Biography of Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680

In Dec 1629 [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (19) and Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (14) were married. They were second cousins once removed.

In 1715 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688. Around 1647 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688. Around 1678 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 in his Garter Robes. Before 10 Sep 1687 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688.

On 24 Feb 1633 Walter Butler 11th Earl Ormonde 4th Earl Ossory 1559-1633 (74) died. His grandson [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (22) succeeded 12th Earl Ormonde, 5th Earl Ossory. Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (17) by marriage Countess Ormonde.

On 08 Jul 1634 Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 was born to [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (23) and Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (18) at Kilkenny Castle, Kilkenny, County Kilkenny.

On 30 Aug 1642 [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (31) was created 1st Marquess Ormonde 1C 1642. Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (27) by marriage Marchioness Ormonde.

John Evelyn's Diary 07 May 1650. 07 May 1650. I went with Sir Richard Browne's (45) lady and my wife (15), together with the Earl of Chesterfield (66), Lord Ossory (15) and his [his brother] brother (10), to Vamber, a place near the city famous for butter; when, coming homeward, being on foot, a quarrel arose between Lord Ossory (15) and a man in a garden, who thrust Lord Ossory (15) from the gate with uncivil language; on which our young gallants struck the fellow on the pate, and bade him ask pardon, which he did with much submission, and so we parted. But we were not gone far before we heard a noise behind us, and saw people coming with guns, swords, staves, and forks, and who followed, flinging stones; on which, we turned, and were forced to engage, and with our swords, stones, and the help of our servants (one of whom had a pistol) made our retreat for near a quarter of a mile, when we took shelter in a house, where we were besieged, and at length forced to submit to be prisoners. Lord Hatton (44), with some others, were taken prisoners in the flight, and his lordship (15) was confined under three locks and as many doors in this rude fellow's master's house, who pretended to be steward to Monsieur St. Germain, one of the presidents of the Grand Chambre du Parlement, and a Canon of Nôtre Dame. Several of us were much hurt. One of our lackeys escaping to Paris, caused the bailiff of St. Germain to come with his guard and rescue us. Immediately afterward, came Monsieur St. Germain himself, in great wrath, on hearing that his housekeeper was assaulted; but when he saw the King's officers, the gentlemen and noblemen, with his Majesty's Resident and understood the occasion, he was ashamed of the accident, requesting the fellow's pardon, and desiring the ladies to accept their submission and a supper at his house. It was ten o'clock at night ere we got to Paris, guarded by Prince Griffith (a Welsh hero going under that name, and well known in England for his extravagancies), together with the scholars of two academies, who came forth to assist and meet us on horseback, and would fain have alarmed the town we received the affront from: which, with much ado, we prevented.

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John Evelyn's Diary 12 May 1650. 12 May 1650. Complaint being come to the Queen and Court of France of the affront we had received, the President was ordered to ask pardon of Sir R. Browne (45), his Majesty's Resident, and the fellow to make submission, and be dismissed. There came along with him the President de Thou, son of the great Thuanus [the historian], and so all was composed. But I have often heard that gallant gentleman, my Lord Ossory (15), affirm solemnly that in all the conflicts he was ever in at sea or on land (in the most desperate of both which he had often been), he believed he was never in so much danger as when these people rose against us. He used to call it the bataile de Vambre, and remember it with a great deal of mirth as an adventure, en cavalier.

After 1654 Philip Stanhope 2nd Earl Chesterfield 1634-1714 and [his sister] Elizabeth Butler Countess Chesterfield 1640-1665 were married. [his sister] She by marriage Countess Chesterfield.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Butler Countess Chesterfield 1640-1665.

In Mar 1655 Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 (37) and [his future sister-in-law] Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (21) were married.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 wearing his Garter Robes. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685. In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718.

On 14 Nov 1659 Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (25) and [his wife] Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688 (24) were married at Den Bosch.

In 1649 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688.

In 1660 [his daughter] Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 was born to Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (25) and Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688 (24).

