History of York Minster

1060 Ealdred Appointed Archbishop of York

1072 Accord of Winchester

1328 Marriage of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault

1327 Death of Edward II

1465 George Neville's Enthronement as Archbishop of York

1483 Edward of Middleham created Prince of Wales

1644 Battle of Marston Moor

York Minster is in York.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 600-649. 625. This year Paulinus was invested bishop of the Northumbrians, by Archbishop Justus, on the twelfth day before the calends of August.

On 19 Jul 627 Paulinus Archbishop of Canterbury -644 was appointed 1st Bishop of York.

In 664 Wilfrid Bishop York -709 was consecrated Bishop of York.

In 678 Bosa of York Bishop -705 was appointed Bishop of York.

In 691 Bosa of York Bishop -705 was appointed Bishop of York.

On 01 Jul 692 Archbishop Berhtwald -731 was elected Archbishop of York.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 8 How when Archbishop Theodore died Bertwald succeeded him as archbishop and among many others whom he ordained he made the learned Tobias bishop of the church of Rochester. [690 a.d.]. Bertwald succeeded Theodore in the archbishopric, being abbot of the monastery called Racuulfe, which stands at the northern mouth of the river Genlade. He was a man learned in the Scriptures, and perfectly instructed in ecclesiastical and monastic teaching, yet in no wise to be compared to his predecessor. He was chosen bishop in the year of our Lord 692, on the first day of July, when Wictred (23) and Suaebhard were kings in Kent; but he was ordained the next year, on Sunday the 29th of June, by Godwin, metropolitan bishop of Gaul, and was enthroned on Sunday the 31st of August. Among the many bishops whom he ordained was Tobias, a man instructed in the Latin, Greek, and Saxon tongues, and otherwise of manifold learning, whom he consecrated in the stead of Gedmund, bishop of the Church of Rochester, who had died.

On 31 Aug 693 Archbishop Berhtwald -731 was enthroned Archbishop of York.

In 705 John of Beverley Bishop -721 was consecrated Archbishop of York.

After 19 Nov 766 Archbishop Æthelbert of York -780 was consecrated Archbishop of York.

On 24 Apr 767 Archbishop Eanbald -796 was consecrated Archbishop of York.

Ealdred Appointed Archbishop of York

On 25 Dec 1060 Ealdred Archbishop of York -1069 was appointed Archbishop of York.

Accord of Winchester

In 1072 the Accord of Winchester established the primacy of the Archbishop of Canterbury over the Archbishop of York. It was signed by ...
William "Conqueror" I King England 1028-1087 (44) and Matilda Flanders Queen Consort England 1031-1083 (41).
Stigand Archbishop of Canterbury -1072.
Ealdred Archbishop of York -1069 who signed "I concede" whereas other signatories signed "I subscribe".
Wulfstan Bishop of Worcester 1008-1095 (64).
Herfast Bishop Chancellor -1084.

In 1191 Geoffrey Plantagenet Archbishop of York 1152-1212 (39) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 10 Nov 1215 Walter Grey Archbishop of York 1180-1255 (35) was elected Archbishop of York.

On 26 Dec 1251 Alexander III King Scotland 1241-1286 (10) and Margaret Plantagenet 1240-1275 (11) were married (he was her half fourth cousin) at York Minster. She a Daughter of Henry III King England and 3 x Great Grand Daughter of Louis "Fat" VI King France.

On 15 Oct 1266 Walter Giffard Archbishop of York 1225-1279 (41) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 01 Nov 1266 Walter Giffard Archbishop of York 1225-1279 (41) was enthroned as Archbishop of York.

On 22 Apr 1279 Walter Giffard Archbishop of York 1225-1279 (54) died at York. He was buried at York Minster.

On 09 Jan 1284 Antony Bek Bishop of Durham 1245-1311 (39) was consecrated Bishop of Durham at which time he also had the remains of Saint William of York moved to a new shrine in York Minster.

On 29 Oct 1285 John le Romeyn Archbishop of York 1230-1296 (55) was elected Archbishop of York.

