History of Middlesex

Acton

On 04 Oct 1484 Richard Culpepper 1458-1484 (26) died at Acton.

On 19 Aug 1537 Thomas Cornwall 8th Baron Burford 1467-1537 (70) died at Acton. His son Richard Cornwall 9th Baron Burford 1493-1569 (44) succeeded 9th Baron Burford (1C).

On 08 Aug 1637 Richard Vaughan 2nd Earl Carbery 1600-1686 (37) and Frances Altham Countess Carbery 1621-1650 (16) were married at Acton. Frances Altham Countess Carbery 1621-1650 (16) by marriage Countess Carbery.

On 11 Dec 1830 John Adams-Acton Sculptor 1830-1910 was born in Acton.

Barnet

Battle of Barnet

On 14 Apr 1471 Edward IV (28) commanded at the Battle of Barnet supported by his brothers George (21) and Richard (18), John Babington 1423-1485 (48), Wiliam Hastings (40) (commanded), Ralph Hastings -1495, William Norreys 1441-1507 (30), William Parr KG 1434-1483 (37), John Savage 1422-1495 (49), Thomas St Leger 1440-1483 (31), John Tuchet 6th Baron Audley Heighley, 3rd Baron Tuchet 1426-1490 (45), Thomas Burgh 1st Baron Burgh 1431-1496 (40) and Thomas Strickland -1494.
The Yorkists William Blount -1471, Humphrey Bourchier 1431-1471 (40), Humphrey Bourchier 1435-1471 (36) and Thomas Parr -1471 were killed. Henry Stafford 1425-1471 (46) was killed making his wife Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 (27) a widow for the second time.
The Lancastrians Warwick the Kingmaker (43), John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 (40) and William Tyrrell -1471 were killed.
William Fiennes 2nd Baron Saye and Sele 1428-1471 (43) was killed. His son Henry Fiennes 3rd Baron Saye and Sele 1446-1476 (25) succeeded 3rd Baron Saye and Sele. Anne Harcourt Baroness Saye and Sele by marriage Baroness Saye and Sele.
Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter 1430-1475 (40) commanded the left flank, was badly wounded and left for dead, Henry Stafford 1425-1471 (46) and John Paston 1444-1504 (27) were wounded, John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (28) commanded, and John Paston 1442-1479 (29) and William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (33) fought. .
Robert Harleston 1435-1471 (36) was killed.
Thomas Hen Salusbury 1409-1471 (62) was killed.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1499-1525 (10). Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge, St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop Rochester 1469-1535 (40). Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

On 07 Jan 1626 Thomas Palmer 1st Baronet Palmer 1540-1626 (86) died at Barnet. He was buried at Wingham. His grandson Thomas Palmer 2nd Baronet Palmer -1656 succeeded 2nd Baronet Palmer of Wingham (1C 1661).

Chiswick

On 06 Apr 1657 William Boothby 1st Baronet Boothby 1638-1707 (19) and Hill Brooke 1636-1704 (21) were married at Chiswick.

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 October. 29 Oct 1682. Being my birthday, and I now entering my great climacterical of 63, after serious recollections of the years past, giving Almighty God thanks for all his merciful preservations and forbearance, begging pardon for my sins and unworthiness, and his blessing on me the year entering, I went with my Lady Fox to survey her building, and give some directions for the garden at Chiswick; the architect is Mr. May (61), somewhat heavy and thick, and not so well understood: the garden much too narrow, the place without water, near a highway, and near another great house of my Lord Burlington (13), little land about it, so that I wonder at the expense; but women will have their will.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

In 1700 Crisp Gascoyne Lord Mayor London 1700-1761 was born in Chiswick. He was baptised on 26 Aug 1700 at Church of St Nicholas, Chiswick.

On 05 Jan 1713 Jean Chardin Traveller 1643-1713 (69) died in Chiswick.

On 26 Jun 1722 Dorothy Molyneux Viscountess Falkland -1722 died at Chiswick.

On 13 Nov 1789 Jane Thornhill 1709-1789 (80) died in Chiswick.

After 1730 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764. Portrait of the artist's wife Jane Thornhill 1709-1789.

On 24 Sep 1822 Charles William Cavendish 1822-1890 was born to Henry Frederick Compton Cavendish 1789-1873 (32) and Frances Susan Lambton -1840 at Chiswick.

Chiswick House, Chiswick

Death of Princess Charlotte

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter V: Country House Visits. After my dear mother's death I visited a great deal with my father (53), and one year we went for the shooting to Lord Huntingfield's place, Heveningham Hall. I slept in the bedroom once occupied by the famous Chevalier d'Éon, who had been a frequent guest at Heveningham, and about whom there were many stories told. It was said that the Chevalier was the one and only lover of cross-grained Queen Charlotte, and that her son, George IV, was the result of their intimacy, although his paternity was of course admitted by King George III. The animosity always displayed by the old Queen to her grand-daughter, Princess Charlotte, was supposed to arise from the fact that as heiress to the throne she innocently dispossessed the other Royal Dukes from the succession. It is certainly a fact that the Princess's untimely death in childbirth was attributed to foul play at the time, and when later the accoucheur Sir Richard Croft, committed suicide, all classes of society were loud in condemnation of the Queen and the Prince Regent. I do not vouch for the accuracy of Queen Charlotte's love affair. I only give the Heveningham gossip as I heard it.
As D'Eon was undoubtedly one of the most picturesque and mysterious personages ot the eighteenth century I was naturally interested in these somewhat scandalous stories.
The ChevalierChevalier wrote his secret cipher communications, and I wondered whether the brocade crowns and frills and furbelows that he wore as a woman had ever hung in the old wardrobe which I used.
My father and I also stayed with the Westmorlands at Apethorpe Hall ; we visited the Earl (38) and Countess of Chichester (36) at Stanmer Park, and we were welcome guests at Cadlands, Silverlands, Chiswick House, West Park, and my uncle Lord Stradbroke's place, Henham Hall, which was afterwards burnt down.
I had visited Deene Park with my mother in 1842, but I must deal with my future home in the chapter devoted to Deene and its associations.

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany Painter 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (19).

Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.

In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (33). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29) when Prince of Wales.

In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (48). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (44) in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

Morton House, Chiswick

On 30 Sep 1811 Mary Campbell 1727-1811 (84) died at Morton House, Chiswick.

Church of St Nicholas, Chiswick

In 1700 Crisp Gascoyne Lord Mayor London 1700-1761 was born in Chiswick. He was baptised on 26 Aug 1700 at Church of St Nicholas, Chiswick.

Turnham Green, Chiswick

On 18 Aug 1681 Philip "Infamous Earl" Herbert 7th Earl Pembroke, 4th Earl Montgomery 1652-1683 (29) killed William Smeeth following a drunken evening in the tavern on Turnham Green, Chiswick. On 21 Jun 1681 he was indicted for the murder; somehwat inexplicably He received a Royal Pardon.

On 20 Aug 1711 Richard Thornhill -1711 was murdered by two men who allegedly invoked Cholmeley Dering 4th Baronet Dering 1679-1711 's name as they killed him at Turnham Green, Chiswick.

Clerkenwell

On 30 Apr 1290 Gilbert "Red Earl" Clare 7th Earl Gloucester, 6th Earl Hertford 1243-1295 (46) and Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester, Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (18) were married at Clerkenwell. Joan of Acre Countess Gloucester, Countess Hertford 1272-1307 (18) by marriage Countess Gloucester (1C 1121), Earl Hertford (1C 1138).

On 22 Sep 1629 Robert Radclyffe 5th Earl of Sussex 1573-1629 (56) died at Clerkenwell. His first-cousin once-removed Edward Radclyffe 6th Earl of Sussex 1559-1643 (70) succeeded 6th Earl of Sussex.

Around 1580 based on a work of 1565.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Robert Radclyffe 5th Earl of Sussex 1573-1629 (6) wearing his Garter Collar and holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Farringdon Road

Fleet Prison

In 1534 Richard Clement of Ingham Mote 1482-1538 (52) was imprisoned in the Fleet Prison for having used excessive force in his roile as Justice of the Peace: Kent during a property dispute in Shipbourne between the rector and Robert Brenner of Hadlow, a servant of Edward Guildford 1474-1534 (60) who was the father-in-law of John Dudley 1504-1553 (30), the future Duke of Northumberland.

After 21 Apr 1509 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms -1534 made a drawing of the death of Henry VII (he wasn't present). The drawing shows those present and in some cases provides their arms by which they can be identified. From top left clockwise:

On 25 Aug 1537 Richard Tempest of Bracewell 1480-1537 (57) died in Fleet Prison.

