Biography of Jemima Montagu -1671

Paternal Family Tree: Montagu

Maternal Family Tree: Amy Fermor 1509-1580

1660 July Creation of Peerages

1665 Great Plague of London

1668 Bawdy House Riots

1672 Battle of Solebay

On 07 Nov 1642 [her father] Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich (age 17) and [her mother] Jemima Crew Countess Sandwich (age 17) were married.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1660. Thence I went to the Temple [Map] to speak with Mr. Calthropp (age 36) about the 60l. due to my Lord, but missed of him, he being abroad. Then I went to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62) and borrowed 10l. of Mr. Andrewes (NOTE. Possibly John Andrews Timber Merchant) for my own use, and so went to my office, where there was nothing to do. Then I walked a great while in Westminster Hall [Map], where I heard that Lambert (age 40) was coming up to London; that my Lord Fairfax (age 47) was in the head of the Irish brigade, but it was not certain what he would declare for. The House was to-day upon finishing the act for the Council of State, which they did; and for the indemnity to the soldiers; and were to sit again thereupon in the afternoon. Great talk that many places have declared for a free Parliament; and it is believed that they will be forced to fill up the House with the old members. From the Hall [Map] I called at home, and so went to Mr. Crew's (age 62) (my wife (age 19) she was to go to her father's), thinking to have dined, but I came too late, so Mr. Moore and I and another gentleman went out and drank a cup of ale together in the new market, and there I eat some bread and cheese for my dinner. After that Mr. Moore and I went as far as Fleet-street [Map] together and parted, he going into the City, I to find Mr. Calthrop (age 36), but failed again of finding him, so returned to Mr. Crew's (age 62) again, and from thence went along with Mrs. Jemimah home, and there she taught me how to play at cribbage. Then I went home, and finding my wife (age 19) gone to see Mrs. Hunt, I went to Will's, and there sat with Mr. Ashwell talking and singing till nine o'clock, and so home, there, having not eaten anything but bread and cheese, my wife (age 19) cut me a slice of brawn which I received from my Lady; which proves as good as ever I had any. So to bed, and my wife (age 19) had a very bad night of it through wind and cold.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jan 1660. Tuesday. I went out in the morning, it being a great frost, and walked to Mrs. Turner's (age 8) to stop her from coming to see me to-day, because of Mrs. Jem's coming, thence I went to the Temple to speak with Mr. Calthrop (age 36), and walked in his chamber an hour, but could not see him, so went to Westminster, where I found soldiers in my office to receive money, and paid it them. At noon went home, where Mrs. Jem, her maid, Mr. Sheply, Hawly, and Moore dined with me on a piece of beef and cabbage, and a collar of brawn. We then fell to cards till dark, and then I went home with Mrs. Jem, and meeting Mr. Hawly got him to bear me company to Chancery Lane [Map], where I spoke with Mr. Calthrop (age 36), he told me that Sir James Calthrop was lately dead, but that he would write to his Lady, that the money may be speedily paid. Thence back to White Hall, where I understood that the Parliament had passed the act for indemnity to the soldiers and officers that would come in, in so many days, and that my Lord Lambert (age 40) should have benefit of the said act. They had also voted that all vacancies in the House, by the death of any of the old members, shall be filled up; but those that are living shall not be called in. Thence I went home, and there found Mr. Hunt and his wife, and Mr. Hawly, who sat with me till ten at night at cards, and so broke up and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1660. Saturday. At my office as I was receiving money of the probate of wills, in came Mrs. Turner (age 37), Theoph. (age 8), Madame Morrice, and Joyce, and after I had done I took them home to my house and Mr. Hawly came after, and I got a dish of steaks and a rabbit for them, while they were playing a game or two at cards. In the middle of our dinner a messenger from Mr. Downing came to fetch me to him, so leaving Mr. Hawly there, I went and was forced to stay till night in expectation of the French Embassador, who at last came, and I had a great deal of good discourse with one of his gentlemen concerning the reason of the difference between the zeal of the French and the Spaniard. After he was gone I went home, and found my friends still at cards, and after that I went along with them to Dr. Whores (sending my wife (age 19) to Mrs. Jem's to a sack-posset), where I heard some symphony and songs of his own making, performed by Mr. May, Harding, and Mallard. Afterwards I put my friends into a coach, and went to Mrs. Jem's, where I wrote a letter to my Lord by the post, and had my part of the posset which was saved for me, and so we went home, and put in at my [her father] Lord's (age 34) lodgings, where we staid late, eating of part of his turkey pie, and reading of Quarles' Emblems. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jan 1660. Monday. For these two or three days I have been much troubled with thoughts how to get money to pay them that I have borrowed money of, by reason of my money being in my uncle's hands. I rose early this morning, and looked over and corrected my brother John's (age 19) speech, which he is to make the next apposition,-[Note. Declamations at St. Paul's School, in which there were opponents and respondents.]-and after that I went towards my office, and in my way met with W. Simons, Muddiman, and Jack Price, and went with them to Harper's and in many sorts of talk I staid till two of the clock in the afternoon. I found Muddiman a good scholar, an arch rogue; and owns that though he writes new books for the Parliament, yet he did declare that he did it only to get money; and did talk very basely of many of them. Among other things, W. Simons told me how his uncle Scobel was on Saturday last called to the bar, for entering in the journal of the House, for the year 1653, these words: "This day his Excellence the Lord General Cromwell dissolved this House;" which words the Parliament voted a forgery, and demanded of him how they came to be entered. He answered that they were his own handwriting, and that he did it by virtue of his office, and the practice of his predecessor; and that the intent of the practice was to-let posterity know how such and such a Parliament was dissolved, whether by the command of the King, or by their own neglect, as the last House of Lords was; and that to this end, he had said and writ that it was dissolved by his Excellence the Lord G[eneral]; and that for the word dissolved, he never at the time did hear of any other term; and desired pardon if he would not dare to make a word himself when it was six years after, before they came themselves to call it an interruption; but they were so little satisfied with this answer, that they did chuse a committee to report to the House, whether this crime of Mr. Scobell's did come within the act of indemnity or no. Thence I went with Muddiman to the Coffee-House, and gave 18d. to be entered of the Club. Thence into the Hall, where I heard for certain that Monk (age 51) was coming to London, and that Bradshaw's lodgings were preparing for him. Thence to Mrs. Jem's, and found her in bed, and she was afraid that it would prove the smallpox. Thence back to Westminster Hall [Map], where I heard how Sir H. Vane (age 46) was this day voted out of the House, and to sit no more there; and that he would retire himself to his house at Raby [Map], as also all the rest of the nine officers that had their commissions formerly taken away from them, were commanded to their farthest houses from London during the pleasure of the Parliament. Here I met with the Quarter Master of my [her father] Lord's (age 34) troop, and his clerk Mr. Jenings, and took them home, and gave them a bottle of wine, and the remainder of my collar of brawn; and so good night. After that came in Mr. Hawly, who told me that I was mist this day at my office, and that to-morrow I must pay all the money that I have, at which I was put to a great loss how I should get money to make up my cash, and so went to bed in great trouble.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1660. Wednesday. Being at Will's with Captain Barker, who hath paid me £300 this morning at my office, in comes my father (age 58), and with him I walked, and leave him at W. Joyce's, and went myself to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62), but came too late to dine, and therefore after a game at shittle-cocks with Mr. Walgrave and [her brother] Mr. Edward (age 12), I returned to my father (age 58), and taking him from W. Joyce's, who was not abroad himself, we inquired of a porter, and by his direction went to an alehouse, where after a cup or two we parted. I went towards London, and in my way went in to see Crowly, who was now grown a very great loon and very tame. Thence to Mr. Steven's with a pair of silver snuffers, and bought a pair of shears to cut silver, and so homeward again. From home I went to see Mrs. Jem, who was in bed, and now granted to have the smallpox. Back again, and went to the Coffee-house, but tarried not, and so home.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jan 1660. Friday. Coming in the morning to my office, I met with Mr. Fage and took him to the Swan [Map]. He told me how high Haselrigge (age 59), and Morly (age 43), the last night began at my Lord Mayor's (age 27) to exclaim against the City of London, saying that they had forfeited their charter. And how the Chamberlain of the City did take them down, letting them know how much they were formerly beholding to the City, &c. He also told me that Monk's (age 51) letter that came to them by the sword-bearer was a cunning piece, and that which they did not much trust to; but they were resolved to make no more applications to the Parliament, nor to pay any money, unless the secluded members be brought in, or a free Parliament chosen. Thence to my office, where nothing to do. So to Will's with Mr. Pinkney, who invited me to their feast at his Hall the next Monday. Thence I went home and took my wife and dined at Mr. Wades, and after that we went and visited Catan. From thence home again, and my wife was very unwilling to let me go forth, but with some discontent would go out if I did, and I going forth towards Whitehall, I saw she followed me, and so I staid and took her round through Whitehall, and so carried her home angry. Thence I went to Mrs. Jem, and found her up and merry, and that it did not prove the smallpox, but only the swine-pox; so I played a game or two at cards with her. And so to Mr. Vines, where he and I and Mr. Hudson played half-a-dozen things, there being there Dick's wife and her sister. After that I went home and found my wife gone abroad to Mr. Hunt's, and came in a little after me.-So to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jan 1660. After that we all went to my [her father] Lord's (age 34), whither came afterwards Mr. Harrison, and by chance seeing Mr. Butler coming by I called him in and so we sat drinking a bottle of wine till night. At which time Mistress Ann [Note. Probably [her sister] Anne Montagu, daughter of Sir Edward Montagu, and sister to Mrs. Jem] came with the key of my Lord's study for some things, and so we all broke up and after I had gone to my house and interpreted my Lord's (age 34) letter by his character [Note. The making of ciphers was a popular amusement about this time. Pepys made several for Montagu, Downing, and others.] I came to her again and went with her to her lodging and from thence to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62), where I advised with him what to do about my Lord's (age 34) lodgings and what answer to give to Sir Ant. Cooper (age 38) and so I came home and to bed. All the world is at a loss to think what Monk (age 51) will do: the City saying that he will be for them, and the Parliament saying he will be for them.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jan 1660. Thursday. This morning I was sent for to Mr Downing (age 35), and at his bed side he told me, that he had a kindness for me, and that he thought that he had done me one; and that was, that he had got me to be one of the Clerks of the Council; at which I was a little stumbled, and could not tell what to do, whether to thank him or no; but by and by I did; but not very heartily, for I feared that his doing of it was but only to ease himself of the salary which he gives me. After that Mr. Sheply staying below all this time for me we went thence and met Mr. Pierce, so at the Harp and Ball drank our morning draft and so to Whitehall where I met with Sir Ant. Cooper (age 38) and did give him some answer from my Lord and he did give us leave to keep the lodgings still. And so we did determine thereupon that Mr. Sheply might now go into the country and would do so to-morrow. Back I went by Mr Downing's (age 35) order and staid there till twelve o'clock in expectation of one to come to read some writings, but he came not, so I staid all alone reading the answer of the Dutch Ambassador to our State, in answer to the reasons of my [her father] Lord's (age 34) coming home, which he gave for his coming, and did labour herein to contradict my Lord's (age 34) arguments for his coming home. Thence to my office and so with Mr. Sheply and Moore, to dine upon a turkey with Mrs. Jem, and after that Mr. Moore and I went to the French Ordinary, where Mr Downing (age 35) this day feasted Sir Arth. Haselrigge (age 59), and a great many more of the Parliament, and did stay to put him in mind of me. Here he gave me a note to go and invite some other members to dinner tomorrow. So I went to White Hall, and did stay at Marsh's, with Simons, Luellin, and all the rest of the Clerks of the Council, who I hear are all turned out, only the two Leighs, and they do all tell me that my name was mentioned the last night, but that nothing was done in it. Hence I went and did leave some of my notes at the lodgings of the members and so home. To bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1660 Saturday. Up early in finishing my accounts and writing to my Lord and from thence to my [her father] Lord's (age 34) and took leave of Mr. Sheply and possession of all the keys and the house. Thence to my office for some money to pay Mr. Sheply and sent it him by the old man. I then went to Mr Downing (age 35) who chid me because I did not give him notice of some of his guests failed him but I told him that I sent our porter to tell him and he was not within, but he told me that he was within till past twelve o'clock. So the porter or he lied. Thence to my office where nothing to do. Then with Mr. Hawly, he and I went to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62) and dined there. Thence into London, to Mr. Vernon's and I received my £25 due by bill for my troopers' pay. Then back again to Steadman's. At the Mitre, in Fleet street, in our way calling on Mr. Fage, who told me how the City have some hopes of Monk (age 51). Thence to the Mitre [Map], where I drank a pint of wine, the house being in fitting for Banister (age 30) to come hither from Paget's. Thence to Mrs. Jem and gave her £5. So home and left my money and to Whitehall where Luellin and I drank and talked together an hour at Marsh's and so up to the clerks' room, where poor Mr. Cook, a black man, that is like to be put out of his clerk's place, came and railed at me for endeavouring to put him out and get myself in, when I was already in a good condition. But I satisfied him and after I had wrote a letter there to my Lord, wherein I gave him an account how this day Lenthall (age 68) took his chair again, and [the House] resolved a declaration to be brought in on Monday next to satisfy the world what they intend to do. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1660. Monday. In the morning called out to carry £20 to Mr Downing (age 35), which I did and came back, and finding Mr. Pierce, the surgeon, I took him to the Axe and gave him his morning draft. Thence to my office and there did nothing but make up my balance. Came home and found my wife dressing of the girl's head, by which she was made to look very pretty. I went out and paid Wilkinson [Note. Landlord of the Crown Tavern] what I did owe him, and brought a piece of beef home for dinner. Thence I went out and paid Waters [Note. Landlord of The Sun, King Street], the vintner, and went to see Mrs. Jem, where I found my [her aunt] Lady Wright, but Scott was so drunk that he could not be seen. Here I staid and made up Mrs. Ann's bills, and played a game or two at cards, and thence to Westminster Hall [Map], it being very dark. I paid Mrs. Michell, my bookseller, and back to Whitehall, and in the garden, going through to the Stone Gallery [Note. The Stone Gallery was a long passage between the Privy Garden and the river. It led from the Bowling Green to the Court of the Palace] I fell into a ditch, it being very dark. At the Clerk's chamber I met with Simons and Luellin, and went with them to Mr. Mount's chamber at the Cock Pit [Map], where we had some rare pot venison, and ale to abundance till almost twelve at night, and after a song round we went home. This day the Parliament sat late, and resolved of the declaration to be printed for the people's satisfaction, promising them a great many good things.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1660. Friday. Going to my office I met with Tom Newton, my old comrade, and took him to the Crown in the Palace [Map], and gave him his morning draft. And as he always did, did talk very high what he would do with the Parliament, that he would have what place he would, and that he might be one of the Clerks to the Council if he would. Here I staid talking with him till the offices were all shut, and then I looked in the Hall, and was told by my bookseller, Mrs. Michell, that Mr. G. Montagu (age 37) had inquired there for me. So I went to his house, and was forced by him to dine with him, and had a plenteous brave dinner and the greatest civility that ever I had from any man. Thence home and so to Mrs. Jem, and played with her at cards, and coming home again my wife told me that Mr. Hawly had been there to speak with me, and seemed angry that I had not been at the office that day, and she told me she was afraid that Mr Downing (age 35) may have a mind to pick some hole in my coat. So I made haste to him, but found no such thing from him, but he sent me to Mr. Sherwin's about getting Mr. Squib to come to him tomorrow, and I carried him an answer. So home and fell a writing the characters for Mr Downing (age 35), and about nine at night Mr. Hawly came, and after he was gone I sat up till almost twelve writing, and-wrote two of them. In the morning up early and wrote another, my wife lying in bed and reading to me.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jan 1660. Thence to Mrs. Jem, where I found her maid in bed in a fit of the ague, and Mrs. Jem among the people below at work and by and by she came up hot and merry, as if they had given her wine, at which I was troubled, but said nothing.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Feb 1660. Wednesday. In the morning went to my office where afterwards the old man brought me my letters from the carrier. At noon I went home and dined with my wife on pease porridge and nothing else. After that I went to the Hall [Map] and there met with Mr. Swan and went with him to Mr Downing's (age 35) Counsellor, who did put me in very little hopes about the business between Mr Downing (age 35) and Squib, and told me that Squib would carry it against him, at which I was much troubled, and with him went to Lincoln's Inn and there spoke with his attorney, who told me the day that was appointed for the trial. From thence I went to Sir Harry Wright's (age 23) and got him to give me his hand for the £60 which I am to-morrow to receive from Mr. Calthrop (age 36) and from thence to Mrs. Jem and spoke with Madam Scott and her husband who did promise to have the thing for her neck done this week. Thence home and took Gammer East, and James the porter, a soldier, to my Lord's lodgings, who told me how they were drawn into the field to-day, and that they were ordered to march away to-morrow to make room for General Monk (age 51); but they did shut their Colonel Fitch, and the rest of the officers out of the field, and swore they would not go without their money, and if they would not give it them, they would go where they might have it, and that was the City. So the Colonel went to the Parliament, and commanded what money could be got, to be got against to-morrow for them, and all the rest of the soldiers in town, who in all places made a mutiny this day, and do agree together. Here I took some bedding to send to Mrs. Ann for her to lie in now she hath her fits of the ague. Thence I went to Will's and staid like a fool there and played at cards till 9 o'clock and so came home, where I found Mr. Hunt's and his wife who staid and sat with me till 10 and so good night.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Feb 1660. Saturday. In the morning at my lute an hour, and so to my office, where I staid expecting to have Mr. Squib come to me, but he did not. At noon walking in the Hall I found Mr. Swan and got him and Captain Stone together, and there advised about Mr Downing's (age 35) business. So to Will's, and sat there till three o'clock and then to Mr. Swan's, where I found his wife in very genteel mourning for her father, and took him out by water to the Counsellor at the Temple [Map], Mr. Stephens, and from thence to Gray's Inn, thinking to speak with Sotherton Ellis [Note. Probably Solicitor Ellis], but found him not, so we met with an acquaintance of his in the walks, and went and drank, where I ate some bread and butter, having ate nothing all day, while they were by chance discoursing of Marriot, the great eater, so that I was, I remember, ashamed to eat what I would have done. Here Swan shewed us a ballad to the tune of Mardike which was most incomparably wrote in a printed hand, which I borrowed of him, but the song proved but silly, and so I did not write it out. Thence we went and leaving Swan at his master's, my Lord Widdrington (age 60), I met with Spicer, Washington, and D. Vines in Lincoln's Inn Court, and they were buying of a hanging jack to roast birds on of a fellow that was there selling of some. I was fain to slip from there and went to [her grandmother] Mrs. Crew's (age 58) to her and advised about a maid to come and be with Mrs. Jem while her maid is sick, but she could spare none. Thence to Sir Harry Wright's (age 23), but my lady not being within I spoke to Mrs. Carter about it, who will get one against Monday. So with a link boy [Note. Links were torches of tow or pitch to light the way. Ed.] to Scott's, where Mrs. Ann was in a heat, but I spoke not to her, but told Mrs. Jem what I had done, and after that went home and wrote letters into the country by the post, and then played awhile on my lute, and so done, to supper and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Feb 1660. Monday. Before I went to my office I went to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62) and paid Mr. Andrews the same £60 that he had received of Mr. Calthrop (age 36) the last week. So back to Westminster and walked with him thither, where we found the soldiers all set in the Palace Yard [Map], to make way for General Monk (age 51) to come to the House. At the Hall we parted, and meeting Swan he and I to the Swan [Map] and drank our morning draft. So back again to the Hall, where I stood upon the steps and saw Monk (age 51) go by, he making observance to the judges as he went along. At noon my father (age 59) dined with me upon my turkey that was brought from Denmark, and after dinner he and I to the Bull Head Tavern [Map], where we drank half a pint of wine and so parted. I to Mrs. Ann, and Mrs. Jem being gone out of the chamber she and I had a very high bout, I rattled her up, she being in her bed, but she becoming more cool, we parted pretty good friends. Thence I went to Will's, where I staid at cards till 10 o'clock, losing half a crown, and so home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Feb 1660. Wednesday. A little practice on my flageolet, and afterwards walking in my yard to see my stock of pigeons, which begin now with the spring to breed very fast. I was called on by Mr. Fossan, my fellow pupil at Cambridge, and I took him to the Swan [Map] in the Palace yard, and drank together our morning draft. Thence to my office, where I received money, and afterwards Mr. Carter, my old friend at Cambridge, meeting me as I was going out of my office I took him to the Swan [Map], and in the way I met with Captain Lidcott, and so we three went together and drank there, the Captain talking as high as ever he did, and more because of the fall of his brother Thurlow (age 43). Hence I went to Captain Stone, who told me how Squib had been with him, and that he could do nothing with him, so I returned to Mr. Carter and with him to Will's, where I spent upon him and Monsieur L'Impertinent, alias Mr. Butler, who I took thither with me, and thence to a Rhenish wine house, and in our way met with Mr. Hoole, where I paid for my cozen Roger Pepys (age 42) his wine, and after drinking we parted. So I home, in my way delivering a letter which among the rest I had from my Lord to-day to Sir N. Wheeler [Note. Another source has this as W Wheler probably being Sir William Wheler Baronet (age 49).]. At home my wife's brother (age 20) brought her a pretty black dog which I liked very well, and went away again. Hence sending a porter with the hamper of bottles to the Temple [Map] I called in my way upon Mrs. Jem, who was much frighted till I came to tell her that her [her mother] mother (age 35) was well. So to the Temple [Map], where I delivered the wine and received the money of my cos. Roger (age 42) that I laid out, and thence to my father's (age 59), where he shewed me a base angry letter that he had newly received from my uncle Robert about my brother John (age 19), at which my father (age 59) was very sad, but I comforted him and wrote an answer. My brother John (age 19) has an exhibition granted him from the school. My father (age 59) and I went down to his kitchen, and there we eat and drank, and about 9 o'clock I went away homewards, and in Fleet Street [Map], received a great jostle from a man that had a mind to take the wall1, which I could not help?.