On 10 Feb 1286 John le Romeyn Archbishop of York 1230-1296 (56) was consecrated Archbishop of York by Latino Malabranca Orsini Cardinal -1294 in Rome.

On 09 Jun 1286 Latino Malabranca Orsini Cardinal -1294 was enthroned Archbishop of York.

In Jan 1315 William Melton Archbishop of York 1275-1340 (40) was elected Archbishop of York.

In Sep 1317 William Melton Archbishop of York 1275-1340 (42) was consecrated Archbishop of York at Avignon.

Marriage of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault

On 24 Jan 1328 King Edward III England (15) and Philippa of Hainault (13) were married (he was her second cousin) at York Minster. She (13) by marriage Queen Consort England. She a Great Grand Daughter of Philip "Bold" III King France.

Death of Edward II

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XIX. Jun 1328. IT was not long after but that the king (15) and the queen (33) his mother, the earl of Kent (26) his uncle, the earl of Lancaster (47), sir Roger Mortimer (41) and all the barons of England, and by the advice of the king's council, they sent a bishop' and two knights bannerets, with two notable clerks, to sir John of Hainault (40), praying him to be a mean that their lord the young king of England might have in marriage one of the earl's (42) daughters of Hainault, his brother (42), named Philippa (13); for the king and all the nobles of the realm had rather have her than any other lady, for the love of him. Sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont feasted and honoured greatly these ambassadors, and brought them to Valenciennes to the earl his brother, who honourably received them and made them such cheer, that it were over long here to rehearse. And when they had skewed the content of their message, the earl (42) said, 'Sirs, I thank greatly the king (15) your prince and the queen (33) his mother and all other lords of England, sith they have sent such sufficient personages as ye be to do me such honour as to treat for the marriage; to the which request I am well agreed, if our holy father the pope (84) will consent thereto'-. with the which answer these ambassadors were right well content. Then they sent two knights and two clerks incontinent to the pope, to Avignon, to purchase a dispensation for this marriage to be had; for without the pope's licence they might not marry, for [by] the lineage of France they were so near of kin as at the third degree, for the two mothers [Note. Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (33) and Joan Valois Countess Zeeland Holland Avesnes and Hainault 1294-1342 (34)] were cousin-germans issued of two brethren. And when these ambassadors were come to the pope (84), and their requests and considerations well heard, our holy father the pope (84) with all the whole college consented to this marriage, and so feasted them. And then they departed and came again to Valenciennes with their bulls. Then this marriage was concluded and affirmed on both parties. Then was there devised and purveyed for their apparel and for all things honourable that belonged to such a lady, who should be queen of England: and there this princess was married by a sufficient procuration brought from the king of England; and after all feasts and triumphs done, then this young queen entered into the sea at Wissant, and arrived with all her company at Dover. And sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont, her uncle, did conduct her to the city of London, where there was made great feast, and many nobles of England, ... queen was crowned. And there was also great jousts, tourneys, dancing, carolling and great feasts every day, the which endured the, space of three weeks. The English chronicle saith this marriage and coronation of the queen was done at York with much honour, the Sunday in the even of the Conversion of Saint Paul, in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. In the which chronicle is shewed many other things of the ruling of the realm, and of the death of king Edward of Caernarvon, and divers other debates that were within the realm, as in the same chronicle more plainly it appeareth: the which the author of this book speaketh no word of, because peradventure he knew it not; for it was hard for a stranger to know all things. But according to his writing this young queen Philippa (13) abode still in England with a small company of any persons of her own country, saving one who was named Watelet of Manny (18), who abode still with the queen and was, her carver, and after did so many great prowesses in divers places, that it were hard to make mention of them all.

Before 03 Mar 1337 William Plantagenet 1337-1337 died. He was buried at York Minster.

On 02 May 1340 William Zouche Archbishop of York -1352 was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 19 Jul 1352 William Zouche Archbishop of York -1352 died at Cawood Selby North Yorkshire. He was buried at York Minster.

In Nov 1373 Alexander Neville Archbishop of York 1341-1392 (32) was elected Archbishop of York.

