River Trent

River Trent is in Humber Estuary.

The River Trent rises on Biddulph Moor and flows, in a great horseshoe through, or near, Stoke-on-Trent, Stone, Essex Bridge, Bishton Hall, Colwich passing St Michael and All Angels Church Colwich, Rugeley, Kings Bromley, Alrewas, Burton upon Trent, Newton Solney, Repton, under Swarkestone Bridge, Sawley, Nottingham, Holme Pierrepoint, Stoke Ferry Shelford, under Gunthorpe Bridge, past Gunthorpe Lock, Hoveringham Nottingham, Newark on Trent, Knaith, Dunham Bridge, Sutton on Trent, the Isle of Axholme and Gainsborough before joining the Humber Estuary at Trent Falls.

1575. Essex Bridge is located just downstream of where the River Sow and River Trent converge adjacent to the Trent & Mersey Canal. Originally forty arches only fourteen remain. It was commissioned by Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (9) as a pack-horse bridge although this seems unlikely given its width of four feet and narrow cutwaters.

The confluence of the River Sow on the left and River Trent on the right.

In 1590 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601. Around 1596 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601. Around 1597 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601.

Bishton Hall is located 150m north of the River Trent.

Exterior of St Michael and All Angels Church Colwich with view of the River Trent from the graveyard.

Stoke Ferry Shelford is a former crossing point on the River Trent that gives its name to Shelford.

View from St Peter's Church Shelford looking across to Stoke Ferry Shelford.

The former ford and ferry across the River Trent at Stoke Ferry Shelford.

Gunthorpe Bridge is a bridge over the River Trent which replaced a ferry which operated until 1875. The original bridge opened in 1875. It was built largely in iron. The current bridge was built in 1927 400 metres upstream from the old one.

Gunthorpe Lock is a lock and weir on the River Trent.

John Evelyn's Diary 14 August 1654. 14 Aug 1654. Went by Newark-on-Trent, a brave town and garrison. Next, by Wharton House, belonging to the Lord Chaworth, a handsome seat; then by Home, a noble place belonging to the Marquis of Dorchester (48), and passed the famous River Trent, which divides the South from the North of England; and so lay that night at Nottingham.

In Sep 1678 Humphrey Ferrers 1652-1678 (25) drowned in the River Trent.

River Soar

The River Soar rises near Wibtoft after which it travels broadly north through Leicester, past Mountsorrel Castle, Normanton on Soar and Holy Trinity Church Ratcliffe on Soar before joining the River Trent.

River Wreake aka Eye

The River Wreake aka Eye rises near Stapleford although the land is so low lying there are many tributaries that may form the River Eye and it may rise at Waltham on the Wolds. It flows through Melton Mowbray after which its name changes from the River Eye to the River Wreake. Thereafter it flows past Asfordby, Hoby, Rotherby, Thrussington, Ratcliffe on the Wreake to Cossington where it joins the River Soar.

River Derwent

River Dove

The River Dove rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Pilsbury, Hartington, Norbury, Rocester, Sudbury Hall and Tutbury Castle before joining the River Trent at Newton Solney.

Pilsbury is a Norman motte-and-bailey castle occupying an area of high ground around 160m by 137m overlooking the River Dove commissioned by Henry Ferrers -1100.

Tutbury Castle guards the confluence of the River Dove and River Derwent.

River Manifold

The River Manifold rises on Axe Edge Moor after which it travels broadly south past Longnor, Hulme End, Ecton, Thor's Cave, Beeston Tor and Ilam at which it joins the River Dove.

The River Hamps rises at Merryton Low after which it passes Onecote, Winkhill, Waterhouses before turning north to join the River Manifold at Beeston Tor.

River Hamps

The River Hamps rises at Merryton Low after which it passes Onecote, Winkhill, Waterhouses before turning north to join the River Manifold at Beeston Tor.

River Tame

The River Tame rises near Oldbury after which it passes Wednesbury, Tamworth, Perry Barr, Spaghetti Junction, Drayton Bassett, St Peter's Church Elford before joining the River Trent 2km east of Alrewas.

River Sow

The River Sow rises near Fair Oak. From there it flows past Outlands, Bishops Offley, Copmere End, Eccleshall Castle, Chebsey, Little Bridgeford, Great Bridgeford, Stafford to Baswich where it is joined by the River Penk.

After Baswich the River Penk flows past Milford to Essex Bridge where it joins the River Trent.

1575. Essex Bridge is located just downstream of where the River Sow and River Trent converge adjacent to the Trent & Mersey Canal. Originally forty arches only fourteen remain. It was commissioned by Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (9) as a pack-horse bridge although this seems unlikely given its width of four feet and narrow cutwaters.

The confluence of the River Sow on the left and River Trent on the right.

In 1590 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601. Around 1596 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601. Around 1597 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. Portrait of Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601.

River Penk

The River Penk rises near Perton from where it flows past Pendeford, Coven, Brewood Staffordshire, Stretton, Penkridge, Acton Trussell to Baswich where it joins the River Penk.

The River Sow rises near Fair Oak. From there it flows past Outlands, Bishops Offley, Copmere End, Eccleshall Castle, Chebsey, Little Bridgeford, Great Bridgeford, Stafford to Baswich where it is joined by the River Penk.

After Baswich the River Penk flows past Milford to Essex Bridge where it joins the River Trent.