Note 1. This was a constant trouble to the pedestrian until the rule of passing to the right of the person met was generally accepted. Gay commences his "Trivia" with an allusion to this ... "When to assert the wall, and when resign-" and the epigram on the haughty courtier and the scholar is well known.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Feb 1660. Thursday. Soon as out of my bed I wrote letters into the country to go by carrier to-day. Before I was out of my bed, I heard the soldiers very busy in the morning, getting their horses ready where they lay at Hilton's, but I knew not then their meaning in so doing: After I had wrote my letters I went to Westminster up and down the Hall, and with Mr. Swan walked a good [deal] talking about Mr Downing's (age 35) business. I went with him to Mr. Phelps's house where he had some business to solicit, where we met Mr. Rogers my neighbour, who did solicit against him and talked very high, saying that he would not for a £1000 appear in a business that Swan [Map] did, at which Swan was very angry, but I believe he might be guilty enough. In the Hall I understand how Monk (age 51) is this morning gone into London with his army; and met with Mr. Fage, who told me that he do believe that Monk (age 51) is gone to secure some of the Common-council of the City, who were very high yesterday there, and did vote that they would not pay any taxes till the House was filled up. I went to my office, where I wrote to my Lord after I had been at the Upper Bench, where Sir Robert Pye (age 75)1 this morning came to desire his discharge from the Tower; but it could not be granted. After that I went to Mrs. Jem, who I had promised to go along with to her Aunt Wright's, but she was gone, so I went thither, and after drinking a glass of sack I went back to Westminster Hall, and meeting with Mr. Pierce the surgeon, who would needs take me home, where Mr. Lucy, Burrell, and others dined, and after dinner I went home and to Westminster Hall, where meeting Swan [Map] I went with him by water to the Temple [Map] to our Counsel, and did give him a fee to make a motion to-morrow in the Exchequer for Mr Downing (age 35). Thence to Westminster Hall, where I heard an action very finely pleaded between my Lord Dorset (age 37) and some other noble persons, his lady (age 38) and other ladies of quality being here, and it was about; £330 per annum, that was to be paid to a poor Spittal, which was given by some of his predecessors; and given on his side. Thence Swan [Map] and I to a drinking-house near Temple Bar, where while he wrote I played on my flageolet till a dish of poached eggs was got ready for us, which we eat, and so by coach home. I called at Mr. Harper's, who told me how Monk (age 51) had this day clapt up many of the Common-council, and that the Parliament had voted that he should pull down their gates and portcullisses, their posts and their chains, which he do intend to do, and do lie in the City all night. I went home and got some ahlum to my mouth, where I have the beginnings of a cancer, and had also a plaster to my boil underneath my chin.

