrey

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 03 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Ewell. To the Treasurer and the Barons of the Exchequer. Whereas the king lately commanded them to put into execution all the writs of the late King pending in the exchequer, and although the late King commanded his treasurer and barons of the exchquer, at the supplication of the burgesses of Great Yarmouth, by his writ now in the exchequer, as the said burgesses assert, to allow them 1,000 marks in which the late king was bound to them for a loan in the time when John de Kirkeby was his treasurer, and 1,760l. for the arrears of the wages of divers men sent by them to the late King's command into Gascony for the expedition of this war and for remaining there for a great time, and also for 250l.which they expended, by the order of the late King, in the making of two galleys (galiarum) in the said town, and also 780l. for the wages of certain sailors and divers other costs expended by them at divers times for the expedition of the war in Scotland, to be allowed to them out of the debts owing by them to the said late King, as well as the tenth, eleventh, sixth, seventh, twentieth, and thirtieth granted by the community of the kingdom to the late King, as from other causes whatsoever; they are ordered to execute the said writs. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Diary of Samuel Pepys 21 September 1665. 21 Sep 1665. Up between five and six o'clock; and by the time I was ready, my Lord's coach comes for me; and taking Will Hewer (23) with me, who is all in mourning for his father, who is lately dead of the plague, as my boy Tom's is also, I set out, and took about £100 with me to pay the fees there, and so rode in some fear of robbing. When I come thither, I find only Mr. Ward, who led me to Burgess's bedside, and Spicer's, who, watching of the house, as it is their turns every night, did lie long in bed to-day, and I find nothing at all done in my business, which vexed me. But not seeing how to helpe it I did walk up and down with Mr. Ward to see the house; and by and by Spicer and Mr. Falconbrige come to me and he and I to a towne near by, Yowell, there drink and set up my horses and also bespoke a dinner, and while that is dressing went with Spicer and walked up and down the house and park; and a fine place it hath heretofore been, and a fine prospect about the house. A great walk of an elme and a walnutt set one after another in order. And all the house on the outside filled with figures of stories, and good painting of Rubens' or Holben's doing. And one great thing is, that most of the house is covered, I mean the posts, and quarters in the walls; covered with lead, and gilded. I walked into the ruined garden, and there found a plain little girle, kinswoman of Mr. Falconbridge, to sing very finely by the eare only, but a fine way of singing, and if I come ever to lacke a girle again I shall think of getting her.

Thence to the towne, and there Spicer, Woodruffe, and W. Bowyer and I dined together and a friend of Spicer's; and a good dinner I had for them. Falconbrige dined somewhere else, by appointment. Strange to see how young W. Bowyer looks at 41 years; one would not take him for 24 or more, and is one of the greatest wonders I ever did see.

After dinner, about 4 of the clock we broke up, and I took coach and home (in fear for the money I had with me, but that this friend of Spicer's, one of the Duke's guard did ride along the best part of the way with us). I got to my Lord Bruncker's (45) before night, and there I sat and supped with him and his mistresse, and Cocke (48) whose boy is yet ill.

Thence, after losing a crowne betting at Tables [Cribbage], we walked home, Cocke (48) seeing me at my new lodging, where I went to bed. All my worke this day in the coach going and coming was to refresh myself in my musique scale, which I would fain have perfecter than ever I had yet.

In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 29 September 1665. 29 Sep 1665. To sleep till 5 o'clock, when it is now very dark, and then rose, being called up by order by Mr. Marlow, and so up and dressed myself, and by and by comes Mr. Lashmore on horseback, and I had my horse I borrowed of Mr. Gillthropp, Sir W. Batten's (64) clerke, brought to me, and so we set out and rode hard and was at Nonsuch by about eight o'clock, a very fine journey and a fine day. There I come just about chappell time and so I went to chappell with them and thence to the several offices about my tallys, which I find done, but strung for sums not to my purpose, and so was forced to get them to promise me to have them cut into other sums. But, Lord! what ado I had to persuade the dull fellows to it, especially Mr. Warder, Master of the Pells, and yet without any manner of reason for their scruple.

But at last I did, and so left my tallies there against another day, and so walked to Yowell, and there did spend a peece upon them, having a whole house full, and much mirth by a sister of the mistresse of the house, an old mayde lately married to a lieutenant of a company that quarters there, and much pleasant discourse we had and, dinner being done, we to horse again and come to Greenwich before night, and so to my lodging, and there being a little weary sat down and fell to order some of my pocket papers, and then comes Captain Cocke (48), and after a great deal of discourse with him seriously upon the disorders of our state through lack of men to mind the public business and to understand it, we broke up, sitting up talking very late. We spoke a little of my late business propounded of taking profit for my money laid out for these goods, but he finds I rise in my demand, he offering me still £500 certain. So we did give it over, and I to bed. I hear for certain this night upon the road that Sir Martin Noell (65) is this day dead of the plague in London, where he hath lain sick of it these eight days.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 November 1665. 20 Nov 1665. Up before day, and wrote some letters to go to my Lord, among others that about W. Howe, which I believe will turn him out, and so took horse for Nonsuch, with two men with me, and the ways very bad, and the weather worse, for wind and rayne. But we got in good time thither, and I did get my tallys got ready, and thence, with as many as could go, to Yowell, and there dined very well, and I saw my Besse, a very well-favoured country lass there, and after being very merry and having spent a piece I took horse, and by another way met with a very good road, but it rained hard and blew, but got home very well. Here I find Mr. Deering come to trouble me about business, which I soon dispatched and parted, he telling me that Luellin hath been dead this fortnight, of the plague, in St. Martin's Lane, which much surprised me.

The River Hogsmill rises at Ewell from where it flows to Kingston Upon Thames where it joins the River Thames.

Farnham, Surrey

In 1510 Bishop John White 1510-1560 was born to Robert White Merchant at Farnham. He was educated at Winchester College and New College.

John White Lord Mayor of London -1573 was born to Robert White Merchant at Farnham. He was educated at Winchester College and New College.

The River Wey is a tributary of the River Thames which it joins around 2km west of Walton_Bridge. It rises just west of Alton in Hampshire and thereafter flows through, or near, Farnham and Weybridge.

Tongham, Farnham, Surrey

On 17 Feb 1895 Violet Kathleen Brinkley 1895-1985 was born to Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley 1861-1903 (33) and Evelyn Everard Hutton 1860-1937 (35) at Tongham.

Fetcham, Surrey

St Mary's Church Fetcham, Surrey

On or before 25 Sep 1864 Agatha Cox 1864-1958 was born to Homersham Cox. She was baptised on 25 Sep 1864 at St Mary's Church Fetcham.

Frimley Green, Surrey

On 06 Jul 1901 William James Stillman 1828-1901 (73) died at Frimley Green.

Gatton, Surrey

On 07 Oct 1771 Charles Bennet 4th Earl Tankerville 1743-1822 (27) and Emma Colebrooke Countess Tankerville 1752-1836 (19) were married at Gatton. She by marriage Countess Tankerville.

