Biography of Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby 1428-1470

Paternal Family Tree: Welles

Maternal Family Tree: Cecily Fleming 1424

1461 Second Battle of St Albans

1461 Battle of Towton

1464 Battle of Hexham

1470 Welles' Rebellion and Battle of Losecoat Field aka Empingham

Around 1428 Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby was born to Lionel Welles 6th Baron Welles (age 22) and Joan or Cecily Waterton.

On 14 Apr 1447 [his father] Lionel Welles 6th Baron Welles (age 41) and [his step-mother] Margaret Beauchamp Duchess Somerset (age 37) were married. She by marriage Baroness Welles. He a great x 4 grandson of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England.

On 09 Jan 1449 Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 21) and Joan Willoughby 7th Baroness Willoughby of Eresby (age 24) were married. They were fourth cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England. She a great x 4 granddaughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England.

On 25 Jul 1452 [his father-in-law] Robert Willoughby 6th Baron Willoughby (age 67) died. He was buried at All Saints Church, Mettingham Bungay [Map]. His daughter [his wife] Joan Willoughby 7th Baroness Willoughby of Eresby (age 27) succeeded 7th Baroness Willoughby de Eresby. Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 24) by marriage Baron Willoughby de Eresby.

On 31 Jan 1453 Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 25) was knighted.

Second Battle of St Albans

On 17 Feb 1461 the Lancastrian army defeated the Yorkist army at Second Battle of St Albans and rescued King Henry VI of England and II of France (age 39). The Lancastrian army was commanded by Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter (age 30) and included Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (age 39), John Mowbray 3rd Duke of Norfolk (age 45), Henry Grey 4th or 7th Baron Grey of Codnor (age 26), Henry Roos and Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 33).

Thomas Ros 9th Baron Ros Helmsley (age 33), William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme (age 46), John Talbot 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury (age 12) and Thomas Tresham (age 41) were knighted.

The Yorkist army included Richard "Kingmaker" Neville Earl Warwick, 6th Earl Salisbury (age 32), William Fitzalan 16th Earl of Arundel (age 43), John Wenlock 1st Baron Wenlock (age 61) and Henry Bourchier 2nd Count Eu 1st Earl Essex (age 57). John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu (age 30) was captured. Robert Poynings (age 42) and James Luttrell (age 34) were killed.

John Grey (age 29) was killed fighting for Lancaster. A death that was to have far reaching consequences; his widow Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England (age 24) subsequently married King Edward IV of England (age 18).

During the battle William Bonville 1st Baron Bonville (age 68) and Thomas Kyriell (age 65) were assigned to the protection of the King Henry VI (age 39). After the battle both were beheaded against all decent laws of battle.

William Bonville 1st Baron Bonville (age 68) was beheaded. His great granddaughter Cecily Bonville Marchioness Dorset succeeded 2nd Baroness Bonville.

Thomas Kyriell (age 65) was beheaded.

William Cotton (age 21) was killed.

Battle of Towton

On 29 Mar 1461 the Battle of Towton was a decisive victory for King Edward IV of England (age 18) bringing to an end the first war of the Wars of the Roses. Said to be the bloodiest battle on English soil 28000 were killed mainly during the rout that followed the battle.

The Yorkist army was commanded by King Edward IV of England (age 18) with John Mowbray 3rd Duke of Norfolk (age 45), William Neville 1st Earl Kent (age 56), William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings (age 30) (knighted), Walter Blount 1st Baron Mountjoy (age 45), Henry Bourchier 2nd Count Eu 1st Earl Essex (age 57), John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton (age 23) and John Wenlock 1st Baron Wenlock (age 61).

The Lancastrian army suffered significant casualties including Richard Percy (age 35), Ralph Bigod Lord Morley (age 50), John Bigod (age 28), Robert Cromwell (age 71), Ralph Eure (age 49), John Neville 1st Baron Neville of Raby (age 51), John Beaumont (age 33), Thomas Dethick (age 61), Everard Simon Digby, William Plumpton (age 25) and [his uncle] William Welles (age 51) who were killed.

Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (age 39) was killed. His son Henry Percy 4th Earl of Northumberland (age 12) succeeded 4th Earl of Northumberland, 7th Baron Percy of Alnwick, 15th Baron Percy of Topcliffe. Maud Herbert Countess Northumberland (age 3) by marriage Countess of Northumberland.

Ralph Dacre 1st Baron Dacre Gilsland (age 49) was killed. He was buried at the nearby Saxton church where his chest tomb is extant. Baron Dacre Gilsland extinct.

[his father] Lionel Welles 6th Baron Welles (age 55) was killed. His son Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 33) succeeded 7th Baron Welles.

The Lancastrian army was commanded by Henry Beaufort 2nd or 3rd Duke of Somerset (age 25), Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter (age 30), Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (age 39) and Andrew Trollope.

Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter (age 30) was attainted after the battle; Duke Exeter, Earl Huntingdon forfeit.

Those who fought for the Lancaster included William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme (age 46), John Dudley 1st Baron Dudley (age 60), William Norreys (age 20), Thomas Grey 1st Baron Grey of Richemont (age 43), Robert Hungerford 3rd Baron Hungerford 1st Baron Moleyns (age 30), John Talbot 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury (age 12), Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 33), Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers (age 56), James Butler 1st Earl Wiltshire 5th Earl Ormonde (age 40), John Butler 6th Earl Ormonde (age 39), William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont (age 22), Henry Roos and Thomas Tresham (age 41). Cardinal John Morton (age 41) were captured.

Before 13 Feb 1462 [his wife] Joan Willoughby 7th Baroness Willoughby of Eresby (age 37) died. Her son [his son] Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles succeeded 8th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.

On 21 Aug 1463 Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 35) arrived at Dover, Kent [Map] with King Edward IV of England (age 21).

Battle of Hexham

Chronicle of England by Jean de Waurin. [15 May 1464]. Chapter 4.30. Of a battle that took place quite near Newcastle upon Tyne where the Duke of Somerset (age 28) was captured, along with several other great lords captured and killed by the Earl of Northumberland (age 33).

It so happened around this time that between Scotland and Northumberland, the Duke of Somerset, the principal governor of Queen Margaret, had assembled a large force to raid and inflict damage upon the Kingdom of England, particularly targeting those loyal to King Edward. Although the said Duke of Somerset had recently received a pardon from the King and returned to his court, he could not hold himself back. Instead, he preferred to return to King Henry's side rather than remain with King Edward's party. He clearly recognized that King Henry's faction lacked the strength to resist against King Edward's power, who had previously shown him great honour and respect. Despite this, he abandoned King Edward's side to rejoin King Henry and support those who had no power to benefit him, as he had previously experienced.

It so happened that in that season, about fifteen miles from Newcastle upon Tyme or Tyne, the brother of the Earl of Warwick, then known as the Earl of Northumberland, accompanied by the Baron of Greystoke (age 50), the Lord of Crup, the Lord of Welles (age 36), and Sir John Buckingham, was informed that there were the Duke of Somerset, the Lord Ros (deceased), the Earl of Helmsley, Sir Thomas Fiderme, and the Lord of Talbot. They rode in that direction and encountered each other in such a way that there was a great slaughter and many men were killed. But eventually, the Earl of Northumberland, brother to the Earl of Warwick, led them all to complete defeat and on the same day captured the Duke of Somerset, who was promptly beheaded. Also captured were those from his party who were there at Newcastle upon Tyne, namely the Earl of Helmsley, the Lords of Ros (deceased) and Talbot (age 49), along with Sir John Fiderme, in the year 1463.

On 15 May 1464 a Yorkist army commanded by John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu (age 33) defeated a Lancastrian army commanded by Henry Beaufort 2nd or 3rd Duke of Somerset (age 28) at Hexham [Map] during the Battle of Hexham.

Those fighting for York included John Stafford 1st Earl Wiltshire (age 36), John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton (age 26) and Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 36).

Henry Beaufort 2nd or 3rd Duke of Somerset (age 28) was beheaded following the battle. The general pardon which he has previously received was annulled. Duke Somerset, Marquess Dorset, Earl Somerset and Earl Dorset forfeit for the second time. His son Edmund Beaufort 3rd Duke of Somerset (age 25) was styled by supporters of the House of Lancaster as Duke of Somerset but had not right to do so.