On 14 Apr 1374 Alexander Neville Archbishop of York 1341-1392 (33) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 18 Dec 1374 Alexander Neville Archbishop of York 1341-1392 (33) was consecrated as Archbishop of York at York Minster.

On 03 Apr 1388 Thomas Fitzalan Archbishop York and Canterbury 1353-1414 (35) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 05 Oct 1396 Robert Waldby Archbishop York -1397 was appointed Archbishop of York.

Around May 1398 Richard Scrope Archbishop of York 1350-1405 (48) was appointed Archbishop of York.

After 08 Jun 1405 Richard Scrope Archbishop of York 1350-1405 was buried at York Minster.

On 18 Sep 1452 John Scrope 1422-1452 (30) died. He was buried at York Minster.

In 1464 William Booth Archbishop of York 1388-1464 was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 15 Mar 1465 George Neville Archbishop of York 1432-1476 (33) was appointed Archbishop of York.

George Neville's Enthronement as Archbishop of York

On 06 Sep 1465 George Neville Archbishop of York 1432-1476 (33) was enthroned as Archbishop of York at Cawood Castle Cawood North Yorkshire. Isabel Neville Duchess Clarence 1451-1476 (14), Anne Neville Queen Consort England 1456-1485 (9) and Richard III King England 1452-1485 (12) were present.

In 1476 Bishop Lawrence Booth 1420-1480 (56) was translated to Archbishop of York.

In 1480 Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 (56) was appointed Archbishop of York.

Edward of Middleham created Prince of Wales

On 08 Sep 1483 Edward York Prince of Wales 1473-1484 (9) was created Prince of Wales, Earl Chester 6C 1483 at York Minster. His parents Richard III (30) and Anne Neville (27) attended as did Edward Stafford 2nd Earl Wiltshire 1470-1499 (13). Edward "Last Plantagenet" York 17th Earl Warwick 1475-1499 (8) and John York 1471-1499 (11) were knighted.

In 1488 Christopher Urswick 1448-1522 (40) was appointed Dean York.

On 18 Jan 1501 Thomas Savage Archbishop of York 1449-1507 (52) was appointed Archbishop of York.

In 1506 Thomas Rotherham Archbishop of York 1423-1500 was buried at York Minster.

In 1531 Edward Lee Archbishop of York 1482-1544 (49) was appointed Archbishop of York.

In 1555 Nicholas Heath Archbishop of York 1501-1578 (54) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 16 Mar 1560 Richard Goldthorpe Haberdasher Mayor -1560 died. He was buried at York Minster.

On 27 Jan 1561 Thomas Young Archbishop of York 1507-1568 (54) was elected Archbishop of York.

After 26 Jun 1568 Thomas Young Archbishop of York 1507-1568 was buried in the Choir of York Minster.

In 1570 Edmund Grindal Archbishop of York 1519-1583 (51) was consecrated Archbishop of York.

In 1576 Edwin Sandys Archbishop of York 1519-1588 (57) was consecrated Archbishop of York.

In 1631 Richard Neale Archbishop 1562-1640 (68) was elected Archbishop of York.

In 1640 John Williams Archbishop of York 1582-1650 (57) was appointed Archbishop of York.

Before 1634 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of John Williams Archbishop of York 1582-1650.