Leigh Place Gatton, Surrey

Around 1469 Eleanor Copley Baroness De La Warr and West 1469-1536 was born to Roger Copley 1430-1490 (39) in Leigh Place Gatton.

Around 1470 Dorothy Copley 1470- was born to Roger Copley 1430-1490 (40) in Leigh Place Gatton.

Godalming, Surrey

Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 April 1661. 30 Apr 1661. This morning, after order given to my workmen, my wife and I and Mr. Creed took coach, and in Fishstreet took up Mr. Hater and his wife, who through her mask seemed at first to be an old woman, but afterwards I found her to be a very pretty modest black woman. We got a small bait at Leatherhead, and so to Godlyman, where we lay all night, and were very merry, having this day no other extraordinary rencontre, but my hat falling off my head at Newington into the water, by which it was spoiled, and I ashamed of it. I am sorry that I am not at London, to be at Hide-parke to-morrow, among the great gallants and ladies, which will be very fine.

Godstone, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 02 July 1649. 02 Jul 1649. I went from Wotton to Godstone (the residence of Sir John Evelyn (58)), where was also Sir John Evelyn of Wilts. (47), when I took leave of both Sir Johns and their ladies. Mem. the prodigious memory of Sir John of Wilts' (47) daughter, since married to Mr. W. Pierrepont [Note. Mr R Pierrepoint], and mother of the present Earl of Kingston. I returned to Sayes Court this night.

John Evelyn's Diary 03 August 1658. 03 Aug 1658. Went to Sir John Evelyn at Godstone. The place is excellent, but might be improved by turning some offices of the house, and removing the garden. The house being a noble fabric, though not comparable to what was first built by my uncle, who was master of all the powder mills.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 November 1659. 24 Nov 1659. Sir John Evelyn [of Godstone] invited us to the forty-first wedding-day feast, where was much company of friends.

John Evelyn's Diary 14 October 1677. 14 Oct 1677. I went to church at Godstone, and to see old Sir John Evelyn's DORMITORY, joining to the church, paved with marble, where he and his Lady lie on a very stately monument at length; he in armor of white marble. The inscription is only an account of his particular branch of the family, on black marble.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.

The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

Great Bookham, Surrey

Before 17 Sep 1643 Francis Howard 5th Baron Howard 1643-1695 was born to Charles Howard 1615-1672 and Frances Courthope at Great Bookham. On 17 Sep 1643 Francis Howard 5th Baron Howard 1643-1695 was baptised at Great Bookham.

On 07 Jul 1651 Francis Howard 1585-1651 (65) died at Great Bookham.

In 1672 William Howard 1672- was born to William Howard 1616-1686 (56) at Great Bookham.

On 13 Aug 1684 Lieutenenant General Thomas Howard 1684-1753 was baptised at Great Bookham.

On 13 Mar 1702 Lodowick Howard 1632-1702 (69) died at Great Bookham.

In 1722 Mary Howard 1722-1757 was born to Lieutenenant General Thomas Howard 1684-1753 (37) and Mary Moreton -1782 at Great Bookham.

On 31 Mar 1753 Lieutenenant General Thomas Howard 1684-1753 (68) died at 8 Savile Street Savile Street Savile Row. He was buried at Great Bookham.

Guildford

Haling, Surrey

On 20 Oct 1587 Robert Gage 1504-1587 (83) died at Haling.

On 29 Aug 1597 Henry Gage 1597-1645 was born to John Gage 1563- (34) and Margaret Copley 1532- (65) at Haling.

Around 1645 John Weesop Painter -1652. Portrait of Henry Gage 1597-1645.

Kew

Kingston Upon Thames

Kyngsham, Surrey

Around 1447 Nicholas Sidney 1447-1512 was born to William IV Sidney 1417-1477 (30) at Kyngsham.

Lageham, Surrey

Around 1281 John St John Lagenham 2nd Baron St John Lagenham 1281-1323 was born to John St John Lagenham 1st Baron St John Lagenham 1250-1316 (31) and Margaret Unknown Baroness St John Lagenham at Lageham.

Around 1308 John St John Lagenham 3rd Baron St John Lagenham 1308-1349 was born to John St John Lagenham 2nd Baron St John Lagenham 1281-1323 (27) and Margery Unknown Baroness St John Lagenham at Lageham.

Lambeth

Leatherhead, Surrey

Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 April 1661. 30 Apr 1661. This morning, after order given to my workmen, my wife and I and Mr. Creed took coach, and in Fishstreet took up Mr. Hater and his wife, who through her mask seemed at first to be an old woman, but afterwards I found her to be a very pretty modest black woman. We got a small bait at Leatherhead, and so to Godlyman, where we lay all night, and were very merry, having this day no other extraordinary rencontre, but my hat falling off my head at Newington into the water, by which it was spoiled, and I ashamed of it. I am sorry that I am not at London, to be at Hide-parke to-morrow, among the great gallants and ladies, which will be very fine.

John Evelyn's Diary 08 April 1685. 08 Apr 1685. Being now somewhat compos'd after my greate affliction, I went to London to hear Dr. Tenison (48) (it being on a Wednesday in Lent) at Whitehall. I observ'd that tho' the King (51) was not in his seate above in the chapell, the Doctor made his three congees, which they were not us'd to do when the late King was absent, making then one bowing onely. I ask'd the reason; it was sayd he had a special order so to do. The Princesse of Denmark (34) was in the King's (54) Closet, but sat on the left hand of the chaire, the Clearke of the Closet (50) standing by His Ma*s chaire, as If he had ben present. I met the Queene Dowager (46) going now first from Whitehall to dwell at Somerset-house. This day my brother of Wotton and Mr. Onslow (30) were candidates for Surrey against Sr Adam Brown and my cousin Sr Edwd Evelyn, and were circumvented in their election by a trick of the Sheriff's* taking advantage of my brother's party going out of the small village of Leatherhead to seek shelter and lodging, the afternoone being tempestuous, proceeding to the Election when they were gon; they expecting the next morning; whereas before and then they exceeded the other party by many hundreds, as I am assur'd. The Duke of Norfolk (30) led Sr Edw. Evelyn's and Sr Adam Brown's party. For this Parliament, very meane and slight persons (some of them gentlemen's servants, clearkes, and persons neither of reputation nor interest) were set up, but the country would choose my brother whether he would or no, and he miss'd it by the trick above mentioned. Sr Adam Brown was so deafe that he could not heare one word. S1 Edw. Evelyn was an honest gent much in favour with his Majesty (54).

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza. Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1680 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Richard Onslow 1st Baron Onslow 1654-1717.

The River Mole is a tributary of the River Thames which it joins opposite Hampton Court Palace. It rises near Rusper and flows broadly north through Leatherhead.

Mansion House Leatherhead, Surrey

On 02 Aug 1591 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (57) left at Nonsuch Palace to commence her Royal Progress. She travelled south to Mansion House Leatherhead; the home of Edmund Tilney 1536-1610 (55).

Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

St John's School Leatherhead, Surrey

On 08 Mar 1895 Captain Willoughby Thornton Wrigley 1895-1920 was born to Reverend Daniel Wrigley at Nhill. He was educated at St John's School Leatherhead.

