Chambered Tomb

Chambered Tomb is in Neolithic Monuments.

Chambered Tomb. A Chambered Tomb is a prehistoric burial site constructed from large stones over which a mound is constructed. There are numerous sub-types. Sometimes the mound has been destroyed. Sometimes there are numerous chambers. Chambered tombs in England appear to commence around 3400BC and end around 2400BC. In Europe, Ireland and Scotland Chambered Tombs were built earlier.

Around 4000BC. Kits Coty House is a Chambered Tomb constructed around 4000BC.

Around 4000BC. Little Kit's Coty House is a Chambered Tomb constructed around 4000BC.

Before 4000BC. Chestnuts Long Barrow was a chambered tomb.

Around 3500BC. Addington Long Barrow was a chambered tomb the monument originally comprised fifty local sarsen megaliths. The long barrow consisted of a sub-rectangular earthen tumulus enclosed by kerb-stones.

Around 3500BC. Smythe's Megalith was a Chambered Tomb constructed around the middle of the 4th Millenium BC, discovered in 1822 at which time it was dismantled.

Around 3500BC. Coldrum Stones, aka Adscombe Stones, is the remains of a chambered tomb.

3400BC. Minning Low Chambered Tomb is one of the oldest prehistoric monuments in Derbyshire. It comprises five chambered tombs and two Round Barrows located on a highly prominent mound. Today, the mound has a crown of trees making it obvious even at great distances. When north of Minninglow it can be seen from twenty miles away from the Kinder Plateau on a clear day.

Historic England:.

Minning Low hill lies within the south-eastern uplands of the limestone plateau of Derbyshire. The monument includes the chambered tomb and two bowl barrows within a single constraint area which also incorporates the archaeologically sensitive areas between and around the earthworks up to, but not including, the encircling drystone wall.

The chambered tomb is the easternmost of these earthworks and comprises an oval cairn measuring 45m by 38m and surviving to a height of 2.4m. A wedge-shaped chamber of limestone slabs (Chamber I) survives with its capstone in situ at the centre of the mound, while a second complete chamber (Chamber II) lies c.5m to the south and also retains its capstone in addition to part of its south-facing passage which is similarly covered by a capstone. The remains of Chamber III lie c.5m to the west, while those of Chamber IV lie near the edge of the barrow c.6m south of Chamber III. The collapsed slabs of Chamber V lie on the western edge and a single upright slab near the centre of the barrow has been interpreted as the remains of a small cist. During the partial excavations of the site by Thomas Bateman in 1843 and 1851, the mound was found to be constructed of coursed stone and the chambers to contain human bones, including one extended skeleton, fragments of Romano-British Derbyshire ware pottery and a number of Roman coins. The latter show that the barrow had been disturbed in the third or fourth century AD, but Beaker sherds found by Bateman in Chamber IV indicate a Late Neolithic or Bronze Age date for that particular chamber. This represents the latest phase of Prehistoric use since further excavation, carried out by Barry Marsden in 1973-4, has led to the barrow being interpreted as a multi-period site, beginning with the construction of Chamber I and its drystone walled approach passage in the Early Neolithic period. There is no precise chronology for the remaining phases but an extended period of use throughout the Neolithic and into the Early Bronze Age is indicated. Marsden also found evidence of Roman re-use of the site in three Roman bronzes and pottery sherds recovered from Chamber III. He also found a drystone wall running through the north-west side of the barrow. This was traced for c.10m and was orientated east-west.

The two bowl barrows lie c.25m north-west of the chambered tomb. The second of these is superimposed onto the first so that, together, they form an oval mound measuring 23.5m by 16.5m and standing c.2m high. The two were partially excavated by Thomas Bateman in 1849 when the earlier was found to be a limestone cairn containing a central primary cist which had been disturbed at an earlier date. A secondary cremation burial was also found, dating the barrow to the Bronze Age. The later bowl barrow was of earthen construction and contained an in situ primary cremation, two flint knives, a burnt bronze razor and a bone tool. This barrow also dates to the Bronze Age, indicating an extended period of use at this site. Like the chambered tomb, both barrows had been disturbed in the Roman period.

Unstan Chambered Cairn is a Neolthic Chambered Tomb located near Stromness.