Battle of Marston Moor

John Evelyn's Diary 17 August 1654. 17 Aug 1654. Passed through Pontefract; therichard castle famous for many sieges both of late and ancient times, and the death of that unhappy King murdered in it, was now demolishing by the Rebels; it stands on a mount, and makes a goodly show at a distance. The Queen (44) has a house here, and there are many fair seats near it, especially Mr. Pierrepont's (48), built at the foot of a hill out of the castle ruins. We all alighted in the highway to drink at a crystal spring, which they call Robin Hood's Well; near it, is a stone chair, and an iron ladle to drink out of, chained to the seat. We rode to Tadcaster, at the side of which we have prospect of the Archbishop's Palace (which is a noble seat), and in sight of divers other gentlemen's fair houses. This tract is a goodly, fertile, well-watered, and wooded country, abounding with pasture and plenty of provisions.
To York, the second city of England, fairly walled, of a circular form, watered by the brave River Ouse, bearing vessels of considerable burden on it; over it is a stone bridge emulating that of London, and built on; the middle arch is larger than any I have seen in England, with a wharf of hewn stone, which makes the river appear very neat. But most remarkable and worth seeing is St. Peter's Cathedral, which of all the great churches in England had been best preserved from the fury of the sacrilegious, by composition with the Rebels when they took the city, during the many incursions of Scotch and others. It is a most entire magnificent piece of Gothic architecture. The screen before the choir is of stone carved with flowers, running work and statues of the old kings. Many of the. Monuments are very ancient. Here, as a great rarity in these days and at this time, they showed me a Bible and Common Prayer Book covered with crimson velvet, and richly embossed with silver gilt; also a service for the altar of gilt wrought plate, flagons, basin, ewer, plates, chalices, patins, etc., with a gorgeous covering for the altar and pulpit, carefully preserved in the vestry, in the hollow wall whereof rises a plentiful spring of excellent water. I got up to the tower, whence we had a prospect toward Durham, and could see Ripon, part of Lancashire, the famous and fatal Marston Moor, the Spas of Knaresborough, and all the environs of that admirable country. Sir —— Ingoldsby has here a large house, gardens, and tennis court; also the King's (24) house and church near the castle, which was modernly fortified with a palisade and bastions. The streets are narrow and ill-paved, the shops like London.

Around 1401. Jean Creton Painter Chronicler -1420. The Capture and Death of King Richard. Richard II King England 1367-1400 negotiating Henry Percy 1st Earl of Northumberland 1341-1408 at Conwy Castle.  Around 1401. Jean Creton Painter Chronicler -1420. The Capture and Death of King Richard. Richard II King England 1367-1400 (in black) surrendering to Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (holding the white staff) at Flint Castle.  Around 1401. Jean Creton Painter Chronicler -1420. The Capture and Death of King Richard. Richard II King England 1367-1400 delivered to the citizens of London. Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes.Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes.Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

In 1660 Accepted Frewen Archbishop York 1588-1664 (71) was elected Archbishop of York.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 04 October 1660. 04 Oct 1660. This morning I was busy looking over papers at the office all alone, and being visited by Lieut. Lambert (41) of the Charles (to whom I was formerly much beholden), I took him along with me to a little alehouse hard by our office, whither my cozen Thomas Pepys the turner had sent for me to show me two gentlemen that had a great desire to be known to me, one his name is Pepys, of our family, but one that I never heard of before, and the other a younger son of Sir Tho. Bendishes, and so we all called cozens. After sitting awhile and drinking, my two new cozens, myself, and Lieut. Lambert (41) went by water to Whitehall, and from thence I and Lieut. Lambert (41) to Westminster Abbey, where we saw Dr. Frewen (72) translated to the Archbishoprick of York. Here I saw the Bishops of Winchester (71), Bangor (75), Rochester (79), Bath and Wells (80), and Salisbury (68), all in their habits, in King Henry Seventh's chappell. But, Lord! at their going out, how people did most of them look upon them as strange creatures, and few with any kind of love or respect.
From thence at 2 to my Lord's, where we took Mr. Sheply and Wm. Howe to the Raindeer, and had some oysters, which were very good, the first I have eat this year. So back to my Lord's to dinner, and after dinner Lieut. Lambert (41) and I did look upon my Lord's model, and he told me many things in a ship that I desired to understand. From thence by water I (leaving Lieut. Lambert (41) at Blackfriars) went home, and there by promise met with Robert Shaw and Jack Spicer, who came to see me, and by the way I met upon Tower Hill with Mr. Pierce the surgeon and his wife, and took them home and did give them good wine, ale, and anchovies, and staid them till night, and so adieu. Then to look upon my painters that are now at work in my house. At night to bed.

Around 1652. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658. Portrait of General John Lambert 1619-1684.Before 1662 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Brian Duppa Bishop 1589-1662.

On 28 Apr 1664 Richard Sterne Archbishop of York 1596-1683 (68) was elected Archbishop of York.

