Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII 1541

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII 1541 is in Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII.

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII 1541 May

29 May 1541. 868. Marillac to Francis I.

What has here happened since he wrote last, on the 22nd, gives matter to write. To begin with, a case more worthy of compassion than of long letters, the countess of Saalberi (deceased), mother of Cardinal Pol (age 41) and the late lord Montaigue, was yesterday morning, about 7 o'clock, beheaded in a corner of the Tower [Map], in presence of so few people that until evening the truth was still doubted. It was the more difficult to believe as she had been long prisoner, was of noble lineage, above 80 years old, and had been punished by the loss of one son and banishment of the other, and the total ruin of her house. Further reflections upon this. The manner of proceeding in her case and that of a lord who was executed at the same time (who is not yet named, but is presumed to be lord Leonard de Clidas (age 62), formerly the King's lieutenant in Ireland) seems to argue that those here are afraid to put to death publicly those whom they execute in secret. It may be added that yesterday all the heads which were fixed upon the bridge of the river which passes by this town were taken down; in order that the people may forget those whose heads kept their memory fresh, if it were not that this will people the place with new, for Marillac hears from a good place that, before St. John's tide, they reckon to empty the Tower of the prisoners now there for treason.

The talk of going to the North continues, and provisions are already being sent; which are the greater as the company will be 4,000 or 5,000 horse, as well because the King (age 49) wishes to go with more magnificence (as he has not yet been there) as to be secure against any seditious designs. They will be gentlemen of these quarters of King (Kent), whom he trusts most. The 50 gentlemen of the house will each have tent and war equipment, as also will several other young lords; so that it will be rather like following a camp than going to the chase.

As instructed in last packet of the 20th, will write to no one of affairs here. Would not have done it in the past had he known Francis's pleasure, but was only written to to address all he wrote to Francis, not that he should not write to others. Will write affairs concerning war or peace to Mons. de Vendosme, as long as he is in Picardy, and in his absence a word to M. du Bies, to prevent them thinking better or worse in the absence of news. Is not spoken to about the Cauchoide nor about the conversation he wrote last in cipher.

10 Jun 1541. 897. Chapuys (age 51) to the Queen of Hungary.

If the affair is mentioned, will follow her instructions in her letter of the 28th ult. Expects to be summoned before the King (age 49) two days hence. Is vexed at not having received the copy of her answer to the King, referred to in his despatch of 26 May. The news since that date is that on the 27th three of the chief conspirators in the North - an abbot and two gentlemen - were hung and quartered. About the same time took place the lamentable execution of the countess of Salisbury (deceased) at the Tower [Map] in presence of the Lord Mayor and about 150 persons. When informed of her sentence she found it very strange, not knowing her crime; but she walked to the space in front of the Tower, where there was no scaffold but only a small block. She there commended her soul to God, and desired those present to pray for the King, Queen, Prince, and Princess. The ordinary executioner being absent, a blundering "garçonneau" was chosen, who hacked her head and shoulders to pieces. A most virtuous lady nearly 90 years of age. When her death was resolved on her nephew (grandson) (age 21), the son of lord Montague, who had been allowed occasionally to go about within the Tower, was more strictly guarded. It is to be supposed he will soon follow his father and grandmother. London, 10 June 1541. Original at Vienna.

02 Jul 1541. 954. Chapuys (age 51) to the Queen of Hungary.

Almost immediately after Chapuys's return the King (age 50) gave the people of Dunkirk permission to buy here a quantity of wood for their own use for curing herrings, and he has frequently reminded Chapuys of the favor, saying he was surprised that the town had not sent a deputation to say how much wood they required. The deputation has arrived, and now, after being kept 13 days without an answer, they have been told that it is mere loss of time to solicit such things till the Queen has promised to release the harness, copper, and war ammunition purchased by the King some time ago at Antwerp.

On St. Peter's eve lord Leonard (deceased), uncle of the Marquis of Osceter (age 24) (Dorset) and of the Chancellor's (age 53) wife, was beheaded in front of the Tower [Map]. Hears he was accused of letting his nephew (age 16), the young Earl of Kildare, escape to France and thence to Liege.