Limsfield, Surrey

The Kent River Eden rises just north of Clacket Lane Services from where it flows past Limsfield, Oxted, Dormansbridge, Edenbridge, Hever Castle where it forms the moat, past Chiddingstone to Penshurst where it joins the River Medway.

Lingfield

Merton, Surrey

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 750-799. 755. This year Cynewulf, with the consent of the West-Saxon council, deprived Sebright, his relative, for unrighteous deeds, of his kingdom, except Hampshire; which he retained, until he slew the alderman who remained the longest with him. Then Cynewulf drove him to the forest of Andred [Note. The Weald in South-East England], where he remained, until a swain stabbed him at Privett, and revenged the alderman, Cumbra. The same Cynewulf fought many hard battles with the Welsh; and, about one and thirty winters after he had the kingdom, he was desirous of expelling a prince called Cyneard, who was the brother of Sebright. But he having understood that the king was gone, thinly attended, on a visit to a lady at Merton, rode after him, and beset him therein; surrounding the town without, ere the attendants of the king were aware of him. When the king found this, he went out of doors, and defended himself with courage; till, having looked on the etheling, he rushed out upon him, and wounded him severely. Then were they all fighting against the king, until they had slain him. As soon as the king's thanes in the lady's bower heard the tumult, they ran to the spot, whoever was then ready. The etheling immediately offered them life and rewards; which none of them would accept, but continued fighting together against him, till they all lay dead, except one British hostage, and he was severely wounded. When the king's thanes that were behind heard in the morning that the king was slain, they rode to the spot, Osric his alderman, and Wiverth his thane, and the men that he had left behind; and they met the etheling at the town, where the king lay slain. The gates, however, were locked against them, which they attempted to force; but he promised them their own choice of money and land, if they would grant him the kingdom; reminding them, that their relatives were already with him, who would never desert him. To which they answered, that no relative could be dearer to them than their lord, and that they would never follow his murderer. Then they besought their relatives to depart from him, safe and sound. They replied, that the same request was made to their comrades that were formerly with the king; "And we are as regardless of the result," they rejoined, "as our comrades who with the king were slain." Then they continued fighting at the gates, till they rushed in, and slew the etheling and all the men that were with him; except one, who was the godson of the alderman, and whose life he spared, though he was often wounded. This same Cynewulf reigned one and thirty winters. His body lies at Winchester, and that of the etheling at Axminster. Their paternal pedigree goeth in a direct line to Cerdic. The same year Ethelbald, king of the Mercians, was slain at Seckington; and his body lies at Repton. He reigned one and forty years; and Bernred then succeeded to the kingdom, which he held but a little while, and unprosperously; for King Offa the same year put him to flight, and assumed the government; which he held nine and thirty winters. His son Everth held it a hundred and forty days. Offa was the son of Thingferth, Thingferth of Enwulf, Enwulf of Osmod, Osmod of Eawa, Eawa of Webba, Webba of Creoda, Creoda of Cenwald, Cenwald of Cnebba, Cnebba of Icel, Icel of Eomer, Eomer of Angelthew, Angelthew of Offa, Offa of Wermund, Wermund of Witley, Witley of Woden.

In 786 Cyneheard the Ætheling -786 died at Merton having murdered Cynewulf King of Wessex -786.

In 786 Cynewulf King of Wessex -786 was killed by Cyneheard the Ætheling -786 at Merton while visiting his [Cynewulf's] mistress. Beorhtric King Wessex -802 succeeded King Wessex.

On 24 Aug 1550 William Locke Sheriff 1486-1550 (64) died at Merton. He was buried at St Thomas of Acre Church.

Mickleham, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 27 August 1655. 27 Aug 1655. I went to Boxhill, to see those rare natural bowers, cabinets, and shady walks in the box copses: hence we walked to Mickleham, and saw Sir F. Stidolph's seat, environed with elm trees and walnuts innumerable, and of which last he told us they received a considerable revenue. Here are such goodly walks and hills shaded with yew and box, as render the place extremely agreeable, it seeming from these evergreens to be summer all the winter.

In Jan 1735 a great storm occurred in London and elsewhere causing significant damage.

From London Prints:

Yesterday Morning the Wind being at W. and W.S.W. it blew hard; and in the Afternoon we had one of the strongest Storms that has been known for many Years, in which several Lighters and Boats in the River were sunk, and others dashed to Pieces; but all the Ships in the River rode out with Safety. On Shore, great Damage was done in the Houses, by ripping off the Tiles, blowing down Stacks of Chimneys, &c. and many People were killed and wounded; particularly, Five Houses were blown down in St. Giles's Parish, and another in Hartshorn Lane in the Strand, by which two Persons lost their Lives. A Stack of Chimneys fell upon a Footman near Gray's-Inn, and killed him. A House in the Broad-Way, Westminster, was blown down, and a Man and Boy killed. And Mr. Lancashire, a Carpenter in Two-Swan-Yard near Bishopsgate, was blown from the Top of a Twelve-Foot Ladder, by which he fractured his Skull, and died on the Spot.

It likewise blew up by the Roots several large Trees in St. James's Park, and did incredible Damage to a great many Houses, in all Parts of the Cities of London and Westminster.

From Tunbridge-Wells we have an Account that the Land-Floods came down upon them so suddenly, that all the Bridges upon the Brook which runs by the Walks, were carried away by the Torrent, and great Damages done besides, so that the like has not been known before in any one's Memory.

They write from [illegible] Abbey in Yorkshire that [several words illegible] happened such a Storm as had not been known in the Memory of Man; tho' it lasted no longer than three quarters of an Hour, yet four Houses were blown down, and several others damaged, and a great Number of large Trees were either broken or blown up by the Roots.

Moulsey in Surrey, Jan. 9. The River Thames is now rising here, and yet it is already so high, we are forced to live above Stairs; and when the Land Waters come down from the Hills in the West-Country, God knows the Consequence: The Thames rose between 5 and 12 this Morning, very near a Foot in Height.

On the 8th Instant there were near 100 Elm Trees (and other Sorts) blown up by the Roots in this Parish during the violent Storm, all fine tall Sticks, and of a load of Timber in a Stick one with another; which will afford the Navy a fine Opportunity of furnishing the Stores in his Majesty's Dockyard this Year.

Extract of a Letter from Dover, dated Jan. 10. Our Accounts from Deal yesterday bring that 40 Sail were missing, that there is scarce a Ship but has met with Damage, and most people think the Gale of Wind little inferior to the November Storm, and lasted longer.

From several LONDON PRINTS Jan. 11. We have received further Accounts of the Misfortunes occasioned by the terrible Storm on Wednesday last: It was observed to be at the highest at 12 o'Clock, about which Time a Stack of Chimnies fell upon a Coachman near Golden-Square, and fractured his Skull: At Barnet, and the Villages adjacent, they perceived three loud Claps of Thunder, accompanied by Lightning; several Barns were blown down in that Neighbourhood; and in several of the Roads near London, the Trees lie in the Highway in such manner, that it is difficult to pass: The Seat was blow from the Mount in Kensington Gardens. At all Parts of the Town are seen Houses untiled, stript of their Lead, and the Chimnies demolish'd.

