Biography of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley 1614-1686

Paternal Family Tree: Annesly

Before 1613 [his father] Francis Annesley 1st Viscount Valentia (age 26) and [his mother] Dorothy Philipps Viscountess Valentia (age 24) were married. They had eleven children of whom three sons and several daughters reached adulthood.

On 10 Jul 1614 Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley was born to Francis Annesley 1st Viscount Valentia (age 28) and Dorothy Philipps Viscountess Valentia (age 26) at Dublin [Map].

In 1622 [his father] Francis Annesley 1st Viscount Valentia (age 35) was created 1st Viscount Valentia with a reversionary grant that it wouldn't become effective until the death of Henry Power 1st Viscount Valentia.

After 1624 [his father] Francis Annesley 1st Viscount Valentia (age 37) and [his step-mother] Jane Stanhope Viscountess Valentia (age 18) were married. She by marriage Viscountess Valentia.

On 03 May 1624 [his mother] Dorothy Philipps Viscountess Valentia (age 36) died.

In 1634 Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 19) graduated at Magdalen College, Oxford University.

On 24 Apr 1638 Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 23) and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 18) were married.

In 1640 [his daughter] Elizabeth Annesley was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 25) and [his wife] Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 19).

Around 1645 [his son] James Annesley 2nd Earl Anglesey was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 30) and [his wife] Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 24).

In 1654 [his son-in-law] Richard Power 1st Earl Tyrone (age 24) and [his daughter] Dorothy Annesley Countess Tyrone were married. She the daughter of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 39) and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 33).

In 1655 [his son] Richard Annesley 3rd Baron Altham was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 40) and [his wife] Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 34).

In 1660 Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 45) lived at 1 Tavistock Row Covent Garden.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Feb 1660. Thursday, my birthday, now twenty-seven years. A pretty fair morning, I rose and after writing a while in my study I went forth. To my office, where I told Mr. Hawly of my thoughts to go out of town to-morrow. Hither Mr. Fuller comes to me and my Uncle Thomas too, thence I took them to drink, and so put off my uncle. So with Mr. Fuller (age 52) home to my house, where he dined with me, and he told my wife and me a great many stories of his adversities, since these troubles, in being forced to travel in the Catholic countries, &c. He shewed me his bills, but I had not money to pay him. We parted, and I to Whitehall, where I was to see my horse which Mr. Garthwayt lends me to-morrow. So home, where Mr. Pierce comes to me about appointing time and place where and when to meet tomorrow. !So to Westminster Hall [Map], where, after the House rose, I met with Mr. Crew (age 62), who told me that my Lord was chosen by 73 voices, to be one of the Council of State. Mr. Pierpoint (age 52) had the most, 101, and himself the next, too. He brought me in the coach home. He and Mr. Anslow (age 45) being in it. I back to the Hall, and at Mrs. Michell's shop staid talking a great while with her and my Chaplain, Mr. Mumford, and drank a pot or two of ale on a wager that Mr. Prin (age 60) is not of the Council. Home and wrote to my Lord the news of the choice of the Council by the post, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jun 1660. My letters tell me, that Mr. Calamy1 had preached before the King in a surplice (this I heard afterwards to be false); that my Lord, Gen. Monk (age 51), and three more Lords, are made Commissioners for the Treasury2; that my Lord had some great place conferred on him, and they say Master of the Wardrobe3; that the two Dukes [Duke of York and Duke of Gloucester.] do haunt the Park much, and that they were at a play, Madam Epicene,-["Epicene, or the Silent Woman", a comedy, by Ben Jonson.] the other day; that Sir. Ant. Cooper (age 38), Mr. Hollis (age 60), and Mr. Annesly (age 45), & late President of the Council of State, are made Privy Councillors to the King. At night very busy sending Mr. Donne away to London, and wrote to my father for a coat to be made me against I come to London, which I think will not be long. At night Mr. Edward Montagu came on board and staid long up with my Lord. I to bed and about one in the morning,

Note 1. Edmund Calamy, D.D., the celebrated Nonconformist divine, born February, 1600, appointed Chaplain to Charles II., 1660. He refused the bishopric of Lichfield which was offered to him. Died October 29th, 1666.

Note 2. The names of the Commissioners were Sir Edward Hyde (age 51), afterwards Earl of Clarendon, General Monk (age 51), Thomas, Earl of Southampton (age 53), John, Lord Robartes (age 54), Thomas, Lord Colepeper (age 60), Sir Edward Montagu, with Sir Edward Nicholas (age 67) and Sir William Morrice (age 57) as principal Secretaries of State. The patents are dated June 19th, 1660.

Note 3. The duty of the Master of the Wardrobe was to provide "proper furniture for coronations, marriages, and funerals" of the sovereign and royal family, "cloaths of state, beds, hangings, and other necessaries for the houses of foreign ambassadors, cloaths of state for Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Prince of Wales, and ambassadors abroad", as also to provide robes for Ministers of State, Knights of the Garter, &c. The last Master of the Wardrobe was Ralph, Duke of Montague (age 21), who died 1709.

On 22 Nov 1660 [his father] Francis Annesley 1st Viscount Valentia (age 74) died. He was buried at Thorganby, North Yorkshire. His son Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 46) succeeded 2nd Viscount Valentia. [his wife] Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 40) by marriage Viscountess Valentia.

Coronation of Charles II

Evelyn's Diary. 22 Apr 1661. Was the splendid cavalcade of his Majesty (age 30) from the Tower of London to Whitehall, when I saw him in the Banqueting House, Whitehall Palace [Map] create six Earls, and as many Barons, viz:

Edward Lord Hyde, Lord Chancellor (age 52), Earl of Clarendon; supported by the Earls of Northumberland (age 58) and Sussex (age 14); the Earl of Bedford (age 44) carried the cap and coronet, the Earl of Warwick (age 46), the sword, the Earl of Newport (age 64), the mantle.

Next, was Capel, created Earl of Essex.

Brudenell, Cardigan;.

Valentia, Anglesea;.

Greenvill, Bath;.

Howard, Earl of Carlisle.

The Barons were: Denzille Holles; Cornwallis; Booth; Townsend; Cooper; Crew; who were led up by several Peers, with Garter and officers of arms before them; when, after obedience on their several approaches to the throne, their patents were presented by Garter King-at-Arms, which being received by the Lord Chamberlain (age 59), and delivered to his Majesty (age 30), and by him to the Secretary of State, were read, and then again delivered to his Majesty (age 30), and by him to the several Lords created; they were then robed, their coronets and collars put on by his Majesty (age 30), and they were placed in rank on both sides of the state and throne; but the Barons put off their caps and circles, and held them in their hands, the Earls keeping on their coronets, as cousins to the King (age 30).

I spent the rest of the evening in seeing the several archtriumphals built in the streets at several eminent places through which his Majesty (age 30) was next day to pass, some of which, though temporary, and to stand but one year, were of good invention and architecture, with inscriptions.

Notes:

Arthur Capell 1st Earl Essex (age 29) was created 1st Earl Essex. Elizabeth Percy Countess Essex (age 25) by marriage Countess Essex.

Thomas Brudenell 1st Earl Cardigan (age 78) was created 1st Earl Cardigan. Mary Tresham Countess Cardigan by marriage Countess Cardigan.

Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 46) was created 1st Earl Anglesey, 1st Baron Annesley Newport Pagnell Buckinghamshire. [his wife] Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 41) by marriage Countess Anglesey.

John Granville 1st Earl Bath (age 32) was created 1st Earl Bath.

Charles Howard 1st Earl Carlisle (age 32) was created 1st Earl Carlisle.

Denzil Holles 1st Baron Holles (age 61) was created 1st Baron Holles. Jane Shirley Baroness Holles by marriage Baroness Holles.

Frederick Cornwallis 1st Baron Cornwallis (age 50) was created 1st Baron Cornwallis.

George Booth 1st Baron Delamer (age 38) was created 1st Baron Delamer. Elizabeth Grey Baroness Delamer (age 39) by marriage Baroness Delamer.

Horatio Townshend 1st Viscount Townsend (age 30) was created 1st Baron Townshend of Lynn Regis in Norfolk.

Anthony Ashley-Cooper 1st Earl Shaftesbury (age 39) was created 1st Baron Ashley of Wimborne St Giles.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Nov 1664. By and by we were called in, where a great many lords: Annesly (age 50) in the chair. But, Lord! to see what work they will make us, and what trouble we shall have to inform men in a business they are to begin to know, when the greatest of our hurry is, is a thing to be lamented; and I fear the consequence will be bad to us.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Dec 1664. Up, and at the office all the morning, and at noon to Mr. Cutler's, and there dined with Sir W. Rider and him, and thence Sir W. Rider and I by coach to White Hall to a Committee of the Fishery; there only to hear Edward Ford's (age 59) proposal about farthings, wherein, O God! to see almost every body interested for him; only my Lord Annesly (age 43), who is a grave, serious man. My Lord Barkeley (age 62) was there, but is the most hot, fiery man in discourse, without any cause, that ever I saw, even to breach of civility to my Lord Anglesey (age 50), in his discourse opposing to my Lord's. At last, though without much satisfaction to me, it was voted that it should be requested of the King (age 34), and that Edward Ford's (age 59) proposal is the best yet made.

In 1665 [his son-in-law] Charles Mohun 3rd Baron Mohun Okehampton (age 20) and [his daughter] Philippa Annesley Baroness Mohun Okehampton were married. She by marriage Baroness Mohun Okehampton. She the daughter of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 50) and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 44).

In 1665 [his son-in-law] Alexander Macdonnell 3rd Earl Antrim (age 50) and [his daughter] Elizabeth Annesley (age 25) were married. She by marriage Countess Antrim 1C. The difference in their ages was 25 years. She the daughter of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 50) and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 44). He the son of Randal "Arranach" Macdonnell 1st Earl Antrim and Alice O'Neill Countess Antrim.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Nov 1666. This noon W. Hewer (age 24) and T. Hater both tell me that it is all over the town, and Mr. Pierce tells me also, this afternoon coming to me, that for certain Sir G. Carteret (age 56) hath parted with his Treasurer's place, and that my Lord Anglesey (age 52) is in it upon agreement and change of places, though the latter part I do not think. This Povy (age 52) told me yesterday, and I think it is a wise act of Sir G. Carteret.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jun 1667. While we were discoursing over our publique misfortunes, I am called in to a large Committee of the Council: present the Duke of Albemarle (age 58), Anglesey (age 52), Arlington (age 49), Ashly (age 45), Carteret (age 57), Duncomb (age 44), Coventry (age 39), Ingram (age 52), Clifford (age 36), Lauderdale (age 51), Morrice (age 64), Manchester (age 65), Craven (age 59), Carlisle (age 38), Bridgewater (age 44).

