Biography of Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641

1648 Siege of Colchester

1854 Charge of the Light Brigade


Royal Descendants

On 22 Mar 1599 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 was born in Antwerp.

Around 1621 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (21). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel.

In 1623 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671 (20) travelled to England where he lived for sixteen years where he met and was influenced by Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (23), Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648 (33) and Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661 (29).

In 1624 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (24). Portrait of Emanuel Filibert of Savoy 1588-1624 (35).

Around 1624 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (24). Portrait of Sofonisba Anguissola Painter 1532-1625 (92) aged ninety-two.

Around 1625 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661 (31) had a studio in Blackfriars. As did Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (25). Blackfriars was within the boundaries of the City of London, but was a liberty and so avoided the monopoly in the City of members of the London painters' Guild.

Around 1628 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (28). Portrait of Anne Wake.

Around 1628 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (28). Portrait of Katherine Manners Duchess Buckingham 1602-1649 (25).

Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (32). Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.

In 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (32) was knighted.

Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (32). Portrait of Thomas Wharton 1615-1684 (16).

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Dorothy North Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1605-1698 (28).

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Lucy Percy Countess Carlisle 1600-1660 (33).

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox.

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658 (45).

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.

In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Thomas Wentworth 1st Earl Strafford 1593-1641 (39).

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of William Feilding 1st Earl Denbigh 1587-1643 (46).

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of Venetia Stanley 1600-1633 (33).

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Algernon Percy 10th Earl of Northumberland 1602-1668 (31) and Anne Cecil -1637.

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox wearing his Leg Garter and Garter Collar.

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Philip Herbert 4th Earl Pembroke 1st Earl Montgomery 1584-1650 (49).

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew Playwright 1612-1683 (22).

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of Henry "Wizard Earl" Percy 9th Earl of Northumberland 1564-1632.

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of Olivia Boteler -1663.

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of James Stanley 7th Earl Derby 1607-1651 (27) and Charlotte Thouars Countess Derby 1599-1664 (35) and their daughter.

In 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of Christian Bruce Countess Devonshire -1675.

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of Anne Carr 1615-1684 (19).

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of William Laud Archbishop of Canterbury 1573-1645 (62). Wearing a black Chimere over his white Rochet.

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox.

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of Thomas Wentworth 1st Earl Strafford 1593-1641 (42).

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mountjoy Blount 1st Earl Newport 1597-1666 (40).

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Ruthven Countess Atholl.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel and Alethea Talbot Countess Arundel.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677 (24) and William Russell 1st Duke Bedford 1616-1700 (20).

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (36).

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Catherine Hastings Countess Chesterfield -1636 and Lucy Davies Countess Huntingdon 1613-1679 (25).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Isabella Edmondes Baroness De La Warr 1607-1677 (31).

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Diana Cecil Countess Oxford.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of James Hay 2nd Earl Carlisle 1612-1660 (26).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Rachel Massue Countess Southampton 1603-1640 (35).

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew Playwright 1612-1683 (25) and (probably) William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (27).

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Elizabeth Brydges Countess Castlehaven 1619-1678 (19).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Mary Hill 1615-1690 (23).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of William Russell 1st Duke Bedford 1616-1700 (21).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of William Killigrew 1606-1695 (32).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Anne Boteler 1st Countess Newport.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Catherine Howard Countess Newburgh -1650.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677 (25).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Hanmer 2nd Baronet Hamner 1612-1678 (26).

Around 1639 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (39). Portrait of Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 (65) in his Garter Robes.

Around 1639 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (39). Portrait of Thomas Wharton 1588-1622.

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of Mountjoy Blount 1st Earl Newport 1597-1666 (43).

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of Kenelm Digby 1603-1665 (37).

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of Charles Seton 2nd Earl Dunfermline 1615-1672 (24).

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of sisters Essex Cheeke Countess Manchester -1658 and Anne Cheeke Countess Warwick 1620-1652 (20).

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of Alice Bankes.

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of Elizabeth Villiers Countess Morton 1609-1654 (30).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Anne Sophia Herbert Countess Carnarvon -1643.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Richard Boyle 2nd Earl Cork 1st Earl Burlington 1612-1698.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Percy 1st Baron Percy Alnwick 1604-1659 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Dorothy Sidney Countess Sunderland 1617-1683.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Frances Cranfield 1622-1687.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Algernon Percy 10th Earl of Northumberland 1602-1668.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Elizabeth Clifford Countess Burlington 1613-1691.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Percy 8th Earl of Northumberland 1532-1585.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Frances Devereux Duchess Somerset.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Beatrice Van Hemmema Countess Oxford 1580-1653.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Dorothy Devereux Countess Northumberland 1564-1619.

