Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire

Wiltshire is in South-West England.

556 Battle of Beran Burg

652 Battle of Bradford on Avon

825 Battle of Ellendun

878 Battle of Edington

1450 Jack Cade's Rebellion

1521 Trial and Execution of the Duke of Buckingham

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, All Cannings [Map]

The River Avon West, Wiltshire rises around All Cannings, Wiltshire [Map] in the Vale of Pewsey being formed from many streams from where it flows past Patney, Wiltshire [Map], around Marden Henge aka Hatfield Earthworks [Map] and Wilsford Henge [Map], Rushall, Wiltshire [Map] where it joins the River Avon East, Wiltshire to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, All Cannings, Rybury Camp [Map]

Rybury Camp, Wiltshire is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire, Avebury Causewayed Enclosures.

Rybury Camp, Wiltshire [Map]. English Heritage:

This monument includes a causewayed enclosure and slight univallate hillfort situated on the summit of a very steeply sloping and prominent downland ridge called Clifford’s Hill. The causewayed enclosure survives as an oval interior defined by two concentric oval banks with causeways and an outer partially buried ditch with similar causeways which have been surrounded and partially overlain by the earthworks of the slight univallate hillfort. The inner rampart of the causewayed enclosure stands up to 1m high and encloses an area measuring 130m long by 100m wide. It is surrounded by a second bank which survives as a scarp of up to 2.3m high with an outer ditch of 0.2m deep and 3m wide. This second rampart encloses an inner area of approximately 180m long by 160m wide. The slight univallate hillfort is also oval in plan and surrounds the earlier earthworks on all except the north east side. It is defined by a single rampart bank of up to 1.1m high with an outer ditch of up to 1.5m deep and has a single southern entrance. The interior measures approximately 190m long by 150m wide. The whole interior and ramparts relating to both structures have been disturbed by pits associated with post medieval chalk extraction which give an overall uneven appearance. A trial trench in 1963 yielded over 600 flint flakes, a few bones and teeth. Chance finds in 1964 and 1967 included Neolithic pottery. However, the site was more fully understood following extensive field survey in 1995 when its complex development was revealed.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, All Cannings, Tan Hill [Map]

Druidical Temples in the County of Wilts Chapter X. A large fair, alike devoted to pleasure and to business, is annually held on this hill [Tan Hill, Wiltshire [Map]]. The day appropriated to the festival of Saint Anne stands in the Romish Calendar as the 26th of July, but, on the institution of the new style, it naturally fell on the 6th of August, on which day that anniversary of joy and trade, Tan Hill Fair, is now ever kept. This fair of Saint Anne, the successor nearly in name and nature (as I suppose) to the feriæ of the goddess Diana, is well I known by fame throughout the county of Wilts, whose rural population recognize as Tan Hill Fair, that which is evidently the fair of St. Anne's Hill. The corruption of St. Anne's Hill to Tan Hill is curious, but obviously thus. St. Anne's Hill — S'tan Hill— Tan Hill.

The Wiltshire Wansdye remains highly visible in the landscape especially when it is crossing chalk downland that has little vegetation to hide it. Its date is somewhat uncertain; most sources consider it to have been constructed around 600AD give or take a hundred years either was. It was definitely constructed before the 9th century when begins to occur in charters.

It appears to start west of Savernake Forest [Map], after which it travels broadly west through Shaw Medieval Village [Map], Furze Hill [Map], Tan Hill, Wiltshire [Map], Shepherd's Shore, Wiltshire [Map], Furze Knoll [Map] after which it disappears, possibly being absorbed into the Roman Road

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, All Cannings, Tan Hill Barrows [Map]

Tan Hill Barrows is also in Avebury Bronze Age Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1859 V6 Pages 317-336. Still further east, on St. Anne's [Map], or as it is commonly called, Tan Hill [Map]1, to the south of Wansdyke and overlooking the villages of Allington and All Cannings, are four barrows [Map], all of the bowl form, surrounded by shallow trenches.

Note 1. The vulgar name of Tan Hill has almost supplanted its proper designation of St. Anne's Hill, by which it is still known on the Maps. The great annual fair held here on old St. Anne's day, (Aug. 6th) is sufficient proof of the etymology, and of the unsatisfactory nature of the speculations of the late Canon Bowles and others, by whom its name was connected with that of the Celtic Jupiter, Taranis. —(Bremhill, 1828, p. 35; Hermes Brit. p. 14.) Stronger testimony may be derivable from Anglo-Saxon charters of the 10th century, of Edward the elder, Edwy and Edgar, in which, if Fosbroke's reading is to be accepted, mention is made, in describing the boundaries of the adjoining parish of Stanton, of "Anne's Thorn" and "Anne's Stone," probably on this very hill, (Hoare's Regist. Wiltun, p. 6; Cod. Dip. Nos. 335, 467, and 482). In^the 17th century, Aubrey writes of "St. Anne's Hill" as "vulgarly called Tann Hill, where every yeare on St. Anne's day (26 July) is kept a great fair, within an old camp." (Nat. Hist, of Wilts, p. 114). Mr. Duke, 'who thought the fair of St. Anne may have succeeded to the feriæ of Diana, observes "the corruption of St. Anne's Hill to Tan Hill is obviously thus, St. Anne's Hill — S'tan Hill — Tan Hill." (Druidical Temples of Wilts, 1846, p. 95.) There can be little doubt that this hill has been the site of pagan rites, but to what deity these were paid, there is, we think, no proof. The Beltein may likely enough have been here celebrated; but these midsummer fires were especially in honour of the solar god, Belin. The hill, it seems clear, derives its name from that of the patron saint of the parish church (All Cannings) viz. St. Anne.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, All Cannings, Tan Hill Escarpment Barrows [Map]

Tan Hill Escarpment Barrows is also in Avebury Bronze Age Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1859 V6 Pages 317-336. Three low barrows [Map], between St. Anne's Hill and Milk Hill, on the escarpment of the downs close to Wansdyke, were examined; in the first of which a few scattered bones of ruminants, and in the third, traces of incinerated bones were alone met with.

17. In the second, at a depth of two feet, were bones and teeth of sheep and oxen; at three feet two small pieces of deer's horn and a fragment of coarse black pottery, and at four and a half feet, two circular cists scooped out of the chalk rock, a foot or two apart, each two feet and a half in diameter. These were filled with grey ashes, with no distinct trace of burnt bone. Deposits of this kind, to the exclusion of interments, properly so called, have before been found in the barrows of Wiltshire, and are termed cineraria in the descriptions of Sir R. C. Hoare.

On Walker's Hill, Alton-Priors Down, near the very large long barrow [Map], by which it is distinguished1, are three small mounds [Map]; two of which disclosed marks of interment after cremation; they had been previously opened. The smaller one was not examined.

Note 1. Ancient Wilts, vol. ii. pp. 12, 46. Salisbury Vol. of the Arch. Inst. p. 98.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Allengrove

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Allengrove, Giant's Cave Long Barrow [Map]

Giant's Cave Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Giant's Cave Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England

The monument includes a chambered long barrow set on the floor of a valley immediately north of a tributary of the River Avon. The barrow mound is orientated east-west and is trapezoidal in plan. It has maximum dimensions of 56m in length, is 26m wide and 2.5m high. Limestone slabs on the surface of the mound at the eastern end represent the chambers of what was a laterally chambered tomb of the Cotswold-Severn group. Hollows and a spoil heap towards the centre of the mound represent an early exploration of the site although no details are known. Although no longer visible at ground level, quarry ditches run parallel to the north and south sides of the barrow mound. These have become infilled over the years but survive as buried features c.3m wide.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Allington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Alvediston [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Barbury Castle [Map]

Barbury Castle is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Around 550BC. Barbury Castle [Map] is a Multivallate Hill Fort in Wiltshire located on the Ridgeway Path. It has two deep defensive ditches and ramparts. The site was first occupied around the 6th Century BC. In 1996 a geophysical survey revealed traces of forty hut circles inside the castle.

Around 550. Gewisse was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom based in the upper Thames region around Dorchester on Thames, Oxfordshire [Map]. In 552 the Gewisse captured Old Sarum [Map]. In 556 the Gewisse captured Barbury Castle [Map].

In 556 Cynric King Wessex and Ceawlin King Wessex defeated the Britons at Barbury Castle [Map] during the Battle of Beran Burg. Barbury Castle [Map] possibly of strategic importance since it is located on the Ridgeway with extensive views over the Thames valley.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Barford St Martin [Map]

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park, Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wiltshire [Map], Wardour, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Wiltshire [Map], Upper [Map] and Lower [Map] Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Wiltshire [Map], Barford St Martin, Wiltshire [Map], Burcombe, Wiltshire [Map] and Wilton, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton, Wiltshire [Map] after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Baydon [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Berwick St James [Map]

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Berwick St John

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Berwick St John, Winkelbury Camp [Map]

Winkelbury Camp is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Pitt-Rivers. EXCAVATIONS IN WINKELBURY CAMP [Map], SOUTH WILTSHIRE.

Wessex from the Air Plates 2 and 3. Winkelbury [Map] is an interesting camp built on a chalk spur projecting northwards over the village of Berwick St. John. It is divided into two parts by a cross rampart, its northern area is dotted with pits, and the highest part of the area is over 100 ft. above an encircling rampart which has in many places slipped and foundered into its ditch below. It is convenient to compare Hambledon with Winkelbury, for Winkelbury was excavated by General Pitt-Rivers (Excavations in Cranborne Chase, ii), and his conclusions may be briefly summarized.

He found a good deal of pottery of various types, all of which he considered to be contemporary and pre-Roman; one type was new to him. All the pottery was distributed over the area of the camp and under the rampart: whoever built the camp must have been responsible for the pottery, for no relics pointing to a later date were found except a few fragments of Romano-British pottery which were admitted to be without significance. It is possible to look upon Winkelbury as built as a whole and not reconstructed afterwards.

Although Pitt-Rivers was unable to identify some of the pottery he found at Winkelbury, it is now known that it is comparable with that discovered by Captain and Mrs. Cunnington at All Cannings Cross and assigned by them to the transition period when the culture of the Early Iron Age was beginning to replace that of the Bronze Age, and its date in Wiltshire is about 500 B.C. Mrs. Cunnington, commenting on the pottery from Winkelbury, says: 'All the Pottery from Winkelbury illustrated in Plate CLVIII (Excavations in Cranborne Chase, ii) with the exception of Figs. 7 and 10, Romano-British wares, might have come from All Cannings Cross' (All Cannings Cross, p. 198).

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bishopstone [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bishopstrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Blackland

On 16 May 1675 Thomas Hungerford (age 73) died at Blackland, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Blunsdon St Andrew [Map]

Ermine Street 41b travels from Speen, Newbury [Map] through Baydon, Wiltshire [Map], Wanborough, Wiltshire [Map], Blunsdon St Andrew, Wiltshire [Map] to Cirencester, Gloucestershire [Map]. Whilst Margery's scheme doesn't say so, the road appears to continues from Cirencester, Gloucestershire [Map] to Gloucester, Gloucestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Blunsdon St Andrew, St Leonards Church [Map]

On 30 Nov 1347 Ivo Fitzwarin was born to William Fitzwarin (age 31). He was baptised at St Leonards Church, Blunsdon [Map]. His wardship was originally granted to Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England (age 33) but she sold it in the following year for 1100 marks.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Boscombe [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bourton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bradford on Avon [Map]

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 652. This year Kenwal fought at Bradford by the Avon [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bratton

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bratton Camp [Map]

Bratton Camp, Wiltshire is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1872 V13 Pages 339-342. Dr. Thurnam began by observing that the Barrow on and around which those present were now standing, though placed in the centre of the British encampment, popularly known as Bratton Castle [Map] is probably of much earlier date, and has none but an accidental connection with that earthwork. It is a Long Barrow of large size, measuring 230 feet in length, lies east and west; and was opened by Dr. Thurnam in 1866. It belongs to the class of Long Barrows, a form of tumulus which differs essentially from the much more numerous Round Barrows, by which, on the Wiltshire Downs, they are everywhere surrounded. These latter, the Round Barrows, much more commonly than otherwise — at least three times as often — contain interments of burnt bodies, often accompanied by bronze weapons or implements,and especially bronze knives or daggers, and by ornaments of glass, amber, jet or shale, and gold. Sometimes there are flint and other stone implements, but these are all of a kind known to have been in use at the same time as those of bronze. The Round Barrows belong, essentially, and as a rule, to the Bronze Age of this country, and to an age of burning the dead. When the interment is that of the unburnt body — which, in Wiltshire, is less than one in four — the body has been buried with the knees bent and drawn up towards the chest. That the burnt and unburnt inter- ments are of one and the same period is proved by the similarity, or rather identity, of the accompanying implements and ornaments.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bratton Long Barrow [Map]

Bratton Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Bratton. 1. [Bratton Long Barrow [Map]] In Bratton Camp. Length 230ft. (Thurnam); E. and W. Opened by Wm. Cunnington, who found a secondary burial of three skeletons near the top of the larger end, but failed to find the primary one. Thurnam, who re-opened it in 1866, seems to have found the primary burial on the floor of the barrow, consisting of "a heap of imperfectly burnt, or rather charred, human bones, apparently those of one or two adults"1 This barrow is now a rather unshapely heap and much cut about; the mound is not ploughed but it stands on cultivated ground and all trace of the ditches is obliterated. O.M. 45, NW.; A.W. I. 55; Arch. XLII. 180, 192; W.A.M. XIII. 341.

Note 1. In Gough's Camden I. 146 it is said that "many human bones mixed vith stag's horns, fragments of urns, and pieces of iron weapons, and mill-stones," have been found "under the mound."

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bremhill

On 03 May 1602 Thomas Hungerford was born to John Hungerford (age 44) at Bremhill, Wiltshire.

On 31 Mar 1636 John Hungerford (age 16) died at Bremhill, Wiltshire.

On 31 Mar 1636 John Hungerford (age 78) died at Bremhill, Wiltshire.

In 1637 George Hungerford was born to Edward Hungerford at Bremhill, Wiltshire.

In May 1712 George Hungerford (age 75) died at Bremhill, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Brimslade [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Britford [Map]

On 16 Nov 1739 Mary Clarke died. She was buried at Britford, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Britford, St Peter's Church [Map]

On 17 May 1521 Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham (age 43) was beheaded at Tower Hill [Map] for no specific reason other than his having a significant amount of Plantagenet blood and was, therefore, considered a threat by Henry VIII (age 29). He was posthumously attainted by Act of Parliament on 31 July 1523, disinheriting his children. He was buried at St Peter's Church, Britford [Map]. Duke of Buckingham, Earl Stafford and Baron Stafford extinct.

His father Henry Stafford 2nd Duke of Buckingham had been executed for his part in Buckingham's Rebellion, his great-grandfather Humphrey Stafford 1st Duke of Buckingham was killed at the 1460 Battle of Northampton, and his great-great grand-father was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury, not forgetting his great-uncle Henry Stafford who was killed at the Battle of Barnet and his daughter Margaret Stafford (age 10) who was burned at the stake for her part in Bigod's Rebellion.

On 03 Jan 1721 Mary Smyth Lady Bouverie died. She was buried at St Peter's Church, Britford [Map].

On 21 Nov 1736 Edward des Bouverie 2nd Baronet (age 46) died at Aix in France. He was buried at St Peter's Church, Britford [Map]. His brother Jacob Bouverie 1st Viscount Folkestone (age 42) succeeded 3rd Baronet Bouverie of St Catherine Cree Church in London.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Broad Chalke [Map]

Before 06 May 1578, the date he was buried at Broad Chalke, Wiltshire [Map], Edward St Lo (age 59) died.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Broad Hinton

In 1525 Dorothy Wroughton was born to William Wroughton of Broad Hinton (age 15) at Broad Hinton, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bronham

Around 1492 Edward Bayntun was born to John Bayntun of Bromham at Bronham, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bulford

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bulford, Longbarrow Clump [Map]

Longbarrow Clump, Bulford is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows, Stonehenge Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Bulford. 1. "Longbarrow Clump [Map]," on sloping ground, S. of Bulford village, close to and S. of railway line. Length 133ft.; E. and W. There seem to be no records of this barrow, and it is not shown by Hoare. It is a high mound planted with trees, otherwise in fairly good condition. The ground on which it stands is now down to grass, but it was formerly ploughed right up to the edge of the mound, and the ditches are obliterated. O.M. 54 SE.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Burbage

In 1568 Margaret Butler was born to William Butler (age 38) at Burbage, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Burcombe [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Castle Combe

Around 1054 Reginald Dunstanville was born at Castle Combe, Wiltshire.

Around 1080 Alan Dunstanville was born to Reginald Dunstanville (age 26) at Castle Combe, Wiltshire.

In 1130 Adeliza Dunstanville was born to Alan Dunstanville (age 50) at Castle Combe, Wiltshire.

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley was born to John Writhe in Colatford, Wiltshire. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe, Wiltshire or Cricklade, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Castle Combe, Green Barrow Farm Long Barrow [Map]

Green Barrow Farm Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Green Barrow Farm Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England 1018419

The monument includes a long barrow 240m south west of Green Barrow Farm on level farmland to the east of the village of Castle Combe. The monument has a long rounded mound up to 1.5m high interpreted as a long barrow which has been spread by ploughing. It is 57m long on a NNE-SSW axis and 43m wide on a SSE-NNW axis. Crossing the mound towards the south west there is a slight linear depression interpreted as a former field boundary. The barrow from which Green Barrow Farm takes its name is recorded in Scrope's History of Castle Combe as a long oblong mound, levelled by its owner in 1852.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Castle Combe, Lugbury aka Littleton Drew Long Barrow [Map]

Lugbury aka Littleton Drew Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Lugbury aka Littleton Drew Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England 1010397

The monument includes a long barrow set on level ground above the valley of By Brook, a tributary of the River Avon. It is orientated east-west and appears rectangular in shape. The monument measures 56m long, 38m wide and 1.5m high. Towards the eastern end of the mound are the remains of a limestone chamber comprising a capstone, 3m by 2m in size, leaning against the western side of two large uprights which measure 2m by 1m. Flanking ditches, from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument, run parallel to the north and south sides of the mound. These have been infilled over the years but survive as buried features c.3m wide. The monument was partially excavated by Colt-Hoare in 1821 and again by Scrope in 1854/5. Finds included twenty-six skeletons in four limestone chambers.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1856 V3 Pages 164-177. On a Cromlech-tumulus called Lugbury [Map], near Littleton Drew by John Thurnam (age 45), M.D., F.S.A.