That afternoon two gentlemen were hung, one of whom had an income of over 12,000 ducats a year, and was the handsomest and best bred man in England [Note. Not clear as to who this is? If anyone has information on the identity of this person I'd be grateful if they would email Christopher Smith.], only 25 years old and married to a niece of the Duke of Norfolk (age 68). He was sentenced for having belonged to a set of eight rakish youths, one of whom had killed a poor old man in an unpremeditated fray. For the same cause lord Dacres (deceased) also, son1 of the Duke of Norfolk's (age 68) sister, and cousin of this Queen (age 18), 23 years old and possessing a property of about 5,000 ducats a year, was hung from the most ignominious gibbet, and for greater shame dragged through the streets to the place of execution, to the great pity of many people, and even of his very judges, who wept when they sentenced him, and in a body asked his pardon of the King. But the thing which astonished people most was, that, the same day lord Dacres was hung, another young man (age 28), son of the Treasurer of the Royal household (age 56), who was one of those present at the old man's death, was freely pardoned, though he had been already tried for some like misdemeanour.

At the same time in the North, Sir John Neville (deceased) and about 60 more, among whom at least 25 were ecclesiastics, were executed for the conspiracy of which Chapuys wrote some time ago. Has just heard of the arrival of a Polish gentleman with eight or ten servants. Will endeavour to discover who he is and what he comes for. London, 2 July 1541. Original at Vienna.

Note 1. Thomas Fiennes 9th Baron Dacre Gilsland (deceased), Lord Dacre, was the grandson of Anne Bourchier Baroness Dacre of Gilsland who was the maternal half-sister of Thomas Howard 3rd Duke of Norfolk (age 68); Anne and Thomas' mother was Elizabeth Tilney Countess of Surrey.

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII 1541 December

01 Dec 1541. R. O. 1395. Trial of Thomas Culpeper and Francis Dereham, for Treason.

File of documents in Baga de Secretis, Pouch XIII., Bundle 1 consisting of the following:—

1. Special commission for the trial of Culpeper and Derham, at the Guildhall of London, to Michael Dormer, mayor of London, lord Chancellor Audeley, the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk, the earls of Southampton, Sussex, and Hertford, lords Russell and St. John, Sir Ant. Browne, Sir John Gage, Sir Ant. Wyngfeld, Sir Thomas Wriothesley, Sir Ralph Sadler, Sir Richard Ryche, Sir Edward Mountagu, Sir John Baldewyn, Sir Richard Lyster, Sir Walter [Luke], Edm. Mervyn, Sir William Shelley, Sir Thomas Willoughby, Sir Chr. Jenney, and Sir John Daunce. Westm., 30 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

2. Yorkshire: Writ of venire to the sheriff for the return of a petty jury for the trial of Culpeper and Dereham before the special commissioners (named). Westm., 30 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

3. Linc.: The like.

4. City of Lincoln: The like.

5. Midd.: The like.

6. Surr.: The like.

7. Kent: The like.

8. Justices' precept to the constable of the Tower to bring up Dereham and Culpeper at the Guildhall of London on 1 Dec. next. 30 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

9. Yorks.: Writ of certiorari to Francis Earl of Shrewsbury, &c., for the return of indictments, &c., found in Yorkshire. Westm., 28 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

Endd. as answered by Shrewsbury.

10. Yorks.: Indictment found at Doncaster, 24 Nov. 33 Henry VIII., before Shrewsbury and the others (named), by the grand jury (named), who find the annexed inquisition a true bill, viz.:—

That Catharine, Queen of England, formerly called Kath. Howerd, late of Lambyth, Surr., one of the daughters of lord Edmund Howard, before the marriage between the King and her, led an abominable, base, carnal, voluptuous, and vicious life, like a common harlot, with divers persons, as with Francis Derham of Lambeth and Henry Manak of Streteham, Surr., 20 and 24 May 32 Henry VIII., and at other times, maintaining however the outward appearance of chastity and honesty. That she led the King by word and gesture to love her and (he believing her to be pure and chaste and free from other matrimonial yoke) arrogantly coupled herself with him in marriage. And the said Queen and Francis, being charged by divers of the King's Council with their vicious life, could not deny it, but excused themselves by alleging that they were contracted to each other before the marriage with the King; which contract at the time of the marriage they falsely and traitorously concealed from the King, to the peril of the King and of his children to be begotten by her and the damage of the whole realm. And after the marriage, the said Queen and Francis, intending to renew their vicious life, 25 Aug. 33 Henry VIII., at Pomfret, and at other times and places, practised that the said Francis should be retained in the Queen's service; and the Queen, at Pomfret, 27 Aug. 33 Henry VIII., did so retain the said Francis, and had him in notable favour above others, and, in her secret chamber and other suspect places, spoke with him and committed secret affairs to him both by word and writing, and for the fulfilling of their wicked and traitorous purpose, gave him divers gifts and sums of money on the 27 Aug. and at other times.