Philip Wentworth (age 40) was executed at Middleham [Map].

Welles' Rebellion and Battle of Losecoat Field aka Empingham

Warkworth's Chronicle 1470. Feb 1470. And in the x. yere1 of Kynge Edwardes regne, in the moneth of Marche, the Lorde Willowby (age 42), the Lorde Welles his [his son] sonne2, Thomas Delalond knyght, and Sere Thomas Dymmoke (age 42) knyght, the Kynges Champyon, droff oute of Lyncolneschyre Sere Thomas à Burghe, a knyght of the Kynges howse, and pullede downe his place, and toke alle his goodes and cataylle that they mighte fynde, and they gaderid alle the comons of the schyre to the nowmbre of xxx. M¹., and cryed "Kynge Herry," and refused Kynge Edwarde. And the Duke of Clarence and the Earl of Warwick (age 41) causede alle this, lyke as they dyde Robyne of Riddesdale to ryse afore that at Banbury felde. And whenne Kynge Edwarde herde hereof, he made oute his commyssyons, and gaderyd a grete peple of menne, and sent his pardone to the Lorde Wyllowby (age 42), and a commaundement that they schuld come to hym, and so he dyd. And whenne the Kynge was sure of hym, he and alle his oste went towarde Lyncolneschyre, the Lord Welles, and alle the othere peple were gaderd togedere, and commawndede Lorde Wyllowby (age 42) to sende a lettere to hys sonne and to alle the peple that he gaderyde, that they schulde yelde them to hym as to ther sovereyne Lorde, or ellys he made a woue3 that the Lorde Willowby (age 42) schuld lese his hede; and he wrote and sent his lettere forthe, but therfor they wulde noʒt ceysse; wherfor the Kynge comawndyde the Lorde Wyllowhby hede for to be smytene of, notwithstondynge his pardone.

And so the Kynge toke his oste and went towarde his enemyes, and losyde his gonnys of his ordynaunce uppone them, and faught with them, and anone the comons fledde away; but ther was many manne slayne of Lyncolneschyre, and the Lorde Wellys, Sere Thomas Delalonde, and Sere Thomas Dymmoke, knights, takene and beheddede.

Note 1. And in the x. yere. It may be remarked that the regnal years of Edward IV. commence on the fourth of March, “quo die Rex Edwardus iiijtus. incepit regnare [On that day King Edward IV began to reign];" -MS. Magnus Rotulus Pipa, 1 Edw. IV, com. Cornub. Cf. MS. Bib. Geo. III. Mus. Brit. 52. fol. 33, rº.

Note 2. The Lorde Welles his sonne. See the Excerpta Historica, p. 282, for the confession of Sir Robert Welles, which throws very considerable light on this history. It appears that the Duke of Clarence (age 20) took a much more active part in the conspiracy than is generally supposed; that the motive which actuated the multitude was chiefly the fear of the King's vengeance; that a servant of Clarence's was in the battle, and afforded Welles considerable assisttance; that when Lord Welles went to London pursuant to the King's commands, he desired his son, in the event of his hearing that he was in danger, to hasten to his assistance with as many followers as possible; that the real object of the rebellion was to place the crown on Clarence's head; and that both Clarence and Warwick had, for some time, been urging Lord Welles, and his son, to continue firm to their cause.

The following documents are given from the Close Rolls of 10 Edw. IV. (m. 8. dorso.) and are valuable illustrations of the history of this insurrection.

