Biography of Anthony Browne 1500-1548

Paternal Family Tree: Browne

Maternal Family Tree: Aoife NI Diarmait Macmurrough Countess Pembroke and Buckingham 1145-1188

1527 Visit of the French Ambassadors

1537 Birth and Christening Edward VI

1540 Creation of Garter Knights

1546 Henry VIII Revises his Will

1547 Death of Henry VIII Accession of Edward VI

Around 1473 Thomas Fitzwilliam (age 24) and [his mother] Lucy Neville (age 5) were married. She the daughter of John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu and Isabel Ingaldsthorpe (age 32). She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III of England.

After 1492 [his father] Anthony Browne (age 48) and [his mother] Lucy Neville (age 24) were married. The difference in their ages was 24 years. She the daughter of John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu and Isabel Ingaldsthorpe. They were fourth cousins. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III of England.

Around 1500 Anthony Browne was born to Anthony Browne (age 56) and Lucy Neville (age 32).

Around 17 Nov 1506 [his father] Anthony Browne (age 63) died at Calais [Map].

Hall's Chronicle 1522. Mar 1522. In the month of March, as you have heard before, came certain noble men from the Emperor (age 22) to the King, which the more to solace them enterprised at jousts, he himself was chief on the one side, his courser was barded in cloth of silver, of Denmark embroidered with. L. L. L. of gold, and under the letters a heart of a man wounded, and great roll of gold with black letters, in which was written, mon nauera, put together it is, ell mon ceur a nauera, she hath wounded my harte, and the same suite was his base.

Then followed Sir Nicolas Carew (age 26), his base and barde was white damask, on which was embroidered with cloth of gold a prison and a man looking out at a grate, and over the prison came from the prisoner a roll, in which was written in Frenche, in prison I am at liberty, and at liberty I am in prison, and all his apparel was garded with shackles of silver.

Then followed therle of Devonshire (age 26), the Lord Roos (age 30) in one suite, their apparel was white velvet, embroidered with cloth of gold, wrought in device an heart, traversed cross-wise with a chain, the which divided the bard in four quarters, in two quarters was a hand of gold holding a sphere of the world, on the other two quarters was two hands holding two plumes of feathers, and on the borders were written my heart is between joy and pain.

Then followed Anthony Kingston, and Anthony Knyvet, their apparel was a heart bound in a blue lace, embroidered on crimson satin: and written about with letters of gold, my heart is bound.

Nicholas Darrel had a bard and base of black satin, embroidered full of hearts, turned or broken of gold, and written in letters of silver, my heart is broken.

Last of that bend was Anthony Browne (age 22), which had a bard of silver full of spears of the world broken, set on hearts broken al of gold written about in letters of black sans remedy, without remedy.

Then entered the Duke of Suffolk (age 38) and his bend, all in bardes and bases of russet velvet and cloth of silver, embroidered with branches of paunces of gold, at these jousts were many spears broken, which the strangers highly commended.

Before 1526 Anthony Browne (age 26) and Alice Gage (age 19) were married. He a great x 4 grandson of King Edward III of England.

In 1526 [his son] William Browne was born to Anthony Browne (age 26) and [his wife] Alice Gage (age 20).

Around 1527 [his daughter] Mary Browne was born to Anthony Browne (age 27) and [his wife] Alice Gage (age 21).

Visit of the French Ambassadors

Calendars. May 7. [1527] Sanuto Diaries, v. xlv. pp. 194–198.

105. Gasparo Spinelli, Venetian Secretary in London, to his brother Lodovico Spinelli, in Venice.

On the 4th instant all the ambassadors, with the exception of the Emperor's, were summoned to Greenwich, where, in the presence of the King and the chief personages of the Court, the French ambassador, the Bishop of Tarbes, delivered an oration, which was answered by the Bishop of London, who, on the morrow, Cardinal Wolsey being unable to officiate from indisposition, sang mass with the usual ceremonies; after which at the high altar, where the missal was opened by the Cardinal, the French ambassadors swore in his hands (“in mano dil R~mo Cardinal”) to observe the perpetual peace now concluded with the King of England, he on his part swearing in like manner.