On 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (42) died.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 February 1649. 15 Feb 1649. I went to see the collection of one Trean, a rich merchant, who had some good pictures, especially a rare perspective of Stenwyck; from thence, to other virtuosos.
The painter, La Neve has an Andromeda, but I think it a copy after Vandyke from Titian, for the original is in France. Webb, at the Exchange, has some rare things in miniature, of Breughel's, also Putti, in twelve squares, that were plundered from Sir James Palmer (64).
At Du Bois, we saw two tables of Putti, that were gotten, I know not how, out of the Castle of St. Angelo, by old Petit, thought to be Titian's; he had some good heads of Palma, and one of Stenwyck. Bellcar showed us an excellent copy of his Majesty's Sleeping Venus and the Satyr, with other figures; for now they had plundered, sold, and dispersed a world of rare paintings of the King's, and his loyal subjects. After all, Sir William Ducy showed me some excellent things in miniature, and in oil of Holbein's; Sir Thomas More's head, and a whole-length figure of Edward VI., which were certainly his Majesty's; also a picture of Queen Elizabeth; the Lady Isabella Thynne; a rare painting of Rothenhamer, being a Susanna; and a Magdalen, of Quintin, the blacksmith; also a Henry VIII., of Holbein; and Francis I., rare indeed, but of whose hand I know not.

John Evelyn's Diary 08 May 1654. 08 May 1654. I went to Hackney, to see Lady Brook's garden, which was one of the neatest and most celebrated in England, the house well furnished, but a despicable building. Returning, visited one Mr. Tomb's garden; it has large and noble walks, some modern statues, a vineyard, planted in strawberry borders, staked at ten feet distances, the banqueting-house of cedar, where the couch and seats were carved à l'antique; some good pictures in the house, especially one of Vandyke's, being a man in his shirt; also some of Stenwyck. I also called at Mr. Ducie's, who has indeed a rare collection of the best masters, and one of the largest stories of H. Holbein. I also saw Sir Thomas Fowler's aviary, which is a poor business.