John Evelyn's Diary 06 July 1660. 06 Jul 1660. His Majesty (30) began first to TOUCH FOR THE EVIL! according to custom, thus: his Majesty (30) sitting under his state in the Banqueting House, the chirurgeons cause the sick to be brought, or led, up to the throne, where they kneeling, the King (30) strokes their faces, or cheeks with both his hands at once, at which instant a chaplain in his formalities says, "He put his hands upon them, and he healed them". This is said to every one in particular. When they have all been touched, they come up again in the same order, and the other chaplain kneeling, and having angel gold strung on white ribbon on his arm, delivers them one by one to his Majesty (30), who puts them about the necks of the touched as they pass, while the first chaplain repeats, "That is the true light who came into the world". Then follows, an Epistle (as at first a Gospel) with the Liturgy, prayers for the sick, with some alteration; lastly the blessing; and then the Lord Chamberlain and the Comptroller of the Household bring a basin, ewer, and towel, for his Majesty (30) to wash.

The King received a congratulatory address from the city of Cologne, in Germany, where he had been some time in his exile; his Majesty (30) saying they were the best people in the world, the most kind and worthy to him that he ever met with. I recommended Monsieur Messary to be Judge Advocate in Jersey, by the Vice-Chamberlain's mediation with the Earl of St. Albans; and saluted my excellent and worthy noble friend, my Lord Ossory (25), son to the [his father] Marquis of Ormond (49), after many years' absence returned home.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

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On 30 Mar 1661 [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (50) was created 1st Duke Ormonde by King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30). Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (45) by marriage Duchess Ormonde.

In 1662 Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (27) by writ of acceleration 6th Earl Ossory. [his wife] Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688 (26) by marriage Countess Ossory.

In May 1662 [his brother] Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (22) was created 1st Earl Arran 2C 1662.

On 26 Oct 1662 William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707 (22) and [his sister] Mary Butler Duchess Devonshire 1646-1710 (16) were married.

Before 1708 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. In 1697 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. Around 1660 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. Around 1655. Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707.

On 29 Apr 1665 [his son] James Butler 2nd Duke Ormonde 1665-1745 was born to Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (30) and Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688 (30).

In Jul 1665 [his sister] Elizabeth Butler Countess Chesterfield 1640-1665 (25) died.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 October 1666. 27 Oct 1666. Up, and there comes to see me my Lord Bellasses (52), which was a great honour. He tells me great newes, yet but what I suspected, that Vernatty is fled, and so hath cheated him and twenty more, but most of all, I doubt, Mr. Povy (52).

Thence to talk about publique business; he tells me how the two Houses begin to be troublesome; the Lords to have quarrels one with another. My Lord Duke of Buckingham (38) having said to the Chancellor (57) (who is against the passing of the Bill for prohibiting the bringing over of Irish cattle), that whoever was against the Bill, was there led to it by an Irish interest, or an Irish understanding, which is as much as to say he is a Poole; this bred heat from my Chancellor (57), and something he [Buckingham] said did offend my Lord of Ossory (32) my ([his father] Lord Duke of Ormond's (56) son), and they two had hard words, upon which the latter sends a challenge to the former; of which the former complains to the House, and so the business is to be heard on Monday next. Then as to the Commons; some ugly knives, like poignards, to stab people with, about two or three hundred of them were brought in yesterday to the House, found in one of the house's rubbish that was burned, and said to be the house of a Catholique. This and several letters out of the country, saying how high the Catholiques are everywhere and bold in the owning their religion, have made the Commons mad, and they presently voted that the King (36) be desired to put all Catholiques out of employment, and other high things; while the business of money hangs in the hedge. So that upon the whole, God knows we are in a sad condition like to be, there being the very beginnings of the late troubles.

He gone, I at the office all the morning. At noon home to dinner, where Mrs. Pierce and her boy and Knipp, who sings as well, and is the best company in the world, dined with us, and infinite merry. The playhouses begin to play next week. Towards evening I took them out to the New Exchange, and there my wife bought things, and I did give each of them a pair of Jesimy1 plain gloves, and another of white. Here Knipp and I walked up and down to see handsome faces, and did see several. Then carried each of them home, and with great pleasure and content, home myself, where, having writ several letters, I home, and there, upon some serious discourse between my wife and I upon the business, I called to us my brother, and there broke to him our design to send him into the country with some part of our money, and so did seriously discourse the whole thing, and then away to supper and to bed. I pray God give a blessing to our resolution, for I do much fear we shall meet with speedy distractions for want of money.