Two of the ambassadors, namely the prelate and the soldier, dined with the King, the others dining together apart.

On rising from table they went to the Queen's apartment, where the Princess (age 11) danced with the French ambassador, the Viscount of Turenne, who considered her very handsome (“molto bella”), and admirable by reason of her great and uncommon mental endowments; but so thin, spare, and small (“cosi magreta et scarma et picola”) as to render it impossible for her to be married for the next three years.

Then yesterday1 there was a joust, the challengers at the tilt (“al campo”) being four2, the competitors (“concorrenti”) sixteen, each of whom ran six courses; a very delectable sight, by reason of the prowess of the knights. The joust ended with the day, not without rain, which rather impeded the jousting.

The King and the Queens3, with some 200 damsels (“damigelle”), then went to the apartments which I informed you in a former letter were being prepared [on one side of the list-yard at Greenwich] for the reception of the French ambassadors, the rest of the company following them. The site adjoined the other chambers from whence the King and the nobility view the jousts. They were but two halls, about thirty paces in length, and of proportional height and breadth. The centre of the ceiling of the first hall was entirely covered with brocatel of no great value, but producing a good effect; the walls were hung with the most costly tapestry in England, representing the history of David; and there was a row of torches closely set, illuminating the place very brilliantly, being ranged below the windows, which were at no great distance from the roof. The royal table was prepared in front of the hall, with a large canopy of tissue (“soprarizo”), beneath which was the King, with the Queens, his wife and sister, at the sides. Then came two long tables, at one of which, on the right-hand side, were seated the French ambassadors and the Princes, each pairing with some great lady. At the other table, to the left, the Venetian ambassador and the one from Milan placed themselves, with the rest of the lords and ladies. At no great distance from the two tables were two cupboards, reaching from the floor to the roof, forming a semicircle, on which was a large and varied assortment of vases, all of massive gold, the value of which it would be difficult to estimate, nor were any of them touched; silver gilt dishes of another sort being used for the viands of meat and fish, which were in such variety and abundance that the banquet lasted a long while.

The door of this hall was in the form of a very lofty triumphal arch, fashioned after the antique, beneath which were three vaulted entrances; through one passed the dishes for the table, through the other they were removed, and on each side of the centre one, which was the largest, stood two enormous cupboards bearing the wine to be served at table. Over the triumphal arch was a spacious balcony for the musicians, bearing the arms of the King and Queen, with sundry busts of Emperors, and the King's motto, “Dieu et mon droit” and other Greek (sic) words. Could never conceive anything so costly and well designed (“ben ordinata”) as what was witnessed on that night at Greenwich.

On rising from table all were marshalled, according to their rank, along a corridor of no great length to the other hall, which was of rather less size than the first. The floor was covered with cloth of silk embroidered with gold lilies. The ceiling, which was well nigh flat, was all painted, representing a map of the world (“mapamondo in Alpa forma”), the names of the principal provinces being legible; there were also the signs of the zodiac and their properties (“le loro proprietà”), these paintings being supported by giants. Along the sides of the hall were three tiers of seats, each of which had a beam placed lengthwise, for the spectators to lean on, nor did one tier interfere with the other. Above these tiers were in like manner three rows of torches, so well disposed and contrived as not to impede the view.

Within the space for the spectators, on the right-hand side, in the first tier, the ambassadors were placed, in the second the Princes, in the third those to whom admission was granted, they being few. On the opposite side, in the same order, were the ladies, whose various styles of beauty and apparel, enhanced by the brilliancy of the lights, caused me to think I was contemplating the choirs of angels; they, in like manner, being placed one above the other. Two-thirds of the distance down the hall, an arch of a single span had been erected, its depth being five feet and a half [English measure], all gilt with fine gold, the inside of the arch being decorated with a number of beautiful figures in low relief. The magnificence of this arch was such that it was difficult to comprehend how so grand a structure could have been raised in so short a space of time. In the centre, to the front (“nel fronte nel mezo”), stood the royal throne (“soglio”), on which the King sat, the two Queens being seated below at his feet.