"De proclamationibus faciendis. - Rex vicecomiti Warr' et Leicestr' salutem. Præcipimus tibi firmiter injungentes, quod statim, post receptionem præsentium, in singulis locis infra ballivam, tuam tam infra libertates quam extra, ubi magis expediens videris, ex parte nostra publicas proclamationes fieri facias, in hæc verba [Of making proclamations. - The King to the Sheriff of Warwick and Leicester, greetings. We strictly command you, that immediately upon the receipt hereof, in all places within your bailiwick, as well within liberties as without, where you deem it most expedient, you cause public proclamations to be made on our behalf, in these words]:

"For as moche as hit hath plesyd God, of his godeness and grace, to send to our soveraigne Lord the victorye of his Rebelles and Traitours of his shire of Lincolne, late assembled in grete nombre, leveyng werre ayenst his Highness, contrary to their ligeaunce and duete; Oure said Soveraigne Lord, therefore, not willing his subgettis, other than such as now attend upon his most Royall Person, to be putte to charge, labour, and businesse, by vertue of his commissions of array, and other writing, late addressed to dyvers shires, citees, and townes, for the resistens of the malicious and traiterous purpose of the said Rebelles, wolle, and in the most straitest wise chargeth, that noon of his subgettes presume, ne take uppon hym, to ryse, ne make any assemble or gadering, by reason of any of the seid commissions or writings, ne be moeving, steryng, writing, or commaundement ´made, or hereafter to be made, by any persone or persones of what estate, degree, or condition sooever he be of, lesse than hit bee by the Kinges commission, Prive Seal, or writyng under his signet, of new to be made aftir this the xiij. day of Marche. And if any persone or persones presume, or take uppon theym or hym, to doe the contrary hereof, Our Said Soveraigne Lord woll repute and take hym and them soo doyng as his ennemyes and Rebelles, and wool procede to their lawfull Punycion in the most streitest wise, according to his Lawes and Statutes in such case ordeyned.

"Et hoc nullatenus omittas. Teste Rege apud Stamford xiij °. die Martii.

"Per Ipsum Regem [By the King Himself]"

(Here follow the names of counties.)

"De proclamationibus faciendis. - Rex vicecomiti Eborum salutem. Præcipimus tibi, quod statim post receptionem presentium, in singulis locis infra ballivam tuam, tam infra libertates quam extra, ubi magis expediens videris, ex parte nostra publicas proclamationes fieri facias in hæc verba [Of making proclamations. - The King to the Sheriff of York, greetings. We command you that immediately upon the receipt of these presents, in all places within your bailiwick, as well within liberties as without, where you deem it most expedient, you cause public proclamations to be made on our behalf in these words]:

"Howbeit that the King our Soveraine Lord graunted unto Georg Duc of Clarence, and Richard Earl of Warwyk, his pardon generall of all offences committed and doon ayenst him, afore the fest of Christmasse last passed, trusting thereby to have caused theym to have shewed unto him their naturall love, ligeaunce, and duetie, and to have assisted his Highness, as well in subdueing insurrections and rebellions late made ayenst him in the countie of Lincolne, as in all other things concerning the suertie of his persone; and, in trust that they soo wold have done according to their promisses to hym made, his said Highness auctorized theym by his commission undre his grete seal to assemble his subgetts in certain shires, and theym to have brought to his said Highnes, to the entent aforesaid; yet the said Duc and Earl, unnaturally, unkindly, and untruly intending his destruction and the subversion of his reaume, and the commonwele of the same, and to make the said Duke King of this his said Reaume, ayenst Gods law, mannes law, and all reason and conscience, dissimiled with his seid Highness, and, under colour thereof, falsly and traiterously provoked and stured, as well by their writings as otherwise, Sir Robert Welles, late calling himselfe Great Capitayne of the Commons of the seid shire of Lincolne, to continue the said insurrections and rebellions, and to levee warre ayenst hym, as they, by the same, soe dyd with banners displayed, avauncing theymselfe in plain bataylle, unto the time his said Highnesse, by the help of God, put them to flight; wherein the said Duc and Earl promitted to the said Sir Robert and Commons to have yeven them their assistences to the uttermost of their powers, and soo wolde have done, if God ne had yeven unto hym the said victorie, as the same Sir Robert Welles, Sir Thomas de la Laund, Richard Wareyn, and other have openly confessed and shewed before his seid Highnes, the Lordes of his blood, and the multitude of his subgettis attending upon hym in his host at this tyme; which Sir Robert Welles, and the said other pety capitaynes, affirmed to be true at their dethes, uncompelled, unstirred, or undesired soo to doo; and as by the confession of the said Robert Welles, made under his writing and signe manuell, it apperith. And after that the said Duc and Earl, understanding and seing that this ther seid labours wold not serve to the perfourmyng of their fals and traiterous purpose afore declared, laboured by their writings and messages sent into Yorkeshire into divers persons there, theym straitly charging to doo make open proclamations in their owne names, without making mention of his seid Highnes, that all maner men upon peyn of deth shuld come unto theym, and yeve theym their assistences in resisting of hym; whereupon his seid Highnes sent unto the said Duc and Earl, by Garter King of Armes, summonicion and warnyng of their said accusations undir his prive seal, straitly charging theym to come unto his said Highnes, resonably accompanyed according to their astates and degrees, to answer unto their said accusations; which to doo they presumptuously refused, and withdrew themselfe, and fled with their felaship into Lancashire; soo as his said Highness with his host for lak of vitaill might not follow them, to the intent that they might gadre his subgettes in gretter nombre, and to be able to performe their said fals and traiterous purpose and entent; for the which causes they have deserved to be published as fals traitours and rebelles, and to have the uttermost punition of the law; yet, nathelesse, our said Soveraigne Lord considering the nighness of blood that they be of unto him, and the tendre love which he hath afore time borne to theym, were therefore loth to lese theym, if they wold submitt theym to his grace, and put hym in suertie of their good demeaning hereafter.