22 Littleton Drew Barrow. This [Lugbury aka Littleton Drew Long Barrow [Map]] was first noticed by John Aubrey in his MS., "Monumenta Britannica," in the seventeenth century; it was called "Lugbury." It lies in the parish of Nettleton, but close to Littleton Drew, in Wiltshire, just outside the boundary of our county. It measures 180 feet in length, and 90 feet in breadth, its greatest elevation being six feet. Its direction is nearly due east and west. There are three stones at the east end, on the slope of the barrow, thirty feet from its base; the two uprights are six feet six inches apart, two feet thick, and four feet wide; one is six feet six inches high, the other five feet six inches. Resting on the mound and leaning against the uprights is a large stone, twelve feet long, six feet wide, and two feet thick. A cistern was discovered about sixty feet from the east end, containing one skeleton. Another cistern was found on the south side. Three other cisterns were also found, about ten feet long, four feet wide, and two feet deep, formed of rough stone. The total number of skeletons found numbered twenty-six. Several flint flakes were also discovered.

See "Crania Britannica," vol. II.

Also "Ancient Wilts," vol. II, p99 (Hoar).

Also "History of Castle Combe," p7 (Scrope).

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Nettleton, 1. "Littleton Drew Barrow [Map],"1 or "Lugbury," on the Nettleton — Littleton Drew parish boundary. Length 185ft. (Hoare); E. and W. A chambered, stone-built barrow, with two large upright stones and a third large flat stone leaning up against them, near the E. end of the mound. In 1821 Hoare2 cut a trench 150ft. in length down the mound to the west of the standing stones, and found a burial of a single crouched skeleton on the floor of the barrow about 30ft. from them, with a small pointed flint implement. After this the field came under cultivation, and in 1854 a stone cist or chamber was brought to light by the plough, and subsequently Mr. Poulett Scrope, the then owner, made a "complete examination " of the mound, when three other chambers, all on the south side, were found. In these there were nine, seven, and ten skeletons respectively, the fourth chamber being empty.

The field is now down to grass, but the mound has been much spread about by cultivation, and the ditches are scarcely discernible. O.M. 19 NW.; A. W. II. 99, Roman Æra, 101—2; Arch. xlii. 200, 203, 209; W.A.M. iii. 164 (Thurnam); Cr. Brit. PL 24; Gent. Mag. 1822, xcii. 160; Hoare 's MS. (Devizes Museum), Pt. I. p. 160; MS. Cat. 56—65.

Note 1. As Dr. Thurnam remarks both Aubrey and Sir B. C. Hoare connected the barrow with Littleton Drew rather than with Nettleton, because they had'an idea that the name "Drew" had some Druidical connection.

Note 2.Sir B. C. Hoare opened this barrow after his second volume of An. Wilts was published, and his account of the work is contained in a letter from him to the Gentleman's Magazine for 1822, referred to above; practically the whole of this letter is reprinted as an appendix to Poulett Scrope's History of Castle Combe (p. 391). The fullest account of the barrow and of its contents is to be found in the paper by Thurnam in the Wilts Arch. Mag., also referred to above.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Charlton-All-Saints [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Charlton-All-Saints, Trafalgar House Salisbury [Map]

On 08 May 1904 Mary Jane Agar Countess Nelson (age 81) died at Trafalgar House Salisbury, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Chicksgrove

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lower Chicksgrove [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Upper Chicksgrove [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Chilton Foliat

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Chilton Foliat, St Mary's Church

In 1772 Edward Popham (age 68) died. She was buried at St Mary's Church, Chilton Foliat.

In 1836 Elizabeth Andrew (age 53) died. She was buried at St Mary's Church, Chilton Foliat.

On 16 Jun 1843 General Edward William Leyborne Popham (age 78) died. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Chilton Foliat.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Chittern Anstey

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Chittern Anstey, Knook Castle Long Barrow [Map]

Knook Castle Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Knook. 5.. [Knook Castle Long Barrow [Map]] On Knook Down, NE. of "Knook Barrow," E. of Bowl's Barrow, and N. of " Old Ditch." Length 78ft; E. and W. Opened in 1801. Under the usual stratum of black earth three skeletons were found near the E. end, and a little to the W. of these another skeleton. This barrow stands on uncultivated down and is in fair condition. It is a small mound, flat, low, and broad; the ditches are fairly well defined. O.M. 52 NE.; A. W. I. 86; Arch. xlii. 180. Referred to by Thurnam as "Knook b."

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Chittern Anstey, Knook Long Barrow [Map]

Knook Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Knook. 2. "Knook Barrow [Map]," on Knook Down, E. of the "British Village." Length 90ft. (Hoare); a recent measurement 100ft.; nearly N. and S. Opened by Wm. Cunnington 1801 — 2, when he found under a heap of flint and marl stones, and on a pavement of flints, a number of charred human and other animal bones, and charred wood; the bones seemed to be those of seven or eight individuals. A secondary burial of four headless skeletons was also found near the centre of the mound, at a depth of about 18in. The barrow was reopened by Thurnam without further result. This barrow stands on uncultivated down land and is in fair condition, but with some rabbits in it; the ditches are distinct. O.M. 52 NE.; A. W. I. 83; Arch. xlii. 180, 192; xv. 345. This is the barrow referred to by Thurnam as " Knook a."

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Cholderton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Christian Malford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Clarendon Palace

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1664. Thence to my Lord's again, and my Lord being up, was sent for up, and he and I alone. He did begin with a most solemn profession of the same confidence in and love for me that he ever had, and then told me what a misfortune was fallen upon me and him: in me, by a displeasure which my Chancellor (age 55) did show to him last night against me, in the highest and most passionate manner that ever any man did speak, even to the not hearing of any thing to be said to him: but he told me, that he did say all that could be said for a man as to my faithfullnesse and duty to his Lordship, and did me the greatest right imaginable. And what should the business be, but that I should be forward to have the trees in Clarendon Park marked and cut down, which he, it seems, hath bought of my Lord Albemarle (age 55); when, God knows! I am the most innocent man in the world in it, and did nothing of myself, nor knew of his concernment therein, but barely obeyed my Lord Treasurer's (age 57) warrant for the doing thereof. And said that I did most ungentlemanlike with him, and had justified the rogues in cutting down a tree of his; and that I had sent the veriest Fanatique [Deane (age 30)] that is in England to mark them, on purpose to nose [provoke] him. All which, I did assure my Lord, was most properly false, and nothing like it true; and told my Lord the whole passage. My Lord do seem most nearly affected; he is partly, I believe, for me, and partly for himself. So he advised me to wait presently upon my Lord, and clear myself in the most perfect manner I could, with all submission and assurance that I am his creature both in this and all other things; and that I do owne that all I have, is derived through my Lord Sandwich (age 38) from his Lordship. So, full of horror, I went, and found him busy in tryals of law in his great room; and it being Sitting-day, durst not stay, but went to my Lord and told him so: whereupon he directed me to take him after dinner; and so away I home, leaving my Lord mightily concerned for me. I to the office, and there sat busy all the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Jul 1664. Up, and a while to my office, and then home with Deane (age 30) till dinner, discoursing upon the business of my Chancellor's (age 55) timber in Clarendon Parke, and how to make a report therein without offending him; which at last I drew up, and hope it will please him. But I would to God neither I nor he ever had had any thing to have done with it! Dined together with a good pig, and then out by coach to White Hall, to the Committee for Fishing; but nothing done, it being a great day to-day there upon drawing at the Lottery of Sir Arthur Slingsby (age 41). I got in and stood by the two Queenes [Note. Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England (age 25) and Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England (age 54) ] and the Duchesse of Yorke (age 27), and just behind my Baroness Castlemayne (age 23), whom I do heartily adore; and good sport it was to see how most that did give their ten pounds did go away with a pair of globes only for their lot, and one gentlewoman, one Mrs. Fish, with the only blanke. And one I staid to see drew a suit of hangings valued at £430, and they say are well worth the money, or near it. One other suit there is better than that; but very many lots of three and fourscore pounds. I observed the King (age 34) and Queenes (age 54) did get but as poor lots as any else. But the wisest man I met with was Mr. Cholmley (age 31), who insured as many as would, from drawing of the one blank for 12d.; in which case there was the whole number of persons to one, which I think was three or four hundred. And so he insured about 200 for 200 shillings, so that he could not have lost if one of them had drawn it, for there was enough to pay the £10; but it happened another drew it, and so he got all the money he took.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Clench [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Clyffe Pypard

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Clyffe Pypard, St Peter's Church [Map]

St Peter's Church, Clyffe Pypard, Wiltshire [Map]. Monument to Thomas Spackman by John Devall who was the Royal Master Mason. And Pevsner and his wife are buried there.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Codford St Mary [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Colatford

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley was born to John Writhe in Colatford, Wiltshire. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe, Wiltshire or Cricklade, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Colerne

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Colerne, Bury Camp [Map]

Bury Camp is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1856 V3 Pages 67-86. Bury Wood camp [Map], or North Wood camp, referred to by Whitaker as the probable Danish fortress, is in the parish of Colerne, on the borders of Grloucestersliire, and within about half a mile of the Roman road, the Fosse. "It has," says Aubrey, "double-works [and is] therefore not Roman." It contains about twenty-five acres, and is situate on a promontory of Colerne Down, from which it is separated by a double, deep rectilinear rampart, having a single entrance in the centre facing the south-west. The other sides, says the same writer, are well secured by the precipice, at the bottom of which runs a stream. Within the area is a small subsidiary earthwork, about an acre in extent, and with an opening facins: the west.1 The name of Doncombe Bottom, which attaches to the ravine below the camp, may possibly refer to the Danes.

Note 1. See a good plan in Hoare's "Ancient Wilts," vol. II, p. 103, from which our wood engraving has been reduced. See also "Roman Era," p. 103. For this engraving, and for that of Bratton Camp [Map], also reduced from a plate in "Ancient Wilts," vol. I., p. 55, the Committee of the Society are indebted to one of the members, the Rev. E. Meyrick.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Collingbourne Ducis [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Collingbourne Kingston [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Collingbourne Kingston Long Barrow [Map]

Collingbourne Kingston Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Collingbourne Kingston. 21. [Collingbourne Kingston Long Barrow [Map]]. On Fairmile Down. Length 137ft.; E. and W. There is no recorded opening of this barrow, but it appears to have been dug into in four separate places. The mound is otherwise in good condition and stands on unploughed down land. The ditches on either side are unusually deep and well defined. O.M. 42, SE.; W.A.M. viii. 156 (et passim). Not shown by Hoare.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Coombe Bissett [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Corsham

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1015. This year was the great council at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]; where Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia betrayed Sigferth and Morcar, the eldest thanes belonging to the Seven Towns. He allured them into his bower, where they were shamefully slain. Then the king took all their possessions, and ordered the widow of Sigferth to be secured, and brought within Malmsbury [Map]. After a little interval, Edmund Etheling (age 25) went and seized her, against the king's (age 49) will, and had her to wife. Then, before the Nativity of St. Mary, went the etheling west-north into the Five Towns58, and soon plundered all the property of Sigferth and Morcar; and all the people submitted to him. At the same time came King Knute (age 20) to Sandwich, Kent [Map], and went soon all about Kent into Wessex, until he came to the mouth of the Frome; and then plundered in Dorset, and in Wiltshire, and in Somerset. King Ethelred (age 49), meanwhile, lay sick at Corsham, Wiltshire; and Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia collected an army there, and Edmund the etheling (age 25) in the north. When they came together, the alderman designed to betray Edmund the etheling (age 25), but he could not; whereupon they separated without an engagement, and sheered off from their enemies. Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia then seduced forty ships from the king, and submitted to Knute (age 20). The West-Saxons also submitted, and gave hostages, and horsed the army. And he continued there until midwinter.

Note 58. The "seven" towns mentioned above are reduced here to "five"; probably because two had already submitted to the king on the death of the two thanes, Sigferth and Morcar. These five were, as originally, Leicester, Lincoln, Stamford, Nottingham, and Derby. Vid. an. 942, 1013.

In 1755 Bourchier Wrey 6th Baronet (age 40) and Ellen Thresher Lady Wrey (age 24) were married at Corsham, Wiltshire. She by marriage Lady Wrey of Trebitch in Cornwall.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Corton

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Corton Long Barrow [Map]

Corton Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Archaeologia Volume 15 Section XXXIII. Corton Long Barrow [Map][a] is situated about a mile and a quarter fouth of the river Wilye, in the Tenanty field, on a hill called Barrow Hill, from the tumulus we opened. Its situation commands home pleasant, (though not extensive,) views over a great many of the villages on the banks of the Wilye.

It stands exactly east and west, having its broad end to the east; the plough has made encroachments both on the sides, and on the east end;, at this time, the extreme length is 216 feet, by 2$ feet at the east end, and its highest elevation above the adjoining ground, 9 feet. Until this week, I conceived this tumulus to have been a double barrow, and the finding a rude urn, containing, burnt human bones, on the west end marked A, strengthened this opinion. [a] However, the discoveries made in the east end, prove it to have been originally a regular long barrow, similar to several I have opened on the Wiltshire Downs; therefore, the parting in the middle must have been occasioned by the farmers having taken away the earth for agricultural or other purposes. By much the greater part of our long barrows stand nearly east and west, as this does, having the east end much wider than the other, and at this end, we generally find some skeletons. We began the second opening of this barrow, by a large section at B: but making no discoveries there, I was led to consider it as a long barrow, and therefore made another section at C; when, after clearing out the earth, &c. to the depth of about two feet, we came to a large stone which required three men to lift it out. This proved to be the top of a pyramid of loose flints, marl stones, &c. which widened as we approached, the bottom, where the base of the ridge measured more than 20 feet in length, by about, 10 feet in width. Beneath this ridge of flints, &c. we found eight skeletons lying in several directions, as though they had been thrown on a heap without any ceremony.

Archaeologia Volume 15 Section XXXIII. Archaeologia Volume 15 Plate XVI: 1. Boyton Barrow 2 [Map], 2. Boyton Down Long Barrow [Map], 3. Boyton Barrow 1 [Map], Corton Long Barrow [Map] South View,

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Boyton. 1. "Corton Long Barrow [Map]," on Barrow Hill. Length 216ft. (Hoare); E. and W. Opened by Wm. Cunnington 1804; beneath a large heap of flints, marl stones, etc., at the E. end eight skeletons were found "lying in several directions, as though they had been thrown on a heap without ceremony." Seven were those of adults, and one of a child from seven to eight years of age. A secondary burnt burial in a cinerary urn had previously (1801) been found at the W. end by the same explorer. The mound had been reduced in size by the plough even in Hoare's time, and since then it has been reduced still more, and is now only 120ft. in length. Then, as now, it appeared almost as two round barrows from earth having been taken away from about the middle of the mound for agricultural purposes. There are beech trees of considerable age growing on the barrow, but the ground round it has been until recently under cultivation and there is no trace of the ditches. 0.M. 58 NW.; A.W. I. 102; Arch. XV. 338 (Cunnington); XLII. 180.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Coulston

On 07 Mar 1685 Giles Hungerford (age 70) died at Coulston, Wiltshire. He was buried in Salisbury.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Cricklade [Map]

Cricklade, Wiltshire [Map] is on the River Thames.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 905. This year Ethelwald enticed the army in East-Anglia to rebellion; so that they overran all the land of Mercia, until they came to Cricklade [Map], where they forded the Thames; and having seized, either in Bradon or thereabout, all that they could lay their hands upon, they went homeward again. King Edward (age 31) went after, as soon as he could gather his army, and overran all their land between the foss and the Ouse quite to the fens northward. Then being desirous of returning thence, he issued an order through the whole army, that they should all go out at once. But the Kentish men remained behind, contrary to his order, though he had sent seven messengers to them. Whereupon the army surrounded them, and there they fought. There fell Aldermen Siwulf and Sigelm; Eadwold, the king's thane; Abbot Kenwulf; Sigebriht, the son of Siwulf; Eadwald, the son of Acca; and many also with them; though I have named the most considerable. On the Danish side were slain Eohric their king, and Prince Ethelwald, who had enticed them to the war. Byrtsige, the son of Prince Brihtnoth; Governor Ysop; Governor Oskytel; and very many also with them that we now cannot name. And there was on either hand much slaughter made; but of the Danes there were more slain, though they remained masters of the field. Ealswitha died this same year; and a comet appeared on the thirteenth day before the calends of November.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1016. This year came King Knute (age 21) with a marine force of one hundred and sixty ships, and Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia with him, over the Thames into Mercia at Cricklade, Wiltshire [Map]; whence they proceeded to Warwickshire, during the middle of the winter, and plundered therein, and burned, and slew all they met. Then began Edmund the etheling (age 26) to gather an army, which, when it was collected, could avail him nothing, unless the king (age 50) were there and they had the assistance of the citizens of London. The expedition therefore was frustrated, and each man betook himself home. After this, an army was again ordered, under full penalties, that every person, however distant, should go forth; and they sent to the king (age 50) in London, and besought him to come to meet the army with the aid that he could collect. When they were all assembled, it succeeded nothing better than it often did before; and, when it was told the king, that those persons would betray him who ought to assist him, then forsook he the army, and returned again to London. Then rode Edmund the etheling (age 26) to Earl Utred in Northumbria; and every man supposed that they would collect an army King Knute (age 21); but they went into Stafforddhire, and to Shrewsbury, Shropshire [Map], and to Chester [Map]; and they plundered on their parts, and Knute (age 21) on his. He went out through Buckinghamshire to Bedfordshire; thence to Huntingdonshire, and so into Northamptonshire along the fens to Stamford [Map]. Thence into Lincolnshire. Thence to Nottinghamshire; and so into Northumbria toward York [Map]. When Utred understood this, he ceased from plundering, and hastened northward, and submitted for need, and all the Northumbrians with him; but, though he gave hostages, he was nevertheless slain by the advice of Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia, and Thurkytel, the son of Nafan, with him. After this, King Knute (age 21) appointed Eric earl over Northumbria, as Utred was; and then went southward another way, all by west, till the whole army came, before Easter, to the ships. Meantime Edmund Etheling (age 26) went to London to his father (age 50): and after Easter went King Knute (age 21) with all his ships toward London; but it happened that King Ethelred (age 50) died ere the ships came. He ended his days on St. George's day; having held his kingdom in much tribulation and difficulty as long as his life continued.

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley was born to John Writhe in Colatford, Wiltshire. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe, Wiltshire or Cricklade, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Crudwell

On 12 Aug 1877 Ambrose McEvoy was born at Crudwell, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Dauntsey

Around 1488 Thomas Danvers was born to John Danvers (age 36) at Dauntsey, Wiltshire.

On 09 Oct 1532 Thomas Danvers (age 44) died at Dauntsey, Wiltshire.