John Evelyn's Diary 09 June 1658. 09 Jun 1658. I went to see the Earl of Northumberland's (55) pictures, whereof that of the Venetian Senators was one of the best of Titian's and another of Andrea del Sarto, viz, a Madonna, Christ, St. John, and an Old Woman; a St. Catherine of Da Vinci, with divers portraits of Vandyck; a Nativity of Georgioni; the last of our blessed Kings (Charles I.), and the Duke of York, by Lely (39), a Rosary by the famous Jesuits of Brussels, and several more. This was in Suffolk House: the new front toward the gardens is tolerable, were it not drowned by a too massy and clumsy pair of stairs of stone, without any neat invention.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 15 May 1663. 15 May 1663. Up betimes and walked to St. James's, where Mr. Coventry (35) being in bed I walked in the Park, discoursing with the keeper of the Pell Mell, who was sweeping of it; who told me of what the earth is mixed that do floor the Mall, and that over all there is cockle-shells powdered, and spread to keep it fast; which, however, in dry weather, turns to dust and deads the ball.
Thence to Mr. Coventry (35); and sitting by his bedside, he did tell me that he sent for me to discourse upon my Lord Sandwich's (37) allowances for his several pays, and what his thoughts are concerning his demands; which he could not take the freedom to do face to face, it being not so proper as by me: and did give me a most friendly and ingenuous account of all; telling me how unsafe, at this juncture, while every man's, and his actions particularly, are descanted upon, it is either for him to put the Duke upon doing, or my Lord himself to desire anything extraordinary, 'specially the King (32) having been so bountifull already; which the world takes notice of even to some repinings. All which he did desire me to discourse with my Lord of; which I have undertook to do. We talked also of our office in general, with which he told me that he was now-a-days nothing so satisfied as he was wont to be. I confess I told him things are ordered in that way that we must of necessity break in a little time a pieces.
After done with him about these things, he told me that for Mr. Hater the Duke's word was in short that he found he had a good servant, an Anabaptist, and unless he did carry himself more to the scandal of the office, he would bear with his opinion till he heard further, which do please me very much.
Thence walked to Westminster, and there up and down in the Hall and the Parliament House all the morning; at noon by coach to my Lord Crew's, hearing that Lord Sandwich (37) did dine there; where I told him what had passed between Mr. Coventry (35) and myself; with which he was contented, though I could perceive not very well pleased. And I do believe that my Lord do find some other things go against his mind in the House; for in the motion made the other day in the House by my Lord Bruce, that none be capable of employment but such as have been loyal and constant to the King (32) and Church, the General [Monk] and my Lord were mentioned to be excepted; and my Lord Bruce did come since to my Lord, to clear himself that he meant nothing to his prejudice, nor could it have any such effect if he did mean it. After discourse with my Lord; to dinner with him; there dining there my Lord Montagu of Boughton, Mr. William Montagu (45) his brother, the Queen's Sollicitor, &c., and a fine dinner. Their talk about a ridiculous falling-out two days ago at my Lord of Oxford's (36) house, at an entertainment of his, there being there my Lord of Albemarle (54), Lynsey (55), two of the Porters, my Lord Bellasses (48), and others, where there were high words and some blows, and pulling off of perriwiggs; till my Lord Monk (54) took away some of their swords, and sent for some soldiers to guard the house till the fray was ended. To such a degree of madness the nobility of this age is come!
After dinner I went up to Sir Thomas Crew (39), who lies there not very well in his head, being troubled with vapours and fits of dizziness: and there I sat talking with him all the afternoon from one discourse to another, the most was upon the unhappy posture of things at this time; that the King (32) do mind nothing but pleasures, and hates the very sight or thoughts of business; that my Baroness Castlemaine's (22) rules him, who, he says, hath all the tricks of Aretin1 that are to be practised to give pleasure. In which he is too able .... but what is the unhappiness in that, as the Italian proverb says, "lazzo dritto non vuolt consiglio [Translation: An erection seeks no advice]". If any of the sober counsellors give him good advice, and move him in anything that is to his good and honour, the other part, which are his counsellers of pleasure, take him when he is with my Baroness Castlemaine's (22), and in a humour of delight, and then persuade him that he ought not to hear nor listen to the advice of those old dotards or counsellors that were heretofore his enemies: when, God knows! it is they that now-a-days do most study his honour. It seems the present favourites now are my Lord Bristol (50), Duke of Buckingham (35), Sir H. Bennet (45), my Lord Ashley (41), and Sir Charles Barkeley (33); who, among them, have cast my Chancellor (54) upon his back, past ever getting up again; there being now little for him to do, and he waits at Court attending to speak to the King (32) as others do: which I pray God may prove of good effects, for it is feared it will be the same with my Lord Treasurer (56) shortly. But strange to hear how my Lord Ashley (41), by my Lord Bristol's (50) means (he being brought over to the Catholique party against the Bishopps, whom he hates to the death, and publicly rails against them; not that he is become a Catholique, but merely opposes the Bishopps; and yet, for aught I hear, the Bishopp of London (64) keeps as great with the King (32) as ever) is got into favour, so much that, being a man of great business and yet of pleasure, and drolling too, he, it is thought, will be made Lord Treasurer (56) upon the death or removal of the good old man. My Lord Albemarle (54), I hear, do bear through and bustle among them, and will not be removed from the King's good opinion and favour, though none of the Cabinett; but yet he is envied enough. It is made very doubtful whether the King (32) do not intend the making of the Duke of Monmouth (14) legitimate2; but surely the Commons of England will never do it, nor the Duke of York (29) suffer it, whose lady (26), I am told, is very troublesome to him by her jealousy.
But it is wonderful that Sir Charles Barkeley (33) should be so great still, not [only] with the King (32), but Duke also; who did so stiffly swear that he had lain with her3. And another one Armour that he rode before her on horseback in Holland I think.... No care is observed to be taken of the main chance, either for maintaining of trade or opposing of factions, which, God knows, are ready to break out, if any of them (which God forbid!) should dare to begin; the King (32) and every man about him minding so much their pleasures or profits.
My Lord Hinchingbrooke (15), I am told, hath had a mischance to kill his boy by his birding-piece going off as he was a-fowling. The gun was charged with small shot, and hit the boy in the face and about the temples, and he lived four days.
In Scotland, it seems, for all the newes-books tell us every week that they are all so quiett, and everything in the Church settled, the old woman had like to have killed, the other day, the Bishop of Galloway, and not half the Churches of the whole kingdom conform.
Strange were the effects of the late thunder and lightning about a week since at Northampton, coming with great rain, which caused extraordinary floods in a few hours, bearing away bridges, drowning horses, men, and cattle. Two men passing over a bridge on horseback, the arches before and behind them were borne away, and that left which they were upon: but, however, one of the horses fell over, and was drowned. Stacks of faggots carried as high as a steeple, and other dreadful things; which Sir Thomas Crew (39) showed me letters to him about from Mr. Freemantle and others, that it is very true.
The Portugalls have choused us4, it seems, in the Island of Bombay, in the East Indys; for after a great charge of our fleets being sent thither with full commission from the King (32) of Portugall to receive it, the Governour by some pretence or other will not deliver it to Sir Abraham Shipman, sent from the King (32), nor to my Lord of Marlborough (45); which the King (32) takes highly ill, and I fear our Queen (24) will fare the worse for it. The Dutch decay there exceedingly, it being believed that their people will revolt from them there, and they forced to give over their trade. This is talked of among us, but how true I understand not. Sir Thomas showed me his picture and Sir Anthony Vandike's, in crayon in little, done exceedingly well.
Having thus freely talked with him, and of many more things, I took leave, and by coach to St. James's, and there told Mr. Coventry (35) what I had done with my Lord with great satisfaction, and so well pleased home, where I found it almost night, and my wife and the dancing-master alone above, not dancing but talking. Now so deadly full of jealousy I am that my heart and head did so cast about and fret that I could not do any business possibly, but went out to my office, and anon late home again and ready to chide at every thing, and then suddenly to bed and could hardly sleep, yet durst not say any thing, but was forced to say that I had bad news from the Duke concerning Tom Hater as an excuse to my wife, who by my folly has too much opportunity given her with the man, who is a pretty neat black man, but married. But it is a deadly folly and plague that I bring upon myself to be so jealous and by giving myself such an occasion more than my wife desired of giving her another month's dancing. Which however shall be ended as soon as I can possibly. But I am ashamed to think what a course I did take by lying to see whether my wife did wear drawers to-day as she used to do, and other things to raise my suspicion of her, but I found no true cause of doing it.
Note 1. An allusion to Aretin's infamous letters and sonnets accompanying the as infamous "Postures" engraved by Marc Antonio from the designs of Julio Romano (Steinman's "Memoir of Barbara, Duchess of Cleveland", privately printed, 1871).
Note 2. Thomas Ross, Monmouth's tutor, put the idea into his head that Charles II had married his mother. The report was sedulously spread abroad, and obtained some kind of credence, until, in June, 1678, the King (32) set the matter at rest by publishing a declaration, which was entered in the Council book and registered in Chancery. The words of the declaration are: "That to avoid any dispute which might happen in time to come concerning the succession of the Crown, he (Charles) did declare, in the presence of Almighty God, that he never gave, nor made any contract of marriage, nor was married to Mrs. Barlow, alias Waters, the Duke of Monmouth's (14) mother, nor to any other woman whatsoever, but to his present wife, Queen (24) Catherine, then living"..
Note 3. The conspiracy of Sir Charles Berkeley (33), Monsieur Blanfort aka Lord Arran, Jermyn, Talbot, and Killigrew to traduce Anne Hyde (26) was peculiarly disgraceful, and the conduct of all the actors in the affair of the marriage, from Lord Clarendon downwards, was far from creditable (see Lister's "Life of Clarendon", ii. 68-79).
Note 4. The word chouse appears to have been introduced into the language at the beginning of the seventeenth century. In 1609, a Chiaus sent by Sir Robert Shirley, from Constantinople to London, had chiaused (or choused) the Turkish and Persian merchants out of £4,000, before the arrival of his employer, and had decamped. The affair was quite recent in 1610, when Jonson's "Alchemist" appeared, in which it is alluded to.