"Wherefore our said Sovereigne Lord woll, and in the most straitest wyse chargeth, the said Duc and Earl, that they, in their persones, come in humble and obeysant wyse, and appier afore his Highnes the xxviij. day of this present month of March, Wednesday next, or afore, wheresoever he than shall be, to answer unto the said accusations; which if they woll soo doo, and come declare theymselfe nat guilty, his Highness woll be thereof right glad, and have hem in his grace and favour; and if they refuse thus to doo, then our said Soveraigne Lord reputeth, taketh, and declareth thaym as his rebelles and traitoures, willing and straitly charging all his subgetts to doo the same, and that noon of his subgetts from that time forth receive theym, ne eyther of theym ayd, favour, or assist with mete, drink, ne money, or otherwise, ne noon other persone which, after the said Duc and Earl have refused to come to our said Soverain Lord as is aforesaid, abydeth with theym, or aydeth theym, or assisteth in any wise; but that every of the King's subgetts putte hem in effectuell devir to take the said Duc and Earl, and all other soo abyding with theym, or aiding or assisting theym, as is abovesaid, and theym suerly bring to his Highnes uppon peyn of deth; And he that taketh and bringeth the said Duc or Earl shall have for his reward, to hym and his heires, an C. li. worth of his lond of yerely value, or M¹. li. in redy money, at his election; and for a knyght xx.li. worth of his lond, or C. marc in money; and for a squyer x. li. worth of his lond, or xl. li. in money; and over that cause our said soveraigne Lord to have hym and theym soo doing in the more tendre favour of his good grace at all times hereafter.

"Et hoc sub periculo incumbenti nullatenus omittas. Teste Rege apud Eborum xxiiijo die Martii [And under the penalty incumbent, do not omit in any way. Witnessed by the King at York on the twenty-third day of March].

"Per Ipsum Regem [By the King Himself]".

"Consimilia brevia diriguntur vicecomitibus in Com' subscriptis sub data predicta, videlicet, Majori et vicecomitibus Civitatis London''." (&c.)

"Rex Vicecomiti Eborum Salutem. Præcipimus tibi firmiter injungentes, quod, statim post receptionem præsentium, in singulis locis infra ballivam tuam, tam infra libertates quam extra, ubi magis expediens videris, ex parte nostra publicas proclamationes fieri facias, in hæc verba-