Devil's Den Long Barrow. Historic England 1012321.

The monument includes an earthen mound and chambered tomb set on the floor of a dry valley in an area of undulating chalk downland. The chambered tomb comprises four large sarsens (three uprights, one capstone). It is orientated north-west/south-east and set on top of a low earthen mound 8m square and 0.4m high. The sarsen uprights (one of which now lies on its side) range in size from 3-4m square while the capstone is 4m square. Flanking the mound on the north-west and south-east sides are quarry ditches from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument. These are no longer visible at ground level but survive as buried features c.3m wide. The site was partially reconstructed in 1921, after plough damage, and now stands 5m high. A concrete plinth bearing the date `1921' has been inserted on the northern side of the monument.

Five Wells Chambered Tomb is a Chambered Tomb; one of the oldest monuments in Derbyshire. It's location is prominent being at the top edge of the limestone scarp that rises quickly to form the Derbyshire limestone plateau. From the north the scarp and Five Wells are obvious.

Historic England Entry.

Five Wells Chambered Tomb is situated on Taddington Moor on the limestone plateau of Derbyshire. The monument includes a roughly circular burial-mound measuring 23m by 22m and surviving to a height of c.1m. Originally the mound would have been somewhat higher, but most of the surface was robbed of its stone in the eighteenth century. Stone was also taken in the late nineteenth century from the western part and a number of pits on the south side were created in the mid-twentieth century when material was taken for hard-core. Visible today are the remains of two limestone orthostat chambers, situated back to back and orientated east-west with approach passages leading from the western and eastern edges of the mound. These internal features have paved floors and were covered by a cairn measuring 16m by 14.5m which was built of horizontally laid limestone slabs and covered in turn by a mound of earth and stone. In addition to the recovery of skeletal remains and pottery by workmen prior to the mid-eighteenth century, there have been four partial excavations of the monument carried out by Bateman in 1846, Jewitt in 1862, Lukis in 1865 and Salt between 1899 and 1901. Bateman recovered the remains of at least twelve individuals in the two chambers along with burnt bones and a flint, while Jewitt found pottery and a flint and Lukis found the remains of three skeletons in the western passage. Salt found further human remains within the chambers and passages along with flint implements, which included a leaf shaped arrowhead and a plano convex knife, and sherds of pottery of the types known as Neolithic plain ware and Peterborough ware. A barbed and tanged arrowhead was found on the surface of the mound and Salt also uncovered a cist in the north-western part of the monument which was placed outside the cairn but within the earth mound. This contained a contracted inhumation and, along with another inhumation and some burnt bone found in a pit in the top of the mound, is believed to be a secondary burial. The architectural features and archaeological remains indicate that the barrow was in use from the Early Neolithic, with a period of re-use either in the Late Neolithic or to the Bronze Age.

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Coffin Stone, also known as the Coffin and the Table Stone, is a possible Chambered Tomb of which only one large sarsen remains.

Pea Low Bowl Barrow is a very large Bowl Barrow, possibly Chambered Tomb, at Alstonefield. Curiously difficult to see despite its size. It's original shape somewhat denuded by erosion. From the top there are extensive views north six or so miles including the whole of the Dove Valley. Footpaths make it accessible.

Historic England: https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1009603.

The monument includes Pea Low bowl barrow located on the crest of a ridge with higher ground to the northwest. It survives as an impressively large oval mound up to 3.5m high with maximum dimensions of 45.5m by 38m. A series of quarry pits measuring up to 20m diameter by 0.5m deep, and dug for construction of the mound, are visible on all sides except the south-east. The mound displays areas of disturbance, notably a stony hollow on it's southwestern side measuring 13m by 6m and 1.5m deep that is considered to have been the site of a former limekiln, and a shallow area of exposed rubble on the southeastern side that is the site of antiquarian investigations. These limited investigations revealed evidence of the barrow having been re-used during Roman times. Inhumations, cremations, faunal remains, flint, iron artefacts and Roman coins were all recovered during the course of these excavations. All fences and drystone walls are excluded from the scheduling. The ground beneath these features, however, is included.

White Horse Stone. Previously two sarsen megaliths now only one remains. Probably the remains of Chambered Tombs.