All the spectators being thus methodically placed, without the least noise or confusion, and precisely as pre-arranged, the entertainment commenced. One thing above all others surprised me most, never having witnessed the like any where, it being impossible to represent or credit with how much order, regularity, and silence such public entertainments proceed and are conducted in England. First of all, there entered the hall eight singers, forming two wings, and singing certain English songs; in their centre was a very handsome youth alone, clad in skyblue tatfety, a number of eyes being scattered over his gown; and having presented themselves before the King, the singers then withdrew in the same order, there remaining by himself the youth, who, in the guise of Mercury, sent to the King by Jupiter, delivered a learned Latin oration in praise of his Majesty; which panegyric being ended, he announced that Jupiter, having frequently listened to disputes between Love and Riches concerning their relative authority, and that being unable to decide the controversy, he appointed his Majesty as judge, and requested him to pronounce and pass sentence on both of them. Thereupon Mercury departed, and next came eight young choristers of the chapel, four on each side; those to the right were all clad in cloth of gold, much ornamented, and the first of them was Cupid (“Amor”); the others to the left were variously arrayed, and their chief was Plutus (“la Richesa”); in the centre walked one alone, in the guise of Justice, who sang.

In this order they presented themselves to the King, before whom Justice commenced narrating the dispute between the parties, in English, and desired Cupid (“Amor”) to begin with his defence, to which Plutus (“la Richeza”) replied, each of the choristers on either side defending their leaders, by reciting a number of verses. The altercation being ended, Cupid and Plutus determined that judgment should go by battle, and thus, having departed, three men-at-arms in white armour, with three naked swords in their hands, entered from the end of the hall, and having drawn up under the triumphal arch, an opening was made in its centre by some unseen means, and out of the arch fell down a bar, in front of which there appeared three well-armed knights. The combat then commenced valiantly, man to man, some of them dealing such blows that their swords broke. After they had fought some while, a second bar was let down, which separated them, the first three having vanquished the others, fighting with great courage; and the duel (“duello”) being thus ended, the combatants quitted the hall in like manner as they had entered it. Thereupon there fell to the ground at the extremity of the hall a painted canvas [curtain], from an aperture in which was seen a most verdant cave (“antro”) approachable by four steps, each side being guarded by four of the chief gentlemen of the Court, clad in tissue doublets and tall plumes, each of whom carried a torch. Well grouped within the cave were eight damsels of such rare beauty as to be supposed goddesses rather than human beings. They were arrayed in cloth of gold, their hair gathered into a net, with a very richly jewelled garland, surmounted by a velvet cap, the hanging sleeves of their surcoats (“camisa”) being so long that they well nigh touched the ground, and so well and richly wrought as to be no slight ornament to their beauty. They descended gracefully from their seats to the sound of trumpets, the first of them being the Princess, hand in hand with the Marchioness of Exeter (age 24). Her beauty in this array produced such effect on everybody that all the other marvellous sights previously witnessed were forgotten, and they gave themselves up solely to contemplation of so fair an angel. On her person were so many precious stones that their splendour and radiance dazzled the sight, in such wise as to make one believe that she was decked with all the gems of the eighth sphere. Dancing thus they presented themselves to the King, their dance being very delightful by reason of its variety, as they formed certain groups and figures most pleasing to the sight. Their dance being finished, they ranged themselves on one side, and in like order the eight youths, leaving their torches, came down from the cave, and after performing their dance, each of them took by the hand one of those beautiful nymphs, and having led a courant together (“menata una chorea”) for a while, returned to their places.