Note 1. Sir Robert Pye (age 75), the elder, was auditor of the Exchequer, and a staunch Royalist. He garrisoned his house at Faringdon, which was besieged by his son (age 40), of the same names, a decided Republican, son-in-law to Hampden, and colonel of horse under Fairfax (age 48). The son, here spoken of, was subsequently committed to the Tower for presenting a petition to the House of Commons from the county of Berks, which he represented in Parliament, complaining of the want of a settled form of government. He had, however, the courage to move for an habeas corpus, but judge Newdigate decided that the courts of law had not the power to discharge him. Upon Monk's (age 51) coming to London, the secluded members passed a vote to liberate Pye, and at the Restoration he was appointed equerry to the King (age 29). He died in 1701. B.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Feb 1660. Monday. To my office till noon, thence home to dinner, my mouth being very bad of the cancer and my left leg beginning to be sore again. After dinner to see Mrs. Jem, and in the way met with Catan on foot in the street and talked with her a little, so home and took my wife to my father's (age 59). In my way I went to Playford's (age 37), and for two books that I had and 6s. 6d. to boot I had my great book of songs which he sells always for 4s. At my father's (age 59) I staid a while, while my mother sent her maid Bess to Cheapside for some herbs to make a water for my mouth. Then I went to see Mr. Cumberland (age 28), and after a little stay with him I returned, and took my wife home, where after supper to bed. This day Monk (age 51) was invited to White Hall to dinner by my Lords; not seeming willing, he would not come. I went to Mr. Fage from my father's (age 59), who had been this afternoon with Monk (age 51), who do promise to live and die with the City, and for the honour of the City; and indeed the City is very open-handed to the soldiers, that they are most of them drunk all day, and have money given them. He did give me something for my mouth which I did use this night.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Feb 1660. At noon I went home and so to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62), but they had dined, and so I went to see Mrs. Jem where I stayed a while, and home again where I stayed an hour or two at my lute, and so forth to Westminster Hall [Map], where I heard that the Parliament hath now changed the oath so much talked of to a promise; and that among other qualifications for the members that are to be chosen, one is, that no man, nor the son of any man that hath been in arms during the life of the father, shall be capable of being chosen to sit in Parliament.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Feb 1660. Wednesday. Called up in the morning by Captain Holland and Captain Cuttance, and with them to Harper's, thence to my office, thence with Mr. Hill of Worcestershire to Will's, where I gave him a letter to Nan Pepys, and some merry pamphlets against the Rump to carry to her into the country. So to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62), where the dining room being full, Mr. Walgrave [Note. Believed to be a son of John Crew 1st Baron Crew (age 62) and [her grandmother] Jemima Waldegrave Baroness Crew (age 58) although there is no record of such person] and I dined below in the buttery by ourselves upon a good dish of buttered Salmon. Thence to Hering' the merchant about my [her father] Lord's (age 34) Worcester money and back to Paul's Churchyard, where I staid reading in Fuller's (age 51) History of the Church of England an hour or two, and so to my father's (age 59), where Mr. Hill came to me and I gave him direction what to do at Worcester about the money. Thence to my [her aunt] Lady Wright's and gave her a letter from my Lord privily. So to Mrs. Jem and sat with her, who dined at Mr. Crew's (age 62) to-day, and told me that there was at her coming away at least forty gentlemen (I suppose members that were secluded, for Mr. Walgrave told me that there were about thirty met there the last night) came dropping in one after another thither. Thence home and wrote into the country against to-morrow by the carrier and so to bed. At my father's (age 59) I heard how my cousin Kate Joyce had a fall yesterday from her horse and had some hurt thereby. No news to-day, but all quiet to see what the Parliament will do about the issuing of the writs to-morrow for filling up of the House, according to Monk's (age 51) desire.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Feb 1660. Wednesday. In the morning intended to have gone to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62) to borrow some money, but it raining I forbore, and went to my Lord's lodging and look that all things were well there. Then home and sang a song to my viall, so to my office and to Will's, where Mr. Pierce found me out, and told me that he would go with me to Cambridge, where Colonel Ayre's regiment, to which he was surgeon, lieth. Walking in the Hall, I saw Major-General Brown, who had along time been banished by the Rump, but now with his beard overgrown, he comes abroad and sat in the House. To my father's (age 59) to dinner, where nothing but a small dish of powdered beef [Note. Boiled salt beef. To powder was to sprinkle with salt, and the powdering tub a vessel in which meat was salted.] and dish of carrots; they being all busy to get things ready for my brother John (age 19) to go to-morrow. After dinner, my wife staying there, I went to Mr. Crew's (age 62), and got £5 of Mr. Andrews, and so to Mrs. Jemimah, who now hath her instrument about her neck, and indeed is infinitely, altered, and holds her head upright. I paid her maid 40s. of the money that I have received of Mr. Andrews. Hence home to my study, where I only wrote thus much of this day's passages to this * and so out again. To White Hall, where I met with Will. Simons and Mr. Mabbot at Marsh's, who told me how the House had this day voted that the gates of the City should be set up at the cost of the State. And that Major-General Brown's being proclaimed a traitor be made void, and several other things of that nature. Home for my lanthorn and so to my father's (age 59), where I directed John (age 19) what books to put for Cambridge. After that to supper, where my Uncle Fenner and my Aunt, The. Turner (age 8), and Joyce Norton, at a brave leg of veal roasted, and were very merry against John's (age 19) going to Cambridge.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Feb 1660. Tuesday. Up in the morning, and had some red herrings to our breakfast, while my boot-heel was a-mending, by the same token the boy left the hole as big as it was before. Then to horse, and for London through the forest, where we found the way good, but only in one path, which we kept as if we had rode through a canal all the way. We found the shops all shut, and the militia of the red regiment in arms at the Old Exchange, among whom I found and spoke to Nich. Osborne, who told me that it was a thanksgiving-day through the City for the return of the Parliament. At Paul's I light, Mr. Blayton holding my horse, where I found Dr. Reynolds' in the pulpit, and General Monk (age 51) there, who was to have a great entertainment at Grocers' Hall. So home, where my wife and all well. Shifted myself,-[Changed his dress.]-and so to [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62), and then to Sir Harry Wright's (age 23), where I found my Lord at dinner, who called for me in, and was glad to see me. There was at dinner also Mr. John Wright and his lady, a very pretty lady, Alderman Allen's (age 27) daughter. I dined here with Will. Howe, and after dinner went out with him to buy a hat (calling in my way and saw my mother), which we did at the Plough in Fleet Street by my Lord's direction, but not as for him. Here we met with Mr. Pierce a little before, and he took us to the Greyhound Tavern, and gave us a pint of wine, and as the rest of the seamen do, talked very high again of my Lord. After we had done about the hat we went homewards, he to Mr. Crew's (age 62) and I to Mrs. Jem, and sat with her a little. Then home, where I found Mr. Sheply, almost drunk, come to see me, afterwards Mr. Spong comes, with whom I went up and played with him a Duo or two, and so good night. I was indeed a little vexed with Mr. Sheply, but said nothing, about his breaking open of my study at my house, merely to give him the key of the stair door at my Lord's, which lock he might better have broke than mine.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Mar 1660. This morning I went early to my Lord at [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62), where I spoke to him. Here were a great many come to see him, as Secretary Thurlow (age 43) who is now by this Parliament chosen again Secretary of State. There were also General Monk's (age 51) trumpeters to give my Lord a sound of their trumpets this morning. Thence I went to my office, and wrote a letter to Mr Downing (age 35) about the business of his house. Then going home, I met with Mr. Eglin, Chetwind, and Thomas, who took me to the Leg in King's street, where we had two brave dishes of meat, one of fish, a carp and some other fishes, as well done as ever I ate any. After that to the Swan [Map] tavern, where we drank a quart or two of wine, and so parted. So I to Mrs. Jem and took Mr. Moore with me (who I met in the street), and there I met W. Howe and Sheply. After that to Westminster Hall [Map], where I saw Sir G. Booth (age 37) at liberty. This day I hear the City militia is put into good posture, and it is thought that Monk (age 51) will not be able to do any great matter against them now, if he have a mind. I understand that my Lord Lambert (age 40) did yesterday send a letter to the Council, and that to-night he is to come and appear to the Council in person. Sir Arthur Haselrigge (age 59) do not yet appear in the House. Great is the talk of a single person, and that it would now be Charles (age 29), George (age 51), or Richard (age 33)-For the last of which, my Lord St. John (age 61) is said to speak high. Great also is the dispute now in the House, in whose name the writs shall run for the next Parliament; and it is said that Mr. Prin (age 60), in open House, said, "In King Charles's". From Westminster Hall [Map] home. Spent the evening in my study, and so after some talk with my wife, then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1660. While we were drinking, in comes Mr. Day, a carpenter in Westminster, to tell me that it was Shrove Tuesday, and that I must go with him to their yearly Club upon this day, which I confess I had quite forgot. So I went to the Bell, where were Mr. Eglin, Veezy, Vincent a butcher, one more, and Mr. Tanner, with whom I played upon a viall, and he a viallin, after dinner, and were very merry, with a special good dinner, a leg of veal and bacon, two capons and sausages and fritters, with abundance of wine. After that I went home, where I found Kate Sterpin who hath not been here a great while before. She gone I went to see Mrs. Jem, at whose chamber door I found a couple of ladies, but she not being there, we hunted her out, and found that she and another had hid themselves behind a door. Well, they all went down into the dining-room, where it was full of tag, rag, and bobtail, dancing, singing, and drinking, of which I was ashamed, and after I had staid a dance or two I went away. Going home, called at my Lord's for Mr. Sheply, but found him at the Lion with a pewterer, that he had bought pewter to-day of. With them I drank, and so home and wrote by the post, by my Lord's command, for J. Goods to come up presently. For my Lord intends to go forthwith into the Swiftsure till the Nazeby be ready.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Mar 1660. In the morning went to my father's (age 59), whom I took in his cutting house, [Note. His father was a tailor, and this was his cutting-out room.] and there I told him my resolution to go to sea with my Lord, and consulted with him how to dispose of my wife, and we resolved of letting her be at Mr. Bowyer's. Thence to the Treasurer of the Navy, where I received £500 for my Lord, and having left £200 of it with Mr. Rawlinson (age 46) at his house for Sheply, I went with the rest to the Sun tavern [Map] on Fish Street Hill, where Mr. Hill, Stevens and Mr. Hater of the Navy Office had invited me, where we had good discourse and a fine breakfast of Mr. Hater. Then by coach home, where I took occasion to tell my wife of my going to sea, who was much troubled at it, and was with some dispute at last willing to continue at Mr. Bowyer's in my absence. After this to see Mrs. Jem and paid her maid £7, and then to Mr. Blackburne, who told me what Mr. Creed did say upon the news of my coming into his place, and that he did propose to my Lord that there should be two Secretaries, which made me go to Sir H. Wright's (age 23) where my Lord dined and spoke with him about it, but he seemed not to agree to the motion. Hither W. Howe comes to me and so to Westminster. In the way he told me, what I was to provide and so forth against my going. He went with me to my office, whither also Mr. Madge comes half foxed and played the fool upon the violin that made me weary. Then to Whitehall and so home and set many of my things in order against my going. my wife was late making of caps for me, and the wench making an end of a pair of stockings that she was knitting of. So to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1660. To my Lord, where infinity of applications to him and to me. To my great trouble, my Lord gives me all the papers that was given to him, to put in order and give him an account of them. Here I got half-a-piece of a person of Mr. Wright's recommending to my Lord to be Preacher of the Speaker frigate. I went hence to St. James's and Mr. Pierce the surgeon with me, to speak with Mr. Clerke (age 37), Monk's (age 51) secretary, about getting some soldiers removed out of Huntingdon to Oundle, which my Lord told me he did to do a courtesy to the town, that he might have the greater interest in them, in the choice of the next Parliament; not that he intends to be chosen himself, but that he might have Mr. G. Montagu (age 37) and my Lord Mandeville (age 25) chose there in spite of the Bernards. This done (where I saw General Monk (age 51) and methought he seemed a dull heavy man), he and I to Whitehall, where with Luellin we dined at Marsh's. Coming home telling my wife what we had to dinner, she had a mind to some cabbage, and I sent for some and she had it. Went to the Admiralty, where a strange thing how I am already courted by the people. This morning among others that came to me I hired a boy of Jenkins of Westminster and Burr to be my clerk. This night I went to Mr. Creed's chamber where he gave me the former book of the proceedings in the fleet and the Seal. Then to Harper's where old Beard was and I took him by coach to my Lord's, but he was not at home, but afterwards I found him out at Sir H. Wright's (age 23). Thence by coach, it raining hard, to Mrs. Jem, where I staid a while, and so home, and late in the night put up my things in a sea-chest that Mr. Sheply lent me, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Mar 1660. Early packing up my things to be sent by cart with the rest of my Lord's. So to Will's, where I took leave of some of my friends. Here I met Tom Alcock, one that went to school with me at Huntingdon, but I had not seen him these sixteen years. So in the Hall paid and made even with Mrs. Michell; afterwards met with old Beale, and at the Axe paid him this quarter to Ladyday next. In the afternoon Dick Mathews comes to dine, and I went and drank with him at Harper's. So into London by water, and in Fish Street [Map] my wife and I bought a bit of Salmon for 8d. and went to the Sun Tavern [Map] and ate it, where I did promise to give her all that I have in the world but my books, in case I should die at sea. From thence homewards; in the way my wife bought linen for three smocks and other things. I went to my Lord's and spoke with him. So home with Mrs. Jem by coach and then home to my own house. From thence to the Fox in King-street to supper on a brave turkey of Mr. Hawly's, with some friends of his there, Will Bowyer, &c. After supper I went to Westminster Hall [Map], and the Parliament sat till ten at night, thinking and being expected to dissolve themselves to-day, but they did not. Great talk to-night that the discontented officers did think this night to make a stir, but prevented. To the Fox again. Home with my wife, and to bed extraordinary sleepy.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Mar 1660. After that to Westminster, and took leave of Kate Sterpin who was very sorry to part with me, and after that of Mr. George Mountagu (age 37), and received my warrant of Mr. Blackburne, to be Secretary to the two Generals of the Fleet. Then to take my leave of the Clerks of the Council, and thence Doling and Luellin would have me go with them to Mount's chamber, where we sat and talked and then I went away. So to my Lord (in my way meeting Chetwind and Swan [Map] and bade them farewell) where I lay all night with Mr. Andrews. This day Mr. Sheply went away on board and I sent my boy with him. This day also Mrs. Jemimah went to Marrowbone, so I could not see her. Mr. Moore being out of town to-night I could not take leave of him nor speak to him about business which troubled me much. I left my small case therefore with Mr. Andrews for him.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1660. By times to Sir R. Fanshawe (age 52) to draw up the preamble to my Lord's Patent. So to my Lord, and with him to White Hall, where I saw a great many fine antique heads of marble, that my Lord Northumberland (age 57) had given the King. Here meeting with Mr. De Cretz, he looked over many of the pieces, in the gallery with me and told me [by] whose hands they were, with great pleasure. Dined at home and Mr. Hawly with me upon six of my pigeons, which my wife has resolved to kill here. This day came Will1, my boy, to me; the wench continuing lame, so that my wife could not be longer without somebody to help her. In the afternoon with Sir Edward Walker, at his lodgings by St. Giles Church, for my Lord's pedigree, and carried it to Sir R. Fanshawe. To [her grandfather] Mr. Crew's (age 62), and there took money and paid Mrs. Anne, Mrs. Jemima's maid, off quite, and so she went away and another came to her. To White Hall with Mr. Moore, where I met with a letter from Mr. Turner, offering me £150 to be joined with me in my patent, and to advise me how to improve the advantage of my place, and to keep off Barlow. To my Lord's till late at night, and so home.