Long Barrow

3500BC. Stoney Middleton Long Barrow is a Neolithic Long Barrow constructed around 3500BC ±500 years around 7.5km south of Bath on high unlevel ground above a bend in the River Wellow. It is a Severn Cotswolds Tomb type. The stone structure is about 30 metres in length, 3m high, and contains a 12.8 metres long gallery with a roof of overlapping stones with three pairs of side chambers and an end chamber. The tomb was excavated by Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838 in 1816-1817.

Around 1783. Prince Hoare 1755-1834. Portrait of Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838.

South Street Long Barrow. Historic England 1008103.

The monument includes a Neolithic long barrow 70m south east of the Long Stones standing stones and c.300m north east of the Long Stones long barrow, a contemporary funerary monument. The South Street long barrow, despite having been reduced by cultivation and partly excavated, survives as a slight earthwork visible at ground level. The barrow mound is aligned ESE-WNW and is known from excavation to measure 43m in length and 17m across. However, the mound has been spread by cultivation and now measures 64m in length and 43m across. Partial excavation has shown that the mound was constructed of chalk rubble tipped into a series of forty bays, created by the laying out of hurdle fences to mark out the site immediately prior to construction. This building method provided stability to the mound and guided the workforce in deciding where to dump the material quarried from two parallel flanking ditches. These ditches are located c.7m from the base of the mound on both sides and measure c.55m long and c.7m wide. The ditches have been gradually infilled by cultivation over the years but survive as buried features beneath the present ground surface. Radio-carbon dating of some of the finds from the later excavation date the construction of the mound to around 2750BC, making the monument over 4000 years old. Finds from the excavation included flint arrowheads, animal bones and fragments of pottery. Below the barrow mound evidence of early ploughing was discovered, taking the form of lines of cross-ploughing incised into the chalk.

Amesbury 42 Long Barrow is a Long Barrow at the end of the Greater Cursus. It was noted by William Stukeley Antiquarian 1687-1765 (35) in 1723 and Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838 (51) in 1810. It was excavated by John Thurnam Antiquarian 1810-1873 in 1810 who recovered an Ox Skull and discovered secondary inhumations. The barrow is now levelled.

Shepherd's Shore Long Barrow.

The monument includes a Neolithic long barrow, 650m WSW of Shepherds' Shore. It is situated on a false crest overlooking a slight valley to the south and west. The barrow is aligned ENE-WSW, is oval in shape and lies about 500m south of the Wansdyke. The barrow mound has been reduced by cultivation over the years but survives as a visible earthwork measuring 35m long and 16m wide. It stands up to 0.2m high. Originally, it stood at least 1m high and is known from partial excavation in the early 1800s to have contained both inhumation and cremation burials. Unusually, it appears that the barrow mound was constructed without flanking quarry ditches. Chalk and turf was gathered from nearby fields to construct the mound and use was made of the natural contours of the slope to enhance its profile.< a href="https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1014030?section=official-list-entry">Historic England.

Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads Long Barrow. Historic England 1011841.

The monument includes a long barrow north east of Winterbourne Stoke crossroads, situated on a south west-north east ridge and having extensive views to the south east across Wilsford Down and Normanton Down. The long barrow is orientated south west-north east along the ridge and forms the origin and focal point of a linear round barrow cemetery which extends some 500m along the ridge to the north east and contains a total of 22 round barrows. The barrow mound is 95m in length, 22m wide, and 2.5m high. It is flanked on the north west and south east by ditches running the length of the mound from which material was quarried during its construction. The north west ditch is 1m deep and c.8m wide. The south east ditch is visible in part, having become largely infilled over the years, but its full width is visible as a vegetation mark on aerial photographs from which it is calculated to be c.10m wide. The long barrow is therefore 95m long and 40m wide. Partial excavation in the 19th century revealed a primary male inhumation with a flint implement, and six secondary inhumations with a plain food vessel 0.75m from the top of the mound.

Winterbourne Stoke Long Barrow. Historic England 1015021.