After 19 Aug 1565 Thomas Keyes 1523-1571 was imprisoned for having married Mary Grey 1545-1578 without the Queen's permission at Fleet Prison.

On Mar 1599 John Spencer Lord Mayor -1610 was imprisoned ostensibly for having mis-treated his daughter albeit the accuser was William Compton 1st Earl of Northampton -1630 who was trying to marry the said daughter much to William's disapproval at Fleet Prison.

Around 1590. Unknown Artist. Miniature Portrait of William Compton 1st Earl of Northampton -1630.

On May 1613 Robert Killigrew 1580-1633 (33) was imprisoned at Fleet Prison.

In May 1613 Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (1) was caught talking to Thomas Overbury, a prisoner in the Tower of London, and sent to the Fleet Prison for a short time. He was later accused of involvement in Overbury's murder, because he had supplied white powder to his patron, the Earl of Somerset (26), but exonerated.

On 17 Mar 1617 Gervase Clifton 1st Baron Clifton 1570-1618 (47) was prosecuted by the Star Chamber and moved to Fleet Prison.

On 14 Oct 1618 Gervase Clifton 1st Baron Clifton 1570-1618 (48) stabbed himself to death in the Fleet Prison. His daughter Katherine Clifton Duchess Lennox 1592-1637 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Clifton.

In 1619 Walter Butler 11th Earl Ormonde, 4th Earl Ossory 1559-1633 (60) was imprisoned at Fleet Prison for opposing the King's scheme to bring an end to the feuding between the Fitzgerald and Butler families.39136:39136 Walter Butler 11th Earl Ormonde, 4th Earl Ossory 1559-1633 (60) was in prison for eight years.

Around Feb 1621 Francis Norreys 1st Earl Berkshire 1579-1622 (41) was imprisoned for attacking Emanuel Scrope 1st Earl of Sunderland 1584-1630 (36) in front of the House of Lords in the presence the future Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (20) at Fleet Prison.

In 1627 Richard Ogle of Pinchbeck 1553-1627 (74) died in Fleet Prison.

John Evelyn's Diary 1690 June. 27 Jun 1690. I went to visit some friends in the Tower, when asking for Lord Clarendon, they by mistake directed me to the Earl of Torrington (42), who about three days before had been sent for from the fleet, and put into the Tower for cowardice and not fighting the French fleet, which having beaten a squadron of the Hollanders, while Torrington (42) did nothing, did now ride masters of the sea, threatening a descent.

John Evelyn's Diary 1696 April. 06 Apr 1696. I visited Mr. Graham in the Fleet.

In or before 1731 Anne Hamilton 1709-1748 (21) and Mary Edwards 1704-1743 (27) were married in the Chapel of Fleet Prison. She was the richest woman in England at the time having aounrd £60000. Evidence of the marriage was scant; she never used the Hamilton name, although it was reported in the Gentleman's Magazine. She eventually separated from her husband making her children illegitimate. Somewhat curiously his baptism records show his surname as Edwardes.

In 1734 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764 (36). Titled "Edwards Hamilton family on a Terrace" the subjects are Anne Hamilton 1709-1748 (24) and Mary Edwards 1704-1743 (30) and their child Gerard Edwardes of Welham Grove 1734-1773. In her left hand she holds Addison’s Spectator No.580 that describes the need to fill the mind with an awareness of the Divine Being. The books on the table beside her include poetry or sermons of Edward Young, the works of Swift, Pope’s translation of the Iliad, and the devotional writings of Damuel Bowens and Archbishop Tillotson.

In 1742 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764 (44). Portrait of Mary Edwards 1704-1743 (38).

On Jul 1831 William Pole-Tylney-Long-Wellesley 4th Earl Mornington 1788-1857 (43) was imprisoned in Fleet Prison for contempt of court.

St John's Street, Clerkenwell

Hicks Hall

Rye House Plot

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 July. 13 Jul 1683. As I was visiting Sir Thomas Yarborough and his Lady, in Covent Garden, the astonishing news was brought to us of the Earl of Essex (52) having cut his throat, having been but three days a prisoner in the Tower, and this happened on the very day and instant that Lord Russell (43) was on his trial, and had sentence of death [See Rye House Plot.]. This accident exceedingly amazed me, my Lord Essex (52) being so well known by me to be a person of such sober and religious deportment, so well at his ease, and so much obliged to the King (53). It is certain the King (53) and Duke (49) were at the Tower, and passed by his window about the same time this morning, when my Lord (52) asking for a razor, shut himself into a closet, and perpetrated the horrid act. Yet it was wondered by some how it was possible he should do it in the manner he was found, for the wound was so deep and wide, that being cut through the gullet, windpipe, and both the jugulars, it reached to the very vertebræ of the neck, so that the head held to it by a very little skin as it were; the gapping too of the razor, and cutting his own fingers, was a little strange; but more, that having passed the jugulars he should have strength to proceed so far, that an executioner could hardly have done more with an ax. There were odd reflections upon it.
The fatal news coming to Hicks's Hall upon the article of my Lord Russell's (43) trial, was said to have had no little influence on the Jury and all the Bench to his prejudice. Others said that he had himself on some occasions hinted that in case he should be in danger of having his life taken from him by any public misfortune, those who thirsted for his estate should miss of their aim; and that he should speak favorably of that Earl of Northumberland, and some others, who made away with themselves; but these are discourses so unlike his sober and prudent conversation that I have no inclination to credit them. What might instigate him to this devilish act, I am not able to conjecture. My Lord Clarendon, his brother-in-law, who was with him but the day before, assured me he was then very cheerful, and declared it to be the effect of his innocence and loyalty; and most believe that his Majesty (53) had no severe intentions against him, though he was altogether inexorable as to Lord Russell (43) and some of the rest. For my part, I believe the crafty and ambitious Earl of Shaftesbury had brought them into some dislike of the present carriage of matters at Court, not with any design of destroying the monarchy (which Shaftesbury had in confidence and for unanswerable reasons told me he would support to his last breath, as having seen and felt the misery of being under mechanic tyranny), but perhaps of setting up some other whom he might govern, and frame to his own platonic fancy, without much regard to the religion established under the hierarchy, for which he had no esteem; but when he perceived those whom he had engaged to rise, fail of his expectations, and the day past, reproaching his accomplices that a second day for an exploit of this nature was never successful, he gave them the slip, and got into Holland, where the fox died, three months before these unhappy Lords and others were discovered or suspected. Every one deplored Essex (52) and Russell (43), especially the last, as being thought to have been drawn in on pretense only of endeavoring to rescue the King (53) from his present councilors, and secure religion from Popery, and the nation from arbitrary government, now so much apprehended; while the rest of those who were fled, especially Ferguson and his gang, had doubtless some bloody design to get up a Commonwealth, and turn all things topsy-turvy. Of the same tragical principles is Sydney.
I had this day much discourse with Monsieur Pontaq, son to the famous and wise prime President of Bordeaux. This gentleman was owner of that excellent vignoble of Pontaq and O'Brien, from whence come the choicest of our Bordeaux wines; and I think I may truly say of him, what was not so truly said of St. Paul, that much learning had made him mad. He had studied well in philosophy, but chiefly the Rabbins, and was exceedingly addicted to cabalistical fancies, an eternal hablador [romancer], and half distracted by reading abundance of the extravagant Eastern Jews. He spoke all languages, was very rich, had a handsome person, and was well bred, about forty-five years of age.

St John's Church, Clerkenwell

1772 Royal Marriages Act

On 08 Jan 1847 Prince George Hanover 2nd Duke Cambridge 1819-1904 (27) and Sarah Fairbrother 1814-1890 (32) were married at St John's Church, Clerkenwell. The marriage was in contravention of the 1772 Royal Marriages Act by which he was required to seek the permission of the monarch. The marriage was considered illegal.

St Mark's Church, Clerkenwell

On 04 Apr 1678 John Godolphin 1617-1678 (60) died at Fleet Street. He was buried at St Mark's Church, Clerkenwell.

Cornhill

Coronation of Charles II

On 22 Apr 1661 Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) rode from the Tower of London to Whitehall Palace. At the Lime Street end of Leadenhall he passed under a triumphal arch built after the Doric order, with Rebellion, her crimson robe alive with snakes, being crushed by Monarchy Restored, and a fine painting of his Majesty's landing at Dover, "with ships at sea, great guns going off, one kneeling and kissing the King's hand, soldiers, horse and foot and many people gazing".
Outside the East India House in Leadenhall Street, that loyal and honourable trading company expressed their dutiful affections to his Majesty by two Indian youths, one attended by two blackamoors and the other mounted upon a camel, which bore on its back two panniers filled with jewels, spices, and silks to be scattered among the spectators.
At the Conduit in Cornhill a special treat was prepared for the bachelor king in the shape of eight nymphs clad in white. A little further down the street, just opposite the Royal Exchange, was another arch, with stages against it depicting the River Thames and the upper deck of one of his Majesty's ships.
The procession included the Duke of York (27), the Lord High Constable (58) and the Lord Great Chamberlain
The Sword of State was carried by Esmé Stewart 2nd Duke Richmond, 5th Duke Lennox 1649-1660.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

On 12 Nov 1685 Stephen Poyntz 1685-1750 was born to William Poyntz 1640-1720 (45) at Cornhill.