1660 July Creation of Peerages

Pepy's Diary. 04 Aug 1660.To White Hall, where I found my Lord gone with the King by water to dine at the Tower with Sir J. Robinson (age 45), Lieutenant. I found my Lady Jemimah at my Lord's, with whom I staid and dined, all alone; after dinner to the Privy Seal Office, where I did business. So to a Committee of Parliament (Sir Heneage Finch (age 38), Chairman), to give them an answer to an order of theirs, "that we could not give them any account of the Accounts of the Navy in the years 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, as they desire". After that I went and bespoke some linen of Betty Lane in the Hall, and after that to the Trumpet, where I sat and talked with her, &c. At night, it being very rainy, and it thundering and lightning exceedingly, I took coach at the Trumpet door, taking Monsieur L'Impertinent along with me as far as the Savoy, where he said he went to lie with Cary Dillon (age 33)1, and is still upon the mind of going (he and his whole family) to Ireland. Having set him down I made haste home, and in the courtyard, it being very dark, I heard a man inquire for my house, and having asked his business, he told me that my man William (who went this morning-out of town to meet his aunt Blackburne) was come home not very well to his mother, and so could not come home to-night. At which I was very sorry. I found my wife still in pain. To bed, having not time to write letters, and indeed having so many to write to all places that I have no heart to go about them. Mrs. Shaw did die yesterday and her husband so sick that he is not like to live.

Note 1. Colonel Cary Dillon (age 33), a friend of the Butlers, who courted the fair Frances; but the engagement was subsequently broken off, see December 31st, 1661.

In 1662 Nicholas Slanning 1st Baronet (age 18) and [her future sister-in-law] Anne Carteret were married.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Feb 1665. So home, and among other letters found one from Jane, that is newly gone, telling me how her mistresse won't pay her her Quarter's wages, and withal tells me how her mistress will have the boy sit 3 or 4 hours together in the dark telling of stories, but speaks of nothing but only her indiscretion in undervaluing herself to do it, but I will remedy that, but am vexed she should get some body to write so much because of making it publique. Then took coach and to visit my [her mother] Lady Sandwich (age 40), where she discoursed largely to me her opinion of a match, if it could be thought fit by my Lord, for my Lady Jemimah, with [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) eldest son; but I doubt he hath yet no settled estate in land. But I will inform myself, and give her my opinion. Then Mrs. Pickering (age 23) (after private discourse ended, we going into the other room) did, at my Lady's command, tell me the manner of a masquerade1 before the King (age 34) and Court the other day. Where six women (my Baroness Castlemayne (age 24) and Duchesse of Monmouth being two of them) and six men (the Duke of Monmouth (age 15) and Lord Arran (age 25) and Monsieur Blanfort, being three of them) in vizards, but most rich and antique dresses, did dance admirably and most gloriously. God give us cause to continue the mirthe! So home, and after awhile at my office to supper and to bed.

Note 1. The masquerade at Court took place on the 2nd, and is referred to by Evelyn, who was present, in his Diary. Some amusing incidents connected with the entertainment are related in the "Grammont Memoirs (chapter vii.).

Pepy's Diary. 12 Mar 1665. Down to dinner, where my wife in her new lace whiske, which, indeed, is very noble, and I much pleased with it, and so my Lady also. Here very pleasant my Lord was at dinner, and after dinner did look over his plate, which Burston hath brought him to-day, and is the last of the three that he will have made. After satisfied with that, he abroad, and I after much discourse with my Lady about [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) son, of whom she hath some thoughts for a husband for my Lady Jemimah, we away home by coach again, and there sang a good while very pleasantly with Mr. Andrews and Hill. They gone; we to supper, and betimes to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Mar 1665. Thence to my [her mother] Lady Sandwich's (age 40), where my wife all this day, having kept Good Friday very strict with fasting. Here we supped, and talked very merry. My Lady alone with me, very earnest about [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) son, with whom I perceive they do desire my Lady Jemimah may be matched.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Mar 1665. So to my [her mother] Lady Sandwich's (age 40) to dinner, and up to her chamber after dinner, and there discoursed about [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) son, in proposition between us two for my Lady Jemimah.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jun 1665. How poorly Sir John Lawson (age 50) performed, notwithstanding all that was said of him; and how his ship turned out of the way, while Sir J. Lawson (age 50) himself was upon the deck, to the endangering of the whole fleete. It therefore troubles my Lord that Mr. Coventry (age 37) should not mention a word of him in his relation. I did, in answer, offer that I was sure the relation was not compiled by Mr. Coventry (age 37), but by L'Estrange, out of several letters, as I could witness; and that Mr. Coventry's (age 37) letter that he did give the Duke of Albemarle (age 56) did give him as much right as the Prince (age 45), for I myself read it first and then copied it out, which I promised to show my Lord, with which he was somewhat satisfied. From that discourse my Lord did begin to tell me how much he was concerned to dispose of his children, and would have my advice and help; and propounded to match my Lady Jemimah to [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) eldest son, which I approved of, and did undertake the speaking with him about it as from myself, which my Lord liked. So parted, with my head full of care about this business.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1665. Thence I to [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 55) at his chamber, and in the best manner I could, and most obligingly, moved the business: he received it with great respect and content, and thanks to me, and promised that he would do what he could possibly for his son, to render him fit for my Lord's daughter, and shewed great kindness to me, and sense of my kindness to him herein. Sir William Pen (age 44) told me this day that Mr. Coventry (age 37) is to be sworn a Privy Counsellor, at which my soul is glad.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1665. Midsummer-Day. Up very betimes, by six, and at Dr. Clerke's at Westminster by 7 of the clock, having over night by a note acquainted him with my intention of coming, and there I, in the best manner I could, broke my errand about a match between [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) eldest son and my [her father] Lord Sandwich's (age 39) eldest daughter, which he (as I knew he would) took with great content: and we both agreed that my Lord and he, being both men relating to the sea, under a kind aspect of His Majesty, already good friends, and both virtuous and good familys, their allyance might be of good use to us; and he did undertake to find out Sir George (age 55) this morning, and put the business in execution. So being both well pleased with the proposition, I saw his niece there and made her sing me two or three songs very prettily, and so home to the office, where to my great trouble I found Mr. Coventry (age 37) and the board met before I come. I excused my late coming by having been on the River about office business.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jun 1665. At noon dined, and then I abroad by water, it raining hard, thinking to have gone down to Woolwich, Kent [Map], but I did not, but back through bridge to White Hall, where, after I had again visited [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 55), and received his (and now his Lady's (age 63)) full content in my proposal, I went to my [her father] Lord Sandwich (age 39), and having told him how Sir G. Carteret (age 55) received it, he did direct me to return to Sir G. Carteret (age 55), and give him thanks for his kind reception of this offer, and that he would the next day be willing to enter discourse with him about the business. Which message I did presently do, and so left the business with great joy to both sides. My Lord, I perceive, intends to give £5000 with her, and expects about £800 per annum joynture.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1665. Thus this book of two years ends. Myself and family in good health, consisting of myself and wife, Mercer, her woman, Mary, Alice, and Susan our maids, and Tom my boy. In a sickly time of the plague growing on. Having upon my hands the troublesome care of the Treasury of Tangier, with great sums drawn upon me, and nothing to pay them with: also the business of the office great. Consideration of removing my wife to Woolwich, Kent [Map]; she lately busy in learning to paint, with great pleasure and successe. All other things well; especially a new interest I am making, by a match in hand between the eldest son of [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 55), and my Lady Jemimah Montage. The Duke of Yorke (age 31) gone down to the fleete, but all suppose not with intent to stay there, as it is not fit, all men conceive, he should.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jul 1665. In the evening my Lady Pen (age 41) and daughter come to see, and supped with us, then a messenger about business of the office from [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 55) at Chatham, Kent [Map], and by word of mouth did send me word that the business between my Lord and him is fully agreed on1, and is mightily liked of by the King (age 35) and the Duke of Yorke (age 31), and that he sent me this word with great joy; they gone, we to bed.

Note 1. The arrangements for the marriage of Lady Jemimah Montagu to [her future husband] Philip Carteret (age 24) were soon settled, for the wedding took place on July 31st.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jul 1665. So back again home and reshifted myself, and so down to my Baroness Carteret's (age 63), where mighty merry and great pleasantnesse between my [her mother] Lady Sandwich (age 40) and the young ladies and me, and all of us mighty merry, there never having been in the world sure a greater business of general content than this match proposed between [her future husband] Mr. Carteret (age 24) and my Lady Jemimah. But withal it is mighty pretty to think how my poor Lady Sandwich (age 40), between her and me, is doubtfull whether her daughter will like of it or no, and how troubled she is for fear of it, which I do not fear at all, and desire her not to do it, but her fear is the most discreet and pretty that ever I did see.