1. Jessemin (Jasminum), the flowers of which are of a delicate sweet smell, and often used to perfume gloves. Edmund Howes, Stows continuator, informs us that sweet or perfumed gloves were first brought into England by the Earl of Oxford on his return from Italy, in the fifteenth year of Queen (27) Elizabeth, during whose reign, and long afterwards, they were very fashionable. They are frequently mentioned by Shakespeare. Autolyctis, in the "Winter's Tale", has among his Wares—"Gloves as sweet as damask roses". B.

Around 1634 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of John Belasyse 1st Baron Belasyse 1614-1689. Around 1669 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of John Belasyse 1st Baron Belasyse 1614-1689. Around 1657 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Thomas Povey Master of Requests 1614-1705. Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Villiers 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1628-1687 wearing his Garter Collar. Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza. Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 31 October 1666. 31 Oct 1666. Out with Sir W. Batten (65) toward White Hall, being in pain in my cods by being squeezed the other night in a little coach when I carried Pierce and his wife and my people. But I hope I shall be soon well again. This day is a great day at the House, so little to do with the Duke of York (33), but soon parted. Coming out of the Court I met Colonell Atkins, who tells me the whole city rings to-day of Sir Jeremy Smith's killing of Holmes (44) in a duell, at which I was not much displeased, for I fear every day more and more mischief from the man, if he lives; but the thing is not true, for in my coach I did by and by meet Sir Jer. Smith going to Court.

So I by coach to my goldsmith, there to see what gold I can get, which is but little, and not under 22d. So away home to dinner, and after dinner to my closett, where I spent the whole afternoon till late at evening of all my accounts publique and private, and to my great satisfaction I do find that I do bring my accounts to a very near balance, notwithstanding all the hurries and troubles I have been put to by the late fire, that I have not been able to even my accounts since July last before; and I bless God I do find that I am worth more than ever I yet was, which is £6,200, for which the Holy Name of God be praised! and my other accounts of Tangier in a very plain and clear condition, that I am not liable to any trouble from them; but in fear great I am, and I perceive the whole city is, of some distractions and disorders among us, which God of his goodness prevent! Late to supper with my wife and brother, and then to bed. And thus ends the month with an ill aspect, the business of the Navy standing wholly still. No credit, no goods sold us, nobody will trust. All we have to do at the office is to hear complaints for want of money.

The Duke of York (33) himself for now three weeks seems to rest satisfied that we can do nothing without money, and that all must stand still till the King (36) gets money, which the Parliament have been a great while about; but are so dissatisfied with the King's management, and his giving himself up to pleasures, and not minding the calling to account any of his officers, and they observe so much the expense of the war, and yet that after we have made it the most we can, it do not amount to what they have given the King (36) for the warn that they are backward of giving any more. However, £1,800,000 they have voted, but the way of gathering it has taken up more time than is fit to be now lost: The seamen grow very rude, and every thing out of order; commanders having no power over their seamen, but the seamen do what they please. Few stay on board, but all coming running up hither to towne, and nobody can with justice blame them, we owing them so much money; and their familys must starve if we do not give them money, or they procure upon their tickets from some people that will trust them. A great folly is observed by all people in the King's giving leave to so many merchantmen to go abroad this winter, and some upon voyages where it is impossible they should be back again by the spring, and the rest will be doubtfull, but yet we let them go; what the reason of State is nobody can tell, but all condemn it.

The Prince and Duke of Albemarle (57) have got no great credit by this year's service. Our losses both of reputation and ships having been greater than is thought have ever been suffered in all ages put together before; being beat home, and fleeing home the first fight, and then losing so many ships then and since upon the sands, and some falling into the enemy's hands, and not one taken this yeare, but the Ruby, French prize, now at the end of the yeare, by the Frenchmen's mistake in running upon us. Great folly in both Houses of Parliament, several persons falling together by the eares, among others in the House of Lords, the Duke of Buckingham (38) and my Lord Ossory (32). Such is our case, that every body fears an invasion the next yeare; and for my part, I do methinks foresee great unhappiness coming upon us, and do provide for it by laying by something against a rainy day, dividing what I have, and laying it in several places, but with all faithfulness to the King (36) in all respects; my grief only being that the King (36) do not look after his business himself, and thereby will be undone both himself and his nation, it being not yet, I believe, too late if he would apply himself to it, to save all, and conquer the Dutch; but while he and the Duke of York (33) mind their pleasure, as they do and nothing else, we must be beaten. So late with my mind in good condition of quiet after the settling all my accounts, and to bed.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Around 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Freschville Holles 1642-1672 and Admiral Robert Holmes 1622-1692. Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670. Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 15 November 1666. 15 Nov 1666. This [morning] come Mr. Shepley (newly out of the country) to see me; after a little discourse with him, I to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon home, and there dined, Shepley with me, and after dinner I did pay him £70, which he had paid my father for my use in the country. He being gone, I took coach and to Mrs. Pierce's, where I find her as fine as possible, and himself going to the ball at night at Court, it being the Queen's (27) birth-day, and so I carried them in my coach, and having set them into the house, and gotten Mr. Pierce to undertake the carrying in my wife, I to Unthanke's, where she appointed to be, and there told her, and back again about business to White Hall, while Pierce went and fetched her and carried her in.