The Kitchen Chimney of the Lord Bruce was blown down, which broke thro' the Stables of his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland, and did very considerable Damage, some of the Servants narrowly escaping with their Lives.

36 Trees were broke down, and tore up by the Roots, in St. James's Park, particularly the large Tree entering the Mall, from St. James's Palace, under which stood a Centry-Box, which was blown down at the same Time, with the Soldier in it, who narrowly escaped with his Life.

About 300 Weight of Lead was blown off the House of Arundel, Esq; in Burlington Gardens, Surveyor of his Majesty's Roads.

About 500 Wt. of Lead was ript off the Parish Church of St. Laurence Jewry, by Guild-Hall.

At the Marquis de Montandre's House in Brook-street, a large Stack of Chimnies was blown down, which demolished an Office in the back Part of the House, dashing in Pieces a Table at which 9 Servants were to dine a quarter of an Hour after.

At Riskins, the seat of the Lord Bathurst (50) in Buckinghamshire, above 40 large Trees in his Lordship's Grounds were blown down.

At Fulham 2 or 3 Houses were blown down, and a Barn belonging to Mr. Gray, a Farmer.

A great many Wallnut-trees in the Park of Tryon, Esq; at Mickleham, were destroyed. We hear he has made above 300£. per Annum of the Wallnuts which the said Trees produced.

The same Day, as a Servant of Messieurs Frame and Berkley was going along the North Side of St. Paul's, he was thrown down by the Violence of the Winds, at which time his Letter-Case fell from his Side, and the Wind blew his Notes about; all which he found again, except one of £300. one of £139. 16s one of £40. and one of £25. for which Notes a Reward is offered.

Burford Bridge, Mickleham, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Juniper Hall Field Centre, Mickleham, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Mitcham, Surrey

On or before 30 Jan 1665 Mary Smyth -1665 died. She was buried at Mitcham.

Mousley, Surrey

In Jan 1735 a great storm occurred in London and elsewhere causing significant damage.

From London Prints:

Yesterday Morning the Wind being at W. and W.S.W. it blew hard; and in the Afternoon we had one of the strongest Storms that has been known for many Years, in which several Lighters and Boats in the River were sunk, and others dashed to Pieces; but all the Ships in the River rode out with Safety. On Shore, great Damage was done in the Houses, by ripping off the Tiles, blowing down Stacks of Chimneys, &c. and many People were killed and wounded; particularly, Five Houses were blown down in St. Giles's Parish, and another in Hartshorn Lane in the Strand, by which two Persons lost their Lives. A Stack of Chimneys fell upon a Footman near Gray's-Inn, and killed him. A House in the Broad-Way, Westminster, was blown down, and a Man and Boy killed. And Mr. Lancashire, a Carpenter in Two-Swan-Yard near Bishopsgate, was blown from the Top of a Twelve-Foot Ladder, by which he fractured his Skull, and died on the Spot.

It likewise blew up by the Roots several large Trees in St. James's Park, and did incredible Damage to a great many Houses, in all Parts of the Cities of London and Westminster.

From Tunbridge-Wells we have an Account that the Land-Floods came down upon them so suddenly, that all the Bridges upon the Brook which runs by the Walks, were carried away by the Torrent, and great Damages done besides, so that the like has not been known before in any one's Memory.

They write from [illegible] Abbey in Yorkshire that [several words illegible] happened such a Storm as had not been known in the Memory of Man; tho' it lasted no longer than three quarters of an Hour, yet four Houses were blown down, and several others damaged, and a great Number of large Trees were either broken or blown up by the Roots.

Moulsey in Surrey, Jan. 9. The River Thames is now rising here, and yet it is already so high, we are forced to live above Stairs; and when the Land Waters come down from the Hills in the West-Country, God knows the Consequence: The Thames rose between 5 and 12 this Morning, very near a Foot in Height.

On the 8th Instant there were near 100 Elm Trees (and other Sorts) blown up by the Roots in this Parish during the violent Storm, all fine tall Sticks, and of a load of Timber in a Stick one with another; which will afford the Navy a fine Opportunity of furnishing the Stores in his Majesty's Dockyard this Year.

Extract of a Letter from Dover, dated Jan. 10. Our Accounts from Deal yesterday bring that 40 Sail were missing, that there is scarce a Ship but has met with Damage, and most people think the Gale of Wind little inferior to the November Storm, and lasted longer.

From several LONDON PRINTS Jan. 11. We have received further Accounts of the Misfortunes occasioned by the terrible Storm on Wednesday last: It was observed to be at the highest at 12 o'Clock, about which Time a Stack of Chimnies fell upon a Coachman near Golden-Square, and fractured his Skull: At Barnet, and the Villages adjacent, they perceived three loud Claps of Thunder, accompanied by Lightning; several Barns were blown down in that Neighbourhood; and in several of the Roads near London, the Trees lie in the Highway in such manner, that it is difficult to pass: The Seat was blow from the Mount in Kensington Gardens. At all Parts of the Town are seen Houses untiled, stript of their Lead, and the Chimnies demolish'd.

The Kitchen Chimney of the Lord Bruce was blown down, which broke thro' the Stables of his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland, and did very considerable Damage, some of the Servants narrowly escaping with their Lives.

36 Trees were broke down, and tore up by the Roots, in St. James's Park, particularly the large Tree entering the Mall, from St. James's Palace, under which stood a Centry-Box, which was blown down at the same Time, with the Soldier in it, who narrowly escaped with his Life.

About 300 Weight of Lead was blown off the House of Arundel, Esq; in Burlington Gardens, Surveyor of his Majesty's Roads.

About 500 Wt. of Lead was ript off the Parish Church of St. Laurence Jewry, by Guild-Hall.

At the Marquis de Montandre's House in Brook-street, a large Stack of Chimnies was blown down, which demolished an Office in the back Part of the House, dashing in Pieces a Table at which 9 Servants were to dine a quarter of an Hour after.

At Riskins, the seat of the Lord Bathurst (50) in Buckinghamshire, above 40 large Trees in his Lordship's Grounds were blown down.

At Fulham 2 or 3 Houses were blown down, and a Barn belonging to Mr. Gray, a Farmer.

A great many Wallnut-trees in the Park of Tryon, Esq; at Mickleham, were destroyed. We hear he has made above 300£. per Annum of the Wallnuts which the said Trees produced.

The same Day, as a Servant of Messieurs Frame and Berkley was going along the North Side of St. Paul's, he was thrown down by the Violence of the Winds, at which time his Letter-Case fell from his Side, and the Wind blew his Notes about; all which he found again, except one of £300. one of £139. 16s one of £40. and one of £25. for which Notes a Reward is offered.

Norbury Park, Surrey

Before 18 Oct 1722 Charles Tyron 1722-1768 was born to Charles Tyron 1702-1763 and Mary Shirley 1702-1771 at Norbury Park.