Parish of St Michael

Flying Horse

In 1635 Robert Abbott Scrivener 1610-1653 (25) became a member of the Worshipful Company of Scriveners. He established his own shop, the Flying Horse, in the parish of St Michael, Cornhill.

St Peter's Church, Cornhill

On Nov 1620 George Calvert 1st Baron Baltimore 1580-1632 (40) and Anne Mayne -1622 were married at St Peter's Church, Cornhill.

Cranford

Enfield

On 12 Dec 1607 Roger Manners 1535-1607 (72) died at Enfield. He was buried at Uffington Church, Stamford.

On 21 Jul 1638 Richard Brownlow 1553-1638 (85) died in Enfield. Monument to Richard Brownlow 1553-1638 (85) in St Peter and St Paul Church, Belton House, Belton, Grantham sculpted by Joshua Marshall Sculptor 1628-1678 (10).

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 June. 02 Jun 1676. I went with my Lord Chamberlain (58) to see a garden, at Enfield town; thence, to Mr. Secretary Coventry's (48) lodge in the Chase. It is a very pretty place, the house commodious, the gardens handsome, and our entertainment very free, there being none but my Lord and myself. That which I most wondered at was, that, in the compass of twenty-five miles, yet within fourteen of London, there is not a house, barn, church, or building, besides three lodges. To this Lodge are three great ponds, and some few inclosures, the rest a solitary desert, yet stored with no less than 3,000 deer. These are pretty retreats for gentlemen, especially for those who are studious and lovers of privacy.
We returned in the evening by Hampstead, to see Lord Wotton's (33) house and garden (Bellsize House), built with vast expense by Mr. O'Neale, an Irish gentleman who married Lord Wotton's mother, Lady Stanhope. The furniture is very particular for Indian cabinets, porcelain, and other solid and noble movables. The gallery very fine, the gardens very large, but ill kept, yet woody and chargeable. The soil a cold weeping clay, not answering the expense.

On 25 Sep 1752 Henry Streatfield 1706-1762 (46) and Anne Sidney were married at Enfield.

On 23 Dec 1832 Charles Henry Sloane 2nd Earl Cadogan 1749-1832 (83) died unmarried in Enfield. His brother George Cadogan 3rd Earl Cadogan 1783-1864 (49) succeeded 3rd Earl Cadogan (2C 1800).

Edmonton, Enfield

Geoffrey Saye 1155-1230 held land at Edmonton, Enfield.

St Andrew's Church, Enfield

On 27 Jan 1443 John Tiptoft 1st Baron Tiptoft -1443 died. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Enfield. His son John "Butcher of England" Tiptoft 1st Earl Worcester 1427-1470 (15) succeeded 2nd Baron Tiptoft.

In 1446 Joyce Charleton Baroness Tiptoft 1404-1446 (42) died. She was buried at St Andrew's Church, Enfield.

Ely House

In Feb 1638 Francis White Bishop of Norwich 1564-1638 (74) died at Ely House.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 February. 10th February, 1661. Dr. Baldero preached at Ely-house, on Matthew vi. 33, of seeking early the Kingdom of God; after sermon, the Bishop (75) (Dr. Wren) gave us the blessing, very pontifically.

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 November. 14 Nov 1668. To London, invited to the consecration of that excellent person, the Dean of Ripon, Dr. Wilkins (54), now made Bishop of Chester; it was at Ely House, the Archbishop of Canterbury (70), Dr. Cosin (73), Bishop of Durham, the Bishops of Ely (77), Salisbury (51), Rochester (43), and others officiating. Dr. Tillotson (38) preached. Then, we went to a sumptuous dinner in the hall, where were the Duke of Buckingham (40), Judges, Secretaries of State, Lord-Keeper, Council, Noblemen, and innumerable other company, who were honorers of this incomparable man, universally beloved by all who knew him.
This being the Queen's birthday, great was the gallantry at Whitehall, and the night celebrated with very fine fireworks.
My poor brother (66) continuing ill, I went not from him till the 17th, when, dining at the Groom Porters, I heard Sir Edward Sutton play excellently on the Irish harp; he performs genteelly, but not approaching my worthy friend, Mr. Clark, a gentleman of Northumberland, who makes it execute lute, viol, and all the harmony an instrument is capable of; pity it is that it is not more in use; but, indeed, to play well, takes up the whole man, as Mr. Clark has assured me, who, though a gentleman of quality and parts, was yet brought up to that instrument from five years old, as I remember he told me.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

In 1734 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764 (36). Titled "Edwards Hamilton family on a Terrace" the subjects are Anne Hamilton 1709-1748 (24) and Mary Edwards 1704-1743 (30) and their child Gerard Edwardes of Welham Grove 1734-1773. In her left hand she holds Addison’s Spectator No.580 that describes the need to fill the mind with an awareness of the Divine Being. The books on the table beside her include poetry or sermons of Edward Young, the works of Swift, Pope’s translation of the Iliad, and the devotional writings of Damuel Bowens and Archbishop Tillotson.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 June. 27 Jun 1675. At Ely House, I went to the consecration of my worthy friend, the learned Dr. Barlow (51), Warden of Queen's College, Oxford, now made Bishop of Lincoln. After it succeeded a magnificent feast, where were the Duke of Ormond (64), Earl of Lauderdale (59), the Lord Treasurer (43), Lord Keeper, etc.

St Ethedreda's Chapel, Ely House

On or before 27 Apr 1693 William Draper and Susannah Evelyn 1669-1754 (24) were married in St Ethedreda's Chapel, Ely House by Thomas Tenison Archbishop of Canterbury 1636-1715 (56).

John Evelyn's Diary 1693 April. 27 Apr 1693. My daughter Susanna (24) was married to William Draper, Esq, in the chapel of Ely House, by Dr. Tenison (56), Bishop of Lincoln (since Archbishop). I gave her in portion £4,000, her jointure is £500 per annum. I pray Almighty God to give his blessing to this marriage! She is a good child, religious, discreet, ingenious, and qualified with all the ornaments of her sex. She has a peculiar talent in design, as painting in oil and miniature, and an extraordinary genius for whatever hands can do with a needle. She has the French tongue, has read most of the Greek and Roman authors and poets, using her talents with great modesty; exquisitely shaped, and of an agreeable countenance. This character is due to her, though coming from her father. Much of this week spent in ceremonies, receiving visits and entertaining relations, and a great part of the next in returning visits.

Finchley

On 07 Jul 1755 George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis 1755-1801 was born to Henry Herbert 1st Earl Powis 1703-1772 (52) and Barbara Herbert Countess Powis 1735-1786 (20) at Finchley.

In 1776 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787 (67). Portrait of George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis 1755-1801 (20).

Around 1740 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779 (39). Portrait of Henry Herbert 1st Earl Powis 1703-1772 (36).