I, after I had met with Sir W. Coventry (38) and given him some account of matters, I also to the ball, and with much ado got up to the loft, where with much trouble I could see very well. Anon the house grew full, and the candles light, and the King (36) and Queen (27) and all the ladies set: and it was, indeed, a glorious sight to see Mrs. Stewart (19) in black and white lace, and her head and shoulders dressed with dyamonds, and the like a great many great ladies more, only the Queen (27) none; and the King (36) in his rich vest of some rich silke and silver trimming, as the Duke of York (33) and all the dancers were, some of cloth of silver, and others of other sorts, exceeding rich.

Presently after the King (36) was come in, he took the Queene (56), and about fourteen more couple there was, and began the Bransles. As many of the men as I can remember presently, were, the King (36), Duke of York (33), Prince Rupert (46), Duke of Monmouth (17), Duke of Buckingham (38), Lord Douglas (20), Mr. [George] Hamilton (59), Colonell Russell (46), Mr. Griffith, Lord Ossory (32), Lord_Rochester (19); and of the ladies, the Queene (56), Duchess of York (29), Mrs. Stewart (19), Duchess of Monmouth (15), Lady Essex Howard, Mrs. Temples (17), Swedes Embassadress, [his sister-in-law] Lady Arlington (32); Lord George Barkeley's daughter (16) [Note. Assumed Elizabeth], and many others I remember not; but all most excellently dressed in rich petticoats and gowns, and dyamonds, and pearls.

After the Bransles, then to a Corant, and now and then a French dance; but that so rare that the Corants grew tiresome, that I wished it done. Only Mrs. Stewart (19) danced mighty finely, and many French dances, specially one the King (36) called the New Dance, which was very pretty; but upon the whole matter, the business of the dancing of itself was not extraordinary pleasing. But the clothes and sight of the persons was indeed very pleasing, and worth my coming, being never likely to see more gallantry while I live, if I should come twenty times. About twelve at night it broke up, and I to hire a coach with much difficulty, but Pierce had hired a chair for my wife, and so she being gone to his house, he and I, taking up Barker at Unthanke's, to his house, whither his wife was come home a good while ago and gone to bed. So away home with my wife, between displeased with the dull dancing, and satisfied at the clothes and persons. My Baroness Castlemayne (25), without whom all is nothing, being there, very rich, though not dancing. And so after supper, it being very cold, to bed.

Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686. Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Frances Teresa Stewart Duchess Lennox and Richmond 1647-1702. One of the Windsor Beauties. Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the Prince Rupert, Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 and Colonel William Murray. Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1672 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1670. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685. In 1659 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Colonel John Russell 1620-1687. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of John Wilmot 2nd Earl Rochester 1647-1680. Before 26 Jul 1680 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of John Wilmot 2nd Earl Rochester 1647-1680. Around 1661 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. One of the Windsor Beauties. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 07 Nov 1666. William Faithorne Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Around 1664 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. One of the Windsor Beauties. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Around 1690 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 November 1666. 19 Nov 1666. Lay pretty long in bed talking with pleasure with my wife, and then up and all the morning at my own chamber fitting some Tangier matters against the afternoon for a meeting. This morning also came Mr. Caesar, and I heard him on the lute very finely, and my boy begins to play well.