Six masks then entered. To detail their costume would be but to repeat the words “cloth of gold,” cloth of silver,” &c. They chose such ladies as they pleased for their partners, and commenced various dances, which being ended, the King appeared. The French ambassador, the Marquis of Turrene, was at his side, and behind him four couple of noblemen (“signori”), all masked, and all wearing black velvet slippers on their feet, this being done, lest the King should be distinguished from the others, as from the hurt which he received lately on his left foot when playing at tennis (“allo palla”) he wears a black velvet slipper. They were all clad in tissue doublets, over which was a very long and ample gown of black satin, with hoods of the same material, and on their heads caps of tawney velvet. They then took by the hand an equal number of ladies, dancing with great glee, and at the end of the dance unmasked; whereupon the Princess with her companions again descended, and came to the King, who in the presence of the French ambassadors took off her cap, and the net being displaced, a profusion of silver tresses as beautiful as ever seen on human head fell over her shoulders, forming a most agreeable sight. The aforesaid ambassadors then took leave of her; and all departing from that beautiful place returned to the supper hall, where the tables were spread with every sort of confection and choice wines for all who chose to cheer themselves with them. The sun, I believe, greatly hastened his course, having perhaps had a hint from Mercury of so rare a sight; so showing himself already on the horizon, warning being thus given of his presence, everybody thought it time to quit the royal chambers, returning to their own with such sleepy eyes that the daylight could not keep them open.

As the Bishop of Tarbes is departing tomorrow morning in haste, I will not be more diffuse. He will be accompanied by Master Poyntz [Sir Francis Poyntz] and Clarencieux, king-of-arms, to do what I wrote in a former letter. On their departure each of the ambassadors received a gold cup from his Majesty.

London, 7th May 1527. Registered by Sanuto, 3rd June.

[Italian.]

Note 1. 6th May, according to the date of Spinelli's letter. In Hall's Chronicle (pp. 721, 722, ed. London, 1809), mention is made of the mass at Greenwich on Sunday, 5 May, and of the jousts, but of these last he does not state the precise date, giving, however, the names of the challengers, and adding that whilst they tilted “yt rained apace.”

Note 2. Namely. Sir Nicholas Carew (age 31), Sir Robert Jernyngham, Sir Anthony Browne (age 27), and Nicholas Harvy. (See Hall, as above.)

Note 3. Catharine (age 41), and Mary Queen Dowager of France (age 31).

Calendars. May 18. [1527] Sanuto Diaries, v. xlv. p. 193. 112. Marc' Antonio Venier to the Doge and Signory.

Viscount Rochford, late Sir Thomas Boleyn (age 50), and Sir Anthony Browne (age 27), brother of the Treasurer of his Majesty's Chamber (“fradello dil Thesorier dilla Camera dil Re”)1 are gone to France as ambassadors from the King, and an embargo has been laid on all the ships in the Thames for the conveyance of Cardinal Wolsey, who is going to confer with the most Christian King.

Note 1. Sir Wiston Browne obtained the reversion of the Treasurership of Calais by patent, 4th April, 4 Henry VIII. (See Mr. Brewer's Calendar, vol. 2, part 2, No. 3527.)

On 29 Nov 1528 [his son] Anthony Browne 1st Viscount Montagu was born to Anthony Browne (age 28) and [his wife] Alice Gage (age 22).

Around 27 Mar 1534 [his mother] Lucy Neville (age 66) died at Bagshot Manor, Surrey.

Around 1536 [his daughter] Mabel Browne Countess Kildare was born to Anthony Browne (age 36) and [his wife] Alice Gage (age 30).

Birth and Christening Edward VI

On 15 Oct 1537 the future Edward VI was christened by Bishop John Stokesley (age 62) at the Chapel Royal in Hampton Court Palace [Map]. Archbishop Thomas Cranmer (age 48) performed the Baptismal Rites, and was appointed Godfather. Thomas Howard 3rd Duke of Norfolk (age 64) and Queen Mary I of England and Ireland (age 21) were Godparents.

King Edward VI of England and Ireland was created Duke Cornwall, 1st Earl Chester.

Henry Bourchier 2nd Earl Essex 3rd Count Eu carried the Salt. Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 53) was Godfather and supported the Marchioness of Exeter. Richard Long (age 43) was knighted. Thomas Cromwell 1st Earl Essex (age 52), Philip Boteler (age 45), John de Vere 15th Earl of Oxford (age 66) and [his father-in-law] John Gage (age 57) attended. Mary Scrope (age 61) carried Lady Mary's train. Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex (age 54) carried a covered basin. Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex (age 54) carried the canopy.