On 28 Jun 1573 Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby was born to John Danvers (age 33) and Elizabeth Neville (age 23) at Dauntsey, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Dauntsey, St James' the Great Church

On 20 Jan 1644 Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby (age 70) died at Earl of Danby's House Cornbury Park, Oxfordshire. After 20 Jan 1644 Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby (age 70) was reburied at St James' the Great Church, Dauntsey. Earl Danby extinct.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Deverills

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Donhead St Andrew [Map]

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park, Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wiltshire [Map], Wardour, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Wiltshire [Map], Upper [Map] and Lower [Map] Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Wiltshire [Map], Barford St Martin, Wiltshire [Map], Burcombe, Wiltshire [Map] and Wilton, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton, Wiltshire [Map] after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Donhead St Andrew, Ansty 1 Long Barrow [Map]

Ansty 1 Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Ansty. 1 [Map]. On Whitesheet Hill, at junction of Donhead St. Andrew, Ansty, and Berwick St. John parish boundaries, close to and N. of the old Shaftesbury Road, E. of the 14th milestone to Salisbury. Length 132ft. N.E. by S.W. There is no recorded opening of this barrow, but it appears to have been dug into near the centre. It is otherwise in good condition, and stands on uncultivated ground, and the ditches are well defined. O. M. 69, SE; A. W. I. Map of Fovant Station.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Donhead St Mary

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Donhead St Mary Long Barrow [Map]

Donhead St Mary Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Donhead St. Mary. 4. [Donhead St Mary Long Barrow [Map]] S.W. of Wingreen, near the Dorset border. N.W. of Abbot's Copse, and S. of the Ridgeway. Length 132ft.; N.E. and S.W. There is no record of the opening of this barrow, but it appears to have been dug into. The mound is in fair condition, and does not appear to have been ploughed over although the ground round it is under cultivation. Ditches indistinct. O.M. 74 N.W. Not shown by Hoare.

For Long Barrow in Donhead St. Mary parish now destroyed see end of this list.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Downton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Downton, Clearbury Ring [Map]

Clearbury Ring is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Clearbury Ring [Map] is a univallate Iron Age hillfort of two hectares occupying a prominent hilltop overlooking the valley of the River Avon. The rampart is well preserved and consisted of a single bank with a ditch outside it. The fort had a single entrance on the northwest side, consisting simply of a 10-metre (33 ft) wide gap with a causeway across the ditch.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Downton Long Barrow aka Giant's Grave [Map]

Downton Long Barrow aka Giant's Grave is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Downton. 2. [Downton Long Barrow aka Giant's Grave [Map]]. "Giant's Grave," S.E. of Clearbury Rings [Map]. Length about 150ft.; S. and N. This barrow does not appear to have been opened; there is a slight sinking at the larger end, possibly over a cist. The mound is a fine one, in excellent condition, and apparently never disturbed, although the ground round it has been cultivated. Ditches indistinct as a result of cultivation. O.M. 71 SE. Not shown by Hoare.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Draycott

Before 21 Nov 1604 Francis Thynne (age 42) died. He was buried on 21 Nov 1604 at Draycott, Wiltshire.

On 15 Jul 1884 Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl Cowley (age 80) died at 20 Albermarle Street. He was buried at Draycott, Wiltshire. His son William Henry Wellesley 2nd Earl Cowley (age 49) succeeded 2nd Earl Cowley, 2nd Viscount Dangan of Meath, 3rd Baron Cowley. Emily Gwendoline Williams Countess Cowley (age 45) by marriage Countess Cowley.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Shute Manor Draycott

On 28 Feb 1895 William Henry Wellesley 2nd Earl Cowley (age 60) died at Shute Manor Draycott, Wiltshire. His son Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley (age 29) succeeded 3rd Earl Cowley, 3rd Viscount Dangan of Meath, 4th Baron Cowley. Violet Neville Countess Cowley (age 28) by marriage Countess Cowley.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Dundas Aquaduct [Map]

1801. The Dundas Aquaduct, Wiltshire [Map] carries the Kennet and Avon canal over the Gloucestershire River Avon. It was designed by John Rennie and chief engineer John Thomas between 1797 and 1801, and completed in 1805.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, East Chisenbury [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, East Kennet

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, East Kennet Long Barrow [Map]

East Kennet Long Barrow is also in Avebury Long Barrows North.

East Kennet Long Barrow [Map] is a Severn Cotswolds type Chambered Tomb.

Historic England 1012323.

The monument includes a long barrow set below the crest of a gentle north- east facing slope. It survives as a substantial earthwork orientated north- west/south-east and is broadly rectangular in plan. The barrow mound is flat topped. It survives to 106m long, 50m wide and stands to a height of c.8m at the south-east end and 4m at the north-west end. Flanking ditches, from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument, run parallel to the south-west and north-east sides of the mound and survive to a width of c.5m. These have become infilled over the years but survive as a low earthwork on the north-east side of the mound and as a buried feature to the south-west. The monument has been partially excavated, both by the Rev. M Connor in the 19th century and later by Thurnham. No details are known.

It is a curious fact that Five Wells Chambered Tomb [Map] is, within 0.2 of a degree of longitude, north of Stonehenge [Map] - see Five Wells Chambered Tomb and Stonehenge Alignment. Moreover, this line of longitude, give or take 500m, has the highest number of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Monuments on it when compared to other lines of longitude. North to South:

Five Wells Chambered Tomb [Map]

Long Low Barrow [Map]

Willersey Barrow [Map]

Farmington Long Barrow [Map]

Monkton Fields Long Barrow [Map]

East Kennet Long Barrow [Map]

Adam's Grave [Map]

Knap Hill [Map]

Netheravon 6 Long Barrow [Map]

Knighton Long Barrow [Map]

Larkhill Long Barrow [Map]

Amesbury Barrow 14 G1 [Map]

Normanton Barrow 151 G13 [Map]

Stonehenge.

Avebury by William Stukeley. The long barrows are what I call archdruids'. There are but few about Abury left, and but two at Stonehenge. The paucity seems to confirm the notion. One very large at East-Kennet [Map], points to Abury, but with its lesser end: no less than 200 cubits in length, which is 350 feet, a huge body of earth. Another [Map] not far off points to the snake's head temple, being at a right angle with the former.

Diary of a Dean by Merewether. 04 Aug 1849. Saturday, the 4th of August, was in the morning chiefly devoted to Silbury [Map]; and it was arranged that I should be left in charge, as the examination of the centre was every hour becoming more and more critical and interesting. After due consultation respecting Silbury, our steps were directed to a singularly interesting object, described as an Archdruid's barrow [West Kennet long barrow [Map]], lying three quarters of a mile south-east of Silbury Hill [Map]. This appellation I suppose has been adopted from Stukeley; it ranges about east and west, and is at least 150 ft. long, higher and broader at the east end, where it is 30 ft., than at the west. It had evidently been cut through on the ridge in several places, but not improbably, in most instances, merely for agricultural purposes. At the east end were lying, in a dislodged condition, at least 30 sarsen stones, in which might clearly be traced the chamber formed by the side uprights and large transom stones, and the similar but lower and smaller passage leading to it; and below, round the base of the east end, wre to be seen the portion of the circle or semicircle of stones bounding it. There are two other barrows of this kind in the neighbourhood, which I may mention in this place; the one [East Kennet Long Barrow [Map]] about three-quarters of a mile south-east of that just described, which is of much the same character as to shape and dimensions, but differs in construction. I was induced to visit this in consequence of having been informed by the occupier of the surrounding land, that he had caused a hole to be dug at the east end for the purpose of obtaining flints; but that he soon found that it was made up of round and generally flat sarsen stones, which came tumbling so about the men that they gave up the work. It has unfortunately been planted over, as have many of the larger barrows on Hacpen Hill; I think in bad taste. The other is situated on Alton Down [Adam's Grave [Map]?], south of Wansdyke: all these range in the same bearing, south-east by north-west. It is 130 ft. long by 30 high. This is still covered with turf, and has been opened about half-way along the ridge, but not effectually. It is remarkable for having, about half-way down the slope of the east end, a sarsen stone; another at the base in the centre. On the south side, in the trench formed by raising the mound, is a very curious earthwork, in form an oval, with a mound about 2 ft. high round it, and a sarsen stone in the centre; the whole about 40 feet long by 15 broad. In advance of the barrow eastward, and at its very base, is another earthwork, of similar height as to its mound, in a line at right angles with the central line, about 30 ft. long, with a return of 10 ft. on either side. These two curious objects I visited at so late a period of my Wiltshire sojourn, that I could not indulge in the gratification of examining them. It is a satisfaction to mention these three, in the hope that it may lead to the disclosure of their interesting contents at some future day.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1857 V4 Pages 307-363. Another long barrow [East Kennet Long Barrow [Map]], about a mile to the south east of the last, is now planted with trees. It was opened, a few years ago, by the Rev. Mr. Connor of East Kennet.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Kennet. 1. "East Kennet Long Barrow [Map]." Length 344ft.; S.E. and N.W. Included by Thurnam in his list of chambered barrows. Not opened.1Planted with trees, no ditches visible, standing on ploughed ground. O.M. 35 NW.; A.W. II. Map of Marlborough Station; Arch. xlii. 203; Smith p. 179, XII. H. vii. a; Proc. Arch. Inst. Salisbury 98; Stukeley, Abury, 46.

For Kennet, West, see wider Avebury.

Note 1. It is stated by Wm. Long (W.A.M. iv. 343, 1854) that "It was opened, a few years ago, by the Rev. M. Connor, of East Kennet." Nothing seems to be known of this "opening," and Dr. Thurnam speaks of it as "only attempted." Arch. xlii. 203.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, East Kennet, Furze Hill [Map]

The Wiltshire Wansdye remains highly visible in the landscape especially when it is crossing chalk downland that has little vegetation to hide it. Its date is somewhat uncertain; most sources consider it to have been constructed around 600AD give or take a hundred years either was. It was definitely constructed before the 9th century when begins to occur in charters.

It appears to start west of Savernake Forest [Map], after which it travels broadly west through Shaw Medieval Village [Map], Furze Hill [Map], Tan Hill, Wiltshire [Map], Shepherd's Shore, Wiltshire [Map], Furze Knoll [Map] after which it disappears, possibly being absorbed into the Roman Road

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, East Knoyle

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, East Knoyle Long Barrow [Map]

East Knoyle Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Knoyle, East, [1a.] [East Knoyle Long Barrow [Map]] N. of road from Willoughby Hedge to Amesbury, about | mile E. of the 18th milestone. Length? S.E. and N.W. No opening recorded. Now down to grass, but shows every sign of having been formerly under the plough for many years. Much spread about and levelled, and now very inconspicuous. Not marked on the OM., the oblong mound shown on the site being the remnant of a round barrow shown by Hoare, which has also suffered much under the plough. O.M. 63, NE.; A. W. I. Map of Stourton Station.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Easton Grey [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Easton Grey House

On 29 Apr 1908 Thomas Graham Smith died of his burn injuries when he fell while carrying a lighted candle and set his clothes on fire. Asquith (age 55) attended the inquest at Easton Grey.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Easton Grey, Fosse Way River Avon Crossing [Map]

Fosse Way. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road [Map] where it curves around Solsbury Hill, Somerset [Map] to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone [Map], Fosse Gate, Wiltshire [Map], crossing the Gloucestershire River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey [Map] before reaching the Cotswold Airport, Gloucestershire [Map] after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Easton Royal

On 17 Jan 1695 Edward Seymour 8th Duke of Somerset was born to Edward Seymour 5th Baronet (age 34) and Laetitia Popham Baroness Seymour (age 35). He was christened the same day at Easton Royal, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Ebbesbourne Wake [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Edington

Around 12 May 878 King Alfred "The Great" of Wessex (age 29) defeated the Viking army led by Guthrum Viking at the Battle of Edington at Edington, Wiltshire (the location is subject to dispute; possibly Heddington, Wiltshire).

Chronicle of Gregory 1450. 29 Jun 1450. And the same year was the Byschoppe of Sawlysbury (age 55) slayne at Edyngton, a myle out of the towne, a-pon a hyghe hylle; it was the xiiij day of June, and alle his goode mevabylle was departyde to every man dwellynge there that any of his lyflode laye; for bothe oxsyn, sheppe, hors, swyne, carte, plowe, corne, hay, tymbyr, strawe, harnys in castellys of hys, clothynge for his owne body, bokys, chalys, and alle that longyd to any manyr of hys, and the very ledde that coveryd the howsys and wodys wer fylde downe in some placys, but not in every place, but in som, as at Shyrbone in Dorsette schyre. And the men that toke a-pon them alle this mys rewle, whenne they undyrstode that it was wronge that they hadde done bothe to hym, and in specyalle unto the King, they a-non wente thoroughe out alle the towne of Shyrborne an toke to every man, woman, and chylde that was above xij year age and iij chore, every che of them hadde vj d ; and they madde them to swere to be trewe ande holde to gedyr, by cause yf the King wolde have take any execucyon a-pon it he moste have take it a-pon e alle the hoole schyre and contrays there that his lyflode was. And for cause here of the King gaffe a generalle pardon to alle maner men.

On 29 Jun 1450 Bishop William Ayscough (age 55) was murdered at Edington, Wiltshire by an angry mob.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Edington, Tinhead Long Barrow [Map]

Tinhead Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Edington. 7. "Tinhead Barrow [Map]," on Tinhead Hill. Length 220ft.; N.E. and S.W. Opened by Thurnam, who states that "it had evidently been rifled at some unknown period "; he only found "traces of human remains in the usual situation at the east end, with a fragment or two of rude black pottery." It stands on ploughed ground, and its E. end is ploughed over, but the greater part of the mound is planted with trees. The ditches are obliterated, and material has been dug out of the mound in more than one place, many years ago, for large trees are now growing in the hollows. O.M. 45 NE.; A. W. I. 88; Arch. xlii. 180, 194—5.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Elecumbe

Around 1222 John Lovell was born to John Lovell (age 32) and Catherine Basset (age 26) at Elecumbe, Wiltshire. He a great x 3 grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Elston [Map]

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Enford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Everleigh

In 1371 Thomas Astley was born to Thomas Astley (age 28) in Everleigh, Wiltshire.

In 1501 Thomas Astley was born to Richard Astley (age 26) in Everleigh, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Everleigh Barrows

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "Friday, 9 October [1807]. Fine and mild day. From Marlborough to Everley in a chaise, where I met my "Magnus Apollo," Mr. Cunnington. Mounted my horse and rode with him thus— see large map of Wilts. To the right between East and West Everley, a group of three barrows, viz., a finely formed Druid barrow between two bowl-shaped. A little beyond them on the declivity of a hill is a square earthen work, very perfect on three sides, and corners apparently rounded. In a northerly direction is a very interesting group of eight tumuli — very rude and possessing some novelty in their forms— particularly that of a long barrow within a circle. To the west of these, and a little on the left of the track leading to Pewsey, are two circles connected with each other by a ditch or hollow way [Map]. (The blackness of the soil, and the irregularity of the ground give me good reason to suppose that on digging I shall find the site of a British settlement here.) Turned off to the right, and skirted the ridge of hills, enjoying a most enchanting view of the richly wooded and cultivated vale beneath, terminated by the abrupt and bold Martinshall. On the declivity of the down see an immense irregular long barrow, called vulgarly the Giant's Grave [Map]. Beyond this tumulus and between it and Milton Farm-house, we evidently found the site of British habitations, and picked up a great deal of pottery. From hence crossed over to Easton Hill, where we discovered irregular earthen works, and excavations denoting ancient habitation. Returned to Milton Hill — a group of five tumuli very near each other, and another on the declivity of the hill [Map]. In our way back to Everley saw several others detached, but no earthen works or excavations exciting curiosity.

"A most interesting ride, full of novelty and information.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Everleigh, Lidbury Camp [Map]

Lidbury Camp, Wiltshire is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Lidbury Camp, Wiltshire [Map]. From Historic England: The monument comprises a possible barrow together with Iron Age and Romano-British occupation associated with Lidbury Camp and its related trackways.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "The manoeuvres of the day being interrupted by the heavy fall of earth, I left Marden and ascended the chalk hills. The eye is caught by the remains of an ancient earthen work on the summit of the hill overlooking this fine vale. It is called Broadbury, Brodbury, &c. , &c. It has been much mutilated by chalk pits. It is single ditched — similar square excavations (containing fragments of the oldest pottery) to those on Cotley Hill, near Warminster, have been found here.

"These works are situated very near the great Ridge- way — see my map of Wilts. Turned off on the left, and continued my ride along it to Casterley Camp [Map]. Casterley much changed in its appearance, having been lately ploughed up. Nunc seges est ubi Troja fuit [Now the harvest is where Troy was]. Thence crossed the vale of Avon at Chisenbury, once the site of a priory. My trackway led me straight to the perfect little square work called Sidbury [Map]. Great British excavations in its neighbourhood. Saw on my right the beautiful twin barrows — before drawn and noticed. One remains to be opened. 'Par nobile fratrum [A noble pair of brothers].' Returned to Everley gratified and benefitted, as usual, by my ride amongst the Britons.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Everleigh, Weather Hill Long Barrow [Map]

Weather Hill Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Fittleton.1 5. [Weather Hill Long Barrow [Map]] On Weather Hill, S. of Everley and W of the old Marlborough — Salisbury Road. Length about 150ft. N.E. and S.W. Opened by Thurnam, who does not seem to have published any account of the excavations beyond that in the summary list in Arch. xlii. The following entry, however, appears in the MS. Cat.: — "255. Ancient British. Part of a very dolichocephalic calvarium obtained from the north broad end of a long barrow on Fittleton Down, near Chidbury Camp, Oct. 6, 1866. The barrow had been previously disturbed. There were indications of one skull only, and that apparently a female. Remains of bos longifrons and horns of Cervus elaphus? scattered."

The barrow stands on an uncultivated down in good condition with well defined ditches. It shows where it has been dug into, no doubt by Thurnam. This barrow is referred to by Thurnam as "Fittleton."2 O.M. 48 N W.; A. W. I. Map of Everley Station; Arch. xlii. 180; MS. Cat. No. 255.

For Long Barrows in Fittleton parish now destroyed see end of this list.

Note 1. This is not the barrow opened by Wm. Cunnington in 1851, referred to in W.A.M. xxviii. 172. For that see below, List of barrows now destroyed, under Fittleton.

Note 2. Hoare shows two Long Barrows lying near each other on Weather Hill but there is no trace of the second barrow to be found now, and only one is shown on the O.M. As the down does not appear to have been under recent cultivation this was possibly an error of Hoare's.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, West Everleigh Down Barrows

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "Friday, 9 October [1807]. Fine and mild day. From Marlborough to Everley in a chaise, where I met my "Magnus Apollo," Mr. Cunnington. Mounted my horse and rode with him thus— see large map of Wilts. To the right between East and West Everley, a group of three barrows, viz., a finely formed Druid barrow between two bowl-shaped. A little beyond them on the declivity of a hill is a square earthen work, very perfect on three sides, and corners apparently rounded. In a northerly direction is a very interesting group of eight tumuli — very rude and possessing some novelty in their forms— particularly that of a long barrow within a circle. To the west of these, and a little on the left of the track leading to Pewsey, are two circles connected with each other by a ditch or hollow way [Map]. (The blackness of the soil, and the irregularity of the ground give me good reason to suppose that on digging I shall find the site of a British settlement here.) Turned off to the right, and skirted the ridge of hills, enjoying a most enchanting view of the richly wooded and cultivated vale beneath, terminated by the abrupt and bold Martinshall. On the declivity of the down see an immense irregular long barrow, called vulgarly the Giant's Grave [Map]. Beyond this tumulus and between it and Milton Farm-house, we evidently found the site of British habitations, and picked up a great deal of pottery. From hence crossed over to Easton Hill, where we discovered irregular earthen works, and excavations denoting ancient habitation. Returned to Milton Hill — a group of five tumuli very near each other, and another on the declivity of the hill [Map]. In our way back to Everley saw several others detached, but no earthen works or excavations exciting curiosity.