On 08 Jun 1729 William Tyron 1729-1788 was born to Charles Tyron 1702-1763 (26) and Mary Shirley 1702-1771 (26) at Norbury Park.

North Holmwood, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Norwood, Surrey

On 02 May 1859 Eliza Courtenay 1792-1859 (67) died at Norwood.

Ockham, Surrey

On 22 Jul 1734 Peter King 1st Baron King 1669-1734 (65) died in Ockham. His son John King 2nd Baron King 1706-1740 (28) succeeded 2nd Baron King.

Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Peter King 1st Baron King 1669-1734.

In 1740 John King 2nd Baron King 1706-1740 (34) died in Ockham. His brother Peter King 3rd Baron King 1709-1754 (31) succeeded 3rd Baron King.

In 1754 Peter King 3rd Baron King 1709-1754 (45) died in Ockham. His His brother William King 4th Baron King 1711-1767 (43) succeeded 4th Baron King.

In 1767 William King 4th Baron King 1711-1767 (56) died in Ockham. His brother Thomas King 5th Baron King 1712-1779 (55) succeeded 5th Baron King.

In 1779 Thomas King 5th Baron King 1712-1779 (67) died in Ockham. His son Peter King 6th Baron King 1736-1793 (43) succeeded 6th Baron King.

Ockley, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. 851. After these things, the aforesaid pagan host went into Surrey, which is a district situated on the south bank of the River Thames, and to the west of Kent. And Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, and his son Ethelbald, with all their army, fought a long time against them at a place called Ac-lea, i.e. the Oak-plain, and there, after a lengthened battle, which was fought with much bravery on both sides, the greater part of the pagan multitude was destroyed and cut to pieces, so that we never heard of their being so defeated, either before or since, in any country, in one day; and the Christians gained an honourable victory, and were triumphant over their graves.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. 851. This year Alderman Ceorl, with the men of Devonshire, fought the heathen army at Wemburg, and after making great slaughter obtained the victory. The same year King Athelstan and Alderman Elchere fought in their ships, and slew a large army at Sandwich in Kent, taking nine ships and dispersing the rest. The heathens now for the first time remained over winter in the Isle of Thanet. The same year came three hundred and fifty ships into the mouth of the Thames; the crew of which went upon land, and stormed Canterbury and London; putting to flight Bertulf, king of the Mercians, with his army; and then marched southward over the Thames into Surrey. Here Ethelwulf and his son Ethelbald, at the head of the West-Saxon army, fought with them at Ockley, and made the greatest slaughter of the heathen army that we have ever heard reported to this present day. There also they obtained the victory.

On 23 Aug 1420 Thomas Hoo 1370-1420 (50) died at Ockley.

Oxted, Surrey

In 1640 John Hoskins of Oxted 1640-1717 was born to Charles Hoskins 1603-1657 (37) in Oxted.

In Oct 1698 Catherine Hoskyns Duchess Devonshire 1698-1777 was born to John Hoskins of Oxted 1640-1717 (58) in Oxted.

On 16 May 1717 John Hoskins of Oxted 1640-1717 (77) died in Oxted.

The Kent River Eden rises just north of Clacket Lane Services from where it flows past Limsfield, Oxted, Dormansbridge, Edenbridge, Hever Castle where it forms the moat, past Chiddingstone to Penshurst where it joins the River Medway.

Titsey Place Oxted, Surrey

On 07 Dec 1620 Mary Lennard 1549-1620 (71) died in Titsey Place Oxted.

Petersham, Surrey

On 21 Dec 1784 Robert John Wilmot 3rd Baronet Wilmot 1784-1841 was born to Robert Wilmot 2nd Baronet Wilmot Osmaston 1752-1834 (32) and Juliana Elizabeth Byron -1788 in Petersham.

On 19 Sep 1802 Hugh Francis Tollemache 1802-1890 was born to William Manners aka Tollemache 1766-1833 (36) and Catherine Rebecca Gray Lady Manners 1766-1852 (36) at Petersham.

1794. Thomas Lawrence 1769-1830. Portrait of Catherine Rebecca Gray Lady Manners 1766-1852.

On 16 Jul 1881 Claude Bowes-Lyon 14th Earl Strathmore and Kinghorne 1855-1944 (26) and Cecilia Nina Cavendish-Bentinck 1862-1938 (18) were married at Petersham.

On 07 May 1893 Maria Elizabeth Tollemache Marchioness Ailesbury 1809-1893 (83) died at Petersham.

Circle of Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Maria Elizabeth Tollemache Marchioness Ailesbury 1809-1893.

Augusta Anne Wilmot was born to Robert Wilmot 2nd Baronet Wilmot Osmaston 1752-1834 and Marianne Howard 1776-1862 in Petersham.

Church of St Peter Petersham, Surrey

On 05 Jun 1698 Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (71) died at Ham House Ham Richmond. She was buried at Church of St Peter Petersham. Her son Lionel Tollemache 3rd Earl Dysart 1649-1727 (49) succeeded 3rd Earl Dysart.

Around 1641 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1648 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682 and Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1647 John Weesop Painter -1652. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698.

Putney

Reigate

Richmond

Ripley, Surrey

Ripley House Ripley, Surrey

Roehampton, Surrey

On 06 Sep 1623 Thomas Papillon Merchant Politician 1623-1702 was born to David Papillon and Anne Marie Calandrini at Roehampton.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 August 1662. 04 Aug 1662. Came to see me the old Countess of Devonshire, with that excellent and worthy person, my Lord her son (44), from Roehampton.

In 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Christian Bruce Countess Devonshire -1675. In 1631 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684. Around 1647. Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 although the painting says somewhat curiously 2nd Earl Devonshire.

John Evelyn's Diary 08 February 1677. 08 Feb 1677. I went to Roehampton, with my Lady Duchess of Ormond (61). The garden and perspective is pretty, the prospect most agreeable.

On 23 Nov 1684 William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 (67) died at his house in Roehampton. He was buried in the Henry VII Chapel in Westminster Abbey. His son William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707 (44) succeeded 4th Earl Devonshire. Mary Butler Duchess Devonshire 1646-1710 (38) by marriage Countess Devonshire.

Before 1708 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. In 1697 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. Around 1660 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. Around 1655. Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707.

Rookwood, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 23 May 1659. 23 May 1659. I went to Rookwood, and dined with Sir William Hicks (63), where was a great feast and much company. It is a melancholy old house, environed with trees and rooks.

Rowhook, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Seale, Surrey

On 08 Oct 1840 John Jeffreys Pratt 1st Marquess Camden 1759-1840 (81) died in Seale. His son George Pratt 2nd Marquess Camden 1799-1866 (41) succeeded 2nd Marquess Camden, 2nd Earl Brecknock. Harriet Murray Countess Camden 1813-1854 (27) by marriage Countess Camden.

In 1802. Thomas Lawrence 1769-1830. Portrait of John Jeffreys Pratt 1st Marquess Camden 1759-1840.