Edward Seymour 1st Duke of Somerset (age 37) helped his young niece the future Elizabeth I to carry the Crisom. Henry Courtenay 1st Marquess Exeter (age 41) supported his wife Gertrude Blount Marchioness of Exeter (age 34) to carry the child. Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde (age 60) bore a taper of virgin wax. William Fitzalan 18th Earl of Arundel (age 61) carried the train of the Prince's robe. Christopher Barker proclaimed the Prince's titles. Arthur Hopton (age 48) attended.

Edward Seymour 1st Duke of Somerset (age 37) was created 1st Earl Hertford.

Nicholas Carew (age 41), Francis Bryan (age 47), Anthony Browne (age 37) and John Russell 1st Earl Bedford (age 52) surrounded the font.

Henry Knyvet of Charlton Wiltshire (age 27), Edward Neville (age 66), Thomas Seymour 1st Baron Seymour (age 29), Richard Long (age 43) and John Wallop (age 47) carried the canopy.

Bishop Robert Parfew aka Warton and Bishop John Bell attended.

[his half-brother] William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton (age 47) was created 1st Earl of Southampton. Mabel Clifford Countess Southampton (age 55) by marriage Countess of Southampton.

Around 1538 [his daughter] Lucy Browne was born to Anthony Browne (age 38) and [his wife] Alice Gage (age 32).

Before 1540 [his son] William Browne (age 14) and [his daughter-in-law] Anne Hastings (age 10) were married. He a great x 5 grandson of King Edward III of England.

On 31 Mar 1540 [his wife] Alice Gage (age 34) died.

After 31 Mar 1540 Anthony Browne (age 40) and Elizabeth "The Fair Geraldine" Fitzgerald Countess Lincoln (age 13) were married. The difference in their ages was 27 years. She the daughter of Gerald Fitzgerald 9th Earl of Kildare and Elizabeth Grey Countess Kildare (age 43). They were second cousin once removed. He a great x 4 grandson of King Edward III of England. She a great x 5 granddaughter of King Edward III of England.

1540 Creation of Garter Knights

On 24 Apr 1540 Thomas Audley 1st Baron Audley Walden (age 52) was appointed 304th Knight of the Garter by King Henry VIII of England and Ireland (age 48).

In 1540 Anthony Browne (age 40) was appointed 305th Knight of the Garter by King Henry VIII of England and Ireland (age 48).

Before 27 Jan 1541 [his former brother-in-law] Edward Gage (age 38) and Elizabeth Parker (age 18) were married. The difference in their ages was 20 years.

On 15 Oct 1542 [his half-brother] William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton (age 52) died at Newcastle upon Tyne [Map]. Earl of Southampton extinct. Anthony Browne (age 42) inherited Cowdray House [Map].

Before 14 Aug 1545 John Jenyns (age 65) and [his former sister-in-law] Elizabeth Gage were married.

Henry VIII Revises his Will

On 30 Dec 1546 Henry VIII (age 55) made his last revision to his will signed using the Dry Stamp that was used increasingly commonly. The will confirmed the succession as King Edward VI of England and Ireland (age 9), Queen Mary I of England and Ireland (age 30) and Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (age 13).

The will appointed sixteen executors: Anthony Browne (age 46), Archbishop Thomas Cranmer (age 57), Anthony Denny (age 45), John Dudley 1st Duke Northumberland (age 42), William Herbert 1st Earl Pembroke (age 45), Edward Montagu (age 61), Edward North 1st Baron North (age 50), William Paget 1st Baron Paget Beaudasert (age 40), William Paulet 1st Marquess Winchester (age 63), John Russell 1st Earl Bedford (age 61), Edward Seymour 1st Duke of Somerset (age 46), Bishop Cuthbert Tunstall (age 72) and Thomas Wriothesley 1st Earl of Southampton (age 41).