The monument includes a long barrow orientated east - west situated on a downland spur 180m south of the A360 on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The mound is 43m long. A 36m length of the mound survives as a visible earthwork which varies in height from 1.5m high at the western end to c.1m at the eastern end. Beyond this the remainder of the mound is visible as a slight rise in the field surface. The mound is 17m wide and is flanked on either side by a ditch up to 5m wide; that on the south side is visible as a shallow depression. The north western ditch survives as a buried feature. A part excavation by Cunnington in the early 19th century produced a cremation covered with flints and two deep cists containing wood ash and charcoal. The long barrow lies within a levelled field system which has not been included in the scheduling.

Kitchen Long Barrow. Historic England 1012519.

The monument includes a long barrow, orientated SW-NE and set below the crest of a steep south-facing slope. The barrow mound has maximum dimensions of 33m long by 15m wide and survives to a height of 2m when viewed from the south-west. Flanking quarry ditches run parallel and contiguous to the barrow mound. These are 5m wide and up to 0.5m deep on the east side and 1m deep to the west. Central hollows on the surface of the mound suggest the site may once have been excavated. Worked flint artefacts, probably contemporary with the construction and use of the monument, are visible on the surface of the adjacent ploughed field.

Long Stones Long Barrow. Historic England:

The monument includes a Neolithic long barrow aligned north east to south west and situated on a gentle east-facing slope, 300m south west of the South Street long barrow.The barrow mound has been slightly disturbed by cultivation in the past but survives as an impressive earthwork which measures 84m long and 35m wide. The mound stands up to 6m high and is flanked to the north and south by quarry ditches which provided material for the construction of the mound. These have become partially infilled over the years owing to cultivation but survive as slight earthworks c.24m wide and 84m long with a depth of c.0.6m. The barrow was partially excavated by Merewether between 1820 and 1850. He discovered evidence of a Bronze Age cremation burial contained in a 'Deverel Rimbury' style pottery urn and a piece of bronze which was probably part of a dagger. The urn is now located in the Devizes Museum.

Knighton Long Barrow. Historic England 1010052.

A large, impressive long barrow orientated east/west. The mound is c.60m long x 20m wide, and is flanked by ditches c.12m wide which are very deep and well defined. The overall width is c.44m.

Horton Down Long Barrow. The monument includes a long barrow set across a ridge-top on an area of gently undulating chalk downland. The monument survives as a low earthwork, rectangular in plan and orientated NNW-SSE. The barrow mound is c.40 long by 15m across and survives to a height of 0.4m. Flanking ditches, from which material used to construct the mound was quarried, run parallel to the east and west sides of the mound. These have been infilled over the years and now survive as buried features c.5m across. Large quantities of worked flint, including retouched artefacts and cores, are visible both on the surface of the mound and in the immediate area around it. These are believed to be contemporary with the construction and use of the monument.Historic England.

The Thickthorn Down Long Barrows are two Neolithic long barrows near the south-western end of the Dorset Cursus.

Severn Cotswolds Tomb

West Kennet Long Barrow is a Severn Cotswolds Tomb probably constructed in the 3700s BC. Human bones of men, women and children were placed in the chambers between 3670 and 3635 BC. The site appears to be subsequently re-used between 3620 and 3240 BC. In the late Neolithic it was blocked up with the addition of large sarsen boulders. It is 100m in length, 20m wide, constructed from earth with ditches on both sides, oriented east-west. At the east end are multiple chambers formed off a passage that extends 12m into the barrow. The ceiling is between 1.7 and 2.2m high - sufficient to allow an adult to stand upright.

Finds included Grooved Ware, Beaker Ware, Ebbsfleet Ware, Mortlake Ware and Fengate Ware coming from more than two hundred and fifty vessels.

3600BC. Wayland's Smithy Long Barrow is Severn Cotswolds Tomb in Oxfordshire on the Ridgeway Path.

It was first constructed in wood around 3570BC then as a stone monument around 3430BC.

Adam's Grave is a Neolithic Severn Cotswolds Tomb. The chamber was made of sarsen stones. It contained partial human skeletons. An leaf shaped arrowhead was also recovered. The tomb was 70m long, around 7m high with ditches on either side. It was partially excavated by John Thurnam Antiquarian 1810-1873 in 1860.