Great Plague of London

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jul 1665. After doing what business I could in the morning, it being a solemn fast-day1 for the plague growing upon us, I took boat and down to Deptford, Kent [Map], where I stood with great pleasure an houre or two by my [her mother] Lady Sandwich's (age 40) bedside, talking to her (she lying prettily in bed) of my Lady Jemimah's being from my [her aunt] Lady Pickering's (age 39) when our letters come to that place; she being at my Lord Montagu's, at Boughton, Northamptonshire. The truth is, I had received letters of it two days ago, but had dropped them, and was in a very extraordinary straite what to do for them, or what account to give my Lady, but sent to every place; I sent to Moreclacke, where I had been the night before, and there they were found, which with mighty joy come safe to me; but all ending with satisfaction to my Lady and me, though I find my Baroness Carteret (age 63) not much pleased with this delay, and principally because of the plague, which renders it unsafe to stay long at Deptford, Kent [Map].

Note 1. "A form of Common Prayer; together with an order for fasting for the averting of God's heavy visitation upon many places of this realm. The fast to be observed within the cities of London and Westminster and places adjacent, on Wednesday the twelfth of this instant July, and both there and in all parts of this realm on the first Wednesday in every month during the visitation" ("Calendar of State Papers", Domestic, 1664-65, p. 466).

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1665. Up, and very betimes by six o'clock at Deptford, Kent [Map], and there find [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 55), and my Lady (age 63) ready to go: I being in my new coloured silk suit, and coat trimmed with gold buttons and gold broad lace round my hands, very rich and fine. By water to the Ferry, where, when we come, no coach there; and tide of ebb so far spent as the horse-boat could not get off on the other side the river to bring away the coach. So we were fain to stay there in the unlucky Isle of Doggs, in a chill place, the morning cool, and wind fresh, above two if not three hours to our great discontent. Yet being upon a pleasant errand, and seeing that it could not be helped, we did bear it very patiently; and it was worth my observing, I thought, as ever any thing, to see how upon these two scores, Sir G. Carteret (age 55), the most passionate man in the world, and that was in greatest haste to be gone, did bear with it, and very pleasant all the while, at least not troubled much so as to fret and storm at it. Anon the coach comes: in the mean time there coming a News thither with his horse to go over, that told us he did come from Islington [Map] this morning; and that Proctor the vintner of the Miter in Wood-street, and his son, are dead this morning there, of the plague; he having laid out abundance of money there, and was the greatest vintner for some time in London for great entertainments. We, fearing the canonicall hour would be past before we got thither, did with a great deal of unwillingness send away the license and wedding ring. So that when we come, though we drove hard with six horses, yet we found them gone from home; and going towards the church, met them coming from church, which troubled us. But, however, that trouble was soon over; hearing it was well done: they being both in their old cloaths; my [her grandfather] Lord Crew (age 67) giving her, there being three coach fulls of them. The young lady mighty sad, which troubled me; but yet I think it was only her gravity in a little greater degree than usual. All saluted her, but I did not till my [her mother] Lady Sandwich (age 40) did ask me whether I had saluted her or no.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Aug 1666. In the evening to Lumbard-streete [Map] about money, to enable me to pay [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) £3000, which he hath lodged in my hands, in behalf of his son and my Lady Jemimah, toward their portion, which, I thank God, I am able to do at a minute's warning. In my [way] I inquired, and find Mrs. Rawlinson is dead of the sickness, and her mayde continues mighty ill. He himself is got out of the house. I met also with Mr. Evelyn (age 45) in the streete, who tells me the sad condition at this very day at Deptford, Kent [Map] for the plague, and more at Deale [Map] (within his precinct as one of the Commissioners for sick and wounded seamen), that the towne is almost quite depopulated.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1665. So he in the evening gone, I by water to [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55), and there find my [her mother] Lady Sandwich (age 40) and her buying things for my Lady Jem.'s wedding; and my Lady Jem. is beyond expectation come to Dagenhams, where Mr. Carteret is to go to visit her to-morrow; and my proposal of waiting on him, he being to go alone to all persons strangers to him, was well accepted, and so I go with him.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jul 1665. So I bid him good night, and down to prayers with my [her grandfather] Lord Crew's (age 67) family, and after prayers, my Lord, and [her aunt] Lady Wright, and I, to consult what to do; and it was agreed at last to have them go to church together, as the family used to do, though his lameness was a great objection against it. But at last my Lady Jem. sent me word by my Lady Wright that it would be better to do just as they used to do before his coming; and therefore she desired to go to church, which was yielded then to.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jul 1665. So home again and to walk in the gardens, where we left the young couple a second time; and my [her aunt] Lady Wright and I to walk together, who to my trouble tells me that my Lady Jem. must have something done to her body by Scott before she can be married, and therefore care must be had to send him, also that some more new clothes must of necessity be made her, which and other things I took care of. Anon to supper, and excellent discourse and dispute between my [her grandfather] Lord Crew (age 67) and the chaplin, who is a good scholler, but a nonconformist. Here this evening I spoke with Mrs. Carter, my old acquaintance, that hath lived with my Lady these twelve or thirteen years, the sum of all whose discourse and others for her, is, that I would get her a good husband; which I have promised, but know not when I shall perform. After [her future husband] Mr. Carteret (age 24) was carried to his chamber, we to prayers again and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jul 1665. So anon I took leave, and for London. But, Lord! to see, among other things, how all these great people here are afeard of London, being doubtfull of anything that comes from thence, or that hath lately been there, that I was forced to say that I lived wholly at Woolwich, Kent [Map]. In our way [her future husband] Mr. Carteret (age 24) did give me mighty thanks for my care and pains for him, and is mightily pleased, though the truth is, my Lady Jem. hath carried herself with mighty discretion and gravity, not being forward at all in any degree, but mighty serious in her answers to him, as by what he says and I observed, I collect.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jul 1665. By and by the young couple left together. Anon to dinner; and after dinner [her future husband] Mr. Carteret (age 24) took my advice about giving to the servants, and I led him to give £10 among them, which he did, by leaving it to the chief man-servant, Mr. Medows, to do for him. Before we went, I took my Lady Jem. apart, and would know how she liked this gentleman, and whether she was under any difficulty concerning him. She blushed, and hid her face awhile; but at last I forced her to tell me. She answered that she could readily obey what her father and mother had done; which was all she could say, or I expect.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jul 1665. And then up and home, and there dressed myself, and by appointment to Deptford, Kent [Map], to [her future father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 55), between six and seven o'clock, where I found him and my George Carteret 1st Baronet (age 55) and Lady (age 63) almost ready, and by and by went over to the ferry, and took coach and six horses nobly for Dagenhams, himself and lady and their little daughter, Louisonne, and myself in the coach; where, when we come, we were bravely entertained and spent the day most pleasantly with the young ladies, and I so merry as never more. Only for want of sleep, and drinking of strong beer had a rheum in one of my eyes, which troubled me much. Here with great content all the day, as I think I ever passed a day in my life, because of the contentfulnesse of our errand, and the noblenesse of the company and our manner of going. But I find [her future husband] Mr. Carteret (age 24) yet as backward almost in his caresses, as he was the first day. At night, about seven o'clock, took coach again; but, Lord! to see in what a pleasant humour Sir G. Carteret (age 55) hath been both coming and going; so light, so fond, so merry, so boyish (so much content he takes in this business), it is one of the greatest wonders I ever saw in my mind. But once in serious discourse he did say that, if he knew his son to be a debauchee, as many and, most are now-a-days about the Court, he would tell it, and my Lady Jem. should not have him; and so enlarged both he and she about the baseness and looseness of the Court, and told several stories of the Duke of Monmouth (age 16), and Richmond (age 26), and some great person, my Lord of Ormond's (age 54) second son (age 26), married to a Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran (age 26) and lady (age 14) of extraordinary quality (fit and that might have been made a wife for the King (age 35) himself), about six months since, that this great person hath given the pox to---; and discoursed how much this would oblige the Kingdom if the King (age 35) would banish some of these great persons publiquely from the Court, and wished it with all their hearts.

On 31 Jul 1665 Philip Carteret (age 24) and Jemima Montagu were married. She the daughter of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich (age 40) and Jemima Crew Countess Sandwich (age 40).

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1665. At night to supper, and so to talk; and which, methought, was the most extraordinary thing, all of us to prayers as usual, and the young bride and [her husband] bridegroom (age 24) too and so after prayers, soberly to bed; only I got into the bridegroom's (age 24) chamber while he undressed himself, and there was very merry, till he was called to the bride's chamber, and into bed they went. I kissed the bride in bed, and so the curtaines drawne with the greatest gravity that could be, and so good night. But the modesty and gravity of this business was so decent, that it was to me indeed ten times more delightfull than if it had been twenty times more merry and joviall. Whereas I feared I must have sat up all night, we did here all get good beds, and I lay in the same I did before with Mr. Brisband, who is a good scholler and sober man; and we lay in bed, getting him to give me an account of home, which is the most delightfull talke a man can have of any traveller: and so to sleep. My eyes much troubled already with the change of my drink.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Aug 1665. Slept, and lay long; then up and my Lord [Crew] and [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 55) being gone abroad, I first to see the [her husband] bridegroom (age 24) and bride, and found them both up, and he gone to dress himself. Both red in the face, and well enough pleased this morning with their night's lodging.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1665. Up by 4 o'clock and walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where called at Captain Cocke's (age 48) and to his chamber, he being in bed, where something put my last night's dream into my head, which I think is the best that ever was dreamt, which was that I had my Baroness Castlemayne (age 24) in my armes and was admitted to use all the dalliance I desired with her, and then dreamt that this could not be awake, but that it was only a dream; but that since it was a dream, and that I took so much real pleasure in it, what a happy thing it would be if when we are in our graves (as Shakespeere resembles it) we could dream, and dream but such dreams as this, that then we should not need to be so fearful of death, as we are this plague time. Here I hear that news is brought [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 55) that my Lord Hinchingbrooke is not well, and so cannot meet us at Cranborne to-night. So I to Sir G. Carteret's (age 55); and there was sorry with him for our disappointment. So we have put off our meeting there till Saturday next. Here I staid talking with Sir G. Carteret (age 55), he being mighty free with me in his business, and among other things hath ordered Rider and Mr. Cutler to put into my hands copper to the value of £5,000 (which Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) share it seems come to in it), which is to raise part of the money he is to layout for a purchase for my Lady Jemimah.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Aug 1665. After he was gone comes by a pretence of mine yesterday old Delks the waterman, with his daughter Robins, and several times to and again, he leaving her with me, about the getting of his son Robins off, who was pressed yesterday again.... All the afternoon at my office mighty busy writing letters, and received a very kind and good one from my [her father] Lord Sandwich (age 40) of his arrival with the fleete at Solebay [Map], and the joy he has at my last newes he met with, of the marriage of my Lady Jemimah; and he tells me more, the good newes that all our ships, which were in such danger that nobody would insure upon them, from the Eastland1, were all safe arrived, which I am sure is a great piece of good luck, being in much more danger than those of Hambrough which were lost, and their value much greater at this time to us.

Note 1. Eastland was a name given to the eastern countries of Europe. The Eastland Company, or Company of Merchants trading to the East Country, was incorporated in Queen (age 26) Elizabeth's reign (anno 21), and the charter was confirmed 13 Car. II They were also called "The Merchants of Elbing"..