Also the said Queen, not satisfied with her vicious life aforesaid, on the 29 Aug. 33 Henry VIII., at Pomfret, and at other times and places before and after, with Thomas Culpeper, late of London, one of the gentlemen of the King's privy chamber, falsely and traitorously held illicit meeting and conference to incite the said Culpeper to have carnal intercourse with her; and insinuated to him that she loved him above the King and all others. Similarly the said Culpeper incited the Queen. And the better and more secretly to pursue their carnal life they retained Jane Lady Rochford (age 36), late wife of Sir George Boleyn late Lord Rochford, as a go-between to contrive meetings in the Queen's stole chamber and other suspect places; and so the said Jane falsely and traitorously aided and abetted them.

11. Yorks.: Commissioners' precept to the sheriff for the return of the grand jury at Doncaster on Thursday 24 Nov. next. Sheffelde, 20 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Sir Robert Nevell, sheriff, as shown by the panel annexed.

12. Jury panel annexed, viz., Sir William Malorie, Sir John Dawneye, Sir Rog. Lassels, Sir William Fairefaxe, Sir Peter Vavasour, Sir Ralph Evers, Sir Edward Gower, Sir Henry Everingham, William Vavasour, Robert Stapleton, Thomas Marckenfelde, John Barton, William Thwates, of Merston, Edward Saltmersh, Nicholas Tempeste, Chr. Thirkelde, Hugh Wirrall, and Henry Newarke. All marked as sworn.

13. Yorks.: Special commission of oyer and terminer in Yorkshire to Francis Earl of Shrewsbury (age 41), R. Bishop of Llandaff, lord president of the Council in the North, Sir Marm. Constable, senior, Sir William Copley, Sir John Wentworth, Sir Gervaise Clyfton, Thomas Fairfaxe, serjeant-at-law, and William Babthorp. [Westm. xvj.] Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

14. Midd.: Writ of certiorari to Sir Edward Mountagu; Sir Walt. Luke, and Edm. Mervyn, justices, commanding them to return into Chancery the indictments found before them in Middlesex against Culpeper and Derham. Westm., 28 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Mountagu.

15. Midd.: Indictment found at Westminster on Friday in the quinzaine of St. Martin, 33 Henry VIII., before Montagu, Luke and Mervyn, by the grand jury (named), similar to that in § 10, but alleging the offences to have been committed at Hampton Court and Westminster.

16. Midd.: Commissioners' precept to the sheriff for the return of a grand jury at Westminster on Friday in the quinzaine of St. Martin next. 24 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Roland Hyll and Henry Suckeley, sheriffs.

17. Grand jury panel annexed, viz., Richard Harryyong, William Godard,* Thomas Armerer,* John Yngland, John Elderton,* William Genyns,* John James,* Richard Smalwoode,* John Averey,* Robert Medylton,* Ph. Lentall, Robert Scharpe,* Thomas Jent, Richard Warner,* Richard Browne, Chr. Proctour,* Thomas Tayler,* Robert Graunt,* John Powell,* Nicholas Gravener,* John Daunyell,* John Averell, John Swallowe, Henry Lodysman, John Coke, John Browne, and Eustace Rypley. Those marked with the asterisk (*) sworn.

18. Midd.: Special Commission of oyer and terminer to Sir Edward Mountagu, Sir Walt. Luke, and Edm. Mervyn, justices. Westm., 22 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

19. Linc.: Writ of certioriari to Thomas Earl of Rutland (age 49), and others, for the return of indictments against Culpeper and Derham found before them in Lincolnshire. Westm. 28 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Rutland.