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1667. He [Povy (age 53)] tells me that the other day, upon this ill newes of the Dutch being upon us, White Hall was shut up, and the Council called and sat close; and, by the way, he do assure me, from the mouth of some Privy-councillors, that at this day the Privy-council in general do know no more what the state of the Kingdom as to peace and war is, than he or I; nor knows who manages it, nor upon whom it depends; and there my Chancellor (age 58) did make a speech to them, saying that they knew well that he was no friend to the war from the beginning, and therefore had concerned himself little in, nor could say much to it; and a great deal of that kind, to discharge himself of the fault of the war. Upon which my Lord Anglesey (age 52) rose up and told his Majesty that he thought their coming now together was not to enquire who was, or was not, the cause of the war, but to enquire what was, or could be, done in the business of making a peace, and in whose hands that was, and where it was stopped or forwarded; and went on very highly to have all made open to them: and, by the way, I remember that Captain Cocke (age 50) did the other day tell me that this Lord Anglesey (age 52) hath said, within few days, that he would willingly give £10,000 of his estate that he was well secured of the rest, such apprehensions he hath of the sequel of things, as giving all over for lost.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jun 1667. Thence to White Hall, and with Sir W. Pen (age 46), by chariot; and there in the Court met with my Lord Anglesey (age 52): and he to talk with Sir W. Pen (age 46), and told him of the masters of ships being with the Council yesterday, and that we were not in condition, though the men were willing, to furnish them with £200 of money, already due to them as earned by them the last year, to enable them to set out their ships again this year for the King (age 37): which he is amazed at; and when I told him, "my Lord, this is a sad instance of the condition we are in", he answered, that it was so indeed, and sighed: and so parted: and he up to the Council-chamber, where I perceive they sit every morning, and I to Westminster Hall [Map], where it is Term time. I met with none I knew, nor did desire it, but only past through the-Hall and so back again, and by coach home to dinner, being weary indeed of seeing the world, and thinking it high time for me to provide against the foul weather that is certainly coming upon us.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jun 1667. By and by to Burgess, and did as much as we could with him about our Tangier order, though we met with unexpected delays in it, but such as are not to be avoided by reason of the form of the Act and the disorders which the King's necessities do put upon it, and therefore away by coach, and at White Hall spied Mr. Povy (age 53), who tells me, as a great secret, which none knows but himself, that Sir G. Carteret (age 57) hath parted with his place of Treasurer of the Navy, by consent, to my Lord Anglesey (age 52), and is to be Treasurer of Ireland in his stead; but upon what terms it is I know not, but Mr. Povy (age 53) tells it is so, and that it is in his power to bring me to as great a friendship and confidence in my Lord Anglesey (age 52) as ever I was with Sir W. Coventry (age 39), which I am glad of, and so parted, and I to my tailor's about turning my old silk suit and cloak into a suit and vest, and thence with Mr. Kinaston (whom I had set down in the Strand and took up again at the Temple [Map] gate) home, and there to dinner, mightily pleased with my wife's playing on the flageolet, and so after dinner to the office. Such is the want already of coals, and the despair of having any supply, by reason of the enemy's being abroad, and no fleete of ours to secure, that they are come, as Mr. Kinaston tells me, at this day to £5 10s. per chaldron. All the afternoon busy at the office.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jun 1667. I remember I did in the morning tell Sir H. Cholmly (age 34) of this business: and he answered me, he was sorry for it; for, whatever Sir G. Carteret (age 57) was, he is confident my Lord Anglesey (age 52) is one of the greatest knaves in the world, which is news to me, but I shall make my use of it. Having done this discourse with Sir G. Carteret (age 57), and signified my great satisfaction in it, which they seem to look upon as something, I went away and by coach home, and there find my wife making of tea, a drink which Mr. Pelling, the Potticary, tells her is good for her cold and defluxions.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jun 1667. After dinner Sir G. Carteret (age 57) come in, and I to him and my Lady, and there he did tell me that the business was done between him and my Lord Anglesey (age 52); that himself is to have the other's place of Deputy Treasurer of Ireland, which is a place of honour and great profit, being far better, I know not for what reason, but a reason there is, than the Treasurer's, my Lord of Corke's (age 54), and to give the other his, of Treasurer of the Navy; that the King (age 37), at his earnest entreaty, did, with much unwillingness, but with owning of great obligations to him, for his faithfulness and long service to him and his father, and therefore was willing to grant his desire. That the Duke of York (age 33) hath given him the same kind words, so that it is done with all the good manner that could be, and he I perceive do look upon it, and so do I, I confess, as a great good fortune to him to meet with one of my Lord Anglesey's (age 52) quality willing to receive it at this time. Sir W. Coventry (age 39) he hath not yet made acquainted with it, nor do intend it, it being done purely to ease himself of the many troubles and plagues which he thinks the perverseness and unkindness of Sir W. Coventry (age 39) and others by his means have and is likely every day to bring upon him, and the Parliament's envy, and lastly to put himself into a condition of making up his accounts, which he is, he says, afeard he shall never otherwise be. My Chancellor (age 58), I perceive, is his friend in it.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jul 1667. Up, and to the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 46), Sir T. Harvy (age 42) and I met upon Mr. Gawden's accounts, and was at it all the morning. This morning Sir G. Carteret (age 57) did come to us, and walked in the garden. It was to talk with me about some thing of my Lord Sandwich's (age 41), but here he told us that the great seale is passed to my Lord Annesly [Anglesey] (age 52) for Treasurer of the Navy: so that now he do no more belong to us: and I confess, for his sake, I am glad of it, and do believe the other will have little content in it.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jul 1667. Up pretty betimes and to the office, where busy till office time, and then we sat, but nothing to do but receive clamours about money. This day my Lord Anglesey (age 52), our new Treasurer, come the first time to the Board, and there sat with us till noon; and I do perceive he is a very notable man, and understanding, and will do things regular, and understand them himself, not trust Fenn, as Sir G. Carteret (age 57) did, and will solicit soundly for money, which I do fear was Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) fault, that he did not do that enough, considering the age we live in, that nothing will do but by solicitation, though never so good for the King (age 37) or Kingdom, and a bad business well solicited shall, for peace sake, speed when a good one shall not. But I do confess that I do think it a very bold act of him to take upon himself the place of Treasurer of the Navy at this time, but when I consider that a regular accountant never ought to fear any thing nor have reason I then do cease to wonder.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jul 1667. After rising, my Lord Anglesey (age 53), this being the second time of his being with us, did take me aside and asked me where I lived, because he would be glad to have some discourse with me. This I liked well enough, and told him I would wait upon him, which I will do, and so all broke up, and I home to dinner, where Mr. Pierce dined with us, who tells us what troubles me, that my Lord Buckhurst (age 24) hath got Nell (age 17) away from the King's house, lies with her, and gives her £100 a year, so as she hath sent her parts to the house, and will act no more1.

Note 1. Lord Buckhurst (age 24) and Nell Gwyn (age 17), with the help of Sir Charles Sedley (age 28), kept "merry house" at Epsom next door to the King's Head Inn (see Cunningham's "Story of Nell Gwyn", ed. 1892, p. 57).

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jul 1667. After dinner by coach to White Hall, calling on two or three tradesmen and paying their bills, and so to White Hall, to the Treasury-chamber, where I did speak with the Lords, and did my business about getting them to assent to 10 per cent. interest on the 11 months tax, but find them mightily put to it for money. Here I do hear that there are three Lords more to be added to them; my Lord Bridgewater (age 44), my Lord Anglesey (age 53), and my Lord Camberlaine. Having done my business, I to Creed's chamber, and thence out with Creed to White Hall with him; in our way, meeting with Mr. Cooling, my Lord Camberlain's secretary, on horseback, who stopped to speak with us, and he proved very drunk, and did talk, and would have talked all night with us, I not being able to break loose from him, he holding me so by the hand. But, Lord! to see his present humour, how he swears at every word, and talks of the King (age 37) and my Baroness Castlemayne (age 26) in the plainest words in the world. And from him I gather that the story I learned yesterday is true-that the King (age 37) hath declared that he did not get the child of which she is conceived at this time, he having not as he says lain with her this half year. But she told him, "God damn me, but you shall own it!" It seems, he is jealous of Jermin, and she loves him so, that the thoughts of his marrying of my Lady Falmouth puts her into fits of the mother; and he, it seems, hath lain with her from time to time, continually, for a good while; and once, as this Cooling says, the King (age 37) had like to have taken him a-bed with her, but that he was fain to creep under the bed into her closet.... [Missing text ' He says that for a good while the King's greatest pleasure hath been with his fingers, being able to do no more.']