John Evelyn's Diary 16 November 1676. 16 Nov 1676. My son (21) and I dining at my Lord Chamberlain's (58), he showed us among others that incomparable piece of Raphael's, being a Minister of State dictating to Guicciardini, the earnestness of whose face looking up in expectation of what he was next to write, is so to the life, and so natural, as I esteem it one of the choicest pieces of that admirable artist. There was a woman's head of Leonardo da Vinci; a Madonna of old Palma, and two of Vandyke's, of which one was his own picture at length, when young, in a leaning posture; the other, an eunuch, singing. Rare pieces indeed!.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 January 1679. 15 Jan 1679. I went with my Lady Sunderland (33) to Chelsea, and dined with the Countess of Bristol (59) [her mother] in the great house, formerly the Duke of Buckingham's, a spacious and excellent place for the extent of ground and situation in a good air. The house is large but ill-contrived, though my Lord of Bristol, who purchased it after he sold Wimbledon to my Lord Treasurer (46), expended much money on it. There were divers pictures of Titian and Vandyke, and some of Bassano, very excellent, especially an Adonis and Venus, a Duke of Venice, a butcher in his shambles selling meat to a Swiss; and of Vandyke, my Lord of Bristol's picture, with the Earl of Bedford's at length, in the same table. There was in the garden a rare collection of orange trees, of which she was pleased to bestow some upon me.