Pepy's Diary. 25 Feb 1666. Lord's Day. My wife up between three and four of the clock in the morning to dress herself, and I about five, and were all ready to take coach, she and I and Mercer, a little past five, but, to our trouble, the coach did not come till six. Then with our coach of four horses I hire on purpose, and Leshmore to ride by, we through the City to Branford [Map] and so to Windsor, Berkshire [Map], Captain Ferrers overtaking us at Kensington, being to go with us, and here drank, and so through, making no stay, to Cranborne, about eleven o'clock, and found my Lord and the ladies at a sermon in the house; which being ended we to them, and all the company glad to see us, and mighty merry to dinner. Here was my Lord, and [her brother] Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 18), and [her brother] Mr. Sidney (age 15), Sir Charles Herbert (age 26), and [her husband] Mr. Carteret (age 25), my Baroness Carteret (age 64), my Lady Jemimah, and [her sister-in-law] Lady Slaning.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1666. Called up about five in the morning, and my Lord up, and took leave, a little after six, very kindly of me and the whole company. Then I in, and my wife up and to visit my [her sister-in-law] Lady Slaving in her bed, and there sat three hours, with Lady Jemimah with us, talking and laughing, and by and by my Baroness Carteret (age 64) comes, and she and I to talke, I glad to please her in discourse of [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 56), that all will do well with him, and she is much pleased, he having had great annoyance and fears about his well doing, and I fear hath doubted that I have not been a friend to him, but cries out against my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 25), that makes the King (age 35) neglect his business and seems much to fear that all will go to wracke, and I fear with great reason; exclaims against the Duke of Albemarle (age 57), and more the Duchesse (age 46) for a filthy woman, as indeed she is.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1666. Here staid till 9 o'clock almost, and then took coach with so much love and kindnesse from my Baroness Carteret (age 64), Lady Jemimah, and [her sister-in-law] Lady Slaving, that it joys my heart, and when I consider the manner of my going hither, with a coach and four horses and servants and a woman with us, and coming hither being so much made of, and used with that state, and then going to Windsor and being shewn all that we were there, and had wherewith to give every body something for their pains, and then going home, and all in fine weather and no fears nor cares upon me, I do thinke myself obliged to thinke myself happy, and do look upon myself at this time in the happiest occasion a man can be, and whereas we take pains in expectation of future comfort and ease, I have taught myself to reflect upon myself at present as happy, and enjoy myself in that consideration, and not only please myself with thoughts of future wealth and forget the pleasure we at present enjoy.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Oct 1666. By and by the House rose, and then we parted, and I with [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 56), and walked in the Exchequer Court, discoursing of businesses. Among others, I observing to him how friendly Sir W. Coventry (age 38) had carried himself to him in these late inquiries, when, if he had borne him any spleen, he could have had what occasion he pleased offered him, he did confess he found the same thing, and would thanke him for it. I did give him some other advices, and so away with him to his lodgings at White Hall to dinner, where my Baroness Carteret (age 64) is, and mighty kind, both of them, to me. Their son and my Lady Jemimah will be here very speedily. She tells me the ladies are to go into a new fashion shortly, and that is, to wear short coats, above their ancles; which she and I do not like, but conclude this long trayne to be mighty graceful. But she cries out of the vices of the Court, and how they are going to set up plays already; and how, the next day after the late great fast, the Duchesse of York (age 29) did give the King (age 36) and Queene (age 56) a play. Nay, she told me that they have heretofore had plays at Court the very nights before the fast for the death of the late King: She do much cry out upon these things, and that which she believes will undo the whole nation; and I fear so too.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Nov 1666. Thence to my [her grandfather] Lord Crew's (age 68), and there dined, and mightily made of, having not, to my shame, been there in 8 months before. Here my Lord and [her uncle] Sir Thomas Crew (age 42), [her uncle] Mr. John (age 38), and [her uncle] Dr. Crew (age 33), and two strangers. The best family in the world for goodness and sobriety. Here beyond my expectation I met my [her brother] Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 18), who is come to towne two days since from Hinchingbroke [Map], and brought his sister and brother [her husband] Carteret (age 25) with him, who are at [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 56).

Pepy's Diary. 05 Nov 1666. After dinner and this discourse I took coach, and at the same time find my [her brother] Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 18) and [her uncle] Mr. John Crew (age 38) and the [her uncle] Doctor (age 33) going out to see the ruins of the City; so I took the Doctor into my Hackney coach (and he is a very fine sober gentleman), and so through the City. But, Lord! what pretty and sober observations he made of the City and its desolation; till anon we come to my house, and there I took them upon Tower Hill [Map] to shew them what houses were pulled down there since the fire; and then to my house, where I treated them with good wine of several sorts, and they took it mighty respectfully, and a fine company of gentlemen they are; but above all I was glad to see my Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 18) drink no wine at all. Here I got them to appoint Wednesday come se'nnight to dine here at my house, and so we broke up and all took coach again, and I carried the Doctor (age 33) to Chancery Lane [Map], and thence I to White Hall, where I staid walking up and down till night, and then got almost into the play house, having much mind to go and see the play at Court this night; but fearing how I should get home, because of the bonefires and the lateness of the night to get a coach, I did not stay; but having this evening seen my Lady Jemimah, who is come to towne, and looks very well and fat, and heard how Mr. John Pickering (age 55) is to be married this week, and to a fortune with £5000, and seen a rich necklace of pearle and two pendants of dyamonds, which [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 56) hath presented her with since her coming to towne, I home by coach, but met not one bonefire through the whole town in going round by the wall, which is strange, and speaks the melancholy disposition of the City at present, while never more was said of, and feared of, and done against the Papists than just at this time.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Nov 1666. Home to dinner, though Sir R. Viner (age 35) would have staid us to dine with him, he being sheriffe; but, poor man, was so out of countenance that he had no wine ready to drink to us, his butler being out of the way, though we know him to be a very liberal man. And after dinner I took my wife out, intending to have gone and have seen my Lady Jemimah, at White Hall, but so great a stop there was at the New Exchange, that we could not pass in half an houre, and therefore 'light and bought a little matter at the Exchange [Map], and then home, and then at the office awhile, and then home to my chamber, and after my wife and all the mayds abed but Jane, whom I put confidence in-she and I, and my brother, and Tom, and W. Hewer (age 24), did bring up all the remainder of my money, and my plate-chest, out of the cellar, and placed the money in my study, with the rest, and the plate in my dressing-room; but indeed I am in great pain to think how to dispose of my money, it being wholly unsafe to keep it all in coin in one place. 'But now I have it all at my hand, I shall remember it better to think of disposing of it. This done, by one in the morning to bed. This afternoon going towards Westminster, Creed and I did stop, the Duke of York (age 33) being just going away from seeing of it, at Paul's, and in the Convocation House Yard did there see the body of Robert Braybrooke, Bishop of London, that died 1404: He fell down in his tomb out of the great church into St. Fayth's [Map] this late fire, and is here seen his skeleton with the flesh on; but all tough and dry like a spongy dry leather, or touchwood all upon his bones. His head turned aside. A great man in his time, and Lord Chancellor, and his skeletons now exposed to be handled and derided by some, though admired for its duration by others. Many flocking to see it.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Nov 1666. After dinner I to teach her my new recitative of "It is decreed", of which she learnt a good part, and I do well like it and believe shall be well pleased when she hath it all, and that it will be found an agreeable thing. Then carried her home, and my wife and I intended to have seen my Lady Jemimah at White Hall, but the Exchange Streete was so full of coaches, every body, as they say, going thither to make themselves fine against tomorrow night, that, after half an hour's stay, we could not do any [thing], only my wife to see her brother, and I to go speak one word with [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 56) about office business, and talk of the general complexion of matters, which he looks upon, as I do, with horrour, and gives us all for an undone people. That there is no such thing as a peace in hand, nor possibility of any without our begging it, they being as high, or higher, in their terms than ever, and tells me that, just now, my Lord Hollis (age 67) had been with him, and wept to think in what a condition we are fallen. He shewed me my [her father] Lord Sandwich's (age 41) letter to him, complaining of the lack of money, which Sir G. Carteret (age 56) is at a loss how in the world to get the King (age 36) to supply him with, and wishes him, for that reason, here; for that he fears he will be brought to disgrace there, for want of supplies. He says the House is yet in a bad humour; and desiring to know whence it is that the King (age 36) stirs not, he says he minds it not, nor will be brought to it, and that his servants of the House do, instead of making the Parliament better, rather play the rogue one with another, and will put all in fire. So that, upon the whole, we are in a wretched condition, and I went from him in full apprehensions of it.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Nov 1666. Here we walked to and again till one dropped away after another, and so I took coach to White Hall, and there visited my Lady Jemimah, at [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) lodgings. Here was [her uncle] Sir Thomas Crew (age 42), and he told me how hot words grew again to-day in the House of Lords between my Lord Ossory (age 32) and Ashly (age 45), the former saying that something said by the other was said like one of Oliver's Council. Ashly (age 45) said that he must give him reparation, or he would take it his owne way. The House therefore did bring my Lord Ossory (age 32) to confess his fault, and ask pardon for it, as he was also to my Lord Buckingham (age 38), for saying that something was not truth that my Lord Buckingham (age 38) had said. This will render my Lord Ossory (age 32) very little in a little time.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Nov 1666. At the end of the sermon an excellent anthem; but it was a pleasant thing, an idle companion in our pew, a prating, bold counsellor that hath been heretofore at the Navy Office, and noted for a great eater and drinker, not for quantity, but of the best, his name Tom Bales, said, "I know a fitter anthem for this sermon", speaking only of our duty of following the saints, and I know not what. "Cooke should have sung, 'Come, follow, follow me.'" I After sermon up into the gallery, and then to [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) to dinner; where much company. Among others, Mr. Carteret and my Lady Jemimah, and here was also Mr. [John] Ashburnham (age 63), the great man, who is a pleasant man, and that hath seen much of the world, and more of the Court.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1667. Thence I up to the King's closet, and there heard a good Anthem, and discoursed with several people here about business, among others with Lord Bellasses (age 52), and so from one to another after sermon till the King (age 36) had almost dined, and then home with [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and dined with him, being mightily ashamed of my not having seen my Lady Jemimah so long, and my wife not at all yet since she come, but she shall soon do it.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Mar 1667. Lord's Day. Up betime with my wife, and by coach with Sir W. Pen (age 45) and Sir Thomas Allen (age 34) to White Hall, there my wife and I the first time that ever we went to my Lady Jemimah's chamber at Sir Edward Carteret's (age 47) lodgings. I confess I have been much to blame and much ashamed of our not visiting her sooner, but better now than never. Here we took her before she was up, which I was sorry for, so only saw her, and away to chapel, leaving further visit till after sermon. I put my wife into the pew below, but it was pretty to see, myself being but in a plain band, and every way else ordinary, how the verger took me for her man, I think, and I was fain to tell him she was a kinswoman of my [her father] Lord Sandwich's (age 41), he saying that none under knights-baronets' ladies are to go into that pew. So she being there, I to the Duke of York's (age 33) lodging, where in his dressing-chamber he talking of his journey to-morrow or next day to Harwich [Map], to prepare some fortifications there; so that we are wholly upon the defensive part this year, only we have some expectations that we may by our squadrons annoy them in their trade by the North of Scotland and to the Westward. Here Sir W. Pen (age 45) did show the Duke of York (age 33) a letter of Hogg's about a prize he drove in within the Sound at Plymouth, Devon [Map], where the Vice-Admiral claims her. Sir W. Pen (age 45) would have me speak to the latter, which I did, and I think without any offence, but afterwards I was sorry for it, and Sir W. Pen (age 45) did plainly say that he had no mind to speak to the Duke of York (age 33) about it, so that he put me upon it, but it shall be, the last time that I will do such another thing, though I think no manner of hurt done by it to me at all.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Apr 1667. By and by up to the Duke of York (age 33), where our usual business, and among other things I read two most dismal letters of the straits we are in (from Collonell Middleton and Commissioner Taylor) that ever were writ in the world, so as the Duke of York (age 33) would have them to shew the King (age 36), and to every demand of money, whereof we proposed many and very pressing ones, [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 57) could make no answer but no money, which I confess made me almost ready to cry for sorrow and vexation, but that which was the most considerable was when Sir G. Carteret (age 57) did say that he had no funds to raise money on; and being asked by Sir W. Coventry (age 39) whether the eleven months' tax was not a fund, and he answered, "No, that the bankers would not lend money upon it". Then Sir W. Coventry (age 39) burst out and said he did supplicate his Royal Highness, and would do the same to the King (age 36), that he would remember who they were that did persuade the King (age 36) from parting with the Chimney-money to the Parliament, and taking that in lieu which they would certainly have given, and which would have raised infallibly ready money; meaning the bankers and the farmers of the Chimney-money, whereof Sir, G. Carteret, I think, is one; saying plainly, that whoever did advise the King (age 36) to that, did, as much as in them lay, cut the King's throat, and did wholly betray him; to which the Duke of York (age 33) did assent; and remembered that the King (age 36) did say again and again at the time, that he was assured, and did fully believe, the money would be raised presently upon a land-tax. This put as all into a stound; and Sir W. Coventry (age 39) went on to declare, that he was glad he was come to have so lately concern in the Navy as he hath, for he cannot now give any good account of the Navy business; and that all his work now was to be able to provide such orders as would justify his Royal Highness in the business, when it shall be called to account; and that he do do, not concerning himself whether they are or can be performed, or no; and that when it comes to be examined, and falls on my Lord Treasurer (age 60), he cannot help it, whatever the issue of it shall be. Hereupon Sir W. Batten (age 66) did pray him to keep also by him all our letters that come from the office that may justify us, which he says he do do, and, God knows, it is an ill sign when we are once to come to study how to excuse ourselves. It is a sad consideration, and therewith we broke up, all in a sad posture, the most that ever I saw in my life. One thing more Sir W. Coventry (age 39) did say to the Duke of York (age 33), when I moved again, that of about £9000 debt to Lanyon, at Plymouth, Devon [Map], he might pay £3700 worth of prize-goods, that he bought lately at the candle, out of this debt due to him from the King (age 36); and the Duke of York (age 33), and Sir G: Carteret, and Lord Barkeley (age 65), saying, all of them, that my Lord Ashly (age 45) would not be got to yield to it, who is Treasurer of the Prizes, Sir W. Coventry (age 39) did plainly desire that it might be declared whether the proceeds of the prizes were to go to the helping on of the war, or no; and, if it were, how then could this be denied? which put them all into another stound; and it is true, God forgive us! Thence to the chappell, and there, by chance, hear that [her uncle] Dr. Crew (age 34) is to preach; and so into the organ-loft, where I met Mr. Carteret, and my Lady Jemimah, and [her uncle] Sir Thomas Crew's (age 43) two daughters, and Dr. Childe (age 61) played; and Dr. Crew (age 34) did make a very pretty, neat, sober, honest sermon; and delivered it very readily, decently, and gravely, beyond his years: so as I was exceedingly taken with it, and I believe the whole chappell, he being but young; but his manner of his delivery I do like exceedingly. His text was, "But seeke ye first the Kingdom of God, and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you". Thence with my Lady to Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) lodgings, and so up into the house, and there do hear that the Dutch letters are come, and say that the Dutch have ordered a passe to be sent for our Commissioners, and that it is now upon the way, coming with a trumpeter blinded, as is usual. But I perceive every body begins to doubt the success of the treaty, all their hopes being only that if it can be had on any terms, the Chancellor (age 58) will have it; for he dare not come before a Parliament, nor a great many more of the courtiers, and the King (age 36) himself do declare he do not desire it, nor intend it but on a strait; which God defend him from! Here I hear how the King (age 36) is not so well pleased of this marriage between the Duke of Richmond and Mrs. Stewart (age 19), as is talked; and that he [the Duke] by a wile did fetch her to the Beare [Map], at the bridge foot, where a coach was ready, and they are stole away into Kent, without the King's leave; and that the King (age 36) hath said he will never see her more; but people do think that it is only a trick. This day I saw Prince Rupert (age 47) abroad in the Vane-room, pretty well as he used to be, and looks as well, only something appears to be under his periwigg on the crown of his head.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Apr 1667. So to the office till noon, busy, and then (which I think I have not done three times in my life) left the board upon occasion of a letter of Sir W. Coventry (age 39), and meeting Balty (age 27) at my house I took him with me by water, and to the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) to give him an account of the business, which was the escaping of some soldiers for the manning of a few ships now going out with Harman (age 42) to the West Indies, which is a sad consideration that at the very beginning of the year and few ships abroad we should be in such want of men that they do hide themselves, and swear they will not go to be killed and have no pay. I find the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) at dinner with sorry company, some of his officers of the Army; dirty dishes, and a nasty wife at table, and bad meat, of which I made but an ill dinner. Pretty to hear how she talked against Captain Du Tell, the Frenchman, that the Prince and her husband put out the last year; and how, says she, the Duke of York (age 33) hath made him, for his good services, his Cupbearer; yet he fired more shot into the D. Gawden's ship, and others of the King's ships, than of the enemy. And the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) did confirm it, and that somebody in the fight did cry out that a little Dutchman, by his ship, did plague him more than any other; upon which they were going to order him to be sunk, when they looked and found it was Du Tell, who, as the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) says, had killed several men in several of our ships. He said, but for his interest, which he knew he had at Court, he had hanged him at the yard's-arm, without staying for a Court-martiall. One Colonel Howard, at the table, magnified the Duke of Albemarle's (age 58) fight in June last, as being a greater action than ever was done by Caesar. The Duke of Albemarle (age 58), did say it had been no great action, had all his number fought, as they should have done, to have beat the Dutch; but of his 55 ships, not above 25 fought. He did give an account that it was a fight he was forced to: the Dutch being come in his way, and he being ordered to the buoy of the Nore, he could not pass by them without fighting, nor avoid them without great disadvantage and dishonour; and this [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 57), I afterwards giving him an account of what he said, says that it is true, that he was ordered up to the Nore. But I remember he said, had all his captains fought, he would no more have doubted to have beat the Dutch, with all their number, than to eat the apple that lay on his trencher. My Lady Duchesse, among other things, discoursed of the wisdom of dividing the fleete; which the General said nothing to, though he knows well that it come from themselves in the fleete, and was brought up hither by Sir Edward Spragge (age 47). Colonel Howard, asking how the Prince did, the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) answering, "Pretty well"; the other replied, "But not so well as to go to sea again".-"How!" says the Duchess, "what should he go for, if he were well, for there are no ships for him to command? And so you have brought your hogs to a fair market", said she1. One at the table told an odd passage in this late plague: that at Petersfield, Hampshire, I think, he said, one side of the street had every house almost infected through the town, and the other, not one shut up. Dinner being done, I brought Balty (age 27) to the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) to kiss his hand and thank him far his kindness the last year to him, and take leave of him, and then Balty (age 27) and I to walk in the Park, and, out of pity to his father, told him what I had in my thoughts to do for him about the money-that is, to make him Deputy Treasurer of the fleete, which I have done by getting Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) consent, and an order from the Duke of York (age 33) for £1500 to be paid to him. He promises the whole profit to be paid to my wife, for to be disposed of as she sees fit, for her father and mother's relief. So mightily pleased with our walk, it being mighty pleasant weather, I back to Sir G. Carteret's (age 57), and there he had newly dined, and talked, and find that he do give every thing over for lost, declaring no money to be raised, and let Sir W. Coventry (age 39) name the man that persuaded the King (age 36) to take the Land Tax on promise, of raising present money upon it. He will, he says, be able to clear himself enough of it. I made him merry, with telling him how many land-admirals we are to have this year: Allen at Plymouth, Devon [Map], Holmes at Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], Spragge for Medway, Teddiman at Dover, Smith to the Northward, and Harman (age 42) to the Southward. He did defend to me Sir W. Coventry (age 39) as not guilty of the dividing of the fleete the last year, and blesses God, as I do, for my [her father] Lord Sandwich's (age 41) absence, and tells me how the King (age 36) did lately observe to him how they have been particularly punished that were enemies to my Lord Sandwich (age 41). Mightily pleased I am with his family, and my Baroness Carteret (age 65) was on the bed to-day, having been let blood, and tells me of my Lady Jemimah's being big-bellied.