Pepy's Diary. 06 Aug 1667. Up, and to the office, where all the morning very full of business. A full Board. Here, talking of news, my Lord Anglesey (age 53) did tell us that the Dutch do make a further bogle with us about two or three things, which they will be satisfied in, he says, by us easily; but only in one, it seems, they do demand that we shall not interrupt their East Indiamen coming home, and of which they are in some fear; and we are full of hopes that we have 'light upon some of them, and carried them into Lisbon, by Harman (age 42); which God send! But they, which do shew the low esteem they have of us, have the confidence to demand that we shall have a cessation on our parts, and yet they at liberty to take what they will; which is such an affront, as another cannot be devised greater.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Aug 1667. So being all dusty, we put into the Castle tavern, by the Savoy, and there brushed ourselves, and then to White Hall with our fellows to attend the Council, by order upon some proposition of my Lord Anglesey (age 53), we were called in.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1667. Then to the office, where we sat upon a particular business all the morning: and my Lord Anglesey (age 53) with us: who, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47), do bring us news how my Chancellor's (age 58) seal is to be taken away from him to-day. The thing is so great and sudden to me, that it put me into a very great admiration what should be the meaning of it; and they do not own that they know what it should be: but this is certain, that the King (age 37) did resolve it on Saturday, and did yesterday send the Duke of Albemarle (age 58), the only man fit for those works, to him for his purse: to which the Chancellor (age 58) answered, that he received it from the King (age 37), and would deliver it to the King's own hand, and so civilly returned the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) without it; and this morning my Chancellor (age 58) is to be with the King (age 37), to come to an end in the business. After sitting, we rose, and my wife being gone abroad with Mrs. Turner (age 44) to her washing at the whitster's, I dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where Mr. Boreman was, who come from White Hall; who tells us that he saw my Chancellor (age 58) come in his coach with some of his men, without his Seal, to White Hall to his chamber; and thither the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 33) come and staid together alone, an hour or more: and it is said that the King (age 37) do say that he will have the Parliament meet, and that it will prevent much trouble by having of him out of their enmity, by his place being taken away; for that all their enmity will be at him. It is said also that my Chancellor (age 58) answers, that he desires he may be brought to his trial, if he have done any thing to lose his office; and that he will be willing, and is most desirous, to lose that, and his head both together. Upon what terms they parted nobody knows but the Chancellor (age 58) looked sad, he says. Then in comes Sir Richard Ford (age 53), and says he hears that there is nobody more presses to reconcile the King (age 37) and Chancellor (age 58) than the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) and Duke of Buckingham (age 39): the latter of which is very strange, not only that he who was so lately his enemy should do it, but that this man, that but the other day was in danger of losing his own head, should so soon come to be a mediator for others: it shows a wise Government. They all say that he [Clarendon] is but a poor man, not worth above £3000 a-year in land; but this I cannot believe: and all do blame him for having built so great a house, till he had got a better estate. Having dined, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and I to White Hall, where we could be informed in no more than we were told before, nobody knowing the result of the meeting, but that the matter is suspended. So I walked to the King's playhouse, there to meet Sir W. Pen (age 46), and saw "The Surprizall", a very mean play, I thought: or else it was because I was out of humour, and but very little company in the house. But there Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I had a great deal of discourse with Moll; who tells us that Nell (age 17) is already left by my Lord Buckhurst (age 24), and that he makes sport of her, and swears she hath had all she could get of him; and Hart1, her great admirer, now hates her; and that she is very poor, and hath lost my Baroness Castlemayne (age 26), who was her great friend also but she is come to the House, but is neglected by them all2. Thence with Sir W. Pen (age 46) home, and I to the office, where late about business, and then home to supper, and so to bed.

Note 1. Charles Hart, great-nephew of Shakespeare, a favourite actor. He is credited with being Nell Gwyn's (age 17) first lover (or Charles I, as the wits put it), and with having brought her on the stage. He died of stone, and was buried at Stanmore Magna, Middlesex, where he had a country house.