Fulham

On 28 Jun 1485 the will of Richard Scrope 1442-1485 was proved before Thomas Kempe Bishop of London 1390-1489 (95) at Fulham. His will contained many bequests to various religious orders, and the usual array of plate, money, and jewels, including 'my rynge wt the schelde to my lady, my moder' ( Elizabeth Scrope Baroness Scrope Bolton -1498 ). Also books written in French 'Franse bokes' were left to his brother Elizabeth Scrope Baroness Scrope Bolton -1498, and to Margaret Scrope Duchess Suffolk -1515.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Friday 14 May 1669. Up, and to St. James’s to the Duke of York (35), and thence to White Hall, where we met about office business, and then at noon with Mr. Wren (45) to Lambeth, to dinner with the Archbishop of Canterbury (70); the first time I was ever there and I have long longed for it; where a noble house, and well furnished with good pictures and furniture, and noble attendance in good order, and great deal of company, though an ordinary day; and exceeding great cheer, no where better, or so much, that ever I think I saw, for an ordinary table: and the Bishop (70) mighty kind to me, particularly desiring my company another time, when less company there. Most of the company gone, and I going, I heard by a gentleman of a sermon that was to be there; and so I staid to hear it, thinking it serious, till by and by the gentleman told me it was a mockery, by one Cornet Bolton, a very gentleman-like man, that behind a chair did pray and preach like a Presbyter Scot that ever I heard in my life, with all the possible imitation in grimaces and voice. And his text about the hanging up their harps upon the willows: and a serious good sermon too, exclaiming against Bishops, and crying up of my good Lord Eglinton, a till it made us all burst; but I did wonder to have the Bishop (70) at this time to make himself sport with things of this kind, but I perceive it was shewn him as a rarity; and he took care to have the room-door shut, but there were about twenty gentlemen there, and myself, infinitely pleased with the novelty. So over to White Hall, to a little Committee of Tangier; and thence walking in the Gallery, I met Sir Thomas Osborne (37), who, to my great content, did of his own accord fall into discourse with me, with so much proFessions of value and respect, placing the whole virtue of the Office of the Navy upon me, and that for the Comptroller’s place, no man in England was fit for it but me, when Sir J. Minnes (70), as he says it is necessary, is Removed: but then he knows not what to do for a man in my place; and in discourse, though I have no mind to the other, I did bring in Tom Hater to be the fittest man in the world for it, which he took good notice of. But in the whole I was mightily pleased, reckoning myself now fifty per cent. securer in my place than I did before think myself to be. Thence to Unthanke’s, and there find my wife (28), but not dressed, which vexed me, because going to the Park, it being a most pleasant day after yesterday’s rain, which lays all the dust, and most people going out thither, which vexed me. So home, sullen; but then my wife (28) and I by water, with my brother, as high as Fulham, talking and singing, and playing the rogue with the Western barge-men, about the women of Woolwich, which mads them, an so back home to supper and to bed.

John Evelyn's Diary 1681 October. 11 Oct 1681. To Fulham, to visit the Bishop of London (49), in whose garden I first saw the Sedum arborescens in flower, which was exceedingly beautiful.

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 August. 01 Aug 1682. To the Bishop of London (50) at Fulham, to review the additions which Mr. Marshall (62) had made to his curious book of flowers in miniature, and collection of insects.

On 11 Dec 1722 Bowater Vernon 1683-1735 (39) and Jane Cornwallis 1703-1760 (19) were married in Fulham.

In 1734 John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739 (39). Portrait of Bowater Vernon 1683-1735 (50).

In 1735 John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739 (40) (attributed). Portrait of Jane Cornwallis 1703-1760 (32).

All Saints Church, Fulham

On 05 Jun 1675 John Mordaunt 1st Viscount Mordaunt 1626-1675 (48) died. He was buried at All Saints Church, Fulham.

After 07 Jul 1713 Henry Compton Bishop 1632-1713 was buried at All Saints Church, Fulham.

On 06 Sep 1748 Edmund Gibson Bishop of Lincoln and London 1669-1748 (79) died. He was buried in All Saints Church, Fulham.

Craven Cottage, Fulham

Fulham Road, Fulham

76 Fulham Road, Fulham Road, Fulham

Gunnersbury

Around 1460 Thomas Frowyk 1460-1506 was born at Gunnersbury.

Hackney

On 24 Mar 1522 Christopher Urswick 1448-1522 (74) died in Hackney. He was buried in St Augustine's Church, Hackney.

On 21 Feb 1589 William Somerset 3rd Earl Worcester 1526-1589 (63) died at Hackney. He was buried at Church of St Cadoc, Raglan, Monmouthshire, South-East Wales. His son Edward Somerset 4th Earl Worcester 1550-1628 (39) succeeded 4th Earl Worcester (5C 1514).

In 1627 Christopher Wase 1627-1690 was born in Hackney.

On 08 May 1630 Christopher Hatton 1st Baron Hatton 1605-1670 (24) and Elizabeth Montagu Baroness Hatton -1672 were married in Hackney.

On 04 Sep 1634 Robert South Churchman 1634-1716 was born at Hackney.

On 21 Jun 1638 Mildmay Fane 2nd Earl Westmoreland 1602-1666 (36) and Mary Vere Couness Westmoreland 1608-1669 (30) were married at Hackney.

In 1639 Richard Child was buried at Hackney.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 May. 08 May 1654. I went to Hackney, to see Lady Brook's garden, which was one of the neatest and most celebrated in England, the house well furnished, but a despicable building. Returning, visited one Mr. Tomb's garden; it has large and noble walks, some modern statues, a vineyard, planted in strawberry borders, staked at ten feet distances, the banqueting-house of cedar, where the couch and seats were carved à l'antique; some good pictures in the house, especially one of Vandyke's, being a man in his shirt; also some of Stenwyck. I also called at Mr. Ducie's, who has indeed a rare collection of the best masters, and one of the largest stories of H. Holbein. I also saw Sir Thomas Fowler's aviary, which is a poor business.

Around 1621 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (21). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel.

Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (33). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox.

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox wearing his Leg Garter and Garter Collar.

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Around 1635 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (35). Portrait of James Stanley 7th Earl Derby 1607-1651 (27) and Charlotte Thouars Countess Derby 1599-1664 (35) and their daughter.

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of James Stewart 4th Duke Lennox.

Around 1636 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (36). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel and Alethea Talbot Countess Arundel.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Ruthven Countess Atholl.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (37). Portrait of Mary Villiers Duchess Lennox.

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Diana Cecil Countess Oxford.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Hanmer 2nd Baronet Hamner 1612-1678 (26).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Mary Hill 1615-1690 (23).

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Anne Boteler 1st Countess Newport.

Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Isabella Edmondes 4th Baroness De La Warr 1607-1677 (31).

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (25) and (probably) William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (27).

Around 1640 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (40). Portrait of Charles Seton 2nd Earl Dunfermline 1615-1672 (24).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Known as "Lady with a Squirrel and a Starling". The subject is believed to be Anne Ashby -1539 wife of Francis Lovell -1552 (18). The starling is probably intended as a rhyming pun of East Harling, where the family had recently inherited the estate of East Harling Hall, East Harling. Squirrels nibbling on nuts feature on the heraldry of the Lovell family: the windows of the Church of St Peter and St Paul, East Harling include two of the family’s arms in stained glass, each showing six red squirrels. The commission may commemorate the birth of a son to the couple in the spring of 1526, but it also showed off their new status as wealthy landowners.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) wearing the Garter and Inter-twined Knots Collar with St George Pendant. Standing three-quarter length, richly dressed in velvet, fur and cloth-of-gold. Holbein has meticulously shown the varied texture of his cloth-of-gold double which is woven into a pomegranate pattern with a variety of different weaves including loops of gold thread. Similarly, he has carefully articulated the band of black satin running down Guildford’s arm against the richer black of the velvet of his sleeve. A lavish use of both shell-gold paint and gold leaf (which has been used to emulate the highlights of the gold thread in the material) emphasises the luxuriousness of the sitter’s dress and his high status. In his right-hand he holds the Comptroller of the Household Staff of Office.

In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (30). Portrait of Mary Wotton 1499-1535 (28) when she was thirty-two commissioned with that of her husband Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (38) possibly to celebrate their marriage. Hung with gold chains and embellished with pearls, Lady Guildford embodies worldly prosperity, and with her prayer book she is also the very image of propriety.

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (36). Drawing of Thomas Elyot 1490-1546 (43).

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (36). Drawing of Margaret Barrow 1500-1560 (33).

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (39). Drawing of Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542 (33).

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (39). Drawing of Margaret More 1505-1544 (31) known by her married name of "Margaret Roper".

Around 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (40). Drawing of Elizabeth Jenks Baroness Rich Leez 1510-1558 (27).

Around 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (41). Drawing of the wife of Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (55). He had three wives. The sitter is believed to his third wife.

After 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Elizabeth Grey Baroness Audley Waldon -1564 based on she having become Lady Audley on 29 Nov 1538. Coloured chalks, silverpoint, pen and ink on pink-primed paper, 29.2 × 20.7 cm, Royal Collection, Windsor Castle. The drawing is inscribed, by a later hand than Holbein's, "The Lady Audley".

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (42). Portrait of Anne of Cleves Queen Consort England 1515-1557 (23).

Around 1542 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543 (45). Drawing of William Sharington 1495-1553 (47).