After dinner I carried and set my wife down at her brother's, and then to Barkeshire-house, where my Chancellor (57) hath been ever since the fire, but he is not come home yet, so I to Westminster Hall, where the Lords newly up and the Commons still sitting. Here I met with Mr. Robinson, who did give me a printed paper wherein he states his pretence to the post office, and intends to petition the Parliament in it.

Thence I to the Bull-head tavern, where I have not been since Mr. Chetwind and the time of our club, and here had six bottles of claret filled, and I sent them to Mrs. Martin, whom I had promised some of my owne, and, having none of my owne, sent her this.

Thence to my Chancellor's (57), and there Mr. Creed and Gawden, Cholmley (34), and Sir G. Carteret (56) walking in the Park over against the house. I walked with Sir G. Carteret (56), who I find displeased with the letter I have drawn and sent in yesterday, finding fault with the account we give of the ill state of the Navy, but I said little, only will justify the truth of it.

Here we walked to and again till one dropped away after another, and so I took coach to White Hall, and there visited my Lady Jemimah, at Sir G. Carteret's (56) lodgings. Here was Sir Thomas Crew (42), and he told me how hot words grew again to-day in the House of Lords between my Lord Ossory (32) and Ashly (45), the former saying that something said by the other was said like one of Oliver's Council. Ashly (45) said that he must give him reparation, or he would take it his owne way. The House therefore did bring my Lord Ossory (32) to confess his fault, and ask pardon for it, as he was also to my Lord Buckingham (38), for saying that something was not truth that my Lord Buckingham (38) had said. This will render my Lord Ossory (32) very little in a little time.

By and by away, and calling my wife went home, and then a little at Sir W. Batten's (65) to hear news, but nothing, and then home to supper, whither Captain Cocke (49), half foxed, come and sat with us, and so away, and then we to bed.

Around 1707. Charles D'Agar Painter 1669-1723. Portrait of Thomas Crew 2nd Baron Crew 1624-1697. Around 1672 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Anthony Ashley-Cooper 1st Earl Shaftesbury 1621-1683. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Anthony Ashley-Cooper 1st Earl Shaftesbury 1621-1683.

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Around 1670 Colin Lindsay 3rd Earl Balcarres 1652-1722 (17) and [his sister-in-law] Mauritiade Nassau Countess Balcarres -1671 were married. [his sister-in-law] She by marriage Countess Balcarres.

Around 1671 [his sister-in-law] Mauritiade Nassau Countess Balcarres -1671 died.

On 04 Sep 1671 [his son] Charles Butler 3rd Duke Ormond 1671-1758 was born to Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (37) and Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688 (36).

In 1672 Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (37) was appointed 477th Knight of the Garter by King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (41).

1672 Attack on the Smyrna Fleet

On 12 Mar 1672 Admiral John Holmes 1640-1683 (32), commanding The Gloucester, and Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (37) attacked the Dutch Smyrna Fleet on its return from the Mediterranean beginning the Third Anglo-Dutch War.

John Evelyn's Diary 12 March 1672. 12 Mar 1672. Now was the first blow given by us to the Dutch convoy of the Smyrna fleet, by Sir Robert Holmes (32) and Lord Ossory (37), in which we received little save blows, and a worthy reproach for attacking our neighbors ere any war was proclaimed, and then pretending the occasion to be, that some time before, the Merlin yacht chancing to sail through the whole Dutch fleet, their Admiral did not strike to that trifling vessel. Surely, this was a quarrel slenderly grounded, and not becoming Christian neighbors. We are likely to thrive, accordingly. Lord Ossory (37) several times deplored to me his being engaged in it; he had more justice and honor than in the least to approve of it, though he had been over-persuaded to the expedition. There is no doubt but we should have surprised this exceeding rich fleet, had not the avarice and ambition of Holmes (32) and Spragge (52) separated themselves, and willfully divided our fleet, on presumption that either of them was strong enough to deal with the Dutch convoy without joining and mutual help; but they so warmly plied our divided fleets, that while in conflict the merchants sailed away, and got safe into Holland.