In 1683 John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686 (58) was appointed Archbishop of York.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853. Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

John Evelyn's Diary 19 August 1683. 19 Aug 1683. I went to Bromley to visit our Bishop (58), and excellent neighbor, and to congratulate his now being made Archbishop of York. On the 28th, he came to take his leave of us, now preparing for his journey and residence in his province.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853. Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

On 24 Feb 1685 Charles Howard 1st Earl Carlisle 1629-1685 (56) died. He was buried at York Minster. His son Edward Howard 2nd Earl Carlisle 1646-1692 (38) succeeded 2nd Earl Carlisle 3C 1661. Elizabeth Uvedale Countess Carlisle -1696 by marriage Countess Carlisle.

On 27 Dec 1685 Henriette Stanley Countess Strafford 1630-1685 (55) died. She was buried at York Minster.

In 1688 Thomas Lamplugh Archbishop 1615-1691 (73) was translated Archbishop of York.

In 1691 John Sharp Archbishop York 1645-1714 (45) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 16 Oct 1695 William Wentworth 2nd Earl Strafford 1626-1695 (69) died. He was buried at York Minster.

In 1654. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658. Portrait of William Wentworth 2nd Earl Strafford 1626-1695.Around 1740 George Knapton Painter 1698-1778. Portrait of William Wentworth 2nd Earl Strafford 1626-1695.

In 1697 Thomas Gale Scholar 1635-1702 (62) was appointed Dean York.

In 1689 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Thomas Gale Scholar 1635-1702.

In 1714 William Dawes 3rd Baronet Archbishop 1671-1724 (42) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 06 Oct 1723 Thomas Watson 1665-1723 (58) died. He was buried in York Minster.

On 21 Apr 1743 Thomas Herring Archbishop of Canterbury 1693-1757 (50) was translated to Archbishop of York.

Around 1745 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764. Portrait of Thomas Herring Archbishop of Canterbury 1693-1757.

In 1757 George Gilbert Archbishop of York 1693-1761 (63) was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 03 Oct 1761 Robert Hay Drummond Archbishop of York 1711-1776 (49) was elected at Archbishop of York.

In or before 1771 Andrea Soldi Painter 1703-1771. Portrait of Robert Hay Drummond Archbishop of York 1711-1776.

In 1776 Richard Terrick Bishop 1710-1777 (66) refused the Archbishop of York on the grounds of ill health.

On 26 Nov 1807 Edward Venables-Vernon-Harcourt Archbishop of York 1757-1847 (50) was nominated Archbishop of York.

Around 1803 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Edward Venables-Vernon-Harcourt Archbishop of York 1757-1847.

In 1858 Augustus Duncombe 1814-1880 (43) was appointed Dean York.

In 1860 Charles Longley Archbishop 1794-1868 (65) was appointed Archbishop of York.

1868. George Richmond Painter 1809-1896. Portrait of Charles Longley Archbishop 1794-1868.

In 1880 Arthur Purey Cust Archdeacon Buckingham 1828-1916 (51) was appointed Dean York.

In Jan 1891 William Connor Magee Archbishop 1821-1891 was appointed Archbishop of York.

On 17 Mar 1891 William Connor Magee Archbishop 1821-1891 was appointed Archbishop of York. He died seven weeks later.

Times Newspaper Obituaries. 24 Dec 1959. From Our Correspondent STAMFORD BRIDGE, Dec. 23. The Earl of Halifax died to-night at his home at Garrowby, near York. He was 78 and had been suffering from a chest complaint. Lord (53) and Baroness Feversham (49), Lord (47) and Lady Irwin (43), Lady Clarissa Duncombe, and Baroness Bingley were at Garrowby when he died. Baroness Feversham (49) said he had suffered from poor breathing for some time and that had been aggravated by a chest infection. Last July Lord Halifax broke his hip when walking in his garden and was flown to London for an operation at University College Hospital. He made a remarkable recovery from the accident. In September he and Lady Halifax celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. The funeral will be in private. A memorial service and requiem will be held in York Minster next Monday at 11 a.m. The date of a service in London is to be announced later. Obituary on page 8. MR. SELWYN LLOYD'S TRIBUTE Mr. Selwyn Lloyd, Foreign Secretary, in a tribute to Lord Halifax last night, said: "He held high office, as Viceroy of India, Foreign Secretary, and finally as Ambassador to Washington. He adorned each of these offices with his integrity, his idealism, and his ability. He was a great public servant. He will be deeply mourned." WASHINGTON, Dec. 23. Mr. Douglas Dillon, the acting Secretary of State, to-night issued this statement: "The many Americans who knew Lord Halifax deeply regret his passing. He was ever a staunch friend of this country and during his years of public life contributed greatly to the strengthening of Anglo-American relations. He is particularly remembered for his dedicated service to the cause of humanity during the crucial war years as British Ambassador in Washington." Reuter.