Note 2. Lord Buckhurst's (age 24) liaison with Nell Gwyn probably came to an end about this time. We learn from Pepys that in January, 1667-68, the King (age 37) sent several times for Nelly (age 17) (see January 11th, 1667-68). Nell's eldest son by Charles II, Charles Beauclerc, was not born till May 8th, 1670. He was created Earl of Burford in 1676 and Duke of St. Albans in 1684.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1667. Up as soon as I could see and to the office to write over fair with Mr. Hater my last night's work, which I did by nine o'clock, and got it signed, and so with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35), who come to me about his business, to White Hall: and thither come also my Lord Bruncker (age 47): and we by and by called in, and our paper read; and much discourse thereon by Sir G. Carteret (age 57), my Lord Anglesey (age 53), Sir W. Coventry (age 39), and my Lord Ashly (age 46), and myself: but I could easily discern that they none of them understood the business; and the King (age 37) at last ended it with saying lazily, "Why", says he, "after all this discourse, I now come to understand it; and that is, that there can nothing be done in this more than is possible", which was so silly as I never heard: "and therefore", says he, "I would have these gentlemen to do as much as possible to hasten the Treasurer's accounts; and that is all". And so we broke up: and I confess I went away ashamed, to see how slightly things are advised upon there. Here I saw the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) sit in Council again, where he was re-admitted, it seems, the last Council-day: and it is wonderful to see how this man is come again to his places, all of them, after the reproach and disgrace done him: so that things are done in a most foolish manner quite through. The Duke of Buckingham (age 39) did second Sir W. Coventry (age 39) in the advising the King (age 37) that he would not concern himself in the owning or not owning any man's accounts, or any thing else, wherein he had not the same satisfaction that would satisfy the Parliament; saying, that nothing would displease the Parliament more than to find him defending any thing that is not right, nor justifiable to the utmost degree but methought he spoke it but very poorly. After this, I walked up and down the Gallery till noon; and here I met with Bishop Fuller, who, to my great joy, is made, which I did not hear before, Bishop of Lincoln.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Sep 1667. Thence to White Hall, and there a Committee met, where little was done, and thence to the Duke of York (age 33) to Council, where we the officers of the Navy did attend about the business of discharging the seamen by tickets, where several of the Lords spoke and of our number none but myself, which I did in such manner as pleased the King (age 37) and Council. Speaking concerning the difficulty of pleasing of seamen and giving them assurance to their satisfaction that they should be paid their arrears of wages, my Lord Ashly (age 46) did move that an assignment for money on the Act might be put into the hands of the East India Company, or City of London, which he thought the seamen would believe. But this my Lord Anglesey (age 53) did very handsomely oppose, and I think did carry it that it will not be: and it is indeed a mean thing that the King (age 37) should so far own his own want of credit as to borrow theirs in this manner. My Lord Anglesey (age 53) told him that this was the way indeed to teach the Parliament to trust the King (age 37) no more for the time to come, but to have a kingdom's Treasurer distinct from the King's.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Oct 1667. Up, and to the Office; and there all the morning; none but my Lord Anglesey (age 53) and myself; but much surprized with the news of the death of Sir W. Batten (age 66), who died this morning, having been but two days sick. Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I did dispatch a letter this morning to Sir W. Coventry (age 39), to recommend Colonel Middleton, who we think a most honest and understanding man, and fit for that place. Sir G. Carteret (age 57) did also come this morning, and walked with me in the garden; and concluded not to concern [himself] or have any advice made to Sir W. Coventry (age 39), in behalf of my Lord Sandwich's (age 42) business; so I do rest satisfied, though I do think they are all mad, that they will judge Sir W. Coventry (age 39) an enemy, when he is indeed no such man to any body, but is severe and just, as he ought to be, where he sees things ill done.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Oct 1667. After dinner I to the office, where we all met with intent to proceed to the publique sale of several prize ships, but upon discourse my Lord Anglesey (age 53) did discover (which troubled me that he that is a stranger almost should do more than we ourselves could) that the appraisements made by our officers were not above half of what he had been offered for one of them, and did make it good by bringing a gentleman to give us £700 for the Wildboare, which they valued but at £276, which made us all startle and stop the sale, and I did propose to acquaint the Duke of York (age 34) with it, and accordingly we did agree on it, and I wrote a severe letter about it, and we are to attend him with it to-morrow about it.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Oct 1667. This afternoon my Lord Anglesey (age 53) tells us that the House of Commons have this morning run into the inquiry in many things; as, the sale of Dunkirke, the dividing of the fleete the last year, the business of the prizes with my Lord Sandwich (age 42), and many other things; so that now they begin to fall close upon it, and God knows what will be the end of it, but a Committee they have chosen to inquire into the miscarriages of the war. Having done, and being a little tired, Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I in his coach out to Mile End [Map] Green, and there drank a cup of Byde's ale, and so talking about the proceedings of Parliament, and how little a thing the King (age 37) is become to be forced to suffer it, though I declare my being satisfied that things should be enquired into, we back again home, and I to my office to my letters, and so home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Nov 1667. Up, and at the office all this morning, and then home to dinner, and then by coach sent my wife to the King's playhouse, and I to White Hall, there intending, with Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and Sir T. Harvy (age 42) to have seen the Duke of York (age 34), whom it seems the King (age 37) and Queen (age 29) have visited, and so we may now well go to see him. But there was nobody could speak with him, and so we parted, leaving a note in Mr. Wren's (age 38) chamber that we had been there, he being at the free conference of the two Houses about this great business of my Chancellor's (age 58), at which they were at this hour, three in the afternoon, and there they say my Lord Anglesey (age 53) do his part admirablyably, and each of us taking a copy of the Guinny company's defence to a petition against them to the Parliament the other day.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1667. Thence, paying our shot, 6s. apiece, I home, and there to the office and wrote my letters, and then home, my eyes very sore with yesterday's work, and so home and tried to make a piece by my eare and viall to "I wonder what the grave", &c., and so to supper and to bed, where frighted a good while and my wife again with noises, and my wife did rise twice, but I think it was Sir John Minnes's (age 68) people again late cleaning their house, for it was past I o'clock in the morning before we could fall to sleep, and so slept. But I perceive well what the care of money and treasure in a man's house is to a man that fears to lose it. My Lord Anglesey (age 53) told me this day that he did believe the House of Commons would, the next week, yield to the Lords; but, speaking with others this day, they conclude they will not, but that rather the King (age 37) will accommodate it by committing my Lord Clarendon (age 58) himself. I remember what Mr. Evelyn (age 47) said, that he did believe we should soon see ourselves fall into a Commonwealth again. Joseph Williamson I find mighty kind still, but close, not daring to say anything almost that touches upon news or state of affairs.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Dec 1667. Up, by candlelight, the only time I think I have done so this winter, and a coach being got over night, I to Sir W. Coventry's (age 39), the first time I have seen him at his new house since he come to lodge there. He tells me of the vote for none of the House to be of the Commission for the Bill of Accounts; which he thinks is so great a disappointment to Birch (age 52) and others that expected to be of it, that he thinks, could it have been [fore]seen, there would not have been any Bill at all. We hope it will be the better for all that are to account; it being likely that the men, being few, and not of the House, will hear reason. The main business I went about was about. Gilsthrop, Sir W. Batten's clerk; who, being upon his death-bed, and now dead, hath offered to make discoveries of the disorders of the Navy and of £65,000 damage to the King (age 37): which made mighty noise in the Commons' House; and members appointed to go to him, which they did; but nothing to the purpose got from him, but complaints of false musters, and ships being refitted with victuals and stores at Plymouth, Devon [Map], after they come fitted from other ports; but all this to no purpose, nor more than we know, and will owne. But the best is, that this loggerhead should say this, that understands nothing of the Navy, nor ever would; and hath particularly blemished his master by name among us. I told Sir W. Coventry (age 39) of my letter to Sir R. Brookes (age 30), and his answer to me. He advises me, in what I write to him, to be as short as I can, and obscure, saving in things fully plain; for all that he do is to make mischief; and that the greatest wisdom in dealing with the Parliament in the world is to say little, and let them get out what they can by force: which I shall observe. He declared to me much of his mind to be ruled by his own measures, and not to go so far as many would have him to the ruin of my Chancellor (age 58), and for which they do endeavour to do what they can against Sir W. Coventry (age 39). "But", says he, "I have done my do in helping to get him out of the administration of things, for which he is not fit; but for his life or estate I will have nothing to say to it: besides that, my duty to my master the Duke of York (age 34) is such, that I will perish before I will do any thing to displease or disoblige him, where the very necessity of the Kingdom do not in my judgment call me". Thence I home and to the office, where my Lord Anglesey (age 53), and all the discourse was yesterday's vote in the Commons, wherein he told us that, should the Lords yield to what the Commons would have in this matter, it were to make them worse than any justice of Peace (whereas they are the highest Court in the Kingdom) that they cannot be judges whether an offender be to be committed or bailed, which every justice of Peace do do, and then he showed me precedents plain in their defence.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Dec 1667. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to the Duke of York (age 34), the first time that I have seen him, or we waited on him, since his sickness; and, blessed be God! he is not at all the worse for the smallpox, but is only a little weak yet. We did much business with him, and so parted. My Lord Anglesey (age 53) told me how my Lord Northampton (age 45) brought in a Bill into the House of Lords yesterday, under the name of a Bill for the Honour and Privilege of the House, and Mercy to my Lord Clarendon (age 58): which, he told me, he opposed, saying that he was a man accused of treason by the House of Commons; and mercy was not proper for him, having not been tried yet, and so no mercy needful for him. However, the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) and others did desire that the Bill might be read; and it, was for banishing my Lord Clarendon (age 58) from all his Majesty's dominions, and that it should be treason to have him found in any of them: the thing is only a thing of vanity, and to insult over him, which is mighty poor I think, and so do every body else, and ended in nothing, I think.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Dec 1667. So home, and there to dinner, and after dinner abroad with my wife and girle, set them down at Unthanke's, and I to White Hall to the Council chamber, where I was summoned about the business of paying of the seamen, where I heard my Lord Anglesey (age 53) put to it by Sir W. Coventry (age 39) before the King (age 37) for altering the course set by the Council; which he like a wise man did answer in few words, that he had already sent to alter it according to the Council's method, and so stopped it, whereas many words would have set the Commissioners of the Treasury on fire, who, I perceive, were prepared for it. Here I heard Mr. Gawden speak to the King (age 37) and Council upon some business of his before them, but did it so well, in so good words and to the purpose, that I could never have expected from a man of no greater learning. So went away, and in the Lobby met Mr. Sawyer (age 34), my old chamber fellow, and stayed and had an hour's discourse of old things with him, and I perceive he do very well in the world, and is married he tells me and hath a child.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Dec 1667. At noon to dinner, where W. How with us, and after dinner, he being gone, I to my chamber again till almost night, and then took boat, the tide serving, and so to White Hall, where I saw the Duchesse of York (age 30), in a fine dress of second mourning for her mother, being black, edged with ermine, go to make her first visit to the Queene (age 58) since the Duke of York (age 34) was sick; and by and by, she being returned, the Queene (age 58) come and visited her. But it was pretty to observe that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) and I, walking an hour and more together in the Matted Gallery, he observed, and so did I, how the Duchesse, as soon as she spied him, turned her head a one side. Here he and I walked thus long, which we have not done a great while before. Our discourse was upon everything: the unhappiness of having our matters examined by people that understand them not; that it was better for us in the Navy to have men that do understand the whole, and that are not passionate; that we that have taken the most pains are called upon to answer for all crimes, while those that, like Sir W. Batten and Sir J. Minnes (age 68), did sit and do nothing, do lie still without any trouble; that, if it were to serve the King (age 37) and kingdom again in a war, neither of us could do more, though upon this experience we might do better than we did; that the commanders, the gentlemen that could never be brought to order, but undid all, are now the men that find fault and abuse others; that it had been much better for the King (age 37) to have given Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and Sir W. Batten £1000 a-year to have sat still, than to have had them in his business this war: that the serving a Prince that minds not his business is most unhappy for them that serve him well, and an unhappiness so great that he declares he will never have more to do with a war, under him. That he hath papers which do flatly contradict the Duke of Albemarle's (age 59) Narrative; and that he hath been with the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) and shewed him them, to prevent his falling into another like fault: that the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) seems to be able to answer them; but he thinks that the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) and the Prince are contented to let their Narratives sleep, they being not only contradictory in some things (as he observed about the business of the Duke of Albemarle's (age 59) being to follow the Prince upon dividing the fleete, in case the enemy come out), but neither of them to be maintained in others. That the business the other night of my Lord Anglesey (age 53) at the Council was happily got over for my Lord, by his dexterous silencing it, and the rest, not urging it further; forasmuch as, had the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) come in time enough, and had got it by the end, he, would have toused him in it; Sir W. Coventry (age 39) telling me that my Lord Anglesey (age 53) did, with such impudence, maintain the quarrel against the Commons and some of the Lords, in the business of my Lord Clarendon (age 58), that he believes there are enough would be glad but of this occasion to be revenged of him. He tells me that he hears some of the Thomsons (age 60) are like to be of the Commission for the Accounts, and Wildman (age 46), which he much wonders at, as having been a false fellow to every body, and in prison most of the time since the King's coming in. But he do tell me that the House is in such a condition that nobody can tell what to make of them, and, he thinks, they were never in before; that every body leads, and nobody follows; and that he do now think that, since a great many are defeated in their expectation of being of the Commission, now they would put it into such hands as it shall get no credit from: for, if they do look to the bottom and see the King's case, they think they are then bound to give the King (age 37) money; whereas, they would be excused from that, and therefore endeavour to make this business of the Accounts to signify little. I spoke with him about my Lord Sandwich's (age 42) business, in which he is very friendly, and do say that the unhappy business of the prizes is it that hath brought all this trouble upon him, and the only thing that made any thing else mentioned, and it is true. So having discoursed with him, I spent some time with Sir Stephen Fox (age 40) about the business of our adjusting the new method of the Excise between the Guards household and Tangier, the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury being now resolved to bring all their management into a course of payment by orders, and not by tallies, and I am glad of it, and so by water home late, and very dark, and when come home there I got my wife to read, and then come Captain Cocke (age 50) to me; and there he tells me, to my great satisfaction, that Sir Robert Brookes (age 30) did dine with him today; and that he told him, speaking of me, that he would make me the darling of the House of Commons, so much he is satisfied concerning me. And this Cocke (age 50) did tell me that I might give him thanks for it; and I do think it may do me good, for he do happen to be held a considerable person, of a young man, both for sobriety and ability. Then to discourse of business of his own about some hemp of his that is come home to receive it into the King's stores, and then parted, and by and by my wife and I to supper, she not being well, her flux being great upon her, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Dec 1667. Thence to White Hall, and there to visit Sir G. Carteret (age 57), and there was with him a great while, and my Lady and they seem in very good humour, but by and by Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and I alone, and there we did talk of the ruinous condition we are in, the King (age 37) being going to put out of the Council so many able men; such as my Lord Anglesey (age 53), Ashly (age 46), Hollis (age 68), Secretary Morrice (age 65) (to bring in Mr. Trevor), and the Archbishop of Canterbury (age 69), and my Lord Bridgewater (age 44). He tells me that this is true, only the Duke of York (age 34) do endeavour to hinder it, and the Duke of York (age 34) himself did tell him so: that the King (age 37) and the Duke of York (age 34) do not in company disagree, but are friendly; but that there is a core in their hearts, he doubts, which is not to be easily removed; for these men do suffer only for their constancy to the Chancellor (age 58), or at least from the King's ill-will against him: that they do now all they can to vilify the clergy, and do accuse Rochester, Kent [Map] [Dolben]... and so do raise scandals, all that is possible, against other of the Bishops. He do suggest that something is intended for the Duke of Monmouth (age 18), and it may be, against the Queene (age 58) also: that we are in no manner sure against an invasion the next year: that the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) do rule all now, and the Duke of York (age 34) comes indeed to the Caball, but signifies little there. That this new faction do not endure, nor the King (age 37), Sir W. Coventry (age 39); but yet that he is so usefull that they cannot be without him; but that he is not now called to the Caball. That my Lord of Buckingham (age 39), Bristoll (age 55), and Arlington (age 49), do seem to agree in these things; but that they do not in their hearts trust one another, but do drive several ways, all of them. In short, he do bless himself that he is no more concerned in matters now; and the hopes he hath of being at liberty, when his accounts are over, to retire into the country. That he do give over the Kingdom for wholly lost. So after some other little discourse, I away, meeting with Mr. Cooling. I with him by coach to the Wardrobe, where I never was since the fire in Hatton Garden [Map], but did not 'light: and he tells me he fears that my Lord Sandwich (age 42) will suffer much by Mr. Townsend's being untrue to him, he being now unable to give the Commissioners of the Treasury an account of his money received by many thousands of pounds, which I am troubled for.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1668. Up, and there to the office, where we sat all the morning; at noon home to dinner, where my clerks and Mr. Clerke the sollicitor with me, and dinner being done I to the office again, where all the afternoon till late busy, and then home with my mind pleased at the pleasure of despatching my business, and so to supper and to bed, my thoughts full, how to order our design of having some dancing at our house on Monday next, being Twelfth-day. It seems worth remembering that this day I did hear my Lord Anglesey (age 53) at the table, speaking touching this new Act for Accounts, say that the House of Lords did pass it because it was a senseless, impracticable, ineffectual, and foolish Act; and that my Lord Ashly (age 46) having shown this that it was so to the House of Lords, the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) did stand up and told the Lords that they were beholden to my Lord Ashly (age 46), that having first commended them for a most grave and honourable assembly, he thought it fit for the House to pass this Act for Accounts because it was a foolish and simple Act: and it seems it was passed with but a few in the House, when it was intended to have met in a grand Committee upon it. And it seems that in itself it is not to be practiced till after this session of Parliament, by the very words of the Act, which nobody regarded, and therefore cannot come in force yet, unless the next meeting they do make a new Act for the bringing it into force sooner; which is a strange omission. But I perceive my Lord Anglesey (age 53) do make a mere laughing-stock of this Act, as a thing that can do nothing considerable, for all its great noise.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1668. Taking coach as I said before at the Temple [Map], I to Charing Cross [Map], and there went into Unthanke's to have my shoes wiped, dirty with walking, and so to White Hall, where I visited the Vice-Chamberlain (age 58), who tells me, and so I find by others, that the business of putting out of some of the Privy-council is over, the King (age 37) being at last advised to forbear it; for whereas he did design it to make room for some of the House of Commons that are against him, thereby to gratify them, it is believed that it will but so much the more fret the rest that are not provided for, and raise a new stock of enemies by them that are displeased, and so all they think is over: and it goes for a pretty saying of my Lord Anglesey's (age 53) up and down the Court, that he should lately say to one of them that are the great promoters of this putting him and others out of the Council, "Well", says he, "and what are we to look for when we are outed? Will all things be set right in the nation?" The other said that he did believe that many things would be mended: "But", says my Lord, "will you and the rest of you be contented to be hanged, if you do not redeem all our misfortunes and set all right, if the power be put into your hands?" The other answered, "No, I would not undertake that:"-"Why, then", says my Lord, "I and the rest of us that you are labouring to put out, will be contented to be hanged, if we do not recover all that is past, if the King (age 37) will put the power into our hands, and adhere wholly to our advice"; which saying as it was severe, so generally people have so little opinion of those that are likely to be uppermost that they do mightily commend my Lord Anglesey (age 53) for this saying.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jan 1668. At noon home to dinner, and then to the Office again, where we met about some business of D. Gawden's till candle-light; and then, as late as it was, I down to Redriffe [Map], and so walked by moonlight to Deptford, Kent [Map], where I have not been a great while, and my business I did there was only to walk up and down above la casa of Bagwell, but could not see her, it being my intent to have spent a little time con her, she being newly come from her husband; but I did lose my labour, and so walked back again, but with pleasure by the walk, and I had the sport to see two boys swear, and stamp, and fret, for not being able to get their horse over a stile and ditch, one of them swearing and cursing most bitterly; and I would fain, in revenge, have persuaded him to have drove his horse through the ditch, by which I believe he would have stuck there. But the horse would not be drove, and so they were forced to go back again, and so I walked away homeward, and there reading all the evening, and so to bed. This afternoon my Lord Anglesey (age 53) tells us that it is voted in Council to have a fleete of 50 ships out; but it is only a disguise for the Parliament to get some money by; but it will not take, I believe, and if it did, I do not think it will be such as he will get any of, nor such as will enable us to set out such a fleete.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jan 1668. Up, after talking with my wife with pleasure, about her learning on the flageolet a month or two again this winter, and all the rest of the year her painting, which I do love, and so to the office, where sat all the morning, and here Lord Anglesey (age 53) tells us again that a fleete is to be set out; and that it is generally, he hears, said, that it is but a Spanish rhodomontado; and that he saying so just now to the Duke of Albemarle (age 59), who come to town last night, after the thing was ordered, he told him a story of two seamen: one wished all the guns of the ship were his, and that they were silver; and says the other, "You are a fool, for, if you can have it for wishing, why do you not wish them gold?"-"So", says he, "if a rhodomontado will do any good, why do you not say 100 ships?" And it is true; for the Dutch and French are said to make such preparations as 50 sail will do no good.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1668. Up betimes, and by coach to Sir W. Coventry (age 40), whom I found in his chamber, and there stayed an hour and talked with him about several things of the Navy, and our want of money, which they indeed do supply us with a little, but in no degree likely to enable us to go on with the King's service. He is at a stand where to have more, and is in mighty pain for it, declaring that he believes there never was a kingdom so governed as this was in the time of the late Chancellor (age 58) and the Treasurer, nobody minding or understanding any thing how things went or what the King (age 37) had in his Treasury, or was to have, nothing in the world of it minded. He tells me that there are still people desirous to overthrow him; he resolving to stick at nothing nor no person that stands in his way against bringing the King (age 37) out of debt, be it to retrench any man's place or profit, and that he cares not, for rather than be employed under the King (age 37), and have the King (age 37) continue in this condition of indigence, he desires to be put out from among them, thinking it no honour to be a minister in such a government. He tells me he hath no friends in the whole Court but my Lord Keeper and Sir John Duncomb. He tells me they have reduced the charges of Ireland above £70,000 a-year, and thereby cut off good profits from my Lord Lieutenant; which will make a new enemy, but he cares not. He tells me that Townsend, of the Wardrobe, is the eeriest knave and bufflehead that ever he saw in his life, and wonders how my Lord Sandwich (age 42) come to trust such a fellow, and that now Reames and----are put in to be overseers there, and do great things, and have already saved a great deal of money in the King's liverys, and buy linnen so cheap, that he will have them buy the next cloth he hath, for shirts. But then this is with ready money, which answers all. He do not approve of my letter I drew and the office signed yesterday to the Commissioners of Accounts, saying that it is a little too submissive, and grants a little too much and too soon our bad managements, though we lay on want of money, yet that it will be time enough to plead it when they object it. Which was the opinion of my Lord Anglesey (age 53) also; so I was ready to alter it, and did so presently, going from him home, and there transcribed it fresh as he would have it, and got it signed, and to White Hall presently and shewed it him, and so home, and there to dinner, and after dinner all the afternoon and till 12 o'clock at night with Mr. Gibson at home upon my Tangier accounts, and did end them fit to be given the last of them to the Auditor to-morrow, to my great content. This evening come Betty Turner (age 15) and the two Mercers, and W. Batelier, and they had fiddlers, and danced, and kept a quarter1, which pleased me, though it disturbed me; but I could not be with them at all. Mr. Gibson lay at my house all night, it was so late.