"A most interesting ride, full of novelty and information.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fifield [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Figheldean [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Figsbury Rings [Map]

The earthworks of Figsbury Ring [Map] are sub-circular and enclose 6.4 hectares of grassland on a chalk ridge to the north east of Salisbury. The site is unusual for having an outer bank and ditch, the usual form of a henge monument in in addition it has an inner ditch which separates the centre from the rest of the monument. It may have been a Causewayed Enclosure, or a Henge, or both, with further modifications taking place at the start of the Iron Age when it may have been changed to a hill fort.

Colt Hoare 1812. CHLORLIS'S CAMP [Map], but in Mr. Aubrey's Monumenta Britannica, as well as in Mr. Camden's Britannia, it is noticed under the title of FRIPSBURY [Map]. What, the origin of the latter name is, I am at a loss to conjecture. The former may be derived from the British General CONSTANTIUS CHLORES, to whom, perhaps, the construction of this camp may be attributed. In Kennet's Parochial Antiquities, I find this earthen work alluded to, and some history given of its supposed founder. "After the death of Carausius, in the year 297, the Emperors Dioclesian and Maximian succeeded to the government of the empire, and in order to withstand the rebellions that broke out in divers parts of it, elected Galerius Maximus and Constantius Chlorus as their generals. The latter having defeated the usurper Allectus, got a good footing in Britain, and a good governor he was, and was come forwards upon the downs as far as New Sarum2, where, upon the side of the downs he built a fortification, the rampers whereof still appear very apparently, and is called CHLOREN, after the name that the Britons gave him, by reason of his long train carried up after him; it standeth in Wiltshire, upon the north corner of CHLORENDON Park, now called CLARENDON, which taketh is name thereof; a park of that largeness and bigness that it excecdeth any park in the kingdom; it hadi a church covered over with ivy in the north pan thereof next CHLOREN, which thereupon is now called Ivy Church: and if we give credit to a late poet, the park had twenty groves in it, each of them of a mile compass, and without any sophistication, it had a house of kings within, but long since dilapidated; it cloth now belong to the Right Honourable William Earl of Pembroke, Lord Chamberlain to his Majestie, whose heart is as large and liberal as the park is wide. This CONSTANTIUS embraced the Christian faith, and married Helena, daughter to King Coyl that built ColChester, by whom he had Constantine the Great, that removed the empire to the east, and built Constantinople."

Note 1. The following minutes Were sent to me Mr. Cunnington, respecting his researches on these barrows. "August 6, 1807. Aboüt a mile and a half south of Wilbary House, in a shallow vale, immediately under the hills to the is a group of five barrows; three bowl-shaped, and two of the Druid they stand nearly in a straight line, and owing to the ground being in tillage, have been repeatedly over, therefore much reduced in height. No. 1 is a bowl shaped barrow, 74 feet in its base diameter, and 3 feet 9 inches in elevation. It contained within an oblong cist, an interment of burned bones. over which was a brass pin. In making the sections, our men found at the depth of two feet the skeleton of a dog, which had been deposited immediately over the cist. No. 2, a bowl-shaped barrow, 69 feet in diameter, and feet in elevation, produced a little pile of burned bones, unaccompanied by any arms [?] or trinkets. No. 3, a fine Druid barrow, of the second class, contained a deposit of burned bones; but Mr. Cunnington thinks he may have missed the primary interment, or it may have been disturbed by a prior opening, No. 4 and 5 had both been examined before,

"From hence we proceeded to a group of eight barrows on Idmiston Downs, two of which are shaped, four bowl-shaped, and two Druid; all situated on a piece fine maide down. One of the bell-shaped barrows produced a simple interment of burned bones; and in the other, the sepulchral deposit was not discovered.

The fine Druid barrow contained within its area, which measured 194 feet in diameter, two raised mounds, in one of which, immediately under the turf, were discovered three large urns within few inches of each other; they were inverted, and covered the burned bones of three Britons. From being placed so near the surface, two of the urns were broken, but the third is preserved entire in our Museum at Heytesbury. They were all of rude pottery, and without any ornament. Beneath these three urns, in a shallow cist, were the burned bones of another Briton, piled up in R little heap. In the other within the same barrow, was another interment of burned bones, accompanied by the following articles, viz. a small cup similar size to the very diminutive one discovered at Everley, and engraved in Tumuli Plate XXII but without ornament; a brass pin, and a considerable quantity of amber beads." In one of the bowl-shaped barrows Mr. Cunnington railed in finding the interment, and the others he did not open.

Note 1. For New, we must read Old Sarum, as the former dates its origin only from the year 1220, and this transaction must have taken place soon after the accession of Dioclesian and Maximian to the empire in the year 304.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1925 V43 Pages 48-58. Figsbury Rings [Map]. An Account Of Excavations In 19241. By Mrs. M. E. Cunnington (age 55).

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fisherton de la Mere [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fittleton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fosse Gate [Map]

Fosse Way. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road [Map] where it curves around Solsbury Hill, Somerset [Map] to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone [Map], Fosse Gate, Wiltshire [Map], crossing the Gloucestershire River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey [Map] before reaching the Cotswold Airport, Gloucestershire [Map] after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fyfield

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fyfield, Clatford Bottom [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fyfield, Manton Barrow aka Preshute G1a [Map]

Manton Barrow aka Preshute G1a is also in Avebury Bronze Age Barrows.

Manton Barrow aka Preshute G1a [Map] is a Bronze Age Round Barrow excavated by Howard B. Cunnington and Maud Cunnington née Pegge who discovered a number of significant artefacts including gold artfacts. See Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1907 V35 Pages 1-20.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1907 V35 Pages 1-20. Notes on the Opening of a Bronze Age Barrow at Manton [Manton Barrow aka Preshute G1a [Map]], near Marlborough By Mrs M E Cunnington (age 37).

Opening of the Manton Barrow. The Beginning.

The End.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Fyfield, Preshute aka Rockley Long Barrow [Map]

Preshute aka Rockley Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Preshute. 1.1 [Preshute aka Rockley Long Barrow [Map]] On Manton Down, S.W. of Rockley, and N.W. of Manton House. Length 57ft.; S.E. and N.W. Chambered. The chamber seems to have been uncovered, and probably rifled at some unknown period. Hoare speaks of the barrow as "a small long barrow, covered with heath and furze, having a fallen kistvaen at the east end. The mound appears to have been set round with stones." The Rev. A. C. Smith also describes it as being so covered with heath and furze as "to be not easily discovered." This growth has now disappeared, the mound is grass-grown, and the partially-ruined chamber, or "kistvaen," as Hoare calls it, is quite clear. Most, if not all, the stones that once formed the chamber are still in situ, but several have fallen down. It was oblong in shape, with one large stone, that still stands, forming its back, or westernmost wall; the side walls were formed by two stones, one on each side, and it was no doubt the collapse inwards of the one on the northern side that let down the large covering stone into the leaning position in which it now lies. Immediately in front of the two stones forming the side walls, i.e., to the eastward of them, are two fallen stones, so much buried in the ground, that it is not possible to see their size or shape; it seems not improbable that these formed portals to the chamber. Of the stones that once stood round the mound three, or perhaps four, may still be seen lying partially buried. There is now what looks like a wide crack in the covering stone, and the stone is actually in two pieces. The Rev. A. 0. Smith states that this stone was split by workmen preparatory to breaking it up into building stone, but that fortunately he arrived on the scene in time to prevent further damage. O.M. 28 NE.; A. W. II. 43; Arch. xlii. 203; Smith p. 198, xiv. K. iv. a; Proc. Soc. Ant. 2nd S. II. 309.

Note 1. This barrow was referred to by Thurnam as " Rockley."

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Garesden

In 1578 Lawrence Washington was born to Lawrence Washington (age 33) at Garesden, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Great Bedwyn [Map]

On 29 Oct 1567 Anthony Hungerford of Black Bourton was born to Anthony Hungerford (age 27) at Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire [Map].

Around 25 Sep 1614 Giles Hungerford was born to Anthony Hungerford of Black Bourton (age 46) and Sarah Crouch (age 40) at Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire [Map].

On 20 Jan 1836 Henrietta Louisa Elizabeth Danneskiold Samsøe Countess Strafford was born to Christian Danneskiold Samsøe and Elizabeth Brudenell (age 29) in Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire [Map].

The River Dun rises near Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire [Map]. It joins the River Kennet at Hungerford, Berkshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Bedwyn Magna Great Bedwyn

On 30 Mar 1654 Henry Seymour (age 28) died. He was buried at Bedwyn Magna Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Great Bedwyn, St Mary's Church [Map]

After 21 Dec 1536. All Saints Church, Maiden Bradley [Map]. Monument to John Seymour (deceased). Seymour Arms differenced with a Crescent impaled with unknown arms quartered 1 Argent a fess between 3 martlets Gules in chief three fox heads erased 2 per pale Azure three fleur de lys Or 3 Or three talbots courant 4 Or a chevrom Limine between 3 stags heads caboshed. The note below states... The above tablet (a copy of the original in Great Bedwyn [Map]) is placed here by Algernon 15th Duke of Somerset (age 53) Sep 1899.

Henry Machyn's Diary. 06 Dec 1558. The vj day of (December) was bered in the west contray ser Antony Hongerford (deceased) knight, with standard, penon, cot, elmett, target, sword, and iiij dosen skochyons of armes, and no harold of armes.

Note. P. 181. Funeral of sir Anthony Hungerford. This was sir Anthony Hungerford, of Down Amney, in Gloucestershire, sheriff of that county 1552, and knight of the shire 1553. His body was carried to Great Bedwyn, Wilts [Map], where "Anthony Hungerford knighte was buyried the xixth day of November 1558." Collect. Topogr. et Geneal. v. 28.

On 12 Jul 1664 Francis Seymour 1st Baron Seymour of Trowbridge (age 74) died. He was buried in the Chanel of St Mary's Church, Great Bedwyn [Map]. His son Charles Seymour 2nd Baron Seymour of Trowbridge (age 43) succeeded 2nd Baron Seymour of Trowbridge.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Great Chalfield

On 24 Aug 1629 John Eyre (age 49) inherited Great Chalfield, Wiltshire from his father but sold it two years later to Richard Gurney 1st Baronet (age 51).

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Great Durnford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Great Durnford, Ogbury Camp [Map]

Ogbury Camp is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Colt Hoare 1812. I am again happy to do justice to the accuracy of the learned Doctor's description as to the general appearance of OGBURY CAMP [Map], but I cannot attribute the same consequence, or antiquity which he does, to the little square work, which "as no bigger than a tent," for I dug into it, and found no ashes, no bones, no pottery: and I can consider it only as a slight embankment to protect some trees which might have been planted on this very conspicuous eminence in former years. I dug also in several parts within the area of the enclosure, but found no one symptom of ancient residence: but that it was connected with some British establishment in this neighbourhood, can have doubt: and I was fortunate during my researches in these parts to discover and investigate that settlement of the Britons, which existed on some high ground adjoining the camp, and whose site is marked on the map annexed to this Station. The extraordinary verdure of the turf induced me to try the efforts of the spade and pick-axe, for the plough bad at some very distant period nearly levelled the excavations so usually concomitant with British villages; and I was not deceived by these outward appearances; for we immediately, under a rich and black soil, dug up numerous bones of animals, with fragments of the rudest British pottery.

Colt Hoare 1812. From this camp, I descend into the vale of the Winterbourns, which is thickly strewed with villages: the adjacent lands are all in a state of cultivation, and afford no food for the antiquary. Crossing the Roman road, whose line is but faintly to be distinguished, I direct my course to the adjoining vale of the river Avon, on the eastern banks of which is a spacious earthen enclosure, bearing every mark of remote British antiquity, and known by the name of OGBURY CAMP [Map]. On this hill we recognize the very early and simple handiwork of the Britons, unaltered by their successors and conquerors, the Romans and Saxons. Here we see a large tract of 62 acres enclosed within a single rampart, and without any fosse to strengthen it against the attacks of an enemy; and we see within the area the evident marks of enclosures, and only one entrance towards the east. On the northern side the ramparts followed the windings of the hill, and are interrupted by the plantations belonging to Lord Malmesbury's demesne at Great Durnford1 in which parish this earthen work is situated. The area contains 62 acres and a quarter: the circuit of the outward ditch is one mile, one furlong, and fifty-five yards, and the depth of the vallum is 33 feet. On the south-east and west sides, the ramparts are very much mutilated, and in some places nearly levelled. I cannot consider OGBURY as a camp, or work of defence against an invading enemy, but rather as an asylum or place of refuge, whither the Britons, in times of danger, retired with their families and herds of cattle. Such I am glad to find it was considered by the learned Stukeley, who, in his Itinerarium Curiosum, page 138, thus notices it. "On the east side of the river Avon, by Great Durnford, is a very large camp, covering the whole top of a hill, of no determinate figure, as humouring the height it stands on: it is made entirely •without any ditch, the earth being heaped up very steep in the nature of a parapet, when dug away level at the bottom. I doubt not but this was a camp of the Britons, and perhaps an oppidum, where they retired at night from the pasturage upon the river, widl their cattle; within it are many little banks carried straight, and meeting ane another at right angles, square, oblong parallels, and some oblique, as the meres and divisions between ploughed lands; yet it seems never 10 have been ploughed; and there is likewise a small squarish work intrenched, no bigger than a large tent; these to me seem the distinctions and divisions for the several quarters and lodgments of the people within; for I have, upon the downs in Dorsetshire, often remarked the like of too small a compass to be ploughed fields. This camp has an aspect very old; the prominent part of the rampart in many places quite consumed by time, though the steep remains perfect; one being the natural earth, the other factitious. I know not whether we ought to derive the name of it: from the British OG, signifying the hurdles and pens they fence their cattle in with, which perhaps stood upon those meres, or little banks, to distinguish every man's property.

Note 1. The parish church of this little village deserves the antiquary's notice. The north and south doorways present curious examples Saxon decoration, and the font is richly oroameilted with sculpture in the same style.

This church also retains another relick of ancient usage, though not of so remote a date. John Jewel, consecrated Bishop of Salisbury in the year 1560, published, in the year 1562, an Apology for the Church England, to which Harding published a Confutation in the following year. This was answered by Bishop Jewel, in 1564, in a book, entitled A Defense the Church England work was held in such estimation both abroad and at home, that an order was issued by Queen Elizabeth, King James, and King Charles the First, and by four successive Archbishops, that it should bc read and chained up in all parish churches throughout England and Wales. One of these books in a wooden binding, and chained to a reading desk, still exists in the parish church of Great Darnford.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Great Somerford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Great Wishford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Grittleton

On 23 Dec 1778 Catherine Pollok was born at Grittleton, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Hackpen Hill [Map]

Avebury by William Stukeley. If we descend the Hakpen-hill [Map], westward from hence towards Winterburn-basset [Map], upon the declivity of the Hakpen, is another Druid's house, called too Old Chapel. 'Tis a square, double ditched, but small ditches, in the middle a broad oblong square bank. Before it a sort of court, nearly as big as the other. Near it, they say, they have found much old iron and pewter. It seems to have been set round with stones.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Hackpen Hill, Avebury Ridgeway Path [Map]

From Avebury Henge East Entrance [Map] a path leads east to the Ridgeway Path [Map]; a distance of 2.4 Km.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Hackpen Hill, Old Chapel Long Barrow [Map]

Avebury by William Stukeley. THERE is still another of these long archdruids' tumuli at Abury, which leads me to describe a kind of ancient monuments which I meet with here, and near Stonehenge and elsewhere; which I take to be houses of the Druids, or their courts of judicature, or both. The principal of them here, is a remarkable thing, upon the Hakpen-hill east of Abury, near a mile, between it and Rockley. That part of the downs thereabouts is called Temple-downs, and the thing is called old Chapel [Map]. Lord Winchelsea (age 76), Lord (age 39) and Lady Hertford (age 24) and myself were curious in observing it, July 6, 1723. 'Tis a large square, intrenched, 110 druid cubits by 130, like a little Roman camp, with one entrance on the south-west side, towards Abury: for it is posited with accuracy, (as all these works are) from north-east to south-west. The situation of the place is high, and has a descent, quite round three of its sides; the verge of the descent inclosing it like a horseshoe. The entrance is on the side next Abury, on the isthmus of the peninsula (as it were,) on the shortest side of the square, the south-west. It is made of a vallum and ditch; beyond that, a row of flat stones set quite round and pretty close to one another, like a wall. Beyond that, another lesser ditch. There are stones too set on each side the entrance. On the north-west side is a large long barrow 50 cubits in length, with two great stone works upon it. One on the end next the great inclosed place, we have been describing: another stonework towards the other end; which seems to have been a semicircular cove, or demi-ellipsis consisting of five great stones; a Stonehenge cell in miniature, but now in ruins. This probably gave the name of old Chapel [Map] to the place; the barrow likewise has been set quite round with great stones.

In the second stone-work, one stone lies flat on the ground, along the middle line of the barrow. On each side a flat stone stands upright, and two flat stones stand upright at right angles, as wings to 'em. Upon them I suppose other stones were piled as a kist-vaen. Here probably lies the body of the interred. The stones are generally very large, about ten feet long.

The whole I take to have been the palace and interment of an arch-druid, and his tribunal or seat of justice. 'Tis posited exactly enough south-east and north-west. The learned Mr. Rowland, who wrote the history of the Isle of Mona, describes just such works as this in that place, and calls them houses of the Druids.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Heddington

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Around 12 May 878. Then, in the seventh week after Easter, he rode to Brixton by the eastern side of Selwood; and there came out to meet him all the people of Somersersetshire, and Wiltshire, and that part of Hampshire which is on this side of the sea; and they rejoiced to see him. Then within one night he went from this retreat to Hey; and within one night after he proceeded to Heddington; and there fought with all the army, and put them to flight, riding after them as far as the fortress, where he remained a fortnight. Then the army gave him hostages with many oaths, that they would go out of his kingdom. They told him also, that their king would receive baptism. And they acted accordingly; for in the course of three weeks after, King Guthrum, attended by some thirty of the worthiest men that were in the army, came to him at Aller, which is near Athelney [Map], and there the king became his sponsor in baptism; and his crisom-leasing was at Wedmor. He was there twelve nights with the king (age 29), who honoured him and his attendants with many presents.