Note 1. It was pretty to hear the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) himself to wish that they would come on our ground, meaning the French, for that he would pay them, so as to make them glad to go back to France again; which was like a general, but not like an admiral.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Apr 1667. So, meeting Mr. Brisband, he took me up to my Lady Jemimah's chamber, who is let blood to-day, and so there we sat and talked an hour, I think, very merry and one odd thing or other, and so away, and I took up my wife at her tailor's (whose wife is brought to bed, and my wife must be godmother), and so with much ado got a coach to carry us home, it being late, and so to my chamber, having little left to do at my office, my eyes being a little sore by reason of my reading a small printed book the other day after it was dark, and so to supper and to bed. It comes in my head to set down that there have been two fires in the City, as I am told for certain, and it is so, within this week.

Pepy's Diary. 09 May 1667. Mightily pleased with the noblenesse of this house, and the brave furniture and pictures, which indeed is very noble, and, being broke up, I with [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 57) in his coach into Hide Park, to discourse of things, and spent an hour in this manner with great pleasure, telling me all his concernments, and how he is gone through with the purchase for my Lady Jemimah and her [her husband] husband (age 26); how the Treasury is like to come into the hands of a Committee; but that not that, nor anything else, will do our business, unless the King (age 36) himself will mind his business, and how his servants do execute their parts; he do fear an utter ruin in the state, and that in a little time, if the King (age 36) do not mind his business soon; that the King (age 36) is very kind to him, and to my [her father] Lord Sandwich (age 41), and that he doubts not but at his coming home, which he expects about Michaelmas, he will be very well received. But it is pretty strange how he began again the business of the intention of a marriage of my [her brother] Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 19) to a daughter of my Lord Burlington's (age 54) to my Chancellor (age 58), which he now tells me as a great secret, when he told it me the last Sunday but one; but it may be the poor man hath forgot, and I do believe he do make it a secret, he telling me that he has not told it to any but myself, end this day to his daughter my Lady Jemimah, who looks to lie down about two months hence.

Pepy's Diary. 17 May 1667. Then to Sir R. Viner's (age 36) with 600 pieces of gold to turn into silver, for the enabling me to answer [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) £3000; which he now draws all out of my hand towards the paying for a purchase he hath made for his son and my Lady Jemimah, in Northamptonshire, of Sir Samuel Luke (age 64), in a good place; a good house, and near all her friends; which is a very happy thing.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jun 1667. My Lady Jem goes down to Hinchingbroke [Map] to lie down, because of the troubles of the times here. He tells me he is not sure that the King of France (age 28) will not annoy us this year, but that the Court seems [to] reckon upon it as a thing certain, for that is all that I and most people are afeard of this year. He tells me now the great question is, whether a Parliament or no Parliament; and says the Parliament itself cannot be thought able at present to raise money, and therefore it will be to no purpose to call one. I hear this day poor Michell's child is dead.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jun 1667. Thence to [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) to take my leave of my Lady Jem, who is going into the country tomorrow; but she being now at prayers with my Lady and family, and hearing here by Yorke, the carrier, that my wife is coming to towne, I did make haste home to see her, that she might not find me abroad, it being the first minute I have been abroad since yesterday was se'ennight. It is pretty to see how strange it is to be abroad to see people, as it used to be after a month or two's absence, and I have brought myself so to it, that I have no great mind to be abroad, which I could not have believed of myself.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jul 1667. Thence by coach home, and there wrote a few letters, and then to consult with my wife about going to Epsum to-morrow, sometimes designing to go and then again not; and at last it grew late and I bethought myself of business to employ me at home tomorrow, and so I did not go. This afternoon I met with Mr. Rolt, who tells me that he is going Cornett under Collonel Ingoldsby (age 49), being his old acquaintance, and Ingoldsby hath a troop now from under the King (age 37), and I think it is a handsome way for him, but it was an ominous thing, methought, just as he was bidding me his last adieu, his nose fell a-bleeding, which ran in my mind a pretty while after. This afternoon Sir Alexander Frazier (age 57), who was of council for Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and had given him over for a dead man, said to me at White Hall:-"What", says he, "Sir J. Minnes (age 68) is dead". I told him, "No! but that there is hopes of his life". Methought he looked very sillily after it, and went his way. Late home to supper, a little troubled at my not going to Epsum to-morrow, as I had resolved, especially having the Duke of York (age 33) and Sir W. Coventry (age 39) out of town, but it was my own fault and at last my judgment to stay, and so to supper and to bed. This day, with great satisfaction, I hear that my Lady Jemimah is brought to bed, at Hinchingbroke [Map], of a [her son] boy.