Death of Henry VIII Accession of Edward VI

Annales of England by John Stow. 28 Jan 1547. Edward (age 9) the first borne at Hampton court [Map] (by the decease of k. Henry (age 55) his father) began his raigne the 28 of January, and was proclaimed k. of England, France and Ireland, defender of the faith, and of the churches of England and also of Ireland the supreme head immedlatly in earth under God, & on the last day of January, in the yere of Christ after the Church of England 1546 but after the accompt of them that begin the yere at Chatfimas 1547 being then of the age of nine yéeres. And the same day in the afternoone the saide young king came to the tower of London [Map] from Hertford, and rode into the City at Aldgate, and so along the wall by the crossed Friars [Map] to the Tower hill, & entred at the red bulwarke [Map], where be was received by [his former father-in-law] sir John Gage (age 67) constable of the tower, and the lieutenant on horseback, the Earle of Hertford (age 47) riding before the king, and sir Anthony Browne (age 47) riding after him: and on the bridge next the warde gate, the archbishop of Canterbury (age 57), the lorde Chancellor (age 41), with other great lords of the Councell received him, and so brought him to his chamber of pretence, there they were sworne to his majesty.

On 06 May 1548 Anthony Browne (age 48) died at Byfleet, Surrey. He was buried at Senlac Hill Hastings. [his son] Anthony Browne 1st Viscount Montagu (age 19) inherited Cowdray House [Map].

On 01 Oct 1552 Edward Clinton 1st Earl Lincoln (age 40) and [his former wife] Elizabeth "The Fair Geraldine" Fitzgerald Countess Lincoln (age 25) were married. She the daughter of Gerald Fitzgerald 9th Earl of Kildare and Elizabeth Grey Countess Kildare. They were half fourth cousins. She a great x 5 granddaughter of King Edward III of England.

In Mar 1590 [his former wife] Elizabeth "The Fair Geraldine" Fitzgerald Countess Lincoln (age 63) died.

Letters of Horace Walpole. 05 Aug 1752. Now you are fully master of Hurst Monceaux, I shall carry you on to Battel-By the way, we bring you a thousand sketches, that you may show us what we have seen. Battel Abbey [Map] stands at the end of the town, exactly as Warwick Castle does of Warwick; but the house of Webster have taken due care that it should not resemble it in any thing else. A vast building, which they call the old refectory, but which I believe was the original church, is now barn, coach-house, etc. The situation is noble, above the level of abbeys: what does remain of gateways and towers is beautiful, particularly the flat side of a cloister, which is now the front of the mansion-house. Miss of the family has clothed a fragment of a portico with cockle-shells! The grounds, and what has been a park, lie in a vile condition. In the church is the tomb of Sir Anthony Browne, master of the horse for life to Harry VIII: from whose descendants the estate was purchased. The head of John Hanimond, the last abbot, is still perfect in one of the windows. Mr. Chute says, "What charming things we should have done if Battel Abbey had been to be sold at Mrs. Chenevix's, as Strawberry was!" Good night!

[his father] Anthony Browne and Eleanor Ughtred were married.

John Grey and [his daughter] Mary Browne were married. He the son of Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset and Margaret Wotton Marchioness Dorset. They were third cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of King Edward III of England. She a great x 5 granddaughter of King Edward III of England.

Anthony Browne 1500-1548 appears on the following Descendants Family Trees:

King Edward III of England 1312-1377

John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster 1340-1399

Ralph Neville 1st Earl of Westmoreland 1364-1425

Joan Beaufort Countess of Westmoreland 1379-1440

John Neville 3rd Baron Neville of Raby 1337-1388

Maud Percy Baroness Neville Raby

Alice Montagu 5th Countess of Salisbury 1407-1462

Richard Neville Earl Salisbury 1400-1460

Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent 1350-1397

Katherine Roet Duchess Lancaster 1350-1403

Royal Ancestors of Anthony Browne 1500-1548

Kings Wessex: Great x 14 Grand Son of King Edmund "Ironside" I of England

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 11 Grand Son of Owain "Great" King Gwynedd

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 17 Grand Son of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg King Deheubarth