Around 12 May 878 King Alfred "The Great" of Wessex (age 29) defeated the Viking army led by Guthrum Viking at the Battle of Edington at Edington, Wiltshire (the location is subject to dispute; possibly Heddington, Wiltshire).

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Heddington, King's Play Hill

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Heddington, King's Play Hill Long Barrow [Map]

King's Play Hill Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1910 V36 Pages 311-317. King's Play Down rises in a steep ascent from the old Bath and London road to the edge of the chalk escarpment overlooking the village of Heddington. About half-way up the slope, and not in a very prominent or conspicuous position, is a long, low, rather flat barrow [King's Play Hill Long Barrow [Map]].1

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1910 V36 Pages 311-317. Notes On Barrows [King's Play Hill Long Barrow [Map], King's Play Hill Round Barrow 1 [Map], King's Play Hill Round Barrow 2 [Map]] On King's Play Down, Heddington.1 By Maud E. Cunnington (age 40).

Note 1. The three barrows here described were opened by Mr. B. H. Cunnington and myself in August, 1907, by kind permission of Captain Spicer, of Spye Park and of his tenant, Mr. Peak-Garland.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Heddington. 3. [King's Play Hill Long Barrow [Map]] On King's Play Down. Length 101ft.; N.E. and S.W. Opened 1907 and found to cover one crouched skeleton of typical "Long" barrow character. Turf, in good condition, with well-defined ditches. The skull, etc., in Devizes Museum. O.M. 34 N W.; A. W. II. Map of Calne and Swindon Stations; W.A.M. xxxvi. 311; Smith p. 62 IV. A vii. c.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Heddington, King's Play Hill Round Barrow 1 [Map]

King's Play Hill Round Barrow 1 is also in South England Bronze Age.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1910 V36 Pages 311-317. Notes On Barrows [King's Play Hill Long Barrow [Map], King's Play Hill Round Barrow 1 [Map], King's Play Hill Round Barrow 2 [Map]] On King's Play Down, Heddington.1 By Maud E. Cunnington (age 40).

Note 1. The three barrows here described were opened by Mr. B. H. Cunnington and myself in August, 1907, by kind permission of Captain Spicer, of Spye Park and of his tenant, Mr. Peak-Garland.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Heddington, King's Play Hill Round Barrow 2 [Map]

King's Play Hill Round Barrow 2 is also in South England Bronze Age.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1910 V36 Pages 311-317. Notes On Barrows [King's Play Hill Long Barrow [Map], King's Play Hill Round Barrow 1 [Map], King's Play Hill Round Barrow 2 [Map]] On King's Play Down, Heddington.1 By Maud E. Cunnington (age 40).

Note 1. The three barrows here described were opened by Mr. B. H. Cunnington and myself in August, 1907, by kind permission of Captain Spicer, of Spye Park and of his tenant, Mr. Peak-Garland.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Hill Deverell

Around 1505 George Ludlow was born to William Ludlow (age 27) in Hill Deverell, Wiltshire.

On 25 May 1580 George Ludlow (age 75) died in Hill Deverell, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Hindon

Around 1677 Henrietta Hyde Countess Dalkeith was born to Lawrence Hyde 1st Earl Rochester (age 34) and Henrietta Boyle Countess Rochester (age 31) at Hindon, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Homington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Kingston

Around 1500 John St Lo was born to Nicholas St Lo (age 20) and Eleanor Arundell (age 26) at Kingston, Wiltshire.

On 01 Sep 1508 Nicholas St Lo (age 28) died at Kingston, Wiltshire.

Around 1519 Edward St Lo was born to John St Lo (age 19) and Margaret Kingston at Kingston, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Kitchen Barrow Hlll [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Kitchen Barrow Hlll, Kitchen Hill Bowl Barrow [Map]

Kitchen Hill Bowl Barrow is also in Avebury Bronze Age Barrows.

Kitchen Hill Bowl Barrow [Map]. Historic England 101426.

The monument includes a barrow situated 800m east of Kitchen Hill Long Barrow [Map]. It forms the southern outlier of a cemetery which includes a total of five barrows. This is one of a number of cemeteries located on the Downs. The barrow has a mound which has been reduced by cultivation in the past but which survives as a visible monument, best seen from the east. It measures 12m in diameter and up to 0.6m high. The western half of the barrow has been reduced to the point where it is no longer clearly definable at ground level. This difference in survival of the mound, which originally stood at least 0.9m high, is due to the fact that it is crossed from north east to south west by a fence line which forms the parish boundary and the extent of cultivation either side of the boundary has been variable. Surrounding the original extent of the mound is a 2m quarry ditch from which material was obtained during its construction. This survives as a buried feature below the modern ground level. Beyond the ditch lies a 1.5m wide counter-scarp bank which stands 0.3m high on the eastern side of the monument. It has been levelled to the west. During the late 1850s the barrow was partly excavated and a secondary cremationburial was found, placed on a flat stone beneath an inverted Late Bronze Age bucket urn.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Kitchen Barrow Hlll, Kitchen Hill Long Barrow [Map]

Kitchen Hill Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Kitchen Hill Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England 1012519.

The monument includes a Long Barrow, orientated SW-NE and set below the crest of a steep south-facing slope. The barrow mound has maximum dimensions of 33m long by 15m wide and survives to a height of 2m when viewed from the south-west. Flanking quarry ditches run parallel and contiguous to the barrow mound. These are 5m wide and up to 0.5m deep on the east side and 1m deep to the west. Central hollows on the surface of the mound suggest the site may once have been excavated. Worked flint artefacts, probably contemporary with the construction and use of the monument, are visible on the surface of the adjacent ploughed field.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lacock

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lacock Abbey [Map]

In 1229 Ela of Salisbury 3rd Countess of Salisbury (age 42) founded Lacock Abbey [Map] as a nunnery of the Augustinian order.

In 1240 Ela of Salisbury 3rd Countess of Salisbury (age 53) was appointed Abbot Lacock.

In 1243 Ela of Salisbury 3rd Countess of Salisbury (age 56) resigned as Abbot Lacock due to ill health.

On 24 Aug 1261 Ela of Salisbury 3rd Countess of Salisbury (age 74) died. She was buried in Lacock Abbey [Map]. Her inscription reads ... Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works. Her great granddaughter Margaret Longespée 4th Countess of Salisbury and Lincoln succeeded 4th Countess Salisbury.

In 1540 William Sharington (age 45) paid £783 for Lacock Abbey [Map] which had been dissolved.

Before 06 Jul 1553 William Sharington (age 58) died. His brother Henry Sharington of Lacock in Wiltshire (age 21) inherited Lacock Abbey [Map].

Before 20 Oct 1743 Michael Dahl (age 84). Portrait of Mary Mansel. Lacock Abbey [Map].

Mary Mansel: she was born to Thomas Mansel 1st Baron Mansel and Martha Millington Baroness Mansel. Before 1717 John Talbot and she were married. On 16 Feb 1786 Louisa Barbara Mansel died. Her estates passed to her aunt Mary Mansel.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lacock, Roman Road Crossing of the River Avon [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lacock, St Cyriac's Church

In 1703 Barbara Slingsby (age 70) died. She was buried at St Cyriac's Church, Lacock.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lanhill

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lanhill Long Barrow aka Hubba's Low [Map]

Lanhill Long Barrow aka Hubba's Low is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Lanhill Long Barrow aka Hubba's Low [Map]. Historic England

The monument includes a long barrow set on level ground close to a tributary of the River Avon. It is rectangular in plan and orientated east-west. The barrow mound is 55m long, 25m wide and 1.5m high. A drystone entrance on the south side of the mound leads into a small chamber c.2m square while two further chambers are recorded on the north side of the mound. Although no longer visible at ground level flanking ditches, from which material was quarried during construction of the monument, run parallel to the north and south sides of the mound. These have become infilled over the years but survive as buried features c.3m wide. The site has been partially excavated, finds including the scattered bones of two adults in a chamber on the north side of the mound, nine skeletons in a chamber on the NW side and eleven skeletons in a further chamber.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1856 V3 Pages 67-86. On the Barrow of Lanhill [Map] near Chippenham. with remarks on the site of, and the events connected with The Battles of Cynuit and Ethandun, A.D. 878 By John Thurnam (age 45), M.D. F.S.A.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1910 V36 Pages 300-310. The Discovery Of A Chamber In The Long Barrow At Lanhill [Lanhill Long Barrow aka Hubba's Low [Map]], Near Chippenham. By Maud E. Cunnington (age 40).

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Chippenham. 1. "Lanhill Barrow [Map]," on Barrow Hill, sometimes called "Hubba's Low." Length about 160ft. (Thurnam); E. and W. chambered. This large stone-built barrow has been long used more or less as a quarry. In 1855 Thurnam made some excavations in it, and found two chambers with remains of skeletons, but they seem to have been previously disturbed. In 1909 a chamber was accidentally discovered by men digging stone from the mound; it was built of six large slabs of stone, with the spaces between them filled in with dry walling, and a corbelled roof of. similar stones. Lying in a confused heap within the chamber were the remains of not fewer than eleven individuals. Steps have been taken to protect this chamber, and it may be seen still intact.

Thurnam's description, written in 1866, of this once fine barrow, applies to it equally well to-day. " At present the mound has the appearance of several irregular hillocks, in part grown over with thorns and briars, resembling somewhat the site of an old quarry." O.M. 19 SE; A. W. II. 99; Arch. xlii. 203; W.A.M. iii. 67 (Thurnam 1856); xxxvi. 300,(1909). This barrow was described by Aubrey about the middle of the 17th century in his manuscript "Monumenta Britannica."

1937. Doris Emerson Chapman (age 34). “Skull 4, Lanhill [Map].”

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Larkhill

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Larkhill Viewpoint [Map]

Stonehenge by William Stukeley. Table XXIX. Prospect of the Cursus & Stonehenge from the North Aug 6. 1723. A. The Entrance of the Avenue [Map]. B. The 7 Barrows. C. The Kings Barrow [Coneybury Hill Barrow [Map]?]. D. Salisbury Steeple [Map]. E. Stonehenge. [The Stonehenge Greater Cursus in the foreground. Appears to have been sketched from highground at Larkhill [Map]]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Laverstock [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Liddington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Liddington Castle [Map]

Liddington Castle is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Around 650BC. Liddington Castle [Map] is a Late Bronze Age Early Iron Age Univallate Hill Fort in Wiltshire at altitude 277m sited on a commanding high point close to the Ridgeway Path covering an area of 30000 square metres. Its first occupation dates to around the 7th Century BC. The earthworks consist of a relatively simple oval bank of timber and earth fronted by a ditch, with opposing causewayed entrances on the east and west sides.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Liddington Long Barrow [Map]

Liddington Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1924 V42 Pages 49-51. New Long Barrow at Liddington [Map]. O.M. XXIII. N.E. Parish of Liddington. In the left-hand top corner of this sheet the 700 foot contour is tongue-shaped and almost equally divided by the Liddington—Wanborough parish boundary. On the highest point of this ridge is an unrecorded long barrow, now measuring 165 feet long by 42 feet wide, and 5 feet high at the S.end, thelongeraxis being rudely S.E.—N.W. (Exactly 40 degrees E. of S. magnetic). The mound has been much narrowed at its extremities by repeated ploughing and the centre portion has several hollows indicative of former excavation. Towards the 8. end is a large sarsen stone showing above the turf, while at intervals towards the N. are others of smaller size. On the east side of the tumulus isa fence, in digging the post-holes for which (about 1890) three skeletons were found. A few years later a shepherd found another, several bones of which came into the writer's collection and have lately been examined by Professor Parsons, of the University of London, who reports as follows:- "The bones submitted to me by Mr. Passmore were those of an adult male. The only complete bones were a right humerus and a right tibia, which latter measured 360 mm. without the spine. This should give a total height of 164 ¢c.m., or about 5ft. 43in. There is a facet on the front of the lower end of the tibia, known as a -Squatting facet, showing that the individual was in the habit of squatting on the ground. The bones are those of a not particularly muscular individual and do not suggest the clean lines and perfect symmetry which I have learned to associate with Anglo-Saxons. I see nothing to make me think that these bones may not have been those of a Neolithic long barrow man, but the absence of the skull and teeth makes the question a difficult one to decide."2

Note 2. These bones have been presented to St. Thomas's Hospital.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Little Durnford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Little Langford

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Little Langford, St Nicholas' Church [Map]

St Nicholas' Church, Little Langford [Map]. Fine tympanum from the Herefordshire School of Carving.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Littlecote

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Littlecote House

On 10 Jan 1419 George Darell of Littlecote was born to William Darell (age 35) at Littlecote House.

In 1429 Richard Darell was born to William Darell (age 45) at Littlecote House.

In 1605 Alexander Popham was born to Francis Popham (age 32) at Littlecote House.

On 21 Aug 1619 John Borlase 1st Baronet was born to William Borlase (age 30) and Jane Popham at Littlecote House.

On 15 Oct 1620 William Borlase was born to William Borlase (age 31) and Jane Popham at Littlecote House.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jun 1668. Tuesday. So paying the reckoning, 14s. 4d., and servants, 2s., poor 1s., set out; and overtook one coach and kept a while company with it, till one of our horses losing a shoe, we stopped and drank and spent 1s. So on, and passing through a good part of this county of Wiltshire, saw a good house of Alexander Popham's (age 63), and another of my Lord Craven's (age 60), I think in Barkeshire. Come to Newbery [Map], and there dined, which cost me, and musick, which a song of the old courtier of Queen Elizabeth's, and how he was changed upon the coming in of the King (age 38), did please me mightily, and I did cause W. Hewer (age 26) to write it out, 3s. 6d. Then comes the reckoning, forced to change gold, 8s. 7d.; servants and poor, 1s. 6d. So out, and lost our way, which made me vexed, but come into it again; and in the evening betimes come to Reading [Map], and there heard my wife read more of "Mustapha", and then to supper, and then I to walk about the town, which is a very great one, I think bigger than Salsbury: a river runs through it, in seven branches, and unite in one, in one part of the town, and runs into the Thames half-a-mile off one odd sign of the Broad Face. W. Hewer (age 26) troubled with the headake we had none of his company last night, nor all this day nor night to talk. Then to my inn, and so to bed.

On 18 Mar 1686 John Sheffield 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby (age 37) and Ursula Stawell Countess Mulgrave and Conway were married at the chapel of Littlecote House. She by marriage Countess Mulgrave. He the son of Edmund Sheffield 2nd Earl Mulgrave and Elizabeth Cranfield Countess Mulgrave (age 78).

Ann Borlase was born to William Borlase and Jane Popham at Littlecote House.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Longford [Map]

In 1573 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle (age 37) acquired the manor of Longford, Wiltshire [Map] which had been owned by the Servington aka Cervington family. In 1576 after his marriage to Helena Snakenbourg Marchioness Northampton (age 24) they commissioned the building of a house on the triangular Swedish style on the banks of the Wiltshire River Avon with money from a shipwreck of the Spanish Armada.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Longford Castle [Map]

Henry Chaplin A Memoir: Youth I. The Chaplins had been squires in Lincolnshire since the year 1658, when on the marriage of John Chaplin with Elizabeth Hamby, only daughter and heiress of Sir John Hamby of Tathwell in that county, they removed thence from Wiltshire. John Chaplin's father, Sir Francis Chaplin of the Clothworkers' Company, was Lord Mayor of London, and lies buried in the Church of St. Catherine Cree in the City, close to the grave of Sir William de Bouverie. It is a curious coincidence that at about the same time as the Chaplins left Wiltshire, Sir William de Bouverie's son Edward bought Longford Castle [Map], almost adjoining their former property; and nearly 200 years later, a daughter of the Chaplins (Helen, Countess of Radnor (age 79) — Henry Chaplin's sister) married another Pleydell-Bouverie [William Pleydell-Bouverie 5th Earl Radnor], and thus linked two families which had been long before near neighbours.

Prodigy House. A large house built in the Tudor, Elizabethan and Jacobean periods defined by their use of glass. Prodigy houses include: Longford Castle, Wiltshire [Map], Wollaton Hall, Nottinghamshire, Longleat House, Burghley House, Hatfield House, Hertfordshire and Hardwick Hall [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Longleat

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Longleat House

In 1550 Anne Thynne was born to John Thynne (age 35) and Christian Gresham (age 28) at Longleat House.

In 1551 Dorothy Thynne was born to John Thynne (age 36) and Christian Gresham (age 29) at Longleat House.

Around 1560 Elizabeth Thynne was born to John Thynne (age 45) and Christian Gresham (age 38) at Longleat House.

In 1691 Bishop Thomas Ken (age 53) was deprived of his See by King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland (age 40) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland (age 28). He was given lodgings at Longleat House by Thomas Thynne 1st Viscount Weymouth (age 51) with whom he was at Oxford. He resided at Longleat for some twenty years.

On 17 Oct 1710 John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville (age 20) and Frances Worsley Countess Granville (age 17) were married at Longleat House. She by marriage Countess Granville. He the son of George Carteret 1st Baron Carteret and Jane Granville Baroness Gower (age 56).

Prodigy House. A large house built in the Tudor, Elizabethan and Jacobean periods defined by their use of glass. Prodigy houses include: Longford Castle, Wiltshire [Map], Wollaton Hall, Nottinghamshire, Longleat House, Burghley House, Hatfield House, Hertfordshire and Hardwick Hall [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Luckington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Luckington, Giant's Cave Long Barrow [Map]

Giant's Cave Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

The Beauties of Wiltshire:Luckington. LUCKINGTON.—About seven miles to the west of Malmesbury is situated the village of Luckington or Lockington, near which rises the principal branch of the river Avon. The parish consists of about 1200 acres. Two manors, denominated "Lochintone," occur in the Domesday survey of Wiltshire, one of which was held by Durand de Gloucester, and before the Conquest, had been the property of King Harold. The other belonged to Ralph de Mortemer, the proprietor of Hullavington, Alderton, In the reign of Henry the Fourth, Richard de St. Maur, or Seymour, died seised of the lordship. His son Richard left an only daughter, who married William, Lord Zouche, of Haringworth, whose son inherited the honours and estates of his maternal ancestors.

In this parish, between the village and Badminton, is a tumulus called Long-barrow [Giant's Cave Long Barrow [Map]], in which are some Caves, said to be nine in number. They are formed of long stones set upon their sides, with other broader stones on the top. According to Aubrey, they were accidentally discovered about the year 1646. Spurs and fragments of armour have been found in or near these caves, which have hence been supposed to be the graves of warriors slain in battle. Sir R. C. Hoare says, "From the experience I have lately had in similar antiquities, I can with safety pronounce this to have been a long barrow with a kistvaen, (as at Lugbury [Map],) placed at the east end; and it is very probable that the oblong stone inclosures on the sides of the barrow may have also been appropriated to sepulchral purposes1." In 1809, another barrow was levelled, and found to contain the remains of several human skeletons.