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Friday 07 May 1669. Up, and by coach to W. Coventry’s (41); and there to talk with him a great deal with great content; and so to the Duke of York (35), having a great mind to speak to him about Tangier; but, when I come to it, his interest for my Lord Middleton (61)Excise Office, having by private vows last night in prayer to God Almighty cleared my mind for the present of the thoughts of going to Deb. (18) at Greenwich, which I did long after. I passed by Guildhall, which is almost finished, and saw a poor labourer carried by, I think, dead with a fall, as many there are, I hear. So home to dinner, and then to the office a little, and so to see my Lord Brouncker (49), who is a little ill of the gout; and there Madam Williams told me that she heard that my wife (28) was going into France this year, which I did not deny, if I can get time, and I pray God I may. But I wondering how she come to know it, she tells me a woman that my wife (28) spoke to for a maid, did tell her so, and that a lady that desires to go thither would be glad to go in her company. Thence with my wife (28) abroad, with our coach, most pleasant weather; and to Hackney, and into the marshes, where I never was before, and thence round about to Old Ford and Bow; and coming through the latter home, there being some young gentlewomen at a door, and I seeming not to know who they were, my wife’s (28) jealousy told me presently that I knew well enough it was that damned place where Deb. (18) dwelt, which made me swear very angrily that it was false, as it was, and I carried [her] back again to see the place, and it proved not so, so I continued out of humour a good while at it, she being willing to be friends, so I was by and by, saying no more of it. So home, and there met with a letter from Captain Silas Taylor (44), and, with it, his written copy of a play that he hath wrote, and intends to have acted. — It is called "The Serenade or Disappointment," which I will read, not believing he can make any good of that kind. He did once offer to show Harris (35) it, but Harris (35) told him that he would judge by one Act whether it were good or no, which is indeed a foolish saying, and we see them out themselves in the choice of a play after they have read the whole, it being sometimes found not fit to act above three times; nay, and some that have been refused at one house is found a good one at the other. This made Taylor (44) say he would not shew it him, but is angry, and hath carried it to the other house, and he thinks it will be acted there, though he tells me they are not yet agreed upon it. But I will find time to get it read to me, and I did get my wife (28) to begin a little to-night in the garden, but not so much as I could make any judgment of it. So home to supper and to bed.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Sunday 23 May 1669. Lord's Day. Called up by Roger Pepys (52) and his son (23) who to church with me, and then home to dinner. In the afternoon carried them to Westminster, and myself to James’s, where, not finding the Duke of York (35), back home, and with my wife (28) spent the evening taking the ayre about Hackney, with great pleasure, and places we had never seen before.

On 02 Aug 1669 Edward Worth Bishop Killaloe 1620-1669 (49) died at Hackney. He was buried at St Mildred's Church, Bread Street.

Hackney Marshes, Hackney

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Friday 07 May 1669. Up, and by coach to W. Coventry’s (41); and there to talk with him a great deal with great content; and so to the Duke of York (35), having a great mind to speak to him about Tangier; but, when I come to it, his interest for my Lord Middleton (61)Excise Office, having by private vows last night in prayer to God Almighty cleared my mind for the present of the thoughts of going to Deb. (18) at Greenwich, which I did long after. I passed by Guildhall, which is almost finished, and saw a poor labourer carried by, I think, dead with a fall, as many there are, I hear. So home to dinner, and then to the office a little, and so to see my Lord Brouncker (49), who is a little ill of the gout; and there Madam Williams told me that she heard that my wife (28) was going into France this year, which I did not deny, if I can get time, and I pray God I may. But I wondering how she come to know it, she tells me a woman that my wife (28) spoke to for a maid, did tell her so, and that a lady that desires to go thither would be glad to go in her company. Thence with my wife (28) abroad, with our coach, most pleasant weather; and to Hackney, and into the marshes, where I never was before, and thence round about to Old Ford and Bow; and coming through the latter home, there being some young gentlewomen at a door, and I seeming not to know who they were, my wife’s (28) jealousy told me presently that I knew well enough it was that damned place where Deb. (18) dwelt, which made me swear very angrily that it was false, as it was, and I carried [her] back again to see the place, and it proved not so, so I continued out of humour a good while at it, she being willing to be friends, so I was by and by, saying no more of it. So home, and there met with a letter from Captain Silas Taylor (44), and, with it, his written copy of a play that he hath wrote, and intends to have acted. — It is called "The Serenade or Disappointment," which I will read, not believing he can make any good of that kind. He did once offer to show Harris (35) it, but Harris (35) told him that he would judge by one Act whether it were good or no, which is indeed a foolish saying, and we see them out themselves in the choice of a play after they have read the whole, it being sometimes found not fit to act above three times; nay, and some that have been refused at one house is found a good one at the other. This made Taylor (44) say he would not shew it him, but is angry, and hath carried it to the other house, and he thinks it will be acted there, though he tells me they are not yet agreed upon it. But I will find time to get it read to me, and I did get my wife (28) to begin a little to-night in the garden, but not so much as I could make any judgment of it. So home to supper and to bed.

King's Place, Hackney

On 05 Dec 1593 Rowland Hayward Lord Mayor 1520-1593 (73) died at King's Place, Hackney.

Newcombe's School, Hackney

Around 1749 Hans Sloane-Stanley 1739-1827 (9) educated at Newcombe's School, Hackney.

St Augustine's Church, Hackney

On 24 Mar 1522 Christopher Urswick 1448-1522 (74) died in Hackney. He was buried in St Augustine's Church, Hackney.

St Leonard's Church, Shoreditch, Hackney

On 25 Jun 1576 Catherine Leigh Baroness Mountjoy 1532-1576 was buried in St Leonard's Church, Shoreditch, Hackney.

On 13 Mar 1778 Robert Shirley 7th Earl Ferrers 1756-1827 (21) and Elizabeth Prentiss Countess Ferrers -1799 were married at St Leonard's Church, Shoreditch, Hackney.

Hammersmith

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Wednesday 19 May 1669. With my coach to St. James’s; and there finding the Duke of York (35) gone to muster his men, in Hyde Park, I alone with my boy thither, and there saw more, walking out of my coach as other gentlemen did, of a soldier’s trade, than ever I did in my life: the men being mighty fine, and their Commanders, particularly the Duke of Monmouth (20); but me-thought their trade but very easy as to the mustering of their men, and the men but indifferently ready to perform what was commanded, in the handling of their arms. Here the news was first talked of Harry Killigrew’s being wounded in nine places last night, by footmen, in the highway, going from the Park in a hackney-coach towards Hammersmith, to his house at Turnham Greene: they being supposed to be my Lady Shrewsbury’s (27) men, she being by, in her (27) coach with six horses; upon an old grudge of his saying openly that he had lain with her. Thence by and by to White Hall, and there I waited upon the King (38) and Queen (59) all dinner-time, in the Queen’s lodgings, she being in her white pinner and apron, like a woman with child; and she seemed handsomer plain so, than dressed. And by and by, dinner done, I out, and to walk in the Gallery, for the Duke of York’s (35) coming out; and there, meeting Mr. May (47), he took me down about four o’clock to Mr. Chevins’s (67) lodgings, and all alone did get me a dish of cold chickens, and good wine; and I dined like a prince, being before very hungry and empty. By and by the Duke of York (35) comes, and readily took me to his closet, and received my petition, and discoursed about my eyes, and pitied me, and with much kindness did give me his consent to be absent, and approved of my proposition to go into Holland to observe things there, of the Navy; but would first ask the King’s (38) leave, which he anon did, and did tell me that the King (38) would be a good master to me, these were his words, about my eyes, and do like of my going into Holland, but do advise that nobody should know of my going thither, but pretend that I did go into the country somewhere, which I liked well. Glad of this, I home, and thence took out my wife (34), and to Mr. Holliard’s (60) about a swelling in her cheek, but he not at home, and so round by Islington and eat and drink, and so home, and after supper to bed. In discourse this afternoon, the Duke of York (35) did tell me that he was the most amazed at one thing just now, that ever he was in his life, which was, that the Duke of Buckingham (41) did just now come into the Queen’s (59) bed-chamber, where the King (38) was, and much mixed company, and among others, Tom Killigrew (57), the father of Harry, who was last night wounded so as to be in danger of death, and his man is quite dead; and [Buckingham (41)] there in discourse did say that he had spoke with some one that was by (which all the world must know that it must be his whore, my Lady Shrewsbury (27)), who says that they did not mean to hurt, but beat him, and that he did run first at them with his sword; so that he do hereby clearly discover that he knows who did it, and is of conspiracy with them, being of known conspiracy with her, which the Duke of York (35) did seem to be pleased with, and said it might, perhaps, cost him his life in the House of Lords; and I find was mightily pleased with it, saying it was the most impudent thing, as well as the most foolish, that ever he knew man do in all his life.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (25) and (probably) William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (27).

John Evelyn's Diary 1695 October. 25 Oct 1695. The Archbishop (59) and myself went to Hammersmith, to visit Sir Samuel Morland (70), who was entirely blind; a very mortifying sight. He showed us his invention of writing, which was very ingenious; also his wooden calendar, which instructed him all by feeling; and other pretty and useful inventions of mills, pumps, etc., and the pump he had erected that serves water to his garden, and to passengers, with an inscription, and brings from a filthy part of the Thames near it a most perfect and pure water. He had newly buried £200 worth of music books six feet under ground, being, as he said, love songs and vanity. He plays himself psalms and religious hymns on the theorbo. Very mild weather the whole of October.