Adam's Grave Historic England Entry:

The monument includes Adam's Grave, a long barrow set on a promontory above a steep south-facing escarpment. It survives as a substantial earthwork orientated NW-SE and is trapezoid in plan. The barrow mound is 70m long, c.7m high and survives to an average width of 20m. Flanking ditches, from which material used to construct the mound was quarried, run parallel to the north and south sides of the mound. These are 7m wide and up to 2m deep. The south-east end of the monument was partially excavated by Thurnham in 1860. Finds included part of a chamber formed from large sarsen stones, traces of human skeletons and a leaf shaped arrowhead. Numerous other long barrows are known in the area while a broadly contemporary enclosure at Knap Hill is situated on an neighbouring promontory.

East Kennet Long Barrow is Severn Cotswolds Tomb.

Historic England 1012323.

The monument includes a long barrow set below the crest of a gentle north- east facing slope. It survives as a substantial earthwork orientated north- west/south-east and is broadly rectangular in plan. The barrow mound is flat topped. It survives to 106m long, 50m wide and stands to a height of c.8m at the south-east end and 4m at the north-west end. Flanking ditches, from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument, run parallel to the south-west and north-east sides of the mound and survive to a width of c.5m. These have become infilled over the years but survive as a low earthwork on the north-east side of the mound and as a buried feature to the south-west. The monument has been partially excavated, both by the Rev. M Connor in the 19th century and later by Thurnham. No details are known.

Belas Knapp Long Barrow, Prehistoric Cotswolds

3000BC. Belas Knapp Long Barrow is a Severn Cotswolds Tomb type of long barrow with a false entrance and four burial chambers.

Hetty Pegler's Tump, Prehistoric Cotswolds

3000BC or before. Hetty Pegler's Tump is a Severn Cotswolds Tomb with a transepted gallery grave with a stone-built central passage with two chambers on each side and another at the end.

Nympsfield Long Barrow, Prehistoric Cotswolds

2800BC. Nympsfield Long Barrow is a chambered Severn Cotswolds Tomb.

In 1862 Buckman and the Cotteswold Naturalist's Field Club excavated the site.

In 1937 by E. M. Clifford excavated the site.

Notgrove Long Barrow, Prehistoric Cotswolds

Notgrove Long Barrow is a Severn Cotswolds Tomb situated on the crest of a ridge in the Cotswold Hills. The long barrow mound was trapezoidal in plan and orientated east-west.

Wayland's Smithy Long Barrow, Prehistoric South-West England

The Ridgeway Path is an ancient footpath that extends from Knap Hill, on the south of the Avebury Plateau, or The Sanctuary, to Ivinghoe Beacon - a distance of more than eighty miles following the scarp slopes. From Knap Hill the Ridgeway Path passes The Sanctuary, Prehistoric Avebury, Barbury Castle, Liddington Castle, Wayland's Smithy Long Barrow, Uffington Castle and White Horse, Segsbury Camp, Scutchamer Knob, Goring, Swyncome, Chinnor, Princes Risborough, Boddington Hill Fort, Tring, Ivinghoe Beacon.

3600BC. Wayland's Smithy Long Barrow is Severn Cotswolds Tomb in Oxfordshire on the Ridgeway Path.

It was first constructed in wood around 3570BC then as a stone monument around 3430BC.

Stoney Middleton Long Barrow, Somerset, Prehistoric South-West England

3500BC. Stoney Middleton Long Barrow is a Neolithic Long Barrow constructed around 3500BC ±500 years around 7.5km south of Bath on high unlevel ground above a bend in the River Wellow. It is a Severn Cotswolds Tomb type. The stone structure is about 30 metres in length, 3m high, and contains a 12.8 metres long gallery with a roof of overlapping stones with three pairs of side chambers and an end chamber. The tomb was excavated by Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838 in 1816-1817.

Around 1783. Prince Hoare 1755-1834. Portrait of Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838.

Amesbury 42 Long Barrow, Stonehenge Long Barrows, Neolithic Stonehenge, Prehistoric South-West England

Amesbury 42 Long Barrow is a Long Barrow at the end of the Greater Cursus. It was noted by William Stukeley Antiquarian 1687-1765 (35) in 1723 and Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838 (51) in 1810. It was excavated by John Thurnam Antiquarian 1810-1873 in 1810 who recovered an Ox Skull and discovered secondary inhumations. The barrow is now levelled.