Note 1. A term for making a noise or disturbance.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Feb 1668. Thence took up my wife, and home, and there busy late at the office writing letters, and so home to supper and to bed. The House was called over to-day. This morning Sir G. Carteret (age 58) come to the Office to see and talk with me: and he assures me that to this day the King (age 37) is the most kind man to my Lord Sandwich (age 42) in the whole world; that he himself do not now mind any publick business, but suffers things to go on at Court as they will, he seeing all likely to come to ruin: that this morning the Duke of York (age 34) sent to him to come to make up one of a Committee of the Council for Navy Affairs; where, when he come, he told the Duke of York (age 34) that he was none of them: which shews how things are now-a-days ordered, that there should be a Committee for the Navy; and the Lord Admiral not know the persons of it! And that Sir G. Carteret (age 58) and my Lord Anglesey (age 53) should be left out of it, and men wholly improper put into it. I do hear of all hands that there is a great difference at this day between my Lord Arlington (age 50) and Sir W. Coventry (age 40), which I am sorry for.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1668. Up, after much pleasant talk with my wife, and upon some alterations I will make in my house in her absence, and I do intend to lay out some money thereon. So she and I up, and she got her ready to be gone, and by and by comes Betty Turner (age 15) and her mother, and W. Batelier, and they and Deb., to whom I did give 10s. this morning, to oblige her to please her mistress (and ego did baiser her mouche), and also Jane, and so in two coaches set out about eight o'clock towards the carrier, there for to take coach for my father's, that is to say, my wife and Betty Turner (age 15), Deb., and Jane; but I meeting my Lord Anglesey (age 53) going to the Office, was forced to 'light in Cheapside, and there took my leave of them (not baisado Deb., which je had a great mind to), left them to go to their coach, and I to the office, where all the morning busy, and so at noon with my other clerks (W. Hewer (age 26) being a day's journey with my wife) to dinner, where Mr. Pierce come and dined with me, and then with Lord Brouncker (age 48) (carrying his little kinswoman on my knee, his coach being full), to the Temple [Map], where my Lord and I 'light and to Mr. Porter's chamber, where Cocke (age 51) and his counsel, and so to the attorney's, whither the Sollicitor-Generall (age 46) come, and there, their cause about their assignments on the £1,250,000 Act was argued, where all that was to be said for them was said, and so answered by the Sollicitor-Generall (age 46) beyond what I expected, that I said not one word all my time, rather choosing to hold my tongue, and so mind my reputation with the Sollicitor-Generall (age 46), who did mightily approve of my speech in Parliament, than say anything against him to no purpose. This I believe did trouble Cocke (age 51) and these gentlemen, but I do think this best for me, and so I do think that the business will go against them, though it is against my judgment, and I am sure against all justice to the men to be invited to part with their goods and be deceived afterward of their security for payment.

Pepy's Diary. 12 May 1668. Up, and to the office, where we sat, and sat all the morning. Here Lord Anglesey (age 53) was with us, and in talk about the late difference between the two Houses, do tell us that he thinks the House of Lords may be in an error, at least, it is possible they may, in this matter of Skinner; and he doubts they may, and did declare his judgement in the House of Lords against their proceedings therein, he having hindered 100 originall causes being brought into their House, notwithstanding that he was put upon defending their proceedings: but that he is confident that the House of Commons are in the wrong, in the method they take to remedy an error of the Lords, for no vote of theirs can do it; but, in all like cases, the Commons have done it by petition to the King (age 37), sent up to the Lords, and by them agreed to, and so redressed, as they did in the Petition of Right. He says that he did tell them indeed, which is talked of, and which did vex the Commons, that the Lords were "Judices nati et Conciliarii nati"; but all other judges among us are under salary, and the Commons themselves served for wages; and therefore the Lords, in reason, were the freer judges.