A few days before this, the Treasurer of the Household, Sir Thomas Clifford (41), hinted to me, as a confidant, that his Majesty (41) would SHUT UP THE EXCHEQUER (and, accordingly, his Majesty (41) made use of infinite treasure there, to prepare for an intended rupture); but, says he, it will soon be open again, and everybody satisfied; for this bold man, who had been the sole adviser of the King (41) to invade that sacred stock (though some pretend it was Lord Ashley's counsel, then Chancellor of the Exchequer), was so over-confident of the success of this unworthy design against the Smyrna merchants, as to put his Majesty (41) on an action which not only lost the hearts of his subjects, and ruined many widows and orphans, whose stocks were lent him, but the reputation of his Exchequer forever, it being before in such credit, that he might have commanded half the wealth of the nation.

The credit of this bank being thus broken, did exceedingly discontent the people, and never did his Majesty's (41) affairs prosper to any purpose after it, for as it did not supply the expense of the meditated war, so it melted away, I know not how.

To this succeeded the King's (41) declaration for an universal toleration; Papists and swarms of Sectaries, now boldly showing themselves in their public meetings. !This was imputed to the same council, Clifford (41) warping to Rome as was believed, nor was Lord Arlington (54) clear of suspicion, to gratify that party, but as since it has proved, and was then evidently foreseen, to the extreme weakening of the Church of England and its Episcopal Government, as it was projected. I speak not this as my own sense, but what was the discourse and thoughts of others, who were lookers-on; for I think there might be some relaxations without the least prejudice to the present establishment, discreetly limited, but to let go the reins in this manner, and then to imagine they could take them up again as easily, was a false policy, and greatly destructive. The truth is, our Bishops slipped the occasion; for, had they held a steady hand upon his Majesty's (41) restoration, as they might easily have done, the Church of England had emerged and flourished, without interruption; but they were then remiss, and covetous after advantages of another kind while his Majesty (41) suffered them to come into a harvest, with which, without any injustice he might have remunerated innumerable gallant gentlemen for their services who had ruined themselves in the late rebellion.

Around 1672 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Thomas Clifford 1st Baron Clifford Chudleigh 1630-1673.

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In 1673 [his son-in-law] William Stanley 9th Earl Derby 1655-1702 (18) and Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 (13) were married. They were half third cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. She by marriage Countess Derby.

John Evelyn's Diary 26 March 1673. 26 Mar 1673. I was sworn a younger brother of the Trinity House, with my most worthy and long-acquainted noble friend, Lord Ossory (38) (eldest son to the [his father] Duke of Ormond (62)), Sir Richard Browne (68), my father-in-law, being now Master of that Society; after which there was a great collation.

In Jan 1675 [his brother] John Butler 1st Earl Gowran 1643-1677 (32) and Anne Chichester Countess Gowran and Longford -1697 were married.

John Evelyn's Diary 31 May 1675. 31 May 1675. I went with Lord Ossory (40) to Deptford, where we chose him Master of the Trinity Company.

On 13 Apr 1676 [his brother] John Butler 1st Earl Gowran 1643-1677 (33) was created 1st Earl Gowran, 1st Viscount Clonmore, 1st Baron Aghrim. Anne Chichester Countess Gowran and Longford -1697 by marriage Countess Gowran.

John Evelyn's Diary 22 May 1676. 22 May 1676. Trinity Monday. A chaplain of my Lord Ossory's (41) preached, after which we took barge to Trinity House in London. Mr. Pepys (43) (Secretary of the Admiralty) succeeded my Lord as Master.

In 1666. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 February 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 06 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 May 1666. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703.

John Evelyn's Diary 06 September 1676. 06 Sep 1676. Supped at the Lord Chamberlain's (58), where also supped the famous beauty and errant lady, the Duchess of Mazarine (30) (all the world knows her story), the Duke of Monmouth (27), Countess of Sussex (15) (both natural children of the King (46) by the Duchess of Cleveland (35)) [Note. A mistake by Evelyn. Jame's Scott's (27) mother was Lucy Walter Mistress 1630-1658 (46), Anne Fitzroy's (15) mother was Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 (35)], and the [his daughter] Countess of Derby (16), a virtuous lady, daughter to my best friend, the Earl of Ossory (42).

Around 1671 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Hortense Mancini Duchess of Mazarin 1646-1699.

In 1677 [his brother] John Butler 1st Earl Gowran 1643-1677 (34) died at Paris.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 October 1677. 15 Oct 1677. Returned to London; in the evening, I saw the Prince of Orange (26), and supped with Lord Ossory (43).

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar.