Shepperton, Surrey

Church of St Nicholas Shepperton, Surrey

On 21 Jul 1641 Charles Rich 4th Earl Warwick 1615-1673 (26) and Mary Boyle Countess Warwick 1625-1678 (15) were married at the Church of St Nicholas Shepperton. Her father strongly disapproved due to her husband's lack of fortune.

Shere, Surrey

Around 1205 John Fitzgeoffrey 1205-1258 was born to Geoffrey Fitzpeter 1st Earl Essex 1162-1213 (43) and Aveline Clare Countess Essex at Shere.

Around 1238 Maud Fitzjohn Countess Warwick 1238-1301 was born to John Fitzgeoffrey 1205-1258 (33) and Isabel Bigod 1212-1250 (26) at Shere.

On 26 Sep 1490 John Tuchet 6th Baron Audley of Heighley 3rd Baron Tuchet 1426-1490 (64) died at Shere. His son James Tuchet 7th Baron Audley of Heighley 1463-1497 (27) succeeded 7th Baron Audley of Heighley in Staffordshire. Joan Bourchier Baroness Audley and Tuchet -1532 by marriage Baroness Audley of Heighley in Staffordshire, Baron Tuchet.

Southwark

Peckham

Stanwell, Surrey

Around 1532 Edward Windsor 3rd Baron Windsor 1532-1575 was born to William Windsor 2nd Baron Windsor 1499-1558 (33) and Margaret Sambourne Baroness Windsor 1501-1554 (31) in Stanwell.

Stanwell Church Stanwell, Surrey

On 27 Jul 1622 Thomas Knyvet 1st Baron Knyvet 1545-1622 (77) died. He was buried at Stanwell Church Stanwell.

Elizabeth Hayward Baroness Knyvet was buried at Stanwell Church Stanwell.

Stanwell Park Stanwell, Surrey

On 16 Sep 1607 Princess Mary Stewart 1605-1607 (2) died of pneumonia at the Stanwell Park Stanwell home of Thomas Knyvet 1st Baron Knyvet 1545-1622 (62) in whose care she had been placed. As soon as Mary died, the Earl of Worcester (57), the Earl of Leicester (43) and the Earl of Totnes (52) went to Hampton Court Palace, to inform the Queen (32) of her daughter's death. Seeing the three men before her, Queen Anne realized what had happened and spared the men the task of telling her.

In 1621 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of Edward Somerset 4th Earl Worcester 1550-1628. Around 1588 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Robert Sidney 1st Earl of Leicester 1563-1626. Around 1605 John Critz 1551-1642. Portrait of Anne of Denmark. 1595. Circle of Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of Anne of Denmark.

Sterborough Castle, Surrey

After 25 Oct 1415 Charles Valois Duke Orléans 1394-1465 was imprisoned at Sterborough Castle then Pontefract Castle.

Stoke D'Abernon, Surrey

Around 1412 Henry Norbury 1412-1464 was born to John Norbury 1375-1414 (37) and Elizabeth Boteler 1386-1465 (26) at Stoke D'Abernon.

In 1438 Elizabeth Norbury 1438-1488 was born to Henry Norbury 1412-1464 (26) at Stoke D'Abernon.

Around 1438 John IV Norbury 1438-1504 was born to Henry Norbury 1412-1464 (26) at Stoke D'Abernon.

On 12 Aug 1504 John IV Norbury 1438-1504 (66) died at Stoke D'Abernon. He was buried at Stoke D'Abernon.

On 16 Aug 1757 Mary Howard 1722-1757 (35) died at Stoke D'Abernon.

Streatham, Surrey

On 21 Jan 1565 Margaret Mundy 1510-1565 (55) died. She was buried the next day in Streatham.

On 30 Sep 1710 John Russell 4th Duke Bedford 1710-1771 was born to Wriothesley Russell 2nd Duke Bedford 1680-1711 (29) and Elizabeth Howland Duchess Bedford 1682-1724 (28) at Streatham.

Around 1770 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of John Russell 4th Duke Bedford 1710-1771.

Sutton, Surrey

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Diary of Henry Machyn May 1551. 25 May 1551. The xxv day of May was be syd Rygatt and Croydon, Suttun, and Darkyng, a grett wondernus of herth... and spesshall at Darkyng, and in dyvers plasys .... pottes, panes, and dyssys donst, and mett felle doune ... abowt howse, and with mony odur thyngs.

Worcester Park Sutton, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 03 January 1666. 03 Jan 1666. I supped in Nonesuch House, whither the office of the Exchequer was transferred during the plague, at my good friend.

Mr. Packer's (47), and took an exact view of the plaster statues and bass-relievos inserted between the timbers and puncheons of the outside walls of the Court; which must needs have been the work of some celebrated Italian. I much admired how they had lasted so well and entire since the time of Henry VIII., exposed as they are to the air; and pity it is they are not taken out and preserved in some dry place; a gallery would become them. There are some mezzo-relievos as big as the life; the story is of the Heathen Gods, emblems, compartments, etc. The palace consists of two courts, of which the first is of stone, castle like, by the Lord Lumleys (of whom it was purchased), the other of timber, a Gothic fabric, but these walls incomparably beautiful. I observed that the appearing timber-puncheons, entrelices, etc., were all so covered with scales of slate, that it seemed carved in the wood and painted, the slate fastened on the timber in pretty figures, that has, like a coat of armor, preserved it from rotting. There stand in the garden two handsome stone pyramids, and the avenue planted with rows of fair elms, but the rest of these goodly trees, both of this and of Worcester Park adjoining, were felled by those destructive and avaricious rebels in the late war, which defaced one of the stateliest seats his Majesty (65) had.

In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

Worcester House Worcester Park Sutton, Surrey

On 22 Oct 1660 Charles Stewart 1660-1661 was born to King James II (27) and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (23) at Worcester House Worcester Park Sutton.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Around 1661 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. One of the Windsor Beauties. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671.

Tandbridge, Surrey

22 Jan 1543. Once William Parr 1st Marquess Northampton 1512-1571 (31) and Anne Bourchier 7th Baroness Bourchier 1517-1571 (26) did live together both commenced affairs. She with John Lyngfield, prior of St. James's Church, in Tanbridge, Surrey [Source. Wikipedia. However, there is no church of St James in Tandbridge?], by whom she had an illegitimate child named John Parr. He with Dorothy Braye Baroness Chandos Baroness Knollys 1524-1605 (19). To protect the interest of his subsequent children Parr (31) pursued legislation to disinherit her child. See Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII Volume 18 Part 1 Jan Jul 1543 22 Jan.

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of William Parr 1st Marquess Northampton 1512-1571.

On 23 Dec 1543 Henry VIII (52) enobled his new wife's (31) brother and uncle at ceremony in the Presence Chamber Hampton Court Palace. Henry Grey 1st Duke Suffolk 1517-1554 (26) and Edward Stanley 3rd Earl Derby 1509-1572 (34) were present. Christopher Barker Garter King of Arms -1550 read the Patents.

William Parr 1st Baron Parr Horton 1483-1547 (60) was created 1st Baron Parr Horton. William was sixty with five daughters. He died four years later at which time the Barony extinct.