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1668. Up by four o'clock; and, getting my things ready, and recommending the care of my house to W. Hewer (age 26), I with my boy Tom, whom I take with me, to the Bull, in Bishopsgate Street, and there, about six, took coach, he and I, and a gentleman and his man, there being another coach also, with as many more, I think, in it; and so away to Bishop's Stafford, and there dined, and changed horses and coach, at Mrs. Aynsworth's; but I took no knowledge of her. Here the gentleman and I to dinner, and in comes Captain Forster, an acquaintance of his, he that do belong to my Lord Anglesey (age 53), who had been at the late horse-races at Newmarket, Suffolk, where the King (age 37) now is, and says that they had fair weather there yesterday, though we here, and at London, had nothing but rain, insomuch that the ways are mighty full of water, so as hardly to be passed. Here I hear Mrs. Aynsworth is going to live at London: but I believe will be mistaken in it; for it will be found better for her to be chief where she is, than to have little to do at London. There being many finer than she there.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jun 1668. Up betimes and to the office, there to set my papers in order and books, my office having been new whited and windows made clean, and so to sit, where all the morning, and did receive a hint or two from my Lord Anglesey (age 53), as if he thought much of my taking the ayre as I have done; but I care not a turd; but whatever the matter is, I think he hath some ill-will to me, or at least an opinion that I am more the servant of the Board than I am.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1668. Thence I set him down at the Temple [Map], and Commissioner Middleton dining the first time with me, he and I to White Hall, and so to St. James's, where we met; and much business with the Duke of York (age 34). And I find the Duke of York (age 34) very hot for regulations in the Navy; and, I believe, is put on it by W. Coventry (age 40); and I am glad of it; and particularly, he falls heavy on Chatham-yard [Map], and is vexed that Lord Anglesey (age 53) did, the other day, complain at the Council-table of disorders in the Navy, and not to him. So I to White Hall to a Committee of Tangier; and there vexed, with the importunity and clamours of Alderman Backewell (age 50), for my acquittance for money supplied by him to the garrison, before I have any order for paying it: so home, calling at several places-among others, the 'Change [Map], and on Cooper (age 59), to know when my wife shall come to sit for her picture, which will be next week, and so home and to walk with my wife, and then to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jul 1668. Up, and to St. James's, and there attended the Duke of York (age 34), and was there by himself told how angry he was, and did declare to my Lord Anglesey (age 53), about his late complaining of things of the Navy to the King (age 38) in Council, and not to him; and I perceive he is mightily concerned at it, and resolved to reform things therein.

On 14 Jul 1668 [his son-in-law] John Thompson 1st Baron Haversham (age 20) and [his daughter] Frances Annesley Baroness Haversham were married. She the daughter of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 54) and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 48).

Pepy's Diary. 30 Aug 1668. So to White Hall in the evening, to the Queen's (age 29) side, and there met the Duke of York (age 34); and he did tell me and W. Coventry (age 40), who was with me, how that Lord Anglesey (age 54) did take notice of our reading his long and sharp letter to the Board; but that it was the better, at least he said so. The Duke of York (age 34), I perceive, is earnest in it, and will have good effects of it; telling W. Coventry (age 40) that it was a letter that might have come from the Commissioners of Accounts, but it was better it should come first from him. I met Lord Brouncker (age 48), who, I perceive, and the rest, do smell that it comes from me, but dare not find fault with it; and I am glad of it, it being my glory and defence that I did occasion and write it.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Sep 1668. Up betimes, and walked to the Temple [Map], and stopped, viewing the Exchange [Map], and Paul's, and St. Fayth's [Map], where strange how the very sight of the stones falling from the top of the steeple do make me sea-sick! But no hurt, I hear, hath yet happened in all this work of the steeple, which is very much. So from the Temple [Map] I by coach to St. James's, where I find Sir W. Pen (age 47) and Lord Anglesey (age 54), who delivered this morning his answer to the Duke of York (age 34), but I could not see it. But after being above with the Duke of York (age 34), but said nothing, I down with Mr. Wren; and he and I read all over that I had, and I expounded them to him, and did so order it that I had them home with me, so that I shall, to my heart's wish, be able to take a copy of them.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Sep 1668. So to the office, and thence to St. James's to the Duke of York (age 34), walking it to the Temple [Map], and in my way observe that the Stockes are now pulled quite down; and it will make the coming into Cornhill [Map] and Lumber Street mighty noble. I stopped, too, at Paul's, and there did go into St. Fayth's Church [Map], and also in the body of the west part of the Church; and do see a hideous sight of the walls of the Church ready to fall, that I was in fear as long as I was in it: and here I saw the great vaults underneath the body of the Church. No hurt, I hear, is done yet, since their going to pull down the Church and steeple; but one man, on Monday this week, fell from the top to a piece of the roof, of the east end, that stands next the steeple, and there broke himself all to pieces. It is pretty here to see how the late Church was but a case wrought over the old Church; for you may see the very old pillars standing whole within the wall of this. When I come to St. James's, I find the Duke of York (age 34) gone with the King (age 38) to see the muster of the Guards in Hyde Park; and their Colonel, the Duke of Monmouth (age 19), to take his command this day of the King's Life-Guard, by surrender of my Lord Gerard (age 50). So I took a Hackney-coach and saw it all: and indeed it was mighty noble, and their firing mighty fine, and the Duke of Monmouth (age 19) in mighty rich clothes; but the well-ordering of the men I understand not. Here, among a thousand coaches that were there, I saw and spoke to Mrs. Pierce: and by and by Mr. Wren (age 39) hunts me out, and gives me my Lord Anglesey's (age 54) answer to the Duke of York's (age 34) letter, where, I perceive, he do do what he can to hurt me, by bidding the Duke of York (age 34) call for my books: but this will do me all the right in the world, and yet I am troubled at it. So away out of the Park, and home; and there Mr. Gibson and I to dinner: and all the afternoon with him, writing over anew, and a little altering, my answer to the Duke of York (age 34), which I have not yet delivered, and so have the opportunity of doing it after seeing all their answers, though this do give me occasion to alter very little. This done, he to write it over, and I to the Office, where late, and then home; and he had finished it; and then he to read to me the life of Archbishop Laud, wrote by Dr. Heylin; which is a shrewd book, but that which I believe will do the Bishops in general no great good, but hurt, it pleads for so much Popish. So after supper to bed. This day my father's letters tell me of the death of poor Fancy, in the country, big with puppies, which troubles me, as being one of my oldest acquaintances and servants. Also good Stankes is dead.