20. Linc.: Indictment found at Lincoln Castle, 23 Nov. 33 Henry VIII., before Rutland and the others, by the grand jury (named); similar to § 10, but alleging the offences to have been committed at Gainsborough and elsewhere in Lincolnshire.

21. Linc.: Commissioners' precept to the sheriff for the return of a grand jury at Lincoln Castle, 23 Nov. next. 19 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Robert Tyrwytt, sheriff.

22. Grand jury panel annexed, viz., Sir William Sandon of Asby, Sir John Candysshe of Butterwyk, Edward Dymmok of Skreleby, Robert Sutton of Burton, John Hennege of Haynton, Richard Bolles of Hawe, Thomas Lyttylbery of Staynsby, Henry Portyngton, of Sawclyff, Thomas Dymmok of Northcarleton, William Dalyson of Laughton, Ph. Tyrwhytt of Barton, Arthur Dymmok of Kyrkby upon Bayn, Richard Dysney of Norton Dysney, Hamo Sutton of Whasshyngburgh, Robert Dyghton of Little Sturton, William Mounson of North Ingilby, John Turney of Caneby, Godfrey Colvyle of Walcott, Thomas Hall of Colby, Thomas Kyme of Beneworth, John Bothe of Kyllyngholme, Thomas Horsman of Sleford, Robert Brokylsbye of Glentworth, William Quadryng of Irby beside Borowe. The first 18 sworn.

23. Linc.: Special commission of oyer and terminer in Lincolnshire to Thomas Earl of Rutland (age 49), Sir William Skypwith, Sir Robert Husey, Sir John Copledyke, Sir John Thymolby, Ant. Missenden, serjeant at law, John Haryngton, Edward Forsett and Vincent Grantham. Westm., 16 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

24. City of Lincoln: Writ of certiorari to Thomas Earl of Rutland (age 49) and others for the return of indictments against Culpeper and Derham found before them in the city of Lincoln. Westm., 28 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Rutland.

25. City of Lincoln: Indictment found at the city of Lincoln 23 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. before Rutland and the others, by the grand jury (named), similar to § 10, but alleging the offences to have been committed in the city of Lincoln.

26. City of Lincoln: Commissioners' precept to the sheriffs for the return of a grand jury at Lincoln 23 Nov. next, 19 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by William Hochynson and George Portern, sheriffs.

27. Grand jury panel annexed, viz., Richard Beyvercotes, gent., William Pawfreman, Edward Smythe, Ralph Goodknappe, William Dyghton, William Sames, Robert Hurry, William Yates, William Alynson, Chr. Brampston, Thomas Wryght, and William Smythe, aldermen of the city, John Fynche, draper, John Rotheram and George Stamppe, merchants, Edm. Atkynson, William Qwheler, Nicholas Fawconer, Thomas Emunson, George Skynner, John Beyke, James Plumtre, Edward Dawson, William Mylner, Hugh Hallaley, and William Hudson. From the second to the fifteenth name sworn.

28. City of Lincoln: Special commission of oyer and terminer to Thomas Earl of Rutland (age 49) and the others named in § 23. Westm., 16 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

29. Surr.: Writ of certiorari to Sir Thomas Willoughby and others for return of indictments found against Culpeper and Derham in Surrey. Westm., 28 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Willoughby.

30. Surr.: Indictment found at Southwark on Thursday 24 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. before Willoughby, Long, Dacre, Skynner, Curson, and Scott, by the grand jury (not named); as in § 10, but alleging the offences to have been committed at Lambeth, Otlands, and elsewhere in Surrey.

31. Surr.: Commissioners' precept to the sheriff for the return of a grand jury at Southwark, 24 Nov. next. Westm., 23 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by John Sakvyle, sheriff.

32. Grand jury panel annexed, viz., Edm. Harvye, Nicholas Lye, Hugh Nalyngherst, Robert Draper, Ralph Elyngworthe, William Saunders, John Castelton, Henry Knyght, William Grove, John Gardyner, Henry Ede, John Lyng, William Quyck, Robert Halsyter, William Fowler, Richard Thomas, John Blackford, Thomas Buxston, John Smythe, John Gardyner, Henry Harman, Thomas Luxston, John Westbroke, Robert Hall, and John Amo. The first fifteen sworn.