William Parr 1st Marquess Northampton 1512-1571 (31) was created 1st Earl Essex 7C 1543. His estranged wife Anne Bourchier 7th Baroness Bourchier 1517-1571 (26) was daughter of the last Earl of Essex of the Fifth Creation. A somewhat curious choice given his wife had eloped the year previous year with John Lyngfield, the prior of Tandbridge, by whom she had an illegitimate child.

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548. Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548. Around 1532 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Edward Stanley 3rd Earl Derby 1509-1572.

Thames Ditton, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 05 October 1647. 05 Oct 1647. I came to Wotton, the place of my birth, to my brother (30), and on the 10th to Hampton Court where I had the honor to kiss his Majesty's (46) hand, and give him an account of several things I had in charge, he being now in the power of those execrable villains who not long after murdered him. I lay at my cousin, Sergeant Hatton's at Thames Ditton, whence, on the 13th, I went to London.

In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

On 06 Mar 1706 Admiral George Pocock 1706-1792 was born at Thames Ditton.

Around 1746 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Admiral George Pocock 1706-1792.

On 01 Sep 1797 William Fitzgerald De Ros 22nd Baron Ros Helmsley 1797-1874 was born to Henry Fitzgerald 1761-1829 (36) and Charlotte Boyle 20th Baroness Ros Helmsley 1769-1831 (28) at Thames Ditton. He a great x 3 grandson of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Imber Court Thames Ditton, Surrey

On 15 Mar 1754 Thomas Onslow 2nd Earl Onslow 1754-1827 was born to George Onslow 1st Earl Onslow 1731-1814 (22) and Henrietta Shelley Countess Onslow -1802 at Imber Court Thames Ditton.

Thorpe, Surrey

After May 1627 William Mynterne of Thorpe in Surrey -1627 died. His daughter Elizabeth Mynterne 1593-1615 inherited his two manors in Thorpe.

Tolworth, Surrey

1851 to 1852. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896 (21). "Ophelia". Hamlet Act IV Scene 7 Part IV in which Queen Gertrude describes Ophelia's death to Laertes. Millais painted the scene near Tolworth using the River Hogsmill. Elizabeth Siddal Model 1829-1862 (21) modelled in a bath-tub at 7 Gower Street. Note the initials PRB bottom right next to his name.

Walton on Thames, Surrey

On 31 Jan 1603 the will of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (68) was proved. He asked to be buried in St George's Church Esher. He appointed his son Francis Drake -1634 as his executor. He left his widow Ursula Stafford 1553- (50) the lease on the manor of Walton on Thames, as well as a house on Fetter Lane and his coach and horses.

Walton on Thames Bridge, Surrey

1747. Walton on Thames Bridge is a bridge over the River Thames first opened in 1747.

1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768 (56). Walton on Thames Bridge.

1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768 (56). Walton on Thames Bridge.

After 1788. Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851 (12). Walton_Bridges.

The River Wey is a tributary of the River Thames which it joins around 2km west of Walton_Bridge. It rises just west of Alton in Hampshire and thereafter flows through, or near, Farnham and Weybridge.

Wandsworth, Surrey

Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 November 1665. 28 Nov 1665. Up before day, and Cocke (48) and I took a hackney coach appointed with four horses to take us up, and so carried us over London Bridge. But there, thinking of some business, I did 'light at the foot of the bridge, and by helpe of a candle at a stall, where some payers were at work, I wrote a letter to Mr. Hater, and never knew so great an instance of the usefulness of carrying pen and ink and wax about one: so we, the way being very bad, to Nonsuch, and thence to Sir Robert Longs (65) house; a fine place, and dinner time ere we got thither; but we had breakfasted a little at Mr. Gawden's, he being out of towne though, and there borrowed Dr. Taylor's (52) sermons, and is a most excellent booke and worth my buying, where had a very good dinner, and curiously dressed, and here a couple of ladies, kinswomen of his, not handsome though, but rich, that knew me by report of The. Turner (13), and mighty merry we were.

After dinner to talk of our business, the Act of Parliament, where in short I see Sir R. Long (65) mighty fierce in the great good qualities of it. But in that and many other things he was stiff in, I think without much judgement, or the judgement I expected from him, and already they have evaded the necessity of bringing people into the Exchequer with their bills to be paid there. Sir G. Carteret (55) is titched [fretful, tetchy] at this, yet resolves with me to make the best use we can of this Act for the King (35), but all our care, we think, will not render it as it should be. He did again here alone discourse with me about my Lord, and is himself strongly for my Lord's not going to sea, which I am glad to hear and did confirm him in it. He tells me too that he talked last night with the Duke of Albemarle (56) about my Lord Sandwich (40), by the by making him sensible that it is his interest to preserve his old friends, which he confessed he had reason to do, for he knows that ill offices were doing of him, and that he honoured my Lord Sandwich (40) with all his heart.

After this discourse we parted, and all of us broke up and we parted. Captain Cocke (48) and I through Wandsworth. Drank at Sir Allen Broderick's (42), a great friend and comrade of Cocke's (48), whom he values above the world for a witty companion, and I believe he is so.

So to Fox-Hall and there took boat, and down to the Old Swan, and thence to Lombard Street, it being darke night, and thence to the Tower. Took boat and down to Greenwich, Cocke (48) and I, he home and I to the office, where did a little business, and then to my lodgings, where my wife is come, and I am well pleased with it, only much trouble in those lodgings we have, the mistresse of the house being so deadly dear in everything we have; so that we do resolve to remove home soon as we know how the plague goes this weeke, which we hope will be a good decrease. So to bed.

Before 13 Jul 1673 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Robert Long 1st Baronet Long 1600-1673. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670. Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes. Around 1650 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 05 August 1666. 05 Aug 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and down to the Old Swan, and there called Betty Michell and her husband, and had two or three a long salutes from her out of sight of 'su mari' [Note. her husband], which pleased me mightily, and so carried them by water to West minster, and I to St. James's, and there had a meeting before the Duke of Yorke (32), complaining of want of money, but nothing done to any purpose, for want we shall, so that now our advices to him signify nothing. Here Sir W. Coventry (38) did acquaint the Duke of Yorke (32) how the world do discourse of the ill method of our books, and that we would consider how to answer any enquiry which shall be made after our practice therein, which will I think concern the Controller most, but I shall make it a memento to myself.

Thence walked to the Parish Church to have one look upon Betty Michell, and so away homeward by water, and landed to go to the church, where, I believe, Mrs. Horsely goes, by Merchant-tailors' Hall, and there I find in the pulpit Elborough, my old schoolfellow and a simple rogue, and yet I find him preaching a very good sermon, and in as right a parson-like manner, and in good manner too, as I have heard any body; and the church very full, which is a surprising consideration; but I did not see her.