On 08 Jun 1961 Edward Windsor 2nd Duke Kent 1935- and Katharine Worsley Duchess of Kent -1933 were married at York Minster. She  by marriage Duchess Kent. He a Grand Son of George V King United Kingdom.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 3 The same bishop John by his prayers healed a sick maiden.. The same Berthun told another miracle concerning the said bishop. When the most reverend Wilfrid, after a long banishment, was admitted to the bishopric of the church of Hagustald, and the aforesaid John, upon the death of Bosa, a man of great sanctity and humility, was, in his place, appointed bishop of York, he himself came, once upon a time, to the monastery of nuns, at the place called Wetadun, where the Abbess Heriburg then presided. "When we were come thither," said he, "and had been received with great and universal joy, the abbess told us, that one of the nuns, who was her own daughter after the flesh, laboured under a grievous sickness, for she had been lately let blood in the arm, and whilst she was under treatment, was seized with an attack of sudden pain, which speedily increased, while the wounded arm became worse, and so much swollen, that it could scarce be compassed with both hands; and she lay in bed like to die through excess of pain. Wherefore the abbess entreated the bishop that he would vouchsafe to go in and give her his blessing; for she believed that she would soon be better if he blessed her or laid his hands upon her. He asked when the maiden had been let blood, and being told that it was on the fourth day of the moon, said, 'You did very indiscreetly and unskilfully to let blood on the fourth day of the moon; for I remember that Archbishop Theodore, of blessed memory, said, that blood-letting at that time was very dangerous, when the light of the moon is waxing and the tide of the ocean is rising. And what can I do for the maiden if she is like to die? ".
But the abbess still earnestly entreated for her daughter, whom she dearly loved, and designed to make abbess in her stead, and at last prevailed with him to go in and visit the sick maiden. Wherefore he went in, taking me with him to the maid, who lay, as I said, in sore anguish, and her arm swelling so greatly that it could not be bent at all at the elbow; and he stood and said a prayer over her, and having given his blessing, went out. Afterwards, as we were sitting at table, at the usual hour, some one came in and called me out, saying, 'Quoenburg' (that was the maid's name) 'desires that you should immediately go back to her.' This I did, and entering the chamber, I found her of more cheerful countenance, and like one in good health. And while I was sitting beside her, she said, 'Shall we call for something to drink?'—'Yes,' said I, 'and right glad am I, if you can.' When the cup was brought, and we had both drunk, she said, 'As soon as the bishop had said the prayer for me and given me his blessing and had gone out, I immediately began to mend; and though I have not yet recovered my former strength, yet all the pain is quite gone both from my arm, where it was most burning, and from all my body, as if the bishop had carried it away with him; notwithstanding the swelling of the arm still seems to remain.' But when we departed thence, the cure of the pain in her limbs was followed by the assuaging of the grievous swelling; and the maiden being thus delivered from pains and death, returned praise to our Lord and Saviour, in company with His other servants who were there.

Amaury Montfort 1242-1300 was appointed Canon York.

Scrope Chapel York Minster

On 15 Nov 1455 John Scrope 4th Baron Scrope Masham 1388-1455 (67) died. He was buried at Scrope Chapel York Minster. His son Thomas Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Masham 1429-1483 (26) succeeded 5th Baron Scrope Masham. Elizabeth Greystoke Baroness Scrope Masham 1436-1490 (19) by marriage Baroness Scrope Masham.