Before 1684. Circle of Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Peter Gunning Bishop 1614-1684.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 January 1685. 24 Jan 1685. I din'd at Lord Newport's (64), who has some excellent pictures, especialy that of Sr Tho. Hanmer, by Van Dyke, one of the best he ever painted; another of our English Dobson's painting; but above all, Christ in the Virgin's lap by Poussin, an admirable piece, with some thing of most other famous hands.

Siege of Colchester

John Evelyn's Diary 24 March 1688. 24 Mar 1688. I went with Sir Charles Littleton (60) to Sheen, a house and estate given him by Lord Brounker; one who was ever noted for a hard, covetous, vicious man; but for his worldly craft and skill in gaming few exceeded him. Coming to die, he bequeathed all his land, house, furniture, etc., to Sir Charles (60), to whom he had no manner of relation, but an ancient friendship contracted at the famous siege of Colchester, forty years before. It is a pretty place, with fine gardens, and well planted, and given to one worthy of them, Sir Charles (60) being an honest gentleman and soldier. He is brother to Sir Henry Littleton (64) of Worcestershire, whose great estate he is likely to inherit, his brother being without children. They are descendants of the great lawyer of that name, and give the same arms and motto. He is married to one Mrs. Temple, formerly Maid of Honour to the late Queen (49), a beautiful lady, and he has many fine children, so that none envy his good fortune.
After dinner, we went to see Sir William Temple's near to it; the most remarkable things are his orangery and gardens, where the wall-fruit-trees are most exquisitely nailed and trained, far better than I ever noted.
There are many good pictures, especially of Vandyke's, in both these houses, and some few statues and small busts in the latter.
From thence to Kew, to visit Sir Henry Capel's (50), whose orangery and myrtetum are most beautiful and perfectly well kept. He was contriving very high palisadoes of reeds to shade his oranges during the summer, and painting those reeds in oil.

John Evelyn's Diary 21 June 1693. 21 Jun 1693. I saw a great auction of pictures in the Banqueting house, Whitehall. They had been my Lord Melford's (42), now Ambassador from King James (59) at Rome, and engaged to his creditors here. Lord Mulgrave (45) and Sir Edward Seymour (60) came to my house, and desired me to go with them to the sale. Divers more of the great lords, etc., were there, and bought pictures dear enough. There were some very excellent of Vandyke, Rubens, and Bassan. Lord Godolphin (48) bought the picture of the Boys, by Murillo the Spaniard, for 80 guineas, dear enough; my nephew Glanville, the old Earl of Arundel's head by Rubens, for £20. Growing late, I did not stay till all were sold.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 April 1696. 23 Apr 1696. I went to Eton, and dined with Dr. Godolphin, the provost. The schoolmaster assured me there had not been for twenty years a more pregnant youth in that place than my grandson (14). I went to see the King's House at Kensington. It is very noble, though not great. The gallery furnished with the best pictures [from] all the houses, of Titian, Raphael, Correggio, Holbein, Julio Romano, Bassan, Vandyke, Tintoretto, and others; a great collection of porcelain; and a pretty private library. The gardens about it very delicious.

Charge of the Light Brigade

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter IX: Deene and its History. I believe my husband replaced a great deal of the original furniture at Deene with more modern examples, but many valuable old pieces still remain. The pictures are very beautiful, including a priceless Vandyke representing Queen Henrietta Maria, in the happy days of her early married life, as a regal, gracious figure arrayed in shimmering satin. There is a lovely portrait of Louise de Keroualle and her son, the Duke of Richmond, who married a Brudenell, and there are many examples of Lely, Sir Joshua Reynolds and other eighteenth- and nineteenth-century artists. One painting by Sant represents the Prince Consort and the Royal children listening to the account of the Charge of the Light Brigade by Lord Cardigan, and there are also some interesting pictures of hunting-field incidents, depicting Cardigan and his friends on their favourite mounts.