"Howbeit that the King our Soveraigne Lord graunted unto Georg Duke of Clarence, and Richard Earl of Warrewyk, his pardon generall of all offences committed and doone ayenst him, afore the fest of Cristemasse last past; trusting thereby to have caused theym to have shewed unto hym theyr naturall love, ligeaunce, and duetee, and to have assisted his Highnesse, as well in subdueing insurrections and rebellyons late made ayenst him in the Counte of Lincolne, as in all other things concerning the suertee of his persone; and in trust that they wold soo have done according to their promisses to hym made, his said Highnesse auctorised theym, by his commission under his great seall, to assemble his subgietts in certain shires, and them to have brought unto his said Highnesse, to th'entent aforesaid; yet the said Duke and Earl unnaturally, unkindely, and untruly entending his destruction, and the subversion of his reaume, and the commonwele of the same, and to make the seid Duke King of this his said Reaume, ayenst God's lawe, mannes lawe, all reason and conscience, dissimiled with his said Highness; and under colour thereof, falsly and traiterously provoked, laboured, and stured, as well by their writings as otherwise, Sir Robert Welles, late calling himselfe Grete Capitayne of the commons of the said Shire of Lincolne, to continue the said insurrections and rebellions, and to levee werre ayenst him, as they by the same soo did, with banners displayed, avauncing theymselfe in pleyn bataille, unto the time his said Highness, by the help of God, put theym to flyght; wherein the said Duke and Earl promytted to the said Sir Robert and Commons to have yeven theym their assistences to the uttermost of their powers, and soo wold have doone, yf God ne had yeven unto hym the said victorye, as the same Sir Robert Welles, Sir Thomas de la Laund, Richard Waryng, and other, have openly confessed and shewed before his said Highness, the Lordes of his blode, and the multitude of his subgietts attending upon him in his host at this time; which Sir Robert Welles, and the other pety Captaynes, affermed to be true at their dethes, uncompelled, unstured, or undesired soo to doe; and as by the confession of the said Sir Robert Wells, made under his writyng and sign manuell, it appereth; and after that the said Duke and Earl, understanding and seing that this ther said labours wold not serve in the performing of their fals and traiterous purpose, afore declared, laboured, by their writings and messages sent into Yorkeshire to dyvers persones there, theym streitly charging to doo make open proclamations in their owne names, without mention makeing of his said Highness, that all manner men, uppon peyn of deth, should come unto theym, and yeve theym their assistence in resisting of him; whereupon his said Highnesse sent unto the said Duke and Earl, by Garter Kyng of Armes, summonition and warnyng of their said accusations undre his privie seal, straitly charging theym to come unto his said Highness resonably accompanyed, according to their astates and degrees, to answere to their said accusations; which to doo they presumptuously refused, and withdrewe themselfe, and fled with their felaship into Lancashire, soo as his said Highness with his host, for lake of vitayl, might not follow theym, to th'entent that they might gather his subgetts in greter noumbre, and to be hable to perfourme their said fals and trayterous purpose and entent; ffor which causes they have deserved to be published as fals traitours and rebells, and to have the uttermost punytion of the lawe. Yet nathelesse our said soveraigne Lord considered the nyghnesse of of blode which they be of unto him, and the tender love which he hath afore time borne to theym, therefore was loth to have lost theym, yf they would have submitted theym to his grace, and to have put hym in suertee of their good beryng hereafter; wherefore he sent his writts of proclamation unto dyvers open places, straitly charging theym to have come and appered in their persones afore his Highness in humble and obeysaunt wyse, the xxviijth, day of this present month of Marche or before, to have aunswered unto the said accusations, shewing by the same that yf they soo would have done, and could have declared theymselfe not guilty, his Highness would have be therewith right gladd, and have had theym in his grace and favour, and that, though they soo cowde not have doon, yet his Highness would not have forgeten their seid nighness of blode, ne the love and favour that he aforetime bare to theym, but wold have ministred to theym ryghtwyssely his lawes with favour and pitee shewyng; which they did not, but obstinately refused soo to doo, and dayly aftir withdrew theymself more and more from his Highness; and after the said proclamations, made as before, it hath be evidently shewed by open confessions made at his citee of Yorke, afore our said Soveraigne and his Lordes than there being with hym, by dyvers persones of grete reputation, that the seid Duke and Earl intended the finall destruction of his most royall persone, and the subversion of this his reaume, and the commonwele of the same, which confessions the said persones have affirmed by their solempne othes, made upon the receyving of the blessed sacrament, to bee faithfull and true; wherefore, the præmisses considered, and the grete obstinacy which they shewed hemself to be of, and yet doo contrarye to their ligeaunce, faith, and duetee, our said soveraigne Lord, to the example of all other like offenders, reputeth, taketh, and declareth the said Duke and Earl as his Rebelles and Traytours, willing and straitly charging all his subgetts to doo the same; and that noon of his said subgetts from hensforth receyve theym, ne eyther of theym, ayd, favour, or assist with mete, drynke, or money, or otherwise; nor noo other persone beyng with, or adhering to them, or either of theym, but that every of his said subgetts putt hem in effectuell devoyr to take the said Duke and Earl, and the seid persones soe being with hem, or adhering to theym, or either of theym, and hem surely bring to the King, upon peyn of deth, and forfaiture of all that they may forfait; and he that soo doth shall have for his reward of either of theym C. li. worth of land by yere to him, and to his heires, or a Ml li. in redy money at his election.