Note 1. Ancient Wiltshire, Roman Æra," p. 102.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Luckington. 1. "Giant's Caves [Map]." Length 123ft. 1; E. and W. Chambered. Apparently rifled at some unknown period and the cists or chambers left uncovered. This barrow now appears as a mere untidy shapeless heap in a grass field, covered with bushes; there are several large stones placed edgeways, half buried in the ground, that appear to be the ruins of at least three chambers; one of these, oblong in shape, seems to be fairly complete except for any covering stones it may have had. O.M. 12 NW.; A. W. II. 101—2 (quotes Aubrey and Childrey); Arch. xlii. 203.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Giant's Cave Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Ludgershall

On 29 Sep 1593 Jane Spencer (age 74) died at Ludgershall, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lydiard Tregoze

Around 1428 Oliver St John was born to Oliver St John (age 27) and Margaret Beauchamp Duchess Somerset (age 18) at Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire.

Around 1473 John St John was born to Oliver St John (age 45) and Elizabeth Scrope (age 34) at Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire.

Around 1505 John St John was born to John St John (age 32) and Joan Iwardby (age 20) at Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire.

On 05 Apr 1576 John St John (age 71) died at Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire.

On 08 Nov 1589 Nicholas St John (age 64) died at Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire.

In 1593 Lucy St John was born to John St John (age 41) and Lucy Hungerford at Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lydiard Tregoze, St Mary's Church [Map]

St Mary's Church, Lydiard Tregoze [Map]. Known as the Golden Cavalier, it is known to have been gilded by 1780. On the base is a relief of Edward leading a cavalry charge..

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Maiden Bradley

On 30 Sep 1551 Bishop John Harley was appointed Rector of Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire.

On 22 Oct 1923 Algernon St Maur 15th Duke of Somerset (age 77) died at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. He was buried at Brimble Hill Clump, Bradley House. His third cousin once removed Edward Hamilton Seymour 16th Duke of Somerset (age 63) succeeded 16th Duke Somerset, 14th Baronet Seymour of Berry Pomeroy. Rowena Wall Duchess Somerset (age 62) by marriage Duchess Somerset.

On 19 Apr 1962 Edith Mary Parker Duchess Somerset (age 81) died at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Maiden Bradley, Bradley House

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Maiden Bradley, Bradley House, Brimble Hill Clump

On 22 Oct 1923 Algernon St Maur 15th Duke of Somerset (age 77) died at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire. He was buried at Brimble Hill Clump, Bradley House. His third cousin once removed Edward Hamilton Seymour 16th Duke of Somerset (age 63) succeeded 16th Duke Somerset, 14th Baronet Seymour of Berry Pomeroy. Rowena Wall Duchess Somerset (age 62) by marriage Duchess Somerset.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Manningford Abbots [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Manningford Bruce [Map]

In 1352 Beatrice Brewes Baroness Say was born to Thomas Brewes (age 50) at Manningford Bruce, Wiltshire [Map].

On 08 May 1858 John Meade Falkner was born at Manningford Bruce, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Market Lavington

On 24 Jan 1674 Bishop Thomas Tanner was born at Market Lavington, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Melksham [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Melksham, Seend

Around 1697 Mary Webb Duchess Somerset was born to Daniel Webb of Monkton Farleigh (age 35) and Elizabeth Somner (age 28) in Seend, Melksham, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Melksham, Seend, Holy Cross Church

On 21 Apr 1715 Elizabeth Somner (age 46) died. She was buried at the Holy Cross Church, Seend.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Mere [Map]

Shreen Water rises at Mere, Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows south to join the Dorset River Stour at Gillingham, Dorset [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Mere, St Mary's Church

On 18 Feb 1478 William Stourton 2nd Baron Stourton (age 52) died. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Mere. His son John Stourton 3rd Baron Stourton (age 24) succeeded 3rd Baron Stourton.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Middle Woodford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milston

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milston 1 Long Barrow [Map]

Milston 1 Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Milston. 1. [Milston 1 Long Barrow [Map]] On Brigmerston (or Brigmilston) Field, S. of Silk Hill. Length 1; N.E. and S.W. No recorded opening. Now down to grass, but formerly much ploughed over and thrown about; ditches obliterated. O.M. 55 NW.; A. W. I. Map of Everley Station.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milston 22 Long Barrow [Map]

Milston 22 Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Milston. 22. [Milston 22 Long Barrow [Map]] On Brigmerston Down, E. of source of 9 mile river, and W. of the big "Ditch." Length about 100ft.; S.E. and N. W. Does not appear to have been opened. Turf, in fair condition, apparently never ploughed. Ditch on S.W". side well defined, but on the other side obscured by an old trackway. O.M. 55 NW. Not shown by Hoare.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milston 39 Long Barrow [Map]

Milston 39 Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Milston. 31. On Milston Down, to the N.W. of barrows 39, 40. Length 106ft. S.S. E. and N.N. W. No record of opening. Perhaps a doubtful "Long " barrow. It is a wide rather flat mound, some 66ft. in width, rather larger at the southern end; it can hardly be said that any ditch is distinguishable, but the fact that rabbits have burrowed a good deal on both sides, and not at the ends, suggests that there were side ditches only. It stands in a thin plantation, but there are no trees growing actually on the barrow. O.M. 55 NW.

Milston. 39. [Milston 39 Long Barrow [Map]] On Milston Down, near the Hants border, close to, and N. of new military road from Bulford to Tedworth. Length 173ft; E. and W. No recorded opening. Fine mound with well-defined ditches. The ground round it, though now down to grass, was formerly under cultivation, but the barrow itself does not appear to have been cultivated. It is now badly infested by rabbits that have disfigured it a good deal. There is a distinct berm, or level space, between the inner edges of the ditches and the fringe of the mound.1 O.M. 55 NW.; A.W. I., Map of Everley Station; Arch. xlii. 171.

Milston. 40. On Milston Down, close to the last. Length 87ft; E. and W. No recorded opening. This smaller barrow lies parallel with, and only 52 yards, measured from the nearest edges of their respective ditches, N. of the preceding one. Its ditches are quite evident, but the whole barrow seems to have been under cultivation for a short time; it is now down to grass. It has, like the last, suffered much dilapidation from rabbits. It is unusual to find two Long Barrows close together; these two are the closest on record. O.M. 55 NW.; Arch. xlii. 171. Not shown by Hoare.

Note 1. This is an unusual feature that occurs in only a few other of the Wiltshire Long Barrows. See Brixton Deverill 2 and 7.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milton Lilbourne

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milton Lilbourne, Giant's Grave Long Barrow [Map]

Giant's Grave Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "Friday, 9 October [1807]. Fine and mild day. From Marlborough to Everley in a chaise, where I met my "Magnus Apollo," Mr. Cunnington. Mounted my horse and rode with him thus— see large map of Wilts. To the right between East and West Everley, a group of three barrows, viz., a finely formed Druid barrow between two bowl-shaped. A little beyond them on the declivity of a hill is a square earthen work, very perfect on three sides, and corners apparently rounded. In a northerly direction is a very interesting group of eight tumuli — very rude and possessing some novelty in their forms— particularly that of a long barrow within a circle. To the west of these, and a little on the left of the track leading to Pewsey, are two circles connected with each other by a ditch or hollow way [Map]. (The blackness of the soil, and the irregularity of the ground give me good reason to suppose that on digging I shall find the site of a British settlement here.) Turned off to the right, and skirted the ridge of hills, enjoying a most enchanting view of the richly wooded and cultivated vale beneath, terminated by the abrupt and bold Martinshall. On the declivity of the down see an immense irregular long barrow, called vulgarly the Giant's Grave [Map]. Beyond this tumulus and between it and Milton Farm-house, we evidently found the site of British habitations, and picked up a great deal of pottery. From hence crossed over to Easton Hill, where we discovered irregular earthen works, and excavations denoting ancient habitation. Returned to Milton Hill — a group of five tumuli very near each other, and another on the declivity of the hill [Map]. In our way back to Everley saw several others detached, but no earthen works or excavations exciting curiosity.

"A most interesting ride, full of novelty and information.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1868 V11 Pages 40-49. During the summer of 1865, I had an opportunity of opening a long barrow of great extent on Fyfield Hill, near Pewsey, Wiltshire, locally known as "the Giant's Grave [Map]." It is not less than 315 feet in length, by 70 feet in width at the east, and 50 feet at the west, and is about 7 feet high at the east end. A moderately wide trench runs along each side, but is not continued round the ends of the barrow. On the natural level, near the east end, a heap of three or four skeletons was found, the only perfect skull from which is of a remarkably long and narrow form, the breadth being as ·69 to the length taken as 1·00. One of the other skulls had been forcibly cleft before burial. The only object of antiquity with the skeletons was a finely-chipped arrow-head of flint, of a beautiful leaf-shape, and weighing forty-three grains: the point of its more tapering extremity was broken off when found, as represented in the woodcut. It has measured 2 inches in length, by 9/10 inch in breadth; or 51 by 23 millimetres.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Milton Lilbourne. 7.2 "Giant's Grave [Map]," on Fyfield Down, S. of the village of Milton Lilbourne. Length 315ft. (Thurnam); E.N.E. and W.S. W. Opened by Thurnam in 1865. "On the natural level, near the east end, a heap of three or four skeletons was found, the only perfect skull from which is of a remarkably long and narrow form. One of the other skulls had been forcibly cleft before burial. The only object found with the skeletons was a finely-worked leaf-shaped arrowhead of flint, close to one of the skulls."

Thurnam also says "A moderately wide trench runs along each side, but is not continued round the ends of the barrow." There is now really no sign of a ditch on the S. side; on the N. side it is quite evident, and very irregular in shape; there is also the very unusual feature of a slight but distinct counterscarp on the outer edge of this ditch.3

A very fine barrow and placed in a commanding situation overlooking the Vale of Pewsey. In perfect preservation except for a large hole at the E. end, no doubt not filled up after Thurnam's excavation. O.M. 42, NW.; A.W. I. 190; Arch. xlii. 180, 182, 194; Proc. Soc. Antiq. 2 S., III. 170; W.A.M. xi. 47; MS. Cat. 225.

Note 2. This barrow is referred to by Thurnam as "Fyfield."

Note 3. I have never noticed this feature in any other Long Barrow.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milton Lilbourne, Milton Hill

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milton Lilbourne, Milton Hill Round Barrows

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "Friday, 9 October [1807]. Fine and mild day. From Marlborough to Everley in a chaise, where I met my "Magnus Apollo," Mr. Cunnington. Mounted my horse and rode with him thus— see large map of Wilts. To the right between East and West Everley, a group of three barrows, viz., a finely formed Druid barrow between two bowl-shaped. A little beyond them on the declivity of a hill is a square earthen work, very perfect on three sides, and corners apparently rounded. In a northerly direction is a very interesting group of eight tumuli — very rude and possessing some novelty in their forms— particularly that of a long barrow within a circle. To the west of these, and a little on the left of the track leading to Pewsey, are two circles connected with each other by a ditch or hollow way [Map]. (The blackness of the soil, and the irregularity of the ground give me good reason to suppose that on digging I shall find the site of a British settlement here.) Turned off to the right, and skirted the ridge of hills, enjoying a most enchanting view of the richly wooded and cultivated vale beneath, terminated by the abrupt and bold Martinshall. On the declivity of the down see an immense irregular long barrow, called vulgarly the Giant's Grave [Map]. Beyond this tumulus and between it and Milton Farm-house, we evidently found the site of British habitations, and picked up a great deal of pottery. From hence crossed over to Easton Hill, where we discovered irregular earthen works, and excavations denoting ancient habitation. Returned to Milton Hill — a group of five tumuli very near each other, and another on the declivity of the hill [Map]. In our way back to Everley saw several others detached, but no earthen works or excavations exciting curiosity.

"A most interesting ride, full of novelty and information.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Milton Lilbourne, Milton Hill Round Barrows 6 [Map]

Milton Hill Round Barrows 6 is also in South England Bronze Age.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "Friday, 9 October [1807]. Fine and mild day. From Marlborough to Everley in a chaise, where I met my "Magnus Apollo," Mr. Cunnington. Mounted my horse and rode with him thus— see large map of Wilts. To the right between East and West Everley, a group of three barrows, viz., a finely formed Druid barrow between two bowl-shaped. A little beyond them on the declivity of a hill is a square earthen work, very perfect on three sides, and corners apparently rounded. In a northerly direction is a very interesting group of eight tumuli — very rude and possessing some novelty in their forms— particularly that of a long barrow within a circle. To the west of these, and a little on the left of the track leading to Pewsey, are two circles connected with each other by a ditch or hollow way [Map]. (The blackness of the soil, and the irregularity of the ground give me good reason to suppose that on digging I shall find the site of a British settlement here.) Turned off to the right, and skirted the ridge of hills, enjoying a most enchanting view of the richly wooded and cultivated vale beneath, terminated by the abrupt and bold Martinshall. On the declivity of the down see an immense irregular long barrow, called vulgarly the Giant's Grave [Map]. Beyond this tumulus and between it and Milton Farm-house, we evidently found the site of British habitations, and picked up a great deal of pottery. From hence crossed over to Easton Hill, where we discovered irregular earthen works, and excavations denoting ancient habitation. Returned to Milton Hill — a group of five tumuli very near each other, and another on the declivity of the hill [Map]. In our way back to Everley saw several others detached, but no earthen works or excavations exciting curiosity.

"A most interesting ride, full of novelty and information.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Monkton Farleigh

On 23 Sep 1571 Bishop John Jewel (age 49) died at Monkton Farleigh, Wiltshire. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 08 Mar 1716 Edward Seymour 8th Duke of Somerset (age 21) and Mary Webb Duchess Somerset (age 19) were married at Monkton Farleigh, Wiltshire.

On 20 May 1771 Edward Seymour was christened at Monkton Farleigh, Wiltshire.

On 08 Jun 1772 Webb Seymour was christened at Monkton Farleigh, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Netheravon [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Newton Tony [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, North Newton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, North Wraxall

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, North Wraxall, St James the Great Church

On 16 Jan 1655 William Button 1st Baronet (age 71) died. He was buried at St James the Great Church, North Wraxall.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Norton Bavant [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Oare

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Oare, Martinsell Hill Fort [Map]

Martinsell Hill Fort is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Martinsell Hill Fort [Map]. Martinsell Hill, near Oare and north of Pewsey, is the third highest point in the county of Wiltshire, southwest England, at some 289m above sea level. At the summit is an Iron Age univallate hillfort of 32 acres with a clearly visible bank and ditch system. The entrance appears to be to the northeast where there is also a ditch.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Odstock [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Ogbourne St Andrew

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow [Map]

Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow is also in South England Bronze Age.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Orcheston [Map]

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Patney [Map]

The River Avon West, Wiltshire rises around All Cannings, Wiltshire [Map] in the Vale of Pewsey being formed from many streams from where it flows past Patney, Wiltshire [Map], around Marden Henge aka Hatfield Earthworks [Map] and Wilsford Henge [Map], Rushall, Wiltshire [Map] where it joins the River Avon East, Wiltshire to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Pewsey [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Pewsey Down

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Pewsey Down Circles [Map]

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "Friday, 9 October [1807]. Fine and mild day. From Marlborough to Everley in a chaise, where I met my "Magnus Apollo," Mr. Cunnington. Mounted my horse and rode with him thus— see large map of Wilts. To the right between East and West Everley, a group of three barrows, viz., a finely formed Druid barrow between two bowl-shaped. A little beyond them on the declivity of a hill is a square earthen work, very perfect on three sides, and corners apparently rounded. In a northerly direction is a very interesting group of eight tumuli — very rude and possessing some novelty in their forms— particularly that of a long barrow within a circle. To the west of these, and a little on the left of the track leading to Pewsey, are two circles connected with each other by a ditch or hollow way [Map]. (The blackness of the soil, and the irregularity of the ground give me good reason to suppose that on digging I shall find the site of a British settlement here.) Turned off to the right, and skirted the ridge of hills, enjoying a most enchanting view of the richly wooded and cultivated vale beneath, terminated by the abrupt and bold Martinshall. On the declivity of the down see an immense irregular long barrow, called vulgarly the Giant's Grave [Map]. Beyond this tumulus and between it and Milton Farm-house, we evidently found the site of British habitations, and picked up a great deal of pottery. From hence crossed over to Easton Hill, where we discovered irregular earthen works, and excavations denoting ancient habitation. Returned to Milton Hill — a group of five tumuli very near each other, and another on the declivity of the hill [Map]. In our way back to Everley saw several others detached, but no earthen works or excavations exciting curiosity.

"A most interesting ride, full of novelty and information.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Quidhampton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Rushall [Map]

The River Avon West, Wiltshire rises around All Cannings, Wiltshire [Map] in the Vale of Pewsey being formed from many streams from where it flows past Patney, Wiltshire [Map], around Marden Henge aka Hatfield Earthworks [Map] and Wilsford Henge [Map], Rushall, Wiltshire [Map] where it joins the River Avon East, Wiltshire to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sandy Lane

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sandy Lane, Verlucio Roman Town [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Savernake

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Savernake, Eastern end of the Wansdyke [Map]

The Wiltshire Wansdye remains highly visible in the landscape especially when it is crossing chalk downland that has little vegetation to hide it. Its date is somewhat uncertain; most sources consider it to have been constructed around 600AD give or take a hundred years either was. It was definitely constructed before the 9th century when begins to occur in charters.

It appears to start west of Savernake Forest [Map], after which it travels broadly west through Shaw Medieval Village [Map], Furze Hill [Map], Tan Hill, Wiltshire [Map], Shepherd's Shore, Wiltshire [Map], Furze Knoll [Map] after which it disappears, possibly being absorbed into the Roman Road

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lockeridge House Savernake

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Serrington [Map]

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sharcott [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sherrington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sherrington Clump aka Stockton Long Barrow [Map]

Sherrington Clump aka Stockton Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Stockton. 1. "Stockton Barrow [Map]," N. of Stockton Works, S. of Sherrington Clump. Length about 120ft.; nearly N. and S. Opened by Hoare and Cunnington, who presumably found skeletons, as Hoare only says " a long barrow, which we opened, and found similar to those of the same class." It stands on ploughed ground, but the barrow itself does not appear to have been cultivated; it is planted with trees but otherwise in good condition, and the ditches are still distinct. O.M. 58 SE.; A. W. I. 107; Arch. xlii. 180.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sherrington Long Barrow [Map]

Sherrington Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Sherrington Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England: The monument includes a long barrow set on a floodplain 90m south of the River Wylye. Like other long barrows in the area the barrow mound is ovate and orientated on the same alignment as the river, in this case ENE-WSW. The barrow mound is 30m long, 15m wide and stands to a height of c.4m. The site was partially excavated by Cunnington towards the end of the 19th century. Finds included a layer of charred wood and ashes as well as a cist or stone box 0.7m in diameter containing an ox head and small deer antler. Although no longer visible at ground level, ditches from which material was quarried during construction of the monument, flank the NE and SW sides of the mound. These have become infilled over the years but survive as buried features c.5m wide.