John Evelyn's Diary 19 July 1678. 19 Jul 1678. The Earl of Ossory (44) came to take his leave of me, going into Holland to command the English forces.

John Evelyn's Diary 21 November 1679. 21 Nov 1679. I dined at my Lord Mayor's (50), to accompany my worthiest and generous friend, the Earl of Ossory (45); it was on a Friday, a private day, but the feast and entertainment might have become a King. Such an hospitable costume and splendid magistrature does no city in the world show, as I believe.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 December 1679. 04 Dec 1679. I dined, together with Lord Ossory (45) and the Earl of Chesterfield (45), at the Portugal Ambassador's (53), now newly come, at Cleveland House, a noble palace, too good for that infamous.... [Note. Probably a reference to Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 (39)] The staircase is sumptuous, and the gallery and garden; but, above all, the costly furniture belonging to the Ambassador, especially the rich Japan cabinets, of which I think there were a dozen. There was a billiard table, with as many more hazards as ours commonly have; the game being only to prosecute the ball till hazarded, without passing the port, or touching the pin; if one miss hitting the ball every time, the game is lost, or if hazarded. It is more difficult to hazard a ball, though so many, than in our table, by reason the bound is made so exactly even, and the edges not stuffed; the balls are also bigger, and they for the most part use the sharp and small end of the billiard stick, which is shod with brass, or silver. The entertainment was exceedingly civil; but, besides a good olio, the dishes were trifling, hashed and condited after their way, not at all fit for an English stomach, which is for solid meat. There was yet good fowls, but roasted to coal, nor were the sweetmeats good.

John Evelyn's Diary 26 July 1680. 26 Jul 1680. My most noble and illustrious friend, the Earl of Ossory (46), espying me this morning after sermon in the privy gallery, calling to me, told me he was now going his journey (meaning to Tangier, whither he was designed Governor, and General of the forces, to regain the losses we had lately sustained from the Moors, when Inchiquin (40) was Governor). I asked if he would not call at my house (as he always did whenever he went out of England on any exploit). He said he must embark at Portsmouth, "wherefore let you and me dine together to-day; I am quite alone, and have something to impart to you; I am not well, shall be private, and desire your company"..

Being retired to his lodgings, and set down on a couch, he sent to his secretary for the copy of a letter which he had written to Lord Sunderland (38) (Secretary of State), wishing me to read it; it was to take notice how ill he resented it, that he should tell the King (50) before Lord Ossory's (46) face, that Tangier was not to be kept, but would certainly be lost, and yet added that it was fit Lord Ossory (46) should be sent, that they might give some account of it to the world, meaning (as supposed) the next Parliament, when all such miscarriages would probably be examined; this Lord Ossory (46) took very ill of Lord Sunderland (38), and not kindly of the King (50), who resolving to send him with an incompetent force, seemed, as his Lordship (46) took it, to be willing to cast him away, not only on a hazardous adventure, but in most men's opinion, an impossibility, seeing there was not to be above 300 or 400 horse, and 4,000 foot for the garrison and all, both to defend the town, form a camp, repulse the enemy, and fortify what ground they should get in. This touched my Lord (46) deeply, that he should be so little considered as to put him on a business in which he should probably not only lose his reputation, but be charged with all the miscarriage and ill success; whereas, at first they promised 6,000 foot and 600 horse effective.

My Lord (46), being an exceedingly brave and valiant person, and who had so approved himself in divers signal battles, both at sea and land; so beloved and so esteemed by the people, as one they depended on, upon all occasions worthy of such a captain;—he looked on this as too great an indifference in his Majesty (50), after all his services, and the merits of his [his father] father, the Duke of Ormond (69), and a design of some who envied his virtue. It certainly took so deep root in his mind, that he who was the most void of fear in the world (and assured me he would go to Tangier with ten men if his Majesty (50) commanded him) could not bear up against this unkindness. Having disburdened himself of this to me after dinner, he went with his Majesty (50) to the sheriffs at a great supper in Fishmongers' Hall; but finding himself ill, took his leave immediately of his Majesty (50), and came back to his lodging. Not resting well this night, he was persuaded to remove to Arlington House, for better accommodation. His disorder turned to a malignant fever, which increasing, after all that six of the most able physicians could do, he became delirious, with intervals of sense, during which Dr. Lloyd (52) (after Bishop of St. Asaph) administered the Holy Sacrament, of which I also participated. He died the Friday following, the 30th of July, to the universal grief of all that knew or heard of his great worth, nor had any a greater loss than myself. Oft would he say I was the oldest acquaintance he had in England (when his father was in Ireland), it being now of about thirty years, contracted abroad, when he rode in the Academy in Paris, and when we were seldom asunder.