"Et hoc nullatenus omittas. Teste meipso apud Notingham xxxj °. die Martii.

"Per Ipsum Regem [By the King Himself]".

(Here follow the names of counties.)

(From Madox's transcripts in the British Museum. MS. Add. 4614.)

Note 3. Woue. So in MS. for vowe.

Before 03 Feb 1470 [his son] Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles attacked Gainsborough Old Hall, Lincolnshire [Map] home of Thomas Burgh 1st Baron Burgh (age 39), a senior Yorkist, Edward IV's (age 27) Master of the Horse. It isn't known whether this attack was a consequence of local or national issues. King Edward IV of England (age 27) summoned Robert's father Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 42) and uncle-in-law Thomas Dymoke (age 42) (married to [his sister] Margaret Welles (age 38) sister of Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles) to London. Both initially went into Sanctuary, Westminster Abbey [Map] but were pardoned on 03 Mar 1470.

After 03 Mar 1470 [his son] Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles continued to resist King Edward IV of England (age 27) by raising forces in Lincolnshire. King Edward IV of England (age 27) travelled north and threatened Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles with the execution of his father (age 42) and Thomas Dymoke (age 42) if Robert persisted in rebellion.

On 12 Mar 1470 Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 42). Note. Some sources say on battlefield immediately prior to the battle. [his son] Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles succeeded 8th Baron Welles.

Before 23 Jan 1475 [his daughter] Joan Welles 9th Baroness Willoughby of Eresby died.

Christopher Willoughby 10th Baron Willoughby (age 22) de jure 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. Margaret Jenney Baroness Willoughby of Eresby (age 15) by marriage Baroness Willoughby de Eresby.

King Edward IV of England (age 32) had father and son Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 47) and [his son] Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles posthumously attainted some five years after the Welles' Rebellion to ensure Richard Hastings Baron Willoughby (age 42) would continue to enjoy the benefit of the Welles' estates; he was given a life interest in the estates on 23 Jan 1475. Another example of King Edward IV of England (age 32) being somewhat disingenuous with the legal system to his own advantage. He, Edward (age 32) was, in effect, disinheriting Christopher Willoughby 10th Baron Willoughby (age 22) who should have inherited Baron Willoughby de Eresby and [his half-brother] John Welles 1st Viscount Welles (age 25) who should have inherited Baron Welles following Joan's death.

Around 1485 [his half-brother] John Welles 1st Viscount Welles (age 35) succeeded 10th Baron Welles when the attainders on Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby (age 57) and [his son] Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles were reversed.

[his daughter] Joan Welles 9th Baroness Willoughby of Eresby was born to Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby and Joan Willoughby 7th Baroness Willoughby of Eresby.

[his son] Robert Welles 8th Baron Willoughby 8th Baron Welles was born to Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby and Joan Willoughby 7th Baroness Willoughby of Eresby.