So home, and had a good dinner, and after dinner with my wife, and Mercer, and Jane by water, all the afternoon up as high as Morclaeke with great pleasure, and a fine day, reading over the second part of "The Siege of Rhodes", with great delight. We landed and walked at Barne-elmes, and then at the Neat Houses I landed and bought a millon, [melon] and we did also land and eat and drink at Wandsworth, and so to the Old Swan, and thence walked home. It being a mighty fine cool evening, and there being come, my wife and I spent an houre in the garden, talking of our living in the country, when I shall be turned out of the office, as I fear the Parliament may find faults enough with the office to remove us all, and I am joyed to think in how good a condition I am to retire thither, and have wherewith very well to subsist. Nan, at Sir W. Pen's (45), lately married to one Markeham, a kinsman of Sir W. Pen's (45), a pretty wench she is.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686.

Wandsworth Common, Surrey

Ravenslea Road Wandsworth Common, Surrey

6 Ravenslea Road Wandsworth Common, Surrey

On 02 Apr 1911. 1911 Census. 6 Ravenslea Road Wandsworth Common.

Ellis William Roberts 1860-1930 (50). Portrait Painter.

Eliza Glover -1867 (44). Portrait Painter.

Robert Ellis Roberts 1890- (21). Student at Cambridge.

Millicent Elsie Roberts -1900 (11). School.

DOCUMENTS/CENSUS/C1911/LONDON/WANDSWORTH/STREATHAM/C1911_London_Wandsworth_Streatham_Schedule_361.pngand two servants Lottie Hipkins and Edith Cox.

West Clandon, Surrey

Clandon Park House, West Clandon, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 15 September 1670. 15 Sep 1670. I went to visit Mr. Arthur Onslow (46), at West Clandon, a pretty dry seat on the Downs, where we dined in his great room.

Weybridge, Surrey

The River Wey is a tributary of the River Thames which it joins around 2km west of Walton_Bridge. It rises just west of Alton in Hampshire and thereafter flows through, or near, Farnham and Weybridge.

Oatlands Palace, Weybridge, Surrey

On 28 Jul 1540 Henry VIII (49) and Catherine Howard (17) were married at Oatlands Palace by Bishop of London Edmund Bonner (40). He a son of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. She by marriage Queen Consort England.

Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland 1495-1551 (45) was appointed Lady in Waiting to Queen Catherine Howard of England 1523-1542 (17).

Thomas Cromwell 1st Earl Essex 1485-1540 (55) was one of several executions the same day at Tower Hill.

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1625 based on a work of 1532.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas Cromwell 1st Earl Essex 1485-1540.

Diary of Henry Machyn June 1552. 27 Jun 1552. The xxvij day of Juin the Kyng's (14) mageste removed from Grenwyche by water unto Pottney, and ther [he] toke ys horsse unto Hamtun cowrte one ys progres, and ther lyvyng ther x days, and so to Ottland, and to Gy[lford].

Around 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553 Around 1546 Unknown Painter. After William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553. Around 1547. Workshop of Master John Painter. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553.

Diary of Henry Machyn August 1555. 03 Aug 1555. The iij day of August the Quen (39) and Kynges (28) grace removyd from Hamtun Court unto Hotland, a iiij mylles of: has her grace whent thrugh the parke for to take her barge, ther mett her grace by the way a powre man with ij chruches, and when that he saw her grace, for joy he thruw hys stayffes a-way, and rane after her grace, and sche commondyd that one shuld gyff ym a reward.

Around 1554 Antonis Mor Painter 1517-1577. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558. Around 1556 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558. Around 1573 Sofonisba Anguissola Painter 1532-1625. Portrait of Philip Around 1560 Antonis Mor Painter 1517-1577. Portrait of Philip Around 1550. Titian Painter 1488-1576. Portrait of Philip Around 1554. Titian Painter 1488-1576. Portrait of Philip Around 1594. Juan Pantoja de La Cruz Painter 1553–1608. Portrait of Philip

Diary of Henry Machyn July 1560. 29 Jul 1560. The xxix day of July the Quen('s) (26) grace removyd from Grenwyche on her grace('s) progresse, and at Lambeth she dynyd with my lord of Canturbere (55) and her consell; and after [took her] gorney towhard Rychmond, and her grace lay ther v [5] days; and after to Ottland, and ther So[nday and] Monday dener, and to Suttun to soper.

Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

On 26 Oct 1591 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (58) arrived in Oatlands Palace.

On 03 Jul 1622 William Sherard 1st Baron Sherard 1588-1640 (33) was knighted by King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 (56) at Oatlands Palace.

Around 1600 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 painted the portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. Around 1605 John Critz 1551-1642. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 with Garter Collar and Leg Garter. In 1621 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter. Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. In 1583 Pieter Bronckhorst Painter -1583. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1623. Adam de Colone 1572-1651. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1580. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625.

Wimbledon

Windlesham, Surrey

Ribsden Holt Windlesham, Surrey

On 08 Oct 1972 Alexander Ramsay 1881-1972 (91) died at Ribsden Holt Windlesham.

Woking, Surrey

In 1583 Richard Drake 1535-1603 (48) leased the manor of Woking from Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624 (47).

1576. Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Miniature Portrait of Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624. Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624.

Pyrford, Woking, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 23 August 1681. 23 Aug 1681. I went to Wotton, and, on the following day, was invited to Mr. Denzil Onslow's (39) at his seat at Purford, where was much company, and such an extraordinary feast, as I had hardly seen at any country gentleman's table. What made it more remarkable was, that there was not anything save what his estate about it did afford; as venison, rabbits, hares, pheasants, partridges, pigeons, quails, poultry, all sorts of fowl in season from his own decoy near his house, and all sorts of fresh fish. After dinner we went to see sport at the decoy, where I never saw so many herons.

The seat stands on a flat, the ground pasture, rarely watered, and exceedingly improved since Mr. Onslow (39) bought it of Sir Robert Parkhurst (78), who spent a fair estate. The house is timber, but commodious, and with one ample dining-room, the hall adorned with paintings of fowl and huntings, etc., the work of Mr. Barlow, who is excellent in this kind from the life.

In 1719 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Denzil Onslow of Pyrford 1642-1721.

Woking Abbey, Surrey

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 750-799. 777. This year Cynewulf and Offa fought near Bensington, and Offa took possession of the town. In the days of this king, Offa, there was an abbot at Medhamsted, called Beonna; who, with the consent of all the monks of the minster, let to farm, to Alderman Cuthbert, ten copyhold lands at Swineshead, with leasow and with meadow, and with all the appurtenances; provided that the said Cuthbert gave the said abbot fifty pounds therefore, and each year entertainment for one night, or thirty shillings in money; provided also, that after his decease the said lands should revert to the monastery. The king, Offa, and King Everth, and Archbishop Hibbert, and Bishop Ceolwulf, and Bishop Inwona, and Abbot Beonna, and many other bishops, and abbots, and rich men, were witnesses to this. In the days of this same Offa was an alderman, of the name of Brorda, who requested the king for his sake to free his own monastery, called Woking, because he would give it to Medhamsted and St. Peter, and the abbot that then was, whose name was Pusa. Pusa succeeded Beonna; and the king loved him much. And the king freed the monastery of Woking, against king, against bishop, against earl, and against all men' so that no man should have any claim there, except St. Peter and the abbot. This was done at the king's town called Free-Richburn.

Wotton