Evelyn's Diary. 17 Sep 1668. I entertained Signor Muccinigo, the Venetian Ambassador, of one of the noblest families of the State, this being the day of making his public entry, setting forth from my house [Map] with several gentlemen of Venice and others in a very glorious train. He staid with me till the Earl of Anglesea (age 54) and Sir Charles Cotterell (age 53) (Master of the Ceremonies) came with the King's (age 38) barge to carry him to the Tower [Map], where the guns were fired at his landing; he then entered his Majesty's (age 38) coach, followed by many others of the nobility. I accompanied him to his house, where there was a most noble supper to all the company, of course. After the extraordinary compliments to me and my wife (age 33), for the civilities he received at my house, I took leave and returned. He is a very accomplished person. He is since Ambassador at Rome.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Sep 1668. Thence to my several booksellers and elsewhere, about several errands, and so at noon home, and after dinner by coach to White Hall, and thither comes the Duke of York (age 34) to us, and by and by met at the robe chamber upon our usual business, where the Duke of York (age 34) I find somewhat sour, and particularly angry with Lord Anglesey (age 54) for his not being there now, nor at other times so often as he should be with us.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Sep 1668. Thence to Westminster Hall [Map] and there walked a little, and to the Exchequer, and so home by water, and after eating a bit I to my vintner's, and there did only look upon su wife, which is mighty handsome; and so to my glove and ribbon shop, in Fenchurch Street [Map], and did the like there. And there, stopping against the door of the shop, saw Mrs. Horsfall, now a late widow, in a coach. I to her, and shook her by the hand, and so she away; and I by coach towards the King's playhouse, and meeting W. Howe took him with me, and there saw "The City Match"; not acted these thirty years, and but a silly play: the King (age 38) and Court there; the house, for the women's sake, mighty full. So I to White Hall, and there all the evening on the Queen's (age 29) side; and it being a most summerlike day, and a fine warm evening, the Italians come in a barge under the leads, before the Queen's (age 29) drawing-room; and so the Queen (age 29) and ladies went out, and heard them, for almost an hour: and it was indeed very good together; but yet there was but one voice that alone did appear considerable, and that was Seignor Joanni. This done, by and by they went in; and here I saw Mr. Sidney Montagu kiss the Queen's (age 29) hand, who was mighty kind to him, and the ladies looked mightily on him; and the King (age 38) come by and by, and did talk to him. So I away by coach with Alderman Backewell (age 50) home, who is mighty kind to me, more than ordinary, in his expressions. But I do hear this day what troubles me, that Sir W. Coventry (age 40) is quite out of play, the King (age 38) seldom speaking to him; and that there is a design of making a Lord Treasurer, and that my Lord Arlington (age 50) shall be the man; but I cannot believe it. But yet the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) hath it in his mind, and those with him, to make a thorough alteration in things; and, among the rest, Coventry (age 40) to be out. The Duke of York (age 34) did this day tell me how hot the whole party was in the business of GaudenGawden; and particularly, my Lord Anglesey (age 54) tells me, the Duke of Buckingham (age 40), for Child against Gawden; but the Duke of York (age 34) did stand stoutly to it.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Oct 1668. At the office all the morning, where Mr. Wren (age 39) first tells us of the order from the King (age 38), came last night to the Duke of York (age 35), for signifying his pleasure to the Sollicitor-General (age 46) for drawing up a Commission for suspending of my Lord Anglesey (age 54), and putting in Sir Thomas Littleton (age 47) and Sir Thomas Osborne, the former a creature of Arlington's (age 50), and the latter of the Duke of Buckingham's (age 40), during the suspension. The Duke of York (age 35) was forced to obey, and did grant it, he being to go to Newmarket, Suffolk this day with the King (age 38), and so the King (age 38) pressed for it. But Mr. Wren (age 39) do own that the Duke of York (age 35) is the most wounded in this, in the world, for it is done and concluded without his privity, after his appearing for Lord Anglesey (age 54), and that it is plain that they do ayme to bring the Admiralty into Commission too, and lessen the Duke of York (age 35). This do put strange apprehensions into all our Board; only I think I am the least troubled at it, for I care not at all for it: but my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and Pen do seem to think much of it.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Oct 1668. Up betimes; and Mr. Povy (age 54) comes to even accounts with me, which we did, and then fell to other talk. He tells, in short, how the King (age 38) is made a child of, by Buckingham (age 40) and Arlington (age 50), to the lessening of the Duke of York (age 35), whom they cannot suffer to be great, for fear of my Chancellor's (age 59) return, which, therefore, they make the King (age 38) violent against. That he believes it is impossible these two great men can hold together long: or, at least, that the ambition of the former is so great, that he will endeavour to master all, and bring into play as many as he can. That Anglesey (age 54) will not lose his place easily, but will contend in law with whoever comes to execute it. That the Duke of York (age 35), in all things but in his cod-piece, is led by the nose by his wife (age 31). That W. Coventry (age 40) is now, by the Duke of York (age 35), made friends with the Duchess (age 31); and that he is often there, and waits on her. That he do believe that these present great men will break in time, and that W. Coventry (age 40) will be a great man again; for he do labour to have nothing to do in matters of the State, and is so usefull to the side that he is on, that he will stand, though at present he is quite out of play. That my Baroness Castlemayne (age 27) hates the Duke of Buckingham (age 40). That the Duke of York (age 35) hath expressed himself very kind to my Lord Sandwich (age 43), which I am mighty glad of. That we are to expect more changes if these men stand. This done, he and I to talk of my coach, and I got him to go see it, where he finds most infinite fault with it, both as to being out of fashion and heavy, with so good reason that I am mightily glad of his having corrected me in it; and so I do resolve to have one of his build, and with his advice, both in coach and horses, he being the fittest man in the world for it, and so he carried me home, and said the same to my wife. So I to the office and he away, and at noon I home to dinner, and all the afternoon late with Gibson at my chamber about my present great business, only a little in the afternoon at the office about Sir D. Gawden's accounts, and so to bed and slept heartily, my wife and I at good peace, but my heart troubled and her mind not at ease, I perceive, she against and I for the girle, to whom I have not said anything these three days, but resolve to be mighty strange in appearance to her. This night W. Batelier come and took his leave of us, he setting out for France to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Oct 1668. Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon home to dinner with my people, and afternoon to the office again, and then to my chamber with Gibson to do more about my great answer for the Duke of York (age 35), and so at night after supper to bed well pleased with my advance thereon. This day my Lord Anglesey (age 54) was at the Office, and do seem to make nothing of this business of his suspension, resolving to bring it into the Council, where he seems not to doubt to have right, he standing upon his defence and patent, and hath put in his caveats to the several Offices: so, as soon as the King (age 38) comes back again, which will be on Tuesday next, he will bring it into the Council. So ends this month with some quiet to my mind, though not perfect, after the greatest falling out with my poor wife, and through my folly with the girl, that ever I had, and I have reason to be sorry and ashamed of it, and more to be troubled for the poor girl's sake, whom I fear I shall by this means prove the ruin of, though I shall think myself concerned both to love and be a friend to her. This day Roger Pepys (age 51) and his son Talbot (age 22), newly come to town, come and dined with me, and mighty glad I am to see them.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1668. Up, and by coach to White Hall; and there I find the King (age 38) and Duke of York (age 35) come the last night, and every body's mouth full of my Lord Anglesey's (age 54) suspension being sealed; which it was, it seems, yesterday; so that he is prevented in his remedy at the Council; and, it seems, the two new Treasurers did kiss the King's hand this morning, brought in by my Lord Arlington (age 50). They walked up and down together the Court this day, and several people joyed them; but I avoided it, that I might not be seen to look either way. This day also I hear that my Lord Ormond (age 58) is to be declared in Council no more Deputy Governor of Ireland, his commission being expired: and the King (age 38) is prevailed with to take it out of his hands; which people do mightily admire, saying that he is the greatest subject of any Prince in Christendome, and hath more acres of land than any, and hath done more for his Prince than ever any yet did. But all will not do; he must down, it seems, the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) carrying all before him. But that, that troubles me most is, that they begin to talk that the Duke of York's (age 35) regiment is ordered to be disbanded; and more, that undoubtedly his Admiralty will follow: which do shake me mightily, and I fear will have ill consequences in the nation, for these counsels are very mad. The Duke of York (age 35) do, by all men's report, carry himself wonderfull submissive to the King (age 38), in the most humble manner in the world; but yet, it seems, nothing must be spared that tends to, the keeping out of the Chancellor (age 59); and that is the reason of all this. The great discourse now is, that the Parliament shall be dissolved and another called, which shall give the King (age 38) the Deane (age 34) and Chapter lands; and that will put him out of debt. And it is said that Buckingham do knownly meet daily with Wildman and other Commonwealth-men; and that when he is with them, he makes the King (age 38) believe that he is with his wenches; and something looks like the Parliament's being dissolved, by Harry Brouncker's (age 41) being now come back, and appears this day the first day at White Hall; but hath not been yet with the King (age 38), but is secure that he shall be well received, I hear. God bless us, when such men as he shall be restored! But that, that pleases me most is, that several do tell me that Pen is to be removed; and others, that he hath resigned his place; and particularly Spragg tells me for certain that he hath resigned it, and is become a partner with Gawden in the Victualling: in which I think he hath done a very cunning thing; but I am sure I am glad of it; and it will be well for the King (age 38) to have him out of this Office.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Nov 1668. Up, and Willet come home in the morning, and, God forgive me! I could not conceal my content thereat by smiling, and my wife observed it, but I said nothing, nor she, but away to the office. Presently up by water to White Hall, and there all of us to wait on the Duke of York (age 35), which we did, having little to do, and then I up and down the house, till by and by the Duke of York (age 35), who had bid me stay, did come to his closet again, and there did call in me and Mr. Wren; and there my paper, that I have lately taken pains to draw up, was read, and the Duke of York (age 35) pleased therewith; and we did all along conclude upon answers to my mind for the Board, and that that, if put in execution, will do the King's business. But I do now more and more perceive the Duke of York's (age 35) trouble, and that he do lie under great weight of mind from the Duke of Buckingham's (age 40) carrying things against him; and particularly when I advised that he would use his interest that a seaman might come into the room of W. Pen (age 47), who is now declared to be gone from us to that of the Victualling, and did shew how the Office would now be left without one seaman in it, but the Surveyour and the Controller, who is so old as to be able to do nothing, he told me plainly that I knew his mind well enough as to seamen, but that it must be as others will. And Wren did tell it me as a secret, that when the Duke of York (age 35) did first tell the King (age 38) about Sir W. Pen's (age 47) leaving of the place, and that when the Duke of York (age 35) did move the King (age 38) that either Captain Cox or Sir Jer. Smith might succeed him, the King (age 38) did tell him that that was a matter fit to be considered of, and would not agree to either presently; and so the Duke of York (age 35) could not prevail for either, nor knows who it shall be. The Duke of York (age 35) did tell me himself, that if he had not carried it privately when first he mentioned Pen's leaving his place to the King (age 38), it had not been done; for the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) and those of his party do cry out upon it, as a strange thing to trust such a thing into the hands of one that stands accused in Parliament: and that they have so far prevailed upon the King (age 38) that he would not have him named in Council, but only take his name to the Board; but I think he said that only D. Gawden's name shall go in the patent; at least, at the time when Sir Richard Browne (age 63) asked the King (age 38) the names of D. Gawden's security, the King (age 38) told him it was not yet necessary for him to declare them. And by and by, when the Duke of York (age 35) and we had done, and Wren brought into the closet Captain Cox and James Temple [Map] About business of the Guiney Company, and talking something of the Duke of Buckingham's (age 40) concernment therein, and says the Duke of York (age 35), "I will give the Devil his due, as they say the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) hath paid in his money to the Company", or something of that kind, wherein he would do right to him. The Duke of York (age 35) told me how these people do begin to cast dirt upon the business that passed the Council lately, touching Supernumeraries, as passed by virtue of his authority there, there being not liberty for any man to withstand what the Duke of York (age 35) advises there; which, he told me, they bring only as an argument to insinuate the putting of the Admiralty into Commission, which by all men's discourse is now designed, and I perceive the same by him. This being done, and going from him, I up and down the house to hear news: and there every body's mouth full of changes; and, among others, the Duke of York's (age 35) regiment of Guards, that was raised during the late war at sea, is to be disbanded: and also, that this day the King (age 38) do intend to declare that the Duke of Ormond (age 58) is no more Deputy of Ireland, but that he will put it into Commission. This day our new Treasurers did kiss the King's hand, who complimented them, as they say, very highly, that he had for a long time been abused in his Treasurer, and that he was now safe in their hands. I saw them walk up and down the Court together all this morning; the first time I ever saw Osborne, who is a comely gentleman. This day I was told that my Lord Anglesey (age 54) did deliver a petition on Wednesday in Council to the King (age 38), laying open, that whereas he had heard that his Majesty had made such a disposal of his place, which he had formerly granted him for life upon a valuable consideration, and that, without any thing laid to his charge, and during a Parliament's sessions, he prayed that his Majesty would be pleased to let his case be heard before the Council and the judges of the land, who were his proper counsel in all matters of right: to which, I am told, the King (age 38), after my Lord's being withdrawn, concluded upon his giving him an answer some few days hence; and so he was called in, and told so, and so it ended. Having heard all this I took coach and to Mr. Povy's (age 54), where I hear he is gone to the Swedes Resident in Covent Garden [Map], where he is to dine. I went thither, but he is not come yet, so I to White Hall to look for him, and up and down walking there I met with Sir Robert Holmes (age 46), who asking news I told him of Sir W. Pen's (age 47) going from us, who ketched at it so as that my heart misgives me that he will have a mind to it, which made me heartily sorry for my words, but he invited me and would have me go to dine with him at the Treasurer's, Sir Thomas Clifford (age 38), where I did go and eat some oysters; which while we were at, in comes my Lord Keeper and much company; and so I thought it best to withdraw. And so away, and to the Swedes Agent's, and there met Mr. Povy (age 54); where the Agent would have me stay and dine, there being only them, and Joseph Williamson (age 35), and Sir Thomas Clayton; but what he is I know not. Here much extraordinary noble discourse of foreign Princes, and particularly the greatness of the King of France (age 30), and of his being fallen into the right way of making the Kingdom great, which [none] of his ancestors ever did before. I was mightily pleased with this company and their discourse, so as to have been seldom so much in all my life, and so after dinner up into his upper room, and there did see a piece of perspective, but much inferior to Mr. Povy's (age 54).