Around 1783. Prince Hoare 1755-1834. Portrait of Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838.

Knighton Long Barrow, Stonehenge Long Barrows, Neolithic Stonehenge, Prehistoric South-West England

Knighton Long Barrow. Historic England 1010052.

A large, impressive long barrow orientated east/west. The mound is c.60m long x 20m wide, and is flanked by ditches c.12m wide which are very deep and well defined. The overall width is c.44m.

Larkhill Long Barrow, Stonehenge Long Barrows, Neolithic Stonehenge, Prehistoric South-West England

Larkhill Long Barrow. Historic England 1012167.

The monument includes a long barrow situated within Larkhill Camp, north of the Packway. The barrow mound, which is orientated north west - south east, is up to 1.1m high, 46m long and c.16m wide. Flanking the mound on the north east and south west sides are ditches visible as earthworks up to c.7m wide from which material was quarried during construction of the monument.

White Long Barrow, Stonehenge Long Barrows, Neolithic Stonehenge, Prehistoric South-West England

3750BC. White Long Barrow is 77.5 m long and approximately 47 m wide including the surrounding ditch. Dating of materials found in and around it suggests that it dates from around 3750BC±250.

Winterbourne Stoke Long Barrow, Stonehenge Long Barrows, Neolithic Stonehenge, Prehistoric South-West England

Winterbourne Stoke Long Barrow. Historic England 1015021.

The monument includes a long barrow orientated east - west situated on a downland spur 180m south of the A360 on Winterbourne Stoke Down. The mound is 43m long. A 36m length of the mound survives as a visible earthwork which varies in height from 1.5m high at the western end to c.1m at the eastern end. Beyond this the remainder of the mound is visible as a slight rise in the field surface. The mound is 17m wide and is flanked on either side by a ditch up to 5m wide; that on the south side is visible as a shallow depression. The north western ditch survives as a buried feature. A part excavation by Cunnington in the early 19th century produced a cremation covered with flints and two deep cists containing wood ash and charcoal. The long barrow lies within a levelled field system which has not been included in the scheduling.

Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads Long Barrow, Stonehenge Long Barrows, Neolithic Stonehenge, Prehistoric South-West England

Winterbourne Stoke Crossroads Long Barrow. Historic England 1011841.

The monument includes a long barrow north east of Winterbourne Stoke crossroads, situated on a south west-north east ridge and having extensive views to the south east across Wilsford Down and Normanton Down. The long barrow is orientated south west-north east along the ridge and forms the origin and focal point of a linear round barrow cemetery which extends some 500m along the ridge to the north east and contains a total of 22 round barrows. The barrow mound is 95m in length, 22m wide, and 2.5m high. It is flanked on the north west and south east by ditches running the length of the mound from which material was quarried during its construction. The north west ditch is 1m deep and c.8m wide. The south east ditch is visible in part, having become largely infilled over the years, but its full width is visible as a vegetation mark on aerial photographs from which it is calculated to be c.10m wide. The long barrow is therefore 95m long and 40m wide. Partial excavation in the 19th century revealed a primary male inhumation with a flint implement, and six secondary inhumations with a plain food vessel 0.75m from the top of the mound.

Woodhenge Long Barrow, Stonehenge Long Barrows, Neolithic Stonehenge, Prehistoric South-West England

Woodhenge Long Barrow. Historic England 1009130.

The monument includes a levelled long barrow aligned north east-south west located some 450m WSW of Woodhenge on Countess Farm and situated on a west facing slope. The barrow is now difficult to identify on the ground. However, the ditches which flank the mound of the long barrow on its western and eastern sides, from which material was quarried during its construction, survive as buried features and are visible as parchmarks. These are represented on a parchmark survey carried out in 1990 from which the overall length of the long barrow can be calculated to be 40m and the overall width 28m.

Wooden Structured Burial Chamber

In 1806 Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838 (47) excavated and found areas of black earth that he believed to be the remains of a wooden structured burial chamber.

Around 1783. Prince Hoare 1755-1834. Portrait of Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet Barn Elms 1758-1838.