Royal Ancestors of Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby 1428-1470

Kings Wessex: Great x 13 Grand Son of King Edmund "Ironside" I of England

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 10 Grand Son of Owain "Great" King Gwynedd

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 16 Grand Son of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg King Deheubarth

Kings Powys: Great x 11 Grand Son of Maredudd ap Bleddyn King Powys

Kings England: Great x 5 Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Kings Scotland: Great x 8 Grand Son of William "Lion" I King Scotland

Kings Franks: Great x 9 Grand Son of Louis VII King Franks

Kings France: Great x 6 Grand Son of Philip "Bold" III King France

Ancestors of Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby 1428-1470

Great x 4 Grandfather: Adam Welles 1st Baron Welles

Great x 3 Grandfather: Adam Welles 3rd Baron Welles

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Welles 4th Baron Welles

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas Bardolf 2nd Baron Bardolf

Great x 3 Grandmother: Margaret Bardolf Baroness Welles

Great x 4 Grandmother: Agnes Grandison Baroness Bardolf

Great x 1 Grandfather: John Welles 5th Baron Welles 6 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Ros 1st Baron Ros Helmsley

Great x 3 Grandfather: William Ros 2nd Baron Ros Helmsley

Great x 4 Grandmother: Maud Vaux Baroness Ros

Great x 2 Grandmother: Maud Ros Baroness Welles 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Margery Badlesmere Baroness Ros of Helmsley 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

GrandFather: Eudo Welles 3 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Mowbray 2nd Baron Mowbray 3 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Mowbray 3rd Baron Mowbray 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Aline de Braose Baroness Mowbray 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Mowbray 4th Baron Mowbray Baron Segrave 2 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Henry Plantagenet 3rd Earl of Leicester 3rd Earl Lancaster Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Joan Plantagenet Baroness Mowbray Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Maud Chaworth

Great x 1 Grandmother: Eleanor Mowbray Countess Rockingham 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Stephen Segrave 3rd Baron Segrave

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Segrave 4th Baron Segrave 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Alice Fitzalan Baroness Segrave 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Elizabeth Segrave 5th Baroness Segrave Baroness Mowbray Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Margaret Plantagenet 2nd Countess Norfolk Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Alice Hales Countess Norfolk

Father: Lionel Welles 6th Baron Welles 4 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Robert Fitzralph

Great x 3 Grandfather: Ralph Greystoke 1st Baron Greystoke

Great x 4 Grandmother: Elizabeth Neville

Great x 2 Grandfather: William Greystoke 2nd Baron Greystoke 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Hugh Audley 1st Baron Audley of Stratton Audley 2 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Alice Audley Baroness Greystoke and Neville 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Iseult Mortimer 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 1 Grandfather: Ralph Greystoke 3rd Baron Greystoke 5 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Henry Fitzhenry of Ravensworth

Great x 2 Grandmother: Joan Fitzhenry Baroness Greystoke

GrandMother: Maud Greystoke 6 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 6 x Great Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Robert Clifford 3rd Baron Clifford 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Maud Clare Baroness Clifford Baroness Welles 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Roger Clifford 5th Baron Clifford 4 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Maurice Berkeley 7th and 2nd Baron Berkeley 2 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Isabel Berkeley Baroness Clifford Baroness Musgrave 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Eva Zouche

Great x 1 Grandmother: Catherine Clifford Baroness Greystoke 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl Warwick

Great x 3 Grandfather: Thomas Beauchamp 11th Earl Warwick 6 x Great Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Alice Tosny Countess Warwick 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Maud Beauchamp Baroness Clifford 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 3 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Katherine Mortimer Countess Warwick 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Joan Geneville Baroness Mortimer 2nd Baroness Geneville 7 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Richard Welles 7th Baron Welles, Baron Willoughby 5 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: William Waterton of Waterton in Lincolnshire

Great x 1 Grandfather: John Waterton

Great x 3 Grandfather: Roger Newmarch of Womersley

Great x 2 Grandmother: Elizabeth Newmarch

GrandFather: Robert Waterton Constable

Great x 3 Grandfather: Piers Mauley

Great x 2 Grandfather: Piers Mauley

Great x 1 Grandmother: Joan Mauley

Great x 4 Grandfather: Peter Bruce

Great x 3 Grandfather: Peter Bruce

Great x 4 Grandmother: Juetta Flamville

Great x 2 Grandmother: Joan Bruce

Great x 4 Grandfather: Gilbert fitzRoger Lancaster

Great x 3 Grandmother: Hawise Lancaster

Mother: Joan or Cecily Waterton

Great x 1 Grandfather: Robert Fleming of Woodhall

GrandMother: Cecily Fleming