Archaeologia Volume 15 Section XXXIII. The apparent want of system in the British Sepulchres, gives us much trouble in examining them: this we experienced in a great degree, when opening the large Sherrington barrow [Map], see Plate XVIII.

This tumulus is situated on the borders of Sherrington field, about a hundred yards south of the river Wilye, and not more than a furlong south of the village of Codford. If you conceive an egg cut in two, lengthwise, and one half placed on the ground with the convex side upwards, the great end to the WNW you have the shape and position of the barrow. It is 108 feet long, and 80 feet wide in the broadest part, [m], and at A, 14 feet in elevation; it is chiefly raised by gravel near the Wilye. We opened this tumulus by a large section at the large end, and on the highest part: when at the depth of about 16 inches, we found 4 skeletons, lying from south to north; at the depth of 14 feet, we came to the floor of the barrow, [n] which was covered with charred wood and ashes; on the fouth fide of the floor, was a neat circular cist, made in the original soil, about two feet in diameter, and about sixteen inches deep; in this cist, we found the head of an ox, and one small horn of a deer. In this cist, or near it, we expected to have found the primary interment; being disappointed, we made two large sections at B and C. In the first, at the depth of eighteen inches, we discovered a skeleton lying from west to east; on the right side, we found an iron spear-head, see Plate XIX. Fig. 1. We pursued our researches to the floor of the barrow, but making no further discovery, we next sunk another pit, at C; here, at the depth of 18 inches, we discovered the skeleton of a stout man, [o] lying from west to east. On the right side of this skeleton, close by the thighs, lay a two-edged sword, the blade two feet in length, with rather an obtuse point, but no guarded hilt; it had been enclosed in a scabbard of wood, a considerable quantity of which, now adheres to it, (see Plate XIX. fig. 3.) On the right side of the head lay an iron spear, (see Plate XVIII. fig. 1;) and on the left, and close to the head, we found the umbo of a Shield, (see Plate XIX. fig. 3.) With the latter were found an iron buckle, a piece of leather, a strip of brass perforated in several places: all of which I conceive belonged to this Shield, as did also a thin bit of silver, see Plate XVIII. fig. 2; where it is drawn the full size. This probably covered the projecting part of the umbo; it is mutilated at both ends, and now appears like a small gorget. On the left side of the skeleton, and near the umbo, was found the knife, (see Plate XIX. fig. 4;) also several pieces of corroded iron. On the east of this skeleton, and in the same direction, we discovered two other skeletons, one of an adult, the other of a child four or five years of age; with these were found a small knife, and a piece of corroded lead: in the latter, was, (as I conjectured,) one or more iron rivets.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Sherrington. I.1 Sherrington Barrow [Map], about ½ mile E. of Sherrington Church, and about 100 yards south of the River Wylye. Length, according to Hoare, 108ft., at present 86ft.; W.N.W. and E.S.E. (Hoare). Opened by Wm. Cunnington in 1804, when several secondary interments were found, but no primary interment. Re-opened by Thurnam and the Rev. A. Fane in 1856 without further result. This mound has suffered much injury in the last 100 years from cultivation and other causes. It seems too high to have been ploughed over, but ploughing round it has |much reduced its size. There is a large crater-like hole at the east end, and the whole surface of the mound is irregular, much cut about, and untidy looking; the field is now down to grass; there is no sign of ditches. On the O.M. it appears as an almost circular mound, as now in fact it is. O.M. 58 NE.; A. W. I. 100; Arch. xv. (Cunnington, 1805); xlii. 180.

Note 1. This is the barrow referred to by Thurnam and Hoare as " Sherrington.'

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sherston [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Shipton Bellinger [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Shrewton [Map]

Carbon Date. 2100BC. Early Bronze Age Carbon Dates

Report: Antler, SNDRFRC4, id as red deer, from Pit 1, Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], England. Subm SRS 1982. Comment (subm): The grave goods could not be earlier than 4K BP. This result is earlier than any other from the barrow cemetery and contemporary with dates from the Stonehenge ditch, cursus and the destruction of the lesser cursus. The ditch fill contained small sherds of AOC Beaker, and antler fragments occurred throughout the central grave fill; I believe the AOC sherds and antler are residual and that earlier material was incorporated into the grave fill, to which the 14C date refers.

ID: 8752, C14 ID: HAR-4830 Date BP: 4100 +/- 100, Start Date BP: 4000, End BP: 4200

OS Letter: SU, OS East: 88, OS North: 448

Archaeologist Name: S Rollo-Smith, Trust for Wessex Archaeol

Reference Name: Radiocarbon, 34, 1992, 48; Proc Prehist Soc, 50, 1984, 255-318

Council for British Archaeology (2012) Archaeological Site Index to Radiocarbon Dates from Great Britain and Ireland [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1017767

On 14 Apr 1876 Cecil Herbert Edward Chubb 1st Baronet was born to Alfred Chubb at Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map]. He attended Christ's College, Cambridge University [Map] where he was awarded a double first in Science and Law, leaving with Master of Arts and Bachelor of Law degrees.

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, South Newton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Stapleford [Map]

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Steeple Langford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Steeple Langford, Yarnbury Castle [Map]

Yarnbury Castle is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Yarnbury Castle [Map] is a multiphase, multivallate Iron Age hillfort that covers an area of 11.5 hectares.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Stoke

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Ham Stoke

On 04 Oct 1301 Thomas Monthermer 2nd Baron Monthermer was born to Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer (age 31) and Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester and Hertford (age 29) at Ham Stoke, Wiltshire. He a grandson of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Stourhead [Map]

On 08 Sep 1785 Henry Hoare "The Magnificient" (age 80) died. He was buried at St Peter's Church, Stourton. His great-nephew Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet (age 26) inherited his Stourhead, Wiltshire [Map] estates.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Stourton

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Stourton, St Peter's Church

On 17 Feb 1523 William Stourton 5th Baron Stourton (age 66) died without issue. He was buried in the St Peter's Church, Stourton. His brother Edward Stourton 6th Baron Stourton (age 60) succeeded 6th Baron Stourton.

On 08 Sep 1785 Henry Hoare "The Magnificient" (age 80) died. He was buried at St Peter's Church, Stourton. His great-nephew Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet (age 26) inherited his Stourhead, Wiltshire [Map] estates.

On 19 May 1838 Richard Colt Hoare 2nd Baronet (age 79) died. He was buried at St Peter's Church, Stourton. His half brother Henry Hoare 3rd Baronet (age 76) succeeded 3rd Baronet Hoare of Barn Elms in Surrey.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Stratford Tony [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Stratford sub Castle [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sutton Veny

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Sutton Veny Long Barrow [Map]

Sutton Veny Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Sutton Veny. 2. [Sutton Veny Long Barrow [Map]] In grass field to the N.N.W. of the old Church of St. Leonard. Hoare shows a " Long " barrow in this position. The O.M. shows it as a large circular mound, and in its present condition it has no resemblance to a "Long" barrow, but in deference to Hoare, who saw it in a more perfect condition, it must be regarded as one. It is of great size, and level on top, and now looks more like a "motte" mound than anything else. It is shown by Hoare as unopened, and as lying S. and N. O.M. 52 SW.; A. W. I. Map of Wylye Station.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Swindon

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Lydiard Park Swindon

In Sep 825 Beornwulf King Mercia defeated Ecgberht, King of Wessex (age 52), at the Battle of Ellendun replacing Mercian with Wessex dominance over the Saxon Heptarchy. Sir Frank Stenton described it as 'one of the most decisive battles of English history'. The location of the battle is not known although a number of locations have been suggested: Wroughton, Wiltshire, Lydiard Park Swindon, Wiltshire and Wilton, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Teffont Evias [Map]

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park, Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wiltshire [Map], Wardour, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Wiltshire [Map], Upper [Map] and Lower [Map] Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Wiltshire [Map], Barford St Martin, Wiltshire [Map], Burcombe, Wiltshire [Map] and Wilton, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton, Wiltshire [Map] after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tidcombe

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tidcombe, Shalbourne 5a Long Barrow [Map]

Shalbourne 5a Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Shalbourne. [5a.] [Shalbourne 5a Long Barrow [Map]] On Smay Down, E. of "The Hassock " and W. of old chalk pit. Length about 162ft.; S.E. and N.W. It is said that this barrow has been opened and that skeletons were found, but there is no record of the opening, and no particulars seem to be known. Now down to grass, but it was formerly under cultivation and has been much levelled and flattened. Not on O.M. 43 N W. or in A. W.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tidcombe, Shalbourne 5 Long Barrow [Map]

Shalbourne 5 Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Shalbourne, 5. [Shalbourne 5 Long Barrow [Map]] In Great Botley Copse, N. of Tidcombe. Length 170ft.; S. and N. No recorded opening. Now in a wood and thickly covered with undergrowth; there is a large circular cavity at the south end that may show where it has been dug into. O.M. 43; A. W. I. 187.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tidcombe Great Barrow [Map]

Tidcombe Great Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Tidcombe with Fosbury. 1. "Tidcombe Great Barrow [Map]," about ½ mile S. of Tidcombe. Length 195ft.; according to Lukis 188ft.; S. and N. Chambered. Opened by country people in search for treasure about 1750 (Arch. viii. 91, note i.) who found a chamber at the E. end built of large sarsen stones, and it is said, containing only one skeleton. Opened again by the Rev. W. C. Lukis and Dr. Thurnam 1 without apparently further result.

This once fine barrow has been much injured; a large cutting has been made through the mound from end to end, and never filled up; several large sarsen stones (that once formed the chamber?) are exposed at the southern end. The ground is under cultivation up to the fringe of the mound, and there is no sign of the ditches visible on the surface. O.M. 43 N.W.; A. W. 187 (this is only an incidental reference, and the barrow is not marked on the map of Everley "Station," but there are two round barrows shown in its place). A. W. ii. Roman Æra, 69, and Map of Roman Road, p. 67; Arch. viii. 91, note 1; xlii. 203, 229; W.A.M. viii. 155 (Lukis).

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tidworth [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Tilshead Wiltshire [Map]

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Tilshead Wiltshire, Barrow Plantation Long Barrow [Map]

Barrow Plantation Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Tilshead. 7. [Barrow Plantation Long Barrow [Map]] In Barrow Plantation, E. of the village of Tilshead. Length 210ft. (Thurnam). S.E. and N.W. Opened by Thurnam in 1863, who states it was then covered with trees of about twenty years' growth. "Excavating near the east end, a stratum of black earth was found at the depth of about 5ft.; and in and below this a pile of human bones closely packed within a space of less than 4ft.in diameter, and about 18in. in depth. They proved to be the remains of eight skeletons, strangely cemented together, so closely as to show that if not interred after the decay or removal of the flesh, the bodies must have been packed together as closely as possible in the sitting or crouching posture. The lowest skeleton, covered by the others, and most centrally placed, was that of a woman.... The skeletons were those of three men, three women, and two infants, from one to two years of age;... nearly all (the skulls) had been extremely cleft, apparently during life.... The only skull without greater or less trace of violence is that referred to as the deepest and most centrally placed." Mem. Anthrop. Soc. I. 146.

This barrow, referred to by Thurnam as " Tilshead East," and described by Hoare as a "fine Long barrow on a hill," is now quite obscured in a plantation and covered with thick undergrowth and trees; rabbits are also playing havoc with the mound; the ditches are still distinguishable. There is said to be an artificial fox's earth with drain pipes under the mound. O.M. 46 SE.; A. W. I. 93; Arch. xlii. 180; Mem. Anthrop. Soc. I. 146; MS. Cat. 179—184.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Tilshead Wiltshire, Kill Long Barrow [Map]

Kill Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1868 V11 Pages 40-49. In addition to the two or three Oval Barrows opened by Sir Richard Hoare1, I have examined two or three others. The result appears to be, that, like the bowl and bell shaped tumuli, they cover interments sometimes by simple inhumation, but more generally after cremation. Like the circular barrows, they belong chiefly, if not altogether, to the age of bronze, and of burning the dead; by which phrase I understand a period when this metal and this mode of burial were in common but not universal use; implements and weapons of stone being still employed for many purposes, and burial by simple inhumation being still often resorted to. The attribution of the oval barrow to the bronze period might thus be not ill-founded, even if objects of bronze had not as yet been discovered in them. But in a barrow of this description on Roundway Down, near Devizes, in the examination of which by Mr. W. Cunnington, F.G.S., I had the opportunity of assisting, two blades of bronze were found, one with a deposit of burnt bones at the east, another with a similar deposit at the west end of the burial mound.2 In another oval tumulus, moreover, that called "Kill-barrow [Map]" near Tilshead, opened in 1865, I found many of the burnt bones strongly tinged with copper, clearly proving that objects of bronze had been burnt with the bodies.

Note 1. Those referred to in "Ancient "Wilts," vol. i., p. 169 (118), p. 241 (10), p. 242 (22), appear to be of this description. On the last Sir Richard Hoare observes: — "These diminutive long barrows differ very materially from those of the larger sort, in which we have almost invariably found the interments (of entire skeletons) deposited at the east and broadest end."

Note 2. Wilts Arch. Mag, vol. vi., p. 162. Barrow No. 6, Cran. Brit. pi. xxxi., 43, p. (2).

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Tilshead. 1. "Kill Barrow [Map]," on the Tilshead — Chitterne All Saints parish boundary. Length 170ft. (Thurnam); S.E. and N.W. Opened by Thurnam in 1865.1 At one time Thurnam believed this not to be a true "Long" barrow, but an oval one of the Bronze Age; but he subsequently changed his opinion and compared its unusual features with those of the Long Barrow, Winterbourne Stoke 53 (Hoare's No. 3). " Both... yielded deposits of burnt bones covered and intermixed with a substance resembling mortar, many of the bones being tinged of a green colour. At Kill Barrow it was clear that several bodies had been burnt very imperfectly, some of the bones being merely charred. Others were stained a brilliant green and blue, but chemical tests yielded no traces of copper. Under a pile of a white friable substance like half-dried shelly mortar, were curious masses of a sort of ossiferous breccia; the burnt human bones, black, white, blue, and green, being closely cemented by calcareous matter. I am now convinced that both are Long barrows, and not Oval ones, as I had supposed." The MS. Cat. gives some details that may not be published elsewhere: — " The primary interment consisted of piles of burnt bones on the floor of the barrow at the east end. One of these to the east of the other, would have about filled a peck; the other, 6ft. or 7ft. nearer the middle of the barrow, was in much greater quantity. These burnt bones were some of them curiously [mixed] with burnt flints, sarsen chips, &c, into what I have called an ossiferous breccia, and many were stained of a beautifully vivid blue and green colour. These burnt bones were unequally burnt, and many merely charred were quite black. Above the bones the chalk rubble of the barrow was curiously changed into a delicate friable cream-coloured substance like burnt shells. I fancy this an imperfect lime, formed probably from the burnt bones having been deposited whilst hot. This substance was very abundant, and would probably have filled a bushel." Two secondary burials of skeletons were found also. One was "one foot deep, — stretched at length, with head to the north (or N".N".W.) " The other skeleton was "in the same position, nearer the eastern end." It seems that the barrow was opened on two separate occasions. The skull from the first-mentioned secondary burial only, seems to have been sent to Cambridge.

The barrow is unploughed and in good condition, but no distinguishable ditch. O.M. 46 SW.; AAV. I. 89; Arch, xliii. 297, note; Proc. Soc. Ant., 2 S., II. 427; W.A.M. xi. 42; xiv. 259 (name); MS. Cat. 258.

Note 1. This barrow is not included among the list of those opened by Thurnam.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Tilshead Wiltshire, Tilshead Old Ditch Long Barrow [Map]

Tilshead Old Ditch Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1872 V13 Pages 339-342. The Long Barrows differ in toto from those of the circular form, and belong to a different and earlier epoch. From their usually great size, with one end only devoted to interment, they may be quite as much or even more properly regarded as monuments than as mere tombs. They very commonly measure from 200 to 250 feet in length, and in rare cases even 300 or 400 feet. They seldom exceed ten feet in height, and are wider and higher at one end than at the other — usually that pointing to the east; though at times, they range north and south, in which case the south end is of larger size. It is at this larger end, under what we may term the apex of the tumulus, that the interments are found, on or but little below the natural level of the ground. At each side of the barrow is a trench, whence great part of the material of which the barrow consists has been derived; which trenches, it is remarkable, are not continued round the ends of the barrow. From the great size of the Long Barrows, and the often uncertain position of the apex, their exploration is attended with great labour and difficulty, and hence only a comparatively small number have been explored. About fifteen of those in South Wiltshire were excavated by the elder Cunnington and Sir Richard Hoare, and more recently rather more than that number by Dr. Thurnam. From these data a tolerably complete view of the character of these barrows has been obtained.1 Usually — in at least six cases out of seven — the interments consist of unburnt bodies. Sometimes, there is a single skeleton doubled up; but more commonly a pile of many skeletons, as many perhaps as ten or twenty in number, the bones mixed promiscuously, as if removed from some prior place of burial. The greater part of the skulls are cleft, and many of the long bones split, as if the majority of those interred had been immolated, in honour perhaps of a de- ceased chieftain, and as if not alone human sacrifice, but cannibalism likewise, had been resorted to. In rare cases (and the Long Barrow round which they were now gathered was one), the body or bodies had been burnt, but the cremation was of a peculiar and imperfect sort, the bones being charred, rather than completely burnt like those in the Round Barrows. In one instance, that of the largest Long Barrow in South Wilts, that of Tilshead Old Ditch [Map], which measures 380ft. in length, and was imperfectly explored in 1802, Dr. Thurnam in 1865, found the true primary interment, at a depth of ten feet, consisting of one imperfectly burnt body, and immediately adjacent a doubled-up unburnt skeleton, that of a woman of small stature, the skull bearing indisputable marks of having been violently cleft before burial, and doubtless during life. The burnt body must be regarded as that of the chief, the unburnt one as that of the wife or female slave, slaughtered that she might accompany her lord to the land of spirits.