Kings Powys: Great x 12 Grand Son of Maredudd ap Bleddyn King Powys

Kings England: Great x 4 Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Kings Scotland: Great x 10 Grand Son of William "Lion" I King Scotland

Kings Franks: Great x 10 Grand Son of Louis VII King Franks

Kings France: Great x 6 Grand Son of Philip "The Fair" IV King France

Royal Descendants of Anthony Browne 1500-1548

Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom x 3

Diana Spencer Princess Wales x 9

Ancestors of Anthony Browne 1500-1548

GrandFather: Thomas Browne

Father: Anthony Browne 6 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Richard Fitzalan 10th Earl of Arundel 8th Earl of Surrey 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Fitzalan 1st Baron Arundel Baron Maltravers 2 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Eleanor Plantagenet Countess Arundel and Surrey Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Fitzalan Baron Maltravers 2nd Baron Arundel 3 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Maltravers 4 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Eleanor Maltravers 2nd Baroness Maltravers Baroness Arundel and Cobham 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Gwenllian Unknown

Great x 1 Grandfather: Thomas Fitzalan 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Edward Despencer Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Edward Despencer 1st Baron Despencer, Baron Burghesh 2 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Anne Ferrers 6 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Elizabeth Despencer Baroness Zouche, Harringworth, Maltravers and Arundel 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Bartholomew "The Younger" Burghesh 2nd Baron Burghesh 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Elizabeth Burghesh 3rd Baron Burghesh 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Cecily Weyland Baroness Burghesh 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

GrandMother: Eleanor Fitzalan 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 1 Grandmother: Joan Moyns

Anthony Browne 4 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Ralph Neville 2nd Baron Neville of Raby 8 x Great Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Neville 3rd Baron Neville of Raby 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Alice Audley Baroness Greystoke and Neville 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Ralph Neville 1st Earl of Westmoreland 5 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Henry Percy 10th and 2nd Baron Percy 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Maud Percy Baroness Neville Raby 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Idonia Clifford Baroness Percy 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 1 Grandfather: Richard Neville Earl Salisbury Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: King Edward III of England Son of King Edward II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Joan Beaufort Countess of Westmoreland Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Giles "Payne" Roet

Great x 3 Grandmother: Katherine Roet Duchess Lancaster

GrandFather: John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 2 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Montagu 3rd Earl Salisbury 2 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Margaret Monthermer Baroness Montagu 3rd Baroness Monthermer Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Thomas Montagu 1st Count Perche 4th Earl Salisbury 3 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Adam Francis

Great x 3 Grandmother: Maud Francis Countess of Salisbury

Great x 1 Grandmother: Alice Montagu 5th Countess of Salisbury 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas Holland 1st Earl Kent 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Princess Wales Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Eleanor Holland 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Richard Fitzalan 10th Earl of Arundel 8th Earl of Surrey 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Alice Fitzalan Countess Kent 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Eleanor Plantagenet Countess Arundel and Surrey Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Mother: Lucy Neville 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Ingaldsthorpe

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Ingaldsthorpe

Great x 2 Grandfather: Thomas Ingaldsthorpe

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Burgh

Great x 3 Grandmother: Elizabeth Burgh

Great x 1 Grandfather: Edmund Ingaldsthorpe

Great x 4 Grandfather: Edmund de la Pole

Great x 3 Grandfather: Walter Pole

Great x 2 Grandmother: Margaret Pole

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas Bradeston

Great x 3 Grandmother: Elizabeth Bradeston

GrandMother: Isabel Ingaldsthorpe 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Tiptoft 2nd Baron Tibetot

Great x 3 Grandfather: Pain Tiptoft

Great x 4 Grandmother: Elizabeth Aspall Baroness Tibetot

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Tiptoft 1st Baron Tiptoft

Great x 3 Grandmother: Agnes Wrothe

Great x 1 Grandmother: Joan Tiptoft 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Charleton 3rd Baron Cherleton 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Edward Charleton 5th Baron Cherleton 3 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Joan Stafford Baroness Cherleton and Talbot 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Joyce Charleton Baroness Tiptoft 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Eleanor Holland Countess March and Ulster 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Alice Fitzalan Countess Kent 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England