Parson's Green

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 February. 26th February, 1661. I went to Lord Mordaunt's (34), at Parson's Green.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 November. 29th November, 1661. I dined at the Countess of Peterborough's (39) and went that evening to Parson's Green with my Lord Mordaunt (35), with whom I stayed that night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 December. 02 Dec 1675. Being returned home, I visited Lady Mordaunt (43) at Parson's Green, my Lord, her son, being sick. This pious woman delivered to me £100 to bestow as I thought fit for the release of poor prisoners, and other charitable uses.

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 March. 16 Mar 1676. The Countess of Sunderland (30) and I went by water to Parson's Green, to visit my Lady Mordaunt (44), and to consult with her about my Lord's monument. We returned by coach.

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 July. 14th July, 1679. I went to see how things stood at Parson's Green, my Lady Viscountess Mordaunt (now sick in Paris, whither she went for health) having made me a trustee for her children, an office I could not refuse to this most excellent, pious, and virtuous lady, my long acquaintance.

John Evelyn's Diary 1680 April. 30th April, 1680. To a meeting of the executors of late Viscountess Mordaunt's estate, to consider of the sale of Parson's Green, being in treaty with Mr. Loftus, and to settle the half year's account.

Hampstead

On 20 Sep 1705 William Blackett 2nd Baronet Newcastle-upon Tyne1690-1728 (15) and Barbara Villiers 1706-1761 were married at Hampstead.

Belsize House

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 June. 02 Jun 1676. I went with my Lord Chamberlain (58) to see a garden, at Enfield town; thence, to Mr. Secretary Coventry's (48) lodge in the Chase. It is a very pretty place, the house commodious, the gardens handsome, and our entertainment very free, there being none but my Lord and myself. That which I most wondered at was, that, in the compass of twenty-five miles, yet within fourteen of London, there is not a house, barn, church, or building, besides three lodges. To this Lodge are three great ponds, and some few inclosures, the rest a solitary desert, yet stored with no less than 3,000 deer. These are pretty retreats for gentlemen, especially for those who are studious and lovers of privacy.
We returned in the evening by Hampstead, to see Lord Wotton's (33) house and garden (Bellsize House), built with vast expense by Mr. O'Neale, an Irish gentleman who married Lord Wotton's mother, Lady Stanhope. The furniture is very particular for Indian cabinets, porcelain, and other solid and noble movables. The gallery very fine, the gardens very large, but ill kept, yet woody and chargeable. The soil a cold weeping clay, not answering the expense.

Golden Hill, Hampstead

On 15 Jan 1817 Elizabeth Monck Marchioness Waterford 1742-1817 (75) died at Golden Hill, Hampstead.

Kenwood House, Hampstead

Hanworth

On 02 Jun 1603 Thomas Grimes -1624 was knighted at Hanworth.

On 11 Feb 1613 Henry Killigrew 1613-1700 was born to Robert Killigrew 1580-1633 (33) and Mary Woodhouse -1756 at Hanworth.

On 09 Feb 1802 Aubrey Beauclerk 5th Duke St Albans 1740-1802 (61) died. He was buried at Hanworth. His son Aubrey Beauclerk 6th Duke St Albans 1765-1815 (36) succeeded 6th Duke St Albans (1C 1684), 6th Earl Burford, 6th Baron Heddington.

Harefield

On May 1580 Anne Stanley Countess Castlehaven 1580-1647 was born to Ferdinando Stanley 5th Earl Derby 1559-1594 (21) and Alice Spencer Countess Derby 1549-1637 (30) at Harefield.

On 22 Jul 1624 Mervyn Tuchet 2nd Earl Castlehaven 1593-1631 (31) and Anne Stanley Countess Castlehaven 1580-1647 (44) were married at Harefield. Anne Stanley Countess Castlehaven 1580-1647 (44) by marriage Countess Castlehaven.

On 01 Jan 1681 John Pritchett Bishop -1681 died at Harefield where he is buried.

On 07 Sep 1731 Daniel Pulteney 1684-1731 (47) died in Harefield. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Harlington

On 11 Feb 1695 John Bennet 1st Baron Ossulston 1616-1695 (78) died. He was buried at Harlington. His son Charles Bennet 1st Earl Tankerville 1674-1722 (21) succeeded 2nd Baron Ossulston of Ossulston in Middlesex.

Dawley, Harlington

Harrow

Harrow on the Hill, Harrow

In 1843 John Wordsworth Bishop 1843-1911 was born in Harrow on the Hill, Harrow.

Highgate

Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 05 September, 1666. It crossed toward Whitehall; but oh! the confusion there was then at that Court! It pleased his Majesty (36) to command me, among the rest, to look after the quenching of Fetter-lane end, to preserve (if possible) that part of Holborn, while the rest of the gentlemen took their several posts, some at one part, and some at another (for now they began to bestir themselves, and not till now, who hitherto had stood as men intoxicated, with their hands across), and began to consider that nothing was likely to put a stop but the blowing up of so many houses as might make a wider gap than any had yet been made by the ordinary method of pulling them down with engines. This some stout seamen proposed early enough to have saved near the whole city, but this some tenacious and avaricious men, aldermen, etc., would not permit, because their houses must have been of the first. It was, therefore, now commended to be practiced; and my concern being particularly for the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, near Smithfield, where I had many wounded and sick men, made me the more diligent to promote it; nor was my care for the Savoy less. It now pleased God, by abating the wind, and by the industry of the people, when almost all was lost infusing a new spirit into them, that the fury of it began sensibly to abate about noon, so as it came no farther than the Temple westward, nor than the entrance of Smithfield, north: but continued all this day and night so impetuous toward Cripplegate and the Tower, as made us all despair. It also broke out again in the Temple; but the courage of the multitude persisting, and many houses being blown up, such gaps and desolations were soon made, as, with the former three days' consumption, the back fire did not so vehemently urge upon the rest as formerly. There was yet no standing near the burning and glowing ruins by near a furlong's space.
The coal and wood wharfs, and magazines of oil, rosin, etc., did infinite mischief, so as the invective which a little before I had dedicated to his Majesty (36) and published, giving warning what probably might be the issue of suffering those shops to be in the city was looked upon as a prophecy.
The poor inhabitants were dispersed about St. George's Fields, and Moorfields, as far as Highgate, and several miles in circle, some under tents, some under miserable huts and hovels, many without a rag, or any necessary utensils, bed or board, who from delicateness, riches, and easy accommodations in stately and well-furnished houses, were now reduced to extreme misery and poverty.
In this calamitous condition, I returned with a sad heart to my house, blessing and adoring the distinguishing mercy of God to me and mine, who, in the midst of all this ruin, was like Lot, in my little Zoar, safe and sound.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Highgate Hill, Highgate

On 21 Apr 1770 Samuel Sandys 1st Baron Sandys Ombersley 1695-1770 (74) died after having been injured when his post-chaise overturned on Highgate Hill, Highgate. His son Edwin Sandys 2nd Baron Sandys Ombersley 1726-1797 (43) succeeded 2nd Baron Sandys.

Holborn

Barnard's Inn, Holborn

Gresham College

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 January. 6th January, 1661. Dr. Allestree (39) preached at the Abbey, after which four Bishops were consecrated, Hereford (51), Norwich (61), ...
This night was suppressed a bloody insurrection of some Fifth-Monarchy enthusiasts. Some of them were examined at the Council the next day; but could say nothing to extenuate their madness and unwarrantable zeal.
I was now chosen (and nominated by his Majesty (30) for one of the Council), by suffrage of the rest of the members, a Fellow of the Philosophic Society now meeting at Gresham College, where was an assembly of divers learned gentlemen. This being the first meeting since the King (30)'s return; but it had been begun some years before at Oxford, and was continued with interruption here in London during the Rebellion.
There was another rising of the fanatics, in which some were slain.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 February. 13th February, 1661. I conducted the Danish Ambassador to our meeting at Gresham College, where were shown him various experiments in vacuo, and other curiosities.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 November. 5th November, 1662. The Council of the Royal Society met to amend the Statutes, and dined together; afterward meeting at Gresham College, where was a discourse suggested by me, concerning planting his Majesty's (32) Forest of Dean with oak, now so much exhausted of the choicest ship timber in the world.