His Majesty (50) never lost a worthier subject, nor father a better or more dutiful son; a loving, generous, good-natured, and perfectly obliging friend; one who had done innumerable kindnesses to several before they knew it; nor did he ever advance any that were not worthy; no one more brave, more modest; none more humble, sober, and every way virtuous. Unhappy England in this illustrious person's loss! Universal was the mourning for him, and the eulogies on him; I stayed night and day by his bedside to his last gasp, to close his dear eyes! O sad father, mother, wife, and children! What shall I add? He deserved all that a sincere friend, a brave soldier, a virtuous courtier, a loyal subject, an honest man, a bountiful master, and good Christian, could deserve of his prince and country. One thing more let me note, that he often expressed to me the abhorrence he had of that base and unworthy action which he was put upon, of engaging the Smyrna fleet in time of peace, in which though he behaved himself like a great captain, yet he told me it was the only blot in his life, and troubled him exceedingly. Though he was commanded, and never examined further when he was so, yet he always spoke of it with regret and detestation. The [his wife] Countess (45) was at the seat of her daughter, the Countess of Derby (20), about 200 miles off.

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On 30 Jul 1680 Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (46) died. He was buried in the Duke of Ormonde Vault Henry VII Chapel Westminster Abbey the next day.

Before 12 Dec 1688 [his wife] Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688 died. She was buried 12 Dec 1688 in the Duke of Ormonde Vault Henry VII Chapel Westminster Abbey.

[his brother] Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 and Dorothy Ferrers Countess Arran 1655-1716 were married. She by marriage Countess Arran.

[his brother] Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 and Mary Stewart Countess Arran 1651-1668 were married. She by marriage Countess Arran.

Memoirs of Count Grammont by Anthony Hamilton Chapter 6. The [his father] Duke of Ormond's sons and his nephews had been in the king's court during his exile, and were far from diminishing its lustre after his return. The Earl of Arran had a singular address in all kinds of exercises, played well at tennis and on the guitar, and was pretty successful in gallantry: his elder brother, the Earl of Ossory, was not so lively, but of the most liberal sentiments, and of great probity.

[his daughter] Henrietta Butler Countess Grantham -1724 was born to Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 and Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688.

Memoirs of Count Grammont by Anthony Hamilton Chapter 8. The Duke of York found this last accusation greatly out of bounds, being convinced he himself had sufficient proofs of the contrary: he therefore returned thanks to these officious informers for their frankness, ordered them to be silent for the future upon what they had been telling him, and immediately passed into the king's apartment.

As soon as he had entered the cabinet, Lord Falmouth, who had followed him, related what had passed to the Earl of Ossory, whom he met in the presence chamber: they strongly suspected what was the subject of the conversation of the two brothers, as it was long; and the Duke of York appeared to be in such agitation when he came out, that they no longer doubted that the result had been unfavourable for poor Miss Hyde. Lord Falmouth began to be affected for her disgrace, and to relent that he had been concerned in it, when the Duke of York told him and the Earl of Ossory to meet him in about an hour's time at the chancellor's.

They were rather surprised that he should have the cruelty himself to announce such a melancholy piece of news: they found his royal highness at the appointed hour in Miss Hyde's chamber: a few tears trickled down her cheeks, which she endeavoured to restrain. The chancellor, leaning against the wall, appeared to them to be puffed up with something, which they did not doubt was rage and despair. The Duke of York said to them, with that serene and pleasant countenance with which men generally announce good news: "As you are the two men of the court whom I most esteem, I am desirous you should first have the honour of paying your compliments to the Duchess of York: there she is."

Surprise was of no use, and astonishment was unseasonable on the present occasion: they were, however, so greatly possessed with both surprise and astonishment, that in order to conceal it, they immediately fell on their knees to kiss her hand, which she gave to them with as much majesty as if she had been used to it all her life.

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