Note 1. Archæologia. Vol. XLII., p. 169.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Tilshead. 2. "Old Ditch" Barrow [Map]. Length 377ft. (Hoare); 380ft. (Thurnam); NE. and S.W. Opened, 1802, by Wm. Cunnington, who made a section 85ft. long from the E. end, but failed to find the primary burial; he noticed the usual stratum of black sooty soil, and found two secondary burnt burials near the surface of the mound. He then cut a section at the VV. end and found three skeletons lying on a pavement of flints about 18in. above the floor of the barrow. In 1865 it was re-opened by Thurnam who made a large excavation near the E. end; and only a few feet beyond where Cunnington had left off in 1802, he found the primary interment. The following account of the discovery is from the MS. Cat. " No. 235. Ancient British. From the great Long Barrow at Tilshead, near Old Ditch, excavated by Thurnam, September 29th, 1865. This (the primary interment) was found by us after great labour, and at a depth of ten feet under the highest point of the tumulus close to its eastern end. Here, at or below the base, was a pile of large flints mixed with a stratum of black earth, and below these was a small skeleton well preserved, in the contracted position and with head to the north. The skull was smashed, as I thought at first by the weight of the flints, but from the peculiar character of a contused cleft near the coronal border of the left parietal, it would appear to have been purposely cleaved before interment. Within a foot or two of the skeleton to the east, under the pile of flints, and on a sort of pavement of the same, were a heap of imperfectly burnt bones, in larger pieces than is usual in round barrows. This very exceptional deposit after cremation must have been made contemporaneously with that of the body to which the entire skeleton belonged. The burnt bones, which were unmixed with charcoal, were perhaps buried whilst still hot, many of the flints around them being of a red or blue colour and very brittle as if from the effect of heat. The only relic with them was a rude and heavy opalescent flint; whether the apparently chipped edges were intentionally given to it may be doubtful; it is 2½in. long, 1¾in. wide, and thick. Other extensive excavations were made in the most likely situations without finding anything except in one place the bones of a fox a few feet deep."

This barrow, one of the finest and longest in the county, is in excellent condition. It lies on gently sloping ground, not at the top of a hill, and in spite of its great size is not at all conspicuous. It has lately been planted with a row of trees along its crest. As its name implies it is close to the remarkable bank and ditch known as "Old Ditch" that traverses the down for some miles to E. and W. of the barrow; as noticed by Hoare "Old Ditch" makes a decided curve when it reaches the mound in order to avoid it.

The ditch of the barrow is very well defined on the north side, but not so well on the south, for "Old Ditch" passing the barrow on that side has somewhat obscured it. O.M. 54 NW.; A. W I. 90; Arch, xlii., 175, 180, 191, 192; W.A.M., xiii., 231 [Note. The Page here is incorrect; the page is 341]; Bull, de la Soc. d'Anthrop., 2 S., ii., 357, 676, fig.; Mem. Anthrop. Soc, iii., 65, PI. i.,fig. i.; MS. Cat. 235.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Tilshead Wiltshire, White Long Barrow [Map]

White Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

3750BC. White Long Barrow [Map] is 77.5 m long and approximately 47 m wide including the surrounding ditch. Dating of materials found in and around it suggests that it dates from around 3750BC±250.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Tilshead. 4. "White Barrow [Map]." Length 255ft. (Hoare); E. and W. Opened by Hoare and Cunnington but without success, only a few pieces of stag's horns and the usual "line of black earth " being found. This barrow, with 2¾ acres of land adjoining, is now the property of the National Trust. Hoare speaks of it as having been "lately covered with a plantation," but this has long since disappeared, and the whole barrow was for some time under cultivation. In spite of this it may happily still be described as in good condition with well-defined ditches; it is now down to grass, and under its present ownership will not be ploughed again. O.M. 53 NE.; A.W. I. 91; Arch. xlii. 180.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tockenham [Map]

Time Team Series 2 Episode 3: The Lost Villa was filmed between 06 May 1994 and 08 May 1994. It was originally shown on 22 Jan 1995.

Location: Tockenham, Wiltshire [Map].

Category: Time Team Early Medieval.

The Time Team:

Tony Robinson (age 48), Presenter

Mick Aston (age 48), Bristol University Landscape Archaeologist

Carenza Lewis (age 31), Field Archaeologist

Phil Harding (age 44), Wessex Archaeological Trust Field Archaeologist

Robin Bush (age 51), Archivist

Victor Ambrus (age 59), Historical Illustrator

Stewart Ainsworth (age 43), Landscape Archaeologist

Dr Mike Allen, Environmental Archaeologist

John Gator, Chris Gaffney, Geophysics

Martin Henig, Oxford University

Bryn Walters, Romano-British Archaeologist

Roy Canham, County Archaeologist

Mark Horton, Digger

Louise Shenstone, Mosaic Artist

Amanda Chadburn, English Heritage

Techniques: Coring, Resistivity, Field Walking

Sources: Pevsner who suggests the Roman Figure in the church wall is Asclepius, Plato's Phaedo 118a, Sites and Monuments Record, Tockenham Tithe Map 1866 on linen, 1764 Estate Map.

Outcomes: Martin Henig determines Roman Statue is a Genius; an individual instance of a general divine nature that is present in every individual person, place, or thing like a guardian angel. And Roman Fountain Head in the form of a fish; the finest work of art in Roman Britain. Geophyics identified Roman Villa; Provincial Governors Palace? Carbonised processed grain from Environmental Archaeology. Hypocaust tiles. Saxon pot. Roman Painted Plaster. Roman bowl, glass, mosaic. Monument scheduled.

Channel 4 Episode

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tockenham, St Giles' Church

Around 1200 St Giles' Church, Tockenham was built. There is a Roman Statue embedded in the wall and the church reuses Roman stones. The church was originally dedicated to St John the Evangelist.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tormaton

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Tormaton, Fox Covert Long Barrow [Map]

Fox Covert Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Fox Covert Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England

The monument includes a long barrow set just above the floor of a small valley. The barrow mound is orientated SW-NE, it is trapezoidal in plan and has dimensions of 50m long, 25m wide at the broader NE end and 22m wide at the SW end. The mound varies in height between 2m in the centre and 0.5m at the NE end. Although no longer visible at ground level ditches, from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument, flank the mound to the north and south. These have become infilled over the years but survive as buried features c.3m wide.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Trowbridge [Map]

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire [Map] as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury, Wiltshire [Map] to Yarnbrook, Wiltshire [Map] where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Trowbridge Grammar School

Around 1602 Edward Rodney (age 11) educated at Trowbridge Grammar School.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Upavon [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Upavon, Casterley Camp [Map]

Casterley Camp is also in Iron Age Hill Forts Wiltshire.

Colt Hoare 1812. Proceeding a little further, I quit the ridgeway, and direct my course towards CASTERLEY CAMP [Map]. This earthen work bears the strongest marks of originality, and none of the modern signs of innovation. I consider it as a British town, but not so populous as either of those already noticed at STOCKTON and GROVELY. Here we find no deep or multiplied ramparts, but a simple ditch and vallum of no great elevation, enclosing an area of above sixty acres. The richness of its soil having induced the owner to devote it to tillage, many of the original works and excavations have been defaced, but we still in D. and E. recognize the works of the Britons; the former in its irregularity resembling others before noticed at STOCKTON and GROVELLY: the other, E., by having the ditch within the vallum, denoting probably a place appropriated to religious purposes. Many passages have been made through these works for the accommodation Of waggons; it is therefore difficult to state the original entrances: I rather doubt if C. was one, but can speak, I think, confidently respecting A. and B., though we do not: usually find two entrances so near to each other, and it would be reasonable to suppose there had been another entrance or exit at the northern end, where there are signs of some outworks, &c. The line of ramparts is most perfect and regular on the east side. On the south side, we may observe a bank and ditch issuing from the camp, which runs over the down, and bends towards the vale of Avon. The area of this camp contains above sixty-four acres; the circuit of the outer ditch is one mile and a quarter, and the depth of the vallum is twenty-eight feet. On the west side also, are the signs of another bank and ditch.

Note 1. We often meet with the names of Bodbury, and Badbury, evidently derived from the British word bod, a dwelling but in digging in the area of camp, Mr. Cunningtons could not find any pottery, or other signs of residence.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1885 V22 Pages 234-238. "The manoeuvres of the day being interrupted by the heavy fall of earth, I left Marden and ascended the chalk hills. The eye is caught by the remains of an ancient earthen work on the summit of the hill overlooking this fine vale. It is called Broadbury, Brodbury, &c. , &c. It has been much mutilated by chalk pits. It is single ditched — similar square excavations (containing fragments of the oldest pottery) to those on Cotley Hill, near Warminster, have been found here.

"These works are situated very near the great Ridge- way — see my map of Wilts. Turned off on the left, and continued my ride along it to Casterley Camp [Map]. Casterley much changed in its appearance, having been lately ploughed up. Nunc seges est ubi Troja fuit [Now the harvest is where Troy was]. Thence crossed the vale of Avon at Chisenbury, once the site of a priory. My trackway led me straight to the perfect little square work called Sidbury [Map]. Great British excavations in its neighbourhood. Saw on my right the beautiful twin barrows — before drawn and noticed. One remains to be opened. 'Par nobile fratrum [A noble pair of brothers].' Returned to Everley gratified and benefitted, as usual, by my ride amongst the Britons.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Upper Woodford

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Upper Woodford, Woodford 2 Long Barrow [Map]

Woodford 2 Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Woodford. 2. [Woodford 2 Long Barrow [Map]] S. of Druid's Lodge, on the E. side of Devizes — Salisbury Road, and about one-fifth of a mile S. of 6th milestone from Salisbury. Length 64ft.; S. and N. No recorded opening, but it looks as if it had been dug into in more than one place. It is short and broad, and lies on a steep slope on an uncultivated down; the ditches are fairly distinct. On the O.M. it appears as an almost round barrow. O.M. 60 SW.; Arch. xlii. 173, note b. Not shown by Hoare.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Upton Lovell [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Upton Scudamore [Map]

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire [Map] as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury, Wiltshire [Map] to Yarnbrook, Wiltshire [Map] where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wanborough [Map]

Ermine Street 41b travels from Speen, Newbury [Map] through Baydon, Wiltshire [Map], Wanborough, Wiltshire [Map], Blunsdon St Andrew, Wiltshire [Map] to Cirencester, Gloucestershire [Map]. Whilst Margery's scheme doesn't say so, the road appears to continues from Cirencester, Gloucestershire [Map] to Gloucester, Gloucestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wardour [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wardour Castle [Map]

On 20 Mar 1766 Eleanor Mary Arundell Baroness Clifford Chudleigh was born to Henry Arundell 8th Baron Arundel (age 26) and Mary Conquest Baroness Arundel Wardour (age 23) at Wardour Castle [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, West Dean

On 17 Apr 1627 John Evelyn of Godstone (age 72) died at West Dean, Wiltshire. On 21 May 1627 he was buried in the Chancel of St Mary's Church, West Dean.

Around 1662 William Pierrepont 4th Earl Kingston was born to Robert Pierrepont and Elizabeth Evelyn at West Dean, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, West Dean, St Mary's Church

On 17 Apr 1627 John Evelyn of Godstone (age 72) died at West Dean, Wiltshire. On 21 May 1627 he was buried in the Chancel of St Mary's Church, West Dean.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, West Gomeldon [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, West Grafton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, West Grafton, Tow Long Barrow [Map]

Tow Long Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Grafton. 5. [Tow Long Barrow [Map]] On Wexcombe Down, to the N.E. of Jubilee Plantation. Length 83ft. N. and S. In excellent condition, standing on uncultivated down land, and apparently unopened; the ditches are unusually well defined and end abruptly at both ends of the mound in the orthodox way. The mound is rather flat and broad, with one or two depressions in it that may mark the place of interments— perhaps secondary ones. It appears rather as an oval mound on the O.M., and does not seem to have been previously noticed as a "Long" barrow. O.M. 43 N.W.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, West Knoyle [Map]

The Wiltshire River Lodden rises at West Knoyle, Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows south-west past Gutchpool Farm, Gillingham [Map] then between Ham Common, Dorset [Map] and Gillingham, Dorset [Map] joining the Dorset River Stour at Ecliffe, Dorset [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Westbury [Map]

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 15 Apr 1053. In this year was the king (age 50) at Winchester, Hampshire [Map], at Easter; and Earl Godwin (age 52) with him, and Earl Harold (age 31) his son, and Tosty (age 27). On the day after Easter sat he with the king at table; when he suddenly sunk beneath against the foot-rail, deprived of speech and of all his strength. He was brought into the king's chamber; and they supposed that it would pass over: but it was not so. He continued thus speechless and helpless till the Thursday; when he resigned his life, on the seventeenth before the calends of May; and he was buried at Winchester in the old minster. Earl Harold (age 31), his son, took to the earldom that his father had before, and to all that his father possessed; whilst Earl Elgar took to the earldom that Harold (age 31) had before. The Welshmen this year slew a great many of the warders of the English people at Westbury, Wiltshire [Map]. This year there was no archbishop in this land: but Bishop Stigand held the see of Canterbury at Christ church, and Kinsey that of York. Leofwine and Wulfwy went over sea, and had themselves consecrated bishops there. Wulfwy took to the bishopric which Ulf had whilst he was living and in exile.

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire [Map] as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury, Wiltshire [Map] to Yarnbrook, Wiltshire [Map] where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Broke Westbury

Around 1452 Robert Willoughby 1st Baron Willoughby 9th Baron Latimer was born to John Willoughby 8th Baron Latimer of Corby (age 31) and Anne Cheney (age 23) at Broke Westbury, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Whaddon

On 15 Nov 1672 Walter Long 1st Baronet (age 69) died at Whaddon, Wiltshire. His son Walter Long 2nd Baronet (age 45) succeeded 2nd Baronet Long of Whaddon in Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wilsford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wilsford, Ell Barrow [Map]

Ell Barrow is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine 1913 V38 Pages 379-414. Wilsford. 3. (N.Wilts) "Ell Barrow [Map]," on Black Heath, near the Wilsford — Charlton parish boundary. Length 170ft.; E. and W. Opened by Thurnam, but it had been rifled before, and he only found the remains of skeletons. No particulars are given. He also found a secondary Saxon burial of a large male skeleton at full length, a foot or so under the turf. The skull was cleft, but the wound was of a different character from the breakages of skulls in primary burials in "Long" barrows, and had apparently been inflicted by a sword. (Arch. xlii. 196, note).

This conspicuously situated barrow stands on un ploughed down, and its ditches are still quite distinct. It has been much trampled about in the last few years by mounted soldiers, who seem to use it as a look-out post. A flagstaff for flying the danger signal of the artillery range has been planted in the mound. O.M. 46 NE; A. W. I. 175; Arch. xlii. 180, 196, note; MS. Cat. 148 (the entry is that of the secondary interment only).

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wilsford, Lake House [Map]

On 24 Sep 1779 Reverend Edward Duke was born to Edward Duke of Lake House and Fanny Field at Lake House, Wilsford [Map].

Druidical Temples in the County of Wilts. To Archaeologists Of Great Britain And Ireland; Especially To The Fellows Of The Antiquarian Society, To The Members Of The Archaeological Association, And To The Members Of The Archaeological Institute, This Book, (The Amusement And Occupation Of His Leisure Hours,) Is Respectfully Dedicated, By Their Obedient And Humble Servant, The Author. Lake House [Map], Amesbury, August 13th, 1846.

On 28 Aug 1852 Reverend Edward Duke (age 72) died at Lake House, Wilsford [Map]. The eldest son, Edward, who had also entered the church, succeeded to the estates.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wilsford Henge [Map]

Wilsford Henge is also in South England Henges.

Wilsford Henge [Map] is a Neolithic Henge on a gently sloping spur of land about 500m south of the River Avon West, Wiltshire around 43 metres internal diameter. Excavation in 2015 discovered early Bronze Age crouched burial of an adolescent child which included sherds of beaker pottery and a collection of necklace beads.

The River Avon West, Wiltshire rises around All Cannings, Wiltshire [Map] in the Vale of Pewsey being formed from many streams from where it flows past Patney, Wiltshire [Map], around Marden Henge aka Hatfield Earthworks [Map] and Wilsford Henge [Map], Rushall, Wiltshire [Map] where it joins the River Avon East, Wiltshire to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wincombe Park [Map]

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park, Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wiltshire [Map], Wardour, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Wiltshire [Map], Upper [Map] and Lower [Map] Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Wiltshire [Map], Barford St Martin, Wiltshire [Map], Burcombe, Wiltshire [Map] and Wilton, Wiltshire [Map], where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton, Wiltshire [Map] after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Winterbourne Basset [Map]

Avebury by William Stukeley. If we descend the Hakpen-hill [Map], westward from hence towards Winterburn-basset [Map], upon the declivity of the Hakpen, is another Druid's house, called too Old Chapel. 'Tis a square, double ditched, but small ditches, in the middle a broad oblong square bank. Before it a sort of court, nearly as big as the other. Near it, they say, they have found much old iron and pewter. It seems to have been set round with stones.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Winterbourne Gunner [Map]

Time Team Series 2 Episode 5: The Saxon Graves was filmed between 24 Jun 1994 and 26 Jun 1994. It was originally shown on 05 Feb 1995.

Location: Winterbourne Gunner, Wiltshire [Map]

Category: Time Team Prehistory, Time Team Early Medieval.

The Time Team:

Tony Robinson (age 48), Presenter

Mick Aston (age 48), Bristol University Landscape Archaeologist

Carenza Lewis (age 31), Royal Commission on Historic Monuments

Phil Harding (age 45), Wessex Archaeological Trust Field Archaeologist

Robin Bush (age 51), Archivist

Victor Ambrus (age 59), Historical Illustrator

Stewart Ainsworth (age 43), Landscape Archaeologist

Helena Cave-Penney, Assistant County Archaeologist

Ivor Lawton, Saxon Blacksmithing

Margaret Cox, Pathologist

Meg Brooks, Conservationist

Peter Cox, Local Archaeologist

Mick the Dig, Excavator

Sources: Gildas Section 23, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 519, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Battle of Salisbury 552

Outcomes: Saxons Graves including lady with decorated brooch and amber bead, child, decorated iron pin, Bronze Age Inverted Urn with Cremation, Reconstructed Saxon Knife, Ring Ditches, Pond Barrow

Channel 4 Episode

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Winterbourne Stoke [Map]

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire [Map] from where it flows through Orcheston, Wiltshire [Map], Elston, Wiltshire [Map], Shrewton, Wiltshire [Map], Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire [Map], Berwick St James, Wiltshire [Map], where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wootton Bassett

After 1147 Philip Fitzrobert (age 25) died at Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wotton Rivers [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wroughton

In Sep 825 Beornwulf King Mercia defeated Ecgberht, King of Wessex (age 52), at the Battle of Ellendun replacing Mercian with Wessex dominance over the Saxon Heptarchy. Sir Frank Stenton described it as 'one of the most decisive battles of English history'. The location of the battle is not known although a number of locations have been suggested: Wroughton, Wiltshire, Lydiard Park Swindon, Wiltshire and Wilton, Wiltshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Wylye [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Yarnbrook [Map]

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire [Map] as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury, Wiltshire [Map] to Yarnbrook, Wiltshire [Map] where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge, Wiltshire [Map] after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.