Loss of The London

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1665 March. 08 Mar 1665. … though a bitter cold day, yet I rose, and though my pain and tenderness in my testicle remains a little, yet I do verily think that my pain yesterday was nothing else, and therefore I hope my disease of the stone may not return to me, but void itself in pissing, which God grant, but I will consult my physitian.
This morning is brought me to the office the sad newes of "The London," in which Sir J. Lawson’s men were all bringing her from Chatham to The Hope, and thence he was to go to sea in her; but a little a’this side the buoy of the Nower, she suddenly blew up. About 24 [men] and a woman that were in the round-house and coach saved; the rest, being above 300, drowned: the ship breaking all in pieces, with 80 pieces of brass ordnance. She lies sunk, with her round-house above water. Sir J. Lawson hath a great loss in this of so many good chosen men, and many relations among them. I went to the ’Change, where the news taken very much to heart. So home to dinner, and Mr. Moore with me. Then I to Gresham College, and there saw several pretty experiments, and so home and to my office, and at night about 11 home to supper and to bed. See Loss of The London.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Admiral John Lawson 1615-1665 (50). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 July. 02 Jul 1667. Called upon my Lord Arlington (49), as from his Majesty (37), about the new fuel. The occasion why I was mentioned, was from what I said in my Sylva three years before, about a sort of fuel for a need, which obstructed a patent of Lord Carlingford (64), who had been seeking for it himself; he was endeavoring to bring me into the project, and proffered me a share. I met my Lord; and, on the 9th, by an order of Council, went to my Lord Mayor, to be assisting. In the meantime they had made an experiment of my receipt of houllies, which I mention in my book to be made at Maestricht, with a mixture of charcoal dust and loam, and which was tried with success at Gresham College (then being the exchange for the meeting of the merchants since the fire) for everybody to see. This done, I went to the Treasury for £12,000 for the sick and wounded yet on my hands.
Next day, we met again about the fuel at Sir J. Armourer's in the Mews.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Thursday 27 May 1669. At the office all the morning, dined at home, Mr. Hollier (60) with me. Presented this day by Mr. Browne with a book of drawing by him, lately printed, which cost me 20s. to him. In the afternoon to the Temple, to meet with Auditor Aldworth about my interest account, but failed meeting him. To visit my cozen Creed, and found her ill at home, being with child, and looks poorly. Thence to her husband, at Gresham College, upon some occasions of Tangier; and so home, with Sir John Bankes (42) with me, to Mark Lane.

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 December. 01 Dec 1673. To Gresham College, whither the city had invited the Royal Society by many of their chief aldermen and magistrates, who gave us a collation, to welcome us to our first place of assembly, from whence we had been driven to give place to the City, on their making it their Exchange on the dreadful conflagration, till their new Exchange was finished, which it now was. The Society having till now been entertained and having met at Arundel House.

Brooke House, Holborn

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Friday 28 May 1669. To St. James’s, where the King’s (38) being with the Duke of York (35) prevented a meeting of the Tangier Commission. But, Lord! what a deal of sorry discourse did I hear between the King (38) and several Lords about him here! but very mean methought. So with Creed to the Excise Office, and back to White Hall, where, in the Park, Sir G. Carteret (59) did give me an account of his discourse lately, with the Commissioners of Accounts, who except against many things, but none that I find considerable; among others, that of the Officers of the Navy selling of the King’s (38) goods, and particularly my providing him with calico flags, which having been by order, and but once, when necessity, and the King’s (38) apparent profit, justified it, as conformable to my particular duty, it will prove to my advantage that it be enquired into. Nevertheless, having this morning received from them a demand of an account of all monies within their cognizance, received and issued by me, I was willing, upon this hint, to give myself rest, by knowing whether their meaning therein might reach only to my Treasurership for Tangier, or the monies employed on this occasion. I went, therefore, to them this afternoon, to understand what monies they meant, where they answered me, by saying, "The eleven months’ tax, customs, and prizemoney," without mentioning, any more than I demanding, the service they respected therein; and so, without further discourse, we parted, upon very good terms of respect, and with few words, but my mind not fully satisfied about the monies they mean. At noon Mr. Gibson and I dined at the Swan, and thence doing this at Brook house, and thence calling at the Excise Office for an account of payment of my tallies for Tangier, I home, and thence with my wife (28) and brother spent the evening on the water, carrying our supper with us, as high as Chelsea; so home, making sport with the Westerne bargees, and my wife (28) and I singing, to my great content.

Church of St Gile's in the Fields

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 October. 27 Oct 1672. I went to hear that famous preacher, Dr. Frampton (50), at St. Giles's, on Psalm xxxix. 6. This divine had been twice at Jerusalem, and was not only a very pious and holy man, but excellent in the pulpit for the moving affections.

1715 Battle of Preston

The 1715 Battle of Preston was the final action of the 1715 Jacobite Rebellion. It commenced on 09 Nov 1715 when Jacobite cavalry entered Preston. Royalist troops arrived in number over the next few days surrounding Preston forcing the Jaocbite surrender. 1463 were taken prisoner of which 463 were English. The Scottish prisoners included:
George Seton 5th Earl of Winton 1678-1749. The only prisoner to plead not guilty, sentenced to death, escaped from the Tower of London on 04 Aug 1716 around nine in the evening. Travelled to France then to Rome.
On 24 Feb 1716 William Gordon 6th Viscount Kenmure 1672-1716 was beheaded on Tower Hill.
William Maxwell 5th Earl Nithsale 1676-1744. On 09 Feb 1716 he was sentenced to be executed on 24 Feb 1716. The night before his wife (35) effected his escape from the Tower of London by exchanging his clothes with those of her maid. They travelled to Paris then to Rome where the court of James "Old Pretender" Stewart 1688-1766 (26) was.
James Radclyffe 3rd Earl Derwentwater 1689-1716 (25) was imprisoned in the Tower of London. He was examined by the Privy Council on 10 Jan 1716 and impeached on 19 Jan 1716. He pleaded guilty in the expectation of clemency. He was attainted and condemned to death. Attempts were made to procure his pardon. His wife Anna Maria Webb Countess Derwentwater 1692-1723 (23), her sister Mary Webb Countess Waldegrave 1695-1719 (20) [Note. Assumed to be her sister Mary], their aunt Anne Brudenell Duchess Richmond 1671-1722 (44), Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 appealed to George I King Great Britain and Ireland 1660-1727 (54) in person without success. On 24 Feb 1716 James Radclyffe 3rd Earl Derwentwater 1689-1716 (25) was beheaded on Tower Hill.
William Murray 2nd Lord Nairne 1665-1726 was tried on 09 Feb 1716 for treason, found guilty, attainted, and condemned to death. He survived long enough to benefit from the Indemnity Act of 1717.
On 14 May 1716 Henry Oxburgh -1716 was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. He was buried at Church of St Gile's in the Fields. His head was spiked on Temple Bar.
The trials and sentences were overseen by the Lord High Steward William Cowper 1st Earl Cowper 1665-1723 (50) for which he subsequently received his Earldom.

Gray's Inn

In 1521 Edward Hall Author 1496-1548 (25) was a student at Gray's Inn.

In 1541 William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (20) educated at Gray's Inn.

Around 1565 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (44). His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

After 1590 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His left-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

In 1562 Nathaniel Bacon 1546-1622 (16) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1562 Nicholas Bacon 1st Baronet Bacon 1540-1624 (22) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1568 Michael Stanhope 1549-1621 (19) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1570 Walter Cope 1553-1614 (17) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1571 Thomas Fitzherbert 1550- educated at Gray's Inn.

In 1575 Edward Zouche 11th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1556-1625 (18) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1575 Ralph Eure 3rd Baron Eure 1558-1617 (16) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1583 John Holles 1st Earl Clare 1564-1637 (18) educated at Gray's Inn.

On 28 Feb 1584 Thomas Moryson -1592 was nominated a Bencher at Gray's Inn by William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (63).

On 29 Feb 1588 Henry Wriothesley 3rd Earl of Southampton 1573-1624 (14) admitted at Gray's Inn.

On 02 Feb 1589 Thomas Berkeley 1575-1611 (13) commenced studies at Gray's Inn.

In 1590 Henry Carey 1st Viscount Falkland 1575-1633 (15) educated at Gray's Inn.

Around 1525. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Henry Carey 1st Viscount Falkland 1575-1633.

On 20 Apr 1597 Oliver St John 1st Earl Bolingbroke 1580-1646 (17) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1600 Robert Pierrepoint 1st Earl Kingston 1584-1643 (15) admitted at Gray's Inn.

In 1605 George Chaworth 1st Viscount Chaworth 1554-1639 (51) admitted at Gray's Inn.

On 02 Feb 1612 Vivian Molyneux 1596-1642 (16) admitted at Gray's Inn.

On 12 Aug 1617 Hamon Strange 1605-1660 (12) admitted at Gray's Inn.

On 08 Aug 1620 Henry Mildmay 1593-1668 (27) entered at Gray's Inn.