Around 07 Jul 1667 [her son] George Carteret 1st Baron Carteret was born to [her husband] Philip Carteret (age 26) and Jemima Montagu.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jul 1667. He tells me that the King (age 37) and Court were never in the world so bad as they are now for gaming, swearing, whoring, and drinking, and the most abominable vices that ever were in the world; so that all must come to nought. He told me that [her father-in-law] Sir G. Carteret (age 57) was at this end of the town; so I went to visit him in Broad Street; and there he and I together: and he is mightily pleased with my Lady Jem's having a [her son] son; and a mighty glad man he is. He [Sir George Carteret (age 57)] tells me, as to news, that the peace is now confirmed, and all that over. He says it was a very unhappy motion in the House the other day about the land-army; for, whether the King (age 37) hath a mind of his own to do the thing desired or no, his doing it will be looked upon as a thing done only in fear of the Parliament. He says that the Duke of York (age 33) is suspected to be the great man that is for raising of this army, and bringing things to be commanded by an army; but he believes that he is wronged, and says that he do know that he is wronged therein. He do say that the Court is in a way to ruin all for their pleasures; and says that he himself hath once taken the liberty to tell the King (age 37) the necessity of having, at least, a show of religion in the Government, and sobriety; and that it was that, that did set up and keep up Oliver, though he was the greatest rogue in the world, and that it is so fixed in the nature of the common Englishman that it will not out of him. He tells me that while all should be labouring to settle the Kingdom, they are at Court all in factions, some for and others against my Chancellor (age 58), and another for and against another man, and the King (age 37) adheres to no man, but this day delivers himself up to this, and the next to that, to the ruin of himself and business; that he is at the command of any woman like a slave, though he be the best man to the Queene (age 57) in the world, with so much respect, and never lies a night from her: but yet cannot command himself in the presence of a woman he likes. Having had this discourse, I parted, and home to dinner, and thence to the office all the afternoon to my great content very busy. It raining this day all day to our great joy, it having not rained, I think, this month before, so as the ground was everywhere so burned and dry as could be; and no travelling in the road or streets in London, for dust. At night late home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Oct 1667. At noon home, and by coach to Temple Bar to a India shop, and there bought a gown and sash, which cost me 26s., and so she [Mrs. Pepys] and Willet away to the 'Change [Map], and I to my [her grandfather] Lord Crew (age 69), and there met my [her brother] Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 19) and Lady Jemimah, and there dined with them and my Lord, where pretty merry, and after dinner my Lord Crew (age 69) and Hinchingbroke [Map] and myself went aside to discourse about my [her father] Lord Sandwich's (age 42) business, which is in a very ill state for want of money, and so parted, and I to my tailor's, and there took up my wife and Willet, who staid there for me, and to the Duke of York's playhouse, but the house so full, it being a new play, "The Coffe House", that we could not get in, and so to the King's house: and there, going in, met with Knepp, and she took us up into the tireing-rooms: and to the women's shift, where Nell (age 17) was dressing herself, and was all unready, and is very pretty, prettier than I thought.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Dec 1667. After dinner, I did understand from my Lady Jemimah that her brother Hinchingbroke's business was to be ended this day, as she thinks, towards his match, and they do talk here of their intent to buy themselves some new clothes against the wedding, which I am very glad of.

In 1668 [her sister-in-law] Anne Carteret died.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Mar 1668. Thence with Sir Prince homewards, calling at Lincolne's Inn Fields: but my Lady Jemimah was not within: and so to Newgate, where he stopped to give directions to the jaylor about a Knight, one Sir Thomas Halford brought in yesterday for killing one Colonel Temple [Map], falling out at a taverne. So thence as far as Leadenhall, and there I 'light, and back by coach to Lincoln's Inn Fields; but my Lady was not come in, and so I am at a great loss whether she and her brother Hinchingbroke [Map] and sister (age 27) will dine with me to-morrow or no, which vexes me.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1668. Thence with our company to the King's playhouse, where I left them, and I, my head being full of to-morrow's dinner, I to my [her grandfather] Lord Crew's (age 70), there to invite [her uncle] Sir Thomas Crew (age 44); and there met with my [her brother] Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 20) and his lady, the first time I spoke to her. I saluted her; and she mighty civil and; with my Lady Jemimah, do all resolve to be very merry to-morrow at my house. My Lady Hinchingbroke [Note. Probably a reference to Elizabeth Wilmot Countess Sandwich the future Lady Hinchinbroke.] I cannot say is a beauty, nor ugly; but is altogether a comely lady enough, and seems very good-humoured, and I mighty glad of the occasion of seeing her before to-morrow.

1668 Bawdy House Riots

Pepy's Diary. 24 Mar 1668. Thence up and down Westminster by Mrs. Burroughes her mother's shop, thinking to have seen her, but could not, and therefore back to White Hall, where great talk of the tumult at the other end of the town, about Moore-fields [Map], among the 'prentices, taking the liberty of these holydays to pull down bawdy-houses1. And, Lord! to see the apprehensions which this did give to all people at Court, that presently order was given for all the soldiers, horse and foot, to be in armes! and forthwith alarmes were beat by drum and Trumpet through Westminster, and all to their colours, and to horse, as if the French were coming into the town! So Creed, whom I met here, and I to Lincolne's Inn-fields, thinking to have gone into the fields to have seen the 'prentices; but here we found these fields full of soldiers all in a body, and my Lord Craven (age 59) commanding of them, and riding up and down to give orders, like a madman. And some young men we saw brought by soldiers to the Guard at White Hall, and overheard others that stood by say, that it was only for pulling down the bawdy-houses; and none of the bystanders finding fault with them, but rather of the soldiers for hindering them. And we heard a justice of the Peace this morning say to the King (age 37), that he had been endeavouring to suppress this tumult, but could not; and that, imprisoning some [of them] in the new prison at Clerkenwell, the rest did come and break open the prison and release them; and that they do give out that they are for pulling down the bawdy-houses, which is one of the greatest grievances of the nation. To which the King (age 37) made a very poor, cold, insipid answer: "Why, why do they go to them, then?" and that was all, and had no mind to go on with the discourse. Mr. Creed and I to dinner to my [her grandfather] Lord Crew (age 70), where little discourse, there being none but us at the table, and my Lord and my Lady Jemimah, and so after dinner away, Creed and I to White Hall, expecting a Committee of Tangier, but come too late. So I to attend the Council, and by and by were called in with Lord Brouncker (age 48) and Sir W. Pen (age 46) to advise how to pay away a little money to most advantage to the men of the yards, to make them dispatch the ships going out, and there did make a little speech, which was well liked, and after all it was found most satisfactory to the men, and best for the King's dispatch, that what money we had should be paid weekly to the men for their week's work until a greater sum could be got to pay them their arrears and then discharge them. But, Lord! to see what shifts and what cares and thoughts there was employed in this matter how to do the King's work and please the men and stop clamours would make a man think the King (age 37) should not eat a bit of good meat till he has got money to pay the men, but I do not see the least print of care or thoughts in him about it at all. Having done here, I out and there met Sir Fr. Hollis (age 25), who do still tell me that, above all things in the world, he wishes he had my tongue in his mouth, meaning since my speech in Parliament. He took Lord Brouncker (age 48) and me down to the guards, he and his company being upon the guards to-day; and there he did, in a handsome room to that purpose, make us drink, and did call for his bagpipes, which, with pipes of ebony, tipt with silver, he did play beyond anything of that kind that ever I heard in my life; and with great pains he must have obtained it, but with pains that the instrument do not deserve at all; for, at the best, it is mighty barbarous musick.

Note 1. It was customary for the apprentices of the metropolis to avail themselves of their holidays, especially on Shrove Tuesday, to search after women of ill fame, and to confine them during the season of Lent. See a "Satyre against Separatists", 1642. "Stand forth, Shrove Tuesday, one a' the silenc'st bricklayers; 'Tis in your charge to pull down bawdy-houses". Middleton's Inner Temple Masque, 1619, Works, ed. Bullen, vii., 209.

In 1671 Jemima Montagu died.

In 1671 [her son] Edward Carteret was born to [her husband] Philip Carteret (age 30) and Jemima Montagu.

1672 Battle of Solebay

On 28 May 1672 [her former husband] Philip Carteret (age 31) and Winston Churchill were killed at Solebay, Southwold [Map].

[her father] Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich (age 46) was killed. His son [her brother] Edward Montagu 2nd Earl Sandwich (age 24) succeeded 2nd Earl Sandwich.

George Legge 1st Baron Dartmouth (age 25) fought.

Charles Harbord (age 32) was killed. The inscription on his. Monument in Westminster Abbey [Map] reads ... Sr. Charles Harbord Knt. his Majesties Surveyor General, and First Lieutenant of the Royall James, under the most noble and illustrious captain Edward, Earle of Sandwich (age 46), Vice Admirall of England, which after a terrible fight maintained to admiration against a squadron of the Holland fleet for above six houres, neere the Suffolk coast, having put off two fireships, at last being utterly dissabled and few of her men remaining unhurt, was by a third unfortunately set on fire: but he (though he swam well) neglected to save himselfe as some did, and out of the perfect love to that worthy lord (whom for many yeares he had constantly accompanyed in all his honourable imployments, and in all the engagements of the former warr) dyed with him at the age of XXXIII, much bewailed of his father whom he never offended, and much beloved of all for his knowne piety, vertue, loyalty, fortitude and fidelity.

Captain John Cox was killed in action.

Admiral John Holmes (age 32) fought as commander of Rupert.

The Gloucester took part.

[her son] Edward Carteret and Bridget Exton were married.

Royal Ancestors of Jemima Montagu -1671

Kings Wessex: Great x 19 Grand Daughter of King Edmund "Ironside" I of England

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 17 Grand Daughter of Owain "Great" King Gwynedd

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 23 Grand Daughter of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg King Deheubarth

Kings Powys: Great x 18 Grand Daughter of Maredudd ap Bleddyn King Powys

Kings England: Great x 11 Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Kings Scotland: Great x 15 Grand Daughter of William "Lion" I King Scotland

Kings Franks: Great x 15 Grand Daughter of Louis VII King Franks

Kings France: Great x 16 Grand Daughter of Louis "Fat" VI King France

Royal Descendants of Jemima Montagu -1671

Diana Spencer Princess Wales x 1

Ancestors of Jemima Montagu -1671

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Ladde Montagu 5 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Thomas Montagu 6 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Edward Montagu 7 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Dudley

Great x 3 Grandmother: Agnes Dudley

Great x 1 Grandfather: Edward Montagu 8 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Roper

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Roper of Well Hall

Great x 2 Grandmother: Helen Roper

GrandFather: Sidney Montagu 9 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Harrington

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Alexander Harrington

Great x 2 Grandfather: James Harrington

Great x 4 Grandfather: Robert Moton of Peckleton in Leicestershire

Great x 3 Grandmother: Elizabeth Moton

Great x 1 Grandmother: Elizabeth Harrington

Great x 4 Grandfather: Nicholas Sidney

Great x 3 Grandfather: William Sidney

Great x 4 Grandmother: Anne Brandon

Great x 2 Grandmother: Lucy Sidney

Great x 4 Grandfather: Hugh Pakenham

Great x 3 Grandmother: Anne Pakenham

Father: Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 10 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: William Pepys of Cottenham

Great x 2 Grandfather: William Pepys of Cottenham

Great x 1 Grandfather: John Pepys of Impington

GrandMother: Paulina Pepys

Jemima Montagu 11 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Crewe of Nantwich

Great x 3 Grandfather: Randulph Crewe

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Crew

Great x 1 Grandfather: Thomas Crew

GrandFather: John Crew 1st Baron Crew

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Bray of Eaton Bray

Great x 3 Grandfather: Reginald Bray

Great x 2 Grandfather: Reginald Bray of Stene and Hinton

Great x 1 Grandmother: Temperance Bray

Mother: Jemima Crew Countess Sandwich 12 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Waldegrave

Great x 3 Grandfather: George Waldegrave

Great x 2 Grandfather: Edward Waldegrave 9 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Robert Drury

Great x 3 Grandmother: Anne Drury 8 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Anne Calthorpe 7 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 1 Grandfather: Edward Waldegrave 10 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

GrandMother: Jemima Waldegrave Baroness Crew 11 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Higham

Great x 1 Grandmother: Sarah Higham

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Yelverton

Great x 3 Grandfather: William Yelverton

Great x 2 Grandmother: Martha Yelverton

Great x 4 Grandfather: Henry Fermor

Great x 3 Grandmother: Amy Fermor