Pepy's Diary. 11 Nov 1668. Up, and my wife with me as before, and so to the Office, where, by a speciall desire, the new Treasurers come, and there did shew their Patent, and the Great Seal for the suspension of my Lord Anglesey (age 54): and here did sit and discourse of the business of the Office: and brought Mr. Hutchinson with them, who, I hear, is to be their Paymaster, in the room of Mr. Waith. For it seems they do turn out every servant that belongs to the present Treasurer: and so for Fenn, do bring in Mr. Littleton, Sir Thomas's (age 47) brother, and oust all the rest. But Mr. Hutchinson do already see that his work now will be another kind of thing than before, as to the trouble of it. They gone, and, indeed, they appear, both of them, very intelligent men, I home to dinner, and there with my people dined, and so to my wife, who would not dine with [me] that she might not have the girle come in sight, and there sat and talked a while with her and pretty quiet, I giving no occasion of offence, and so to the office1, and there having done, I home and to supper and to bed, where, after lying a little while, my wife starts up, and with expressions of affright and madness, as one frantick, would rise, and I would not let her, but burst out in tears myself, and so continued almost half the night, the moon shining so that it was light, and after much sorrow and reproaches and little ravings (though I am apt to think they were counterfeit from her), and my promise again to discharge the girle myself, all was quiet again, and so to sleep.

Note 1. and then by coach to my cozen Roger Pepys (age 51), who did, at my last being with him this day se'nnight, move me as to the supplying him with £500 this term, and £500 the next, for two years, upon a mortgage, he having that sum to pay, a debt left him by his father, which I did agree to, trusting to his honesty and ability, and am resolved to do it for him, that I may not have all I have lie in the King's hands. Having promised him this I returned home again, where to the office.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Nov 1668. Thence I home, and there to talk, with great pleasure all the evening, with my wife, who tells me that Deb, has been abroad to-day, and is come home and says she has got a place to go to, so as she will be gone tomorrow morning. This troubled me, and the truth is, I have a good mind to have the maidenhead of this girl, which I should not doubt to have if je could get time para be con her. But she will be gone and I not know whither. Before we went to bed my wife told me she would not have me to see her or give her her wages, and so I did give my wife £10 for her year and half a quarter's wages, which she went into her chamber and paid her, and so to bed, and there, blessed be God! we did sleep well and with peace, which I had not done in now almost twenty nights together. This afternoon I went to my coachmaker and Crow's (age 51), and there saw things go on to my great content. This morning, at the Treasury-chamber, I did meet Jack Fenn, and there he did shew me my Lord Anglesey's (age 54) petition and the King's answer: the former good and stout, as I before did hear it: but the latter short and weak, saying that he was not, by what the King (age 38) had done, hindered from taking the benefit of his laws, and that the reason he had to suspect his mismanagement of his money in Ireland, did make him think it unfit to trust him with his Treasury in England, till he was satisfied in the former.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jan 1669. Thence he and I out of doors, but he to Sir J. Duncomb (age 46), and I to White Hall through the Park, where I met the King (age 38) and the Duke of York (age 35), and so walked with them, and so to White Hall, where the Duke of York (age 35) met the office and did a little business; and I did give him thanks for his favour to me yesterday, at the Committee of Tangier, in my absence, Mr. Povy (age 55) having given me advice of it, of the discourse there of doing something as to the putting the payment of the garrison into some undertaker's hand, Alderman Backewell (age 51), which the Duke of York (age 35) would not suffer to go on, without my presence at the debate. And he answered me just thus: that he ought to have a care of him that do the King's business in the manner that I do, and words of more force than that. Then down with Lord Brouncker (age 49) to Sir R. Murray (age 61), into the King's little elaboratory, under his closet, a pretty place; and there saw a great many chymical glasses and things, but understood none of them. So I home and to dinner, and then out again and stop with my wife at my cozen Turner's where I staid and sat a while, and carried The. (age 17) and my wife to the Duke of York's (age 35) house, to "Macbeth", and myself to White Hall, to the Lords of the Treasury, about Tangier business; and there was by at much merry discourse between them and my Lord Anglesey (age 54), who made sport of our new Treasurers, and called them his deputys, and much of that kind. And having done my own business, I away back, and carried my cozen Turner and sister Dyke to a friend's house, where they were to sup, in Lincoln's Inn Fields; and I to the Duke of York's (age 35) house and saw the last two acts, and so carried The. (age 17) thither, and so home with my wife, who read to me late, and so to supper and to bed. This day The. Turner (age 17) shewed me at the play my Baroness Portman (age 29), who has grown out of my knowledge.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1669. Up, and with Sir John Minnes (age 69) in his coach to White Hall, where first we waited on the Lords of the Treasury about finishing the Victualling Contract; and there also I was put to it to make good our letter complaining against my Lord Anglesey's (age 54) failing us in the payment of the moneys assigned us upon the Customs, where Mr. Fenn was, and I know will tell my Lord; but it is no matter, I am over shy already, and therefore must not fear. Then we up to a Committee of the Council for the Navy, about a business of Sir D. Gawden's relating to the Victualling, and thence I by Hackney to the Temple [Map] to the Auditor's man, and with him to a tavern to meet with another under-auditor to advise about the clearing of my Lord Bellasses' (age 54) accounts without injuring myself and perplexing my accounts, and so thence away to my cozen Turner's, where I find Roger Pepys (age 51) come last night to town, and here is his mistress, Mrs. Dickenson, and by and by comes in Mr. Turner, a worthy, sober, serious man-I honour him mightily. And there we dined, having but an ordinary dinner; and so, after dinner, she, and I, and Roger, and his mistress, to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "The Five Hours' Adventure", which hath not been acted a good while before, but once, and is a most excellent play, I must confess. My wife and The. (age 17) come after us, after they had been to buy some things abroad, and so after the play done we to see them home, and then home ourselves, and my wife to read to me, and so to supper and to bed.

On 17 Sep 1669 [his son] James Annesley 2nd Earl Anglesey (age 24) and [his daughter-in-law] Elizabeth Manners Countess Anglesey (age 15) were married. She the daughter of John Manners 8th Earl of Rutland (age 65) and Frances Montagu Countess Rutland (age 55). He the son of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 55) and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 49).

In 1676 John Michael Wright (age 58). Portrait of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 61).

On 03 Sep 1678 [his son] Altham Annesley 1st Baron Altham and [his daughter-in-law] Alicia Leigh Baroness Altham (age 17) were married. He the son of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 64) and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 58).

In 1681 [his son] Altham Annesley 1st Baron Altham was created 1st Baron Altham. [his daughter-in-law] Alicia Leigh Baroness Altham (age 20) by marriage Baroness Altham.

On 06 Apr 1686 Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley (age 71) died. His son [his son] James Annesley 2nd Earl Anglesey (age 41) succeeded 2nd Earl Anglesey, 3rd Viscount Valentia, 2nd Baron Annesley Newport Pagnell Buckinghamshire. [his daughter-in-law] Elizabeth Manners Countess Anglesey (age 32) by marriage Countess Anglesey.

On 24 Jan 1698 [his former wife] Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey (age 78) died.

[his daughter] Dorothy Annesley Countess Tyrone was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

[his daughter] Frances Annesley Baroness Haversham was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

Francis Windham and [his daughter] Frances Annesley Baroness Haversham were married. She the daughter of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

[his son] Charles Annesley was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

[his son] Arthur Annesley was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

[his son] Altham Annesley 1st Baron Altham was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

[his daughter] Anne Annesley was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

[his daughter] Philippa Annesley Baroness Mohun Okehampton was born to Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley and Elizabeth Altham Countess Anglesey.

Royal Ancestors of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley 1614-1686

Kings Wessex: Great x 18 Grand Son of King Edmund "Ironside" I of England

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 15 Grand Son of Owain "Great" King Gwynedd

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 21 Grand Son of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg King Deheubarth

Kings Powys: Great x 16 Grand Son of Maredudd ap Bleddyn King Powys

Kings England: Great x 9 Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Kings Scotland: Great x 16 Grand Son of Malcolm III King Scotland

Kings Franks: Great x 14 Grand Son of Louis VII King Franks

Kings France: Great x 11 Grand Son of Philip "Bold" III King France

Ancestors of Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley 1614-1686

Arthur Annesley 1st Earl Annesley 9 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 1 Grandfather: Morgan Philipps

GrandFather: John Philipps 1st Baronet

Great x 2 Grandfather: Richard Fletcher

Great x 1 Grandmother: Elizabeth Fletcher

Mother: Dorothy Philipps Viscountess Valentia 8 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Thomas Perrot

Great x 1 Grandfather: John Perrot 6 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Maurice Berkeley 3rd Baron Berkeley 4 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: James Berkeley of Thornbury 5 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Isabel Meade 3rd Baroness Berkeley

Great x 2 Grandmother: Mary Berkeley 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Fitzalan 3 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Susan Fitzalan 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

GrandMother: Anne Elizabeth Perrot Lady Philips 7 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 1 Grandmother: Jane Prust