33. Surr.: Special commission of oyer and terminer to Sir Thomas Willoughby, Sir John Gage, Sir Richard Longe, Sir Thomas Pope, Sir Edm. Walsyngham, Sir Chr. More, Sir John Gresham, Robert Dacre, James Skynner, Robert Curson, and John Scott. Westm., 22 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

34. Kent: Writ of certiorari to Sir Thomas Willoughby and others for return of indictments against Culpeper and Derham, found in Kent. Westm., 28 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

35. Kent: Indictment found at Deptford, on Thursday 24 Nov. before Willoughby, Longe, Hales, Hendley, and Boyse by the grand jury (not named); as in § 10, but alleging the offences to have been committed at Greenwich and elsewhere in Kent.

36. Kent: Commissioners' precept to the sheriff for the return of a grand jury at Deptford, 24 Nov. next. Westm., 23 Nov. 33 Henry VIII. Endd. as answered by Ant. Sandes, sheriff.

37. Grand jury panel annexed, viz., John Beer,* John Lovelace,* Thomas Sybbell,* Nicholas Sybbell,* William Harmon, Thomas Hendeley,* Thomas Ferryby,* John Seliard, Robert Knight,* Robert Iden,* Robert Cheseman,* Robert Barfote, Robert Multon,* John à Children,* Thomas Skelton,* [Hugh Provest], Thomas Shepherd, John Tybbold, Steph. Parrott,* George Tomson,* Richard Hybbyng, John Romney, sen., William Knightly, Richard Froggett, Ralph Foxley, John à Court, and George Admondes. Those marked with the asterisk (*) sworn.

38. Kent: Special commission of oyer and terminer in Kent to Sir Thomas Willoughby, Sir John Gage, Sir Richard Longe, Sir Thomas Pope, Sir Edm. Walsyngham, Sir Edward Boughton, James Hales, serjeant-at-law; Walter Hendley, and John Boyse. Westm., 22 Nov. 33 Henry VIII.

39. Justices' precept to the sheriff of Yorkshire for the return of a petty jury at the Guildhall of London, this 1 Dec., of residents near Pomfret, for the trial of Derham and Culpeper. Endd. as answered by Sir Robert Nevyll, sheriff.

40. Jury panel annexed, viz., Sir Henry Savyll,* Sir Arth. Darcy,* Sir John Alen,* Sir Richard Gresham,* Sir William Halles, Sir James Foljambe,* Sir William Newnham,* Sir Nicholas Stirley,* Sir William Pykeryng,* Sir George Griffyth,* Sir Thomas Wentworth,* Sir Edward Mateson,* Thomas Holcroft, Thomas Wentworth,* Richard Chomley, Chr. Lassells, Thomas Dalaryver, Francis Askwyth, Godfrey Foljambe, John Cotes of London, Marm. Wyvell, William Hothom, Ambrose Wolleys, Roger Wentworth, Chr. Metcalff, Henry Ryder, Thomas Legh of St. Oswald's, William Blythman, John Gresham, John More, Ralph Bulmer, James Strangways. Those marked with the asterisk (*) sworn.

41. Record of pleas before Michael Dormer and others (reciting §§ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and noticing § 8), at the Guildhall of London, on Thursday, 1 Dec. 33 Henry VIII., Lord Chancellor Audeley delivered divers indictments of high treason taken against Catharine, Queen of England, and others (§§ 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 recited). Culpeper and Derham, being brought to the bar by Sir John Gage, constable of the Tower, severally plead not guilty. Venire awarded instanter and jury of Yorkshire sworn; but before they retired to consult on their verdict, and after sufficient and probable evidence had been given on the King's part, the said Culpeper and Derham severally plead guilty. The King's serjeants-at-law and attorney thereupon pray judgment.

Judgment, to be taken back to the Tower and thence drawn through London to the gallows at Tyburn, and there hanged, cut down alive, disembowelled, and (they still living) their bowels burnt, beheaded, and quartered.

Delivered of record by lord Chancellor Audeley the Monday next after the month of St. Michael 34 Henry VIII.

Latin.