In 1626 Thomas Fairfax 3rd Lord Fairfax 1612-1671 (13) studied at Gray's Inn.

In 1636 John Bennet 1st Baron Ossulston 1616-1695 (19) educated at Gray's Inn.

In 1641 Thomas Crew 2nd Baron Crew 1624-1697 (17) studying at Gray's Inn.

In 1651 Henry Pierrepoint 1st Marquess Dorchester 1606-1680 (44) admitted at Gray's Inn.

On 26 Apr 1656 Henry Mildmay admitted at Gray's Inn.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 August. 9th August, 1661. I tried several experiments on the sensitive plant and humilis, which contracted with the least touch of the sun through a burning glass, though it rises and opens only when it shines on it.
I first saw the famous Queen Pine brought from Barbadoes, and presented to his Majesty (31); but the first that were ever seen in England were those sent to Cromwell four years since.
I dined at Mr. Palmer's in Gray's Inn, whose curiosity excelled in clocks and pendules, especially one that had innumerable motions, and played nine or ten tunes on the bells very finely, some of them set in parts: which was very harmonious. It was wound up but once in a quarter. He had also good telescopes and mathematical instruments, choice pictures, and other curiosities. Thence, we went to that famous mountebank, Jo. Punteus.
Sir Kenelm Digby (58) presented every one of us his "Discourse of the Vegetation of Plants"; and Mr. Henshaw (43), his "History of Saltpeter and Gunpowder." I assisted him to procure his place of French Secretary to the King (31), which he purchased of Sir Henry De Vic (62).
I went to that famous physician, Sir Fr. Prujean, who showed me his laboratory, his workhouse for turning, and other mechanics; also many excellent pictures, especially the Magdalen of Caracci; and some incomparable paysages done in distemper; he played to me likewise on the polythore, an instrument having something of the harp, lute, and theorbo; by none known in England, nor described by any author, nor used, but by this skillful and learned Doctor.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 May. 26 May 1671. The Earl of Bristol's house in Queen's Street was taken for the Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, and furnished with rich hangings of the King (40)'s. It consisted of seven rooms on a floor, with a long gallery, gardens, etc. This day we met the Duke of Buckingham (43), Earl of Lauderdale (55), Lord Culpeper, Sir George Carteret (61), Vice-Chamberlain, and myself, had the oaths given us by the Earl of Sandwich (45), our President. It was to advise and counsel his Majesty (40), to the best of our abilities, for the well-governing of his Foreign Plantations, etc., the form very little differing from that given to the Privy Council. We then took our places at the Board in the Council-Chamber, a very large room furnished with atlases, maps, charts, globes, etc. Then came the Lord Keeper, Sir Orlando Bridgeman (65), Earl of Arlington (53), Secretary of State, Lord Ashley, Mr. Treasurer (40), Sir John Trevor (34), the other Secretary, Sir John Duncomb (49), Lord Allington (30), Mr. Grey, son to the Lord Grey, Mr. Henry Broncher, Sir Humphrey Winch (49), Sir John Finch, Mr. Waller (65), and Colonel Titus (48), of the bedchamber, with Mr. Slingsby, Secretary to the Council, and two Clerks of the Council, who had all been sworn some days before. Being all set, our Patent was read, and then the additional Patent, in which was recited this new establishment; then, was delivered to each a copy of the Patent, and of instructions: after which, we proceeded to business.
The first thing we did was, to settle the form of a circular letter to the Governors of all his Majesty's (40) Plantations and Territories in the West Indies and Islands thereof, to give them notice to whom they should apply themselves on all occasions, and to render us an account of their present state and government; but, what we most insisted on was, to know the condition of New England, which appearing to be very independent as to their regard to Old England, or his Majesty (40), rich and strong as they now were, there were great debates in what style to write to them; for the condition of that Colony was such, that they were able to contest with all other Plantations about them, and there was fear of their breaking from all dependence on this nation; his Majesty (40), therefore, commended this affair more expressly. We, therefore, thought fit, in the first place, to acquaint ourselves as well as we could of the state of that place, by some whom we heard of that were newly come from thence, and to be informed of their present posture and condition; some of our Council were for sending them a menacing letter, which those who better understood the peevish and touchy humor of that Colony, were utterly against.
A letter was then read from Sir Thomas Modiford (51), Governor of Jamaica; and then the Council broke up.
Having brought an action against one Cocke, for money which he had received for me, it had been referred to an arbitration by the recommendation of that excellent good man, the Chief-Justice Hale (61), but, this not succeeding, I went to advise with that famous lawyer, Mr. Jones, of Gray's Inn, and, 27th of May, had a trial before Chief Justice of the King (40)Lord Chief Justice Hale; and, after the lawyers had wrangled sufficiently, it was referred to a new arbitration. This was the very first suit at law that ever I had with any creature, and oh, that it might be the last!.

Henry Hastings 5th Earl Huntingdon 1586-1643 educated at Gray's Inn.

Hatton Garden

On 09 May 1671 John Kelynge Chief Justice 1607-1671 (64) died at his house in Hatton Garden.

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 September. 23 Sep 1673. I went to see Paradise, a room in Hatton Garden furnished with a representation of all sorts of animals handsomely painted on boards or cloth, and so cut out and made to stand, move, fly, crawl, roar, and make their several cries. The man who showed it, made us laugh heartily at his formal poetry.

Holborn Hill, Holborn

On 20 Jun 1632 Miles Hobart 1595-1632 (37) died in an accident having been fatally injured in a carriage accident on Holborn Hill, Holborn.

Parish of St Andrew's Holborn

On 09 Jan 1685 Elias Leighton Engineer -1685 died at the Parish of St Andrew's Holborn. He was buried at St Giles' Church, Horsted Keynes.

St Andrew's Church, Holborn

Christening of Henry Wriothesley

On 24 Apr 1545 Henry Wriothesley, the future 2nd Earl Southamption, was christened at St Andrew's Church, Holborn. His godparents were Henry VIII (53), Henry's daughter Mary Tudor (29) and Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk (61).

On 12 Apr 1553 Richard Brownlow 1553-1638 was baptised at St Andrew's Church, Holborn.

On 23 Feb 1607 Henry Arundell 3rd Baron Arundel Wardour 1607-1694 was baptised at St Andrew's Church, Holborn.

On 16 Dec 1667 John Middleton 1st Earl Middleton 1608-1674 (59) and Martha Carey Countess Middleton 1635-1705 (32) were married at St Andrew's Church, Holborn. Martha Carey Countess Middleton 1635-1705 (32) by marriage Countess Middleton.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Sunday 09 May 1669. Lord’s day. Up and, after dressing in my best suit with gold trimming, I to the Office, and there with Gibson and Tom finishing against to-morrow my notes upon Commanders’ Instructions; and, when church-time, to church with my wife (28), leaving them at work. Dr. Mills preached a dull sermon, and so we home to dinner; and thence by coach to St. Andrew’s, Holborne, thinking to have heard Dr. Stillingfleete (34) preach, but we could not get a place, and so to St. Margaret’s, and there heard a sermon, and did get a place, the first we have heard there these many years, and here at a distance I saw Betty Michell, but she is become much a plainer woman than she was a girl. Thence towards the Park, but too soon to go in, so went on to Knightsbridge, and there eat and drank at "The World’s End," where we had good things, and then back to the Park, and there till night, being fine weather, and much company, and so home, and after supper to bed. This day I first left off both my waistcoats by day, and my waistcoat by night, it being very hot weather, so hot as to make me break out, here and there, in my hands, which vexes me to see, but is good for me.

John Evelyn's Diary 1680 February. 21st February, 1680. Shrove-Tuesday. My son (25) was married to Mrs. Martha Spencer (21), daughter to my Lady Stonehouse by a former gentleman, at St. Andrew's, Holborn, by our Vicar, borrowing the church of Dr. Stillingfleet (44), Dean of St. Paul's, the present incumbent. We afterward dined at a house in Holborn; and, after the solemnity and dancing was done, they were bedded at Sir John Stonehouse's (41) lodgings in Bow Street, Convent Garden.

On 12 Nov 1712 Thomas Drury 1st Baronet Drury 1712-1759 was baptised at St Andrew's Church, Holborn.

In 1754 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779 (53). Portrait of Thomas Drury 1st Baronet Drury 1712-1759 (41).

St Giles' Field, Holborn

Execution of Lollard John Oldcastle

On 14 Dec 1417 John Oldcastle -1417 was hanged in St Giles' Field, Holborn for being a Lollard.

Babington Plot

On 20 Sep 1586 Anthony Babington 1561-1586 (24), John Ballard -1586, Henry Donn -1586, Thomas Salusbury 1564-1586 (22) and Chideock Tichbourne 1562-1586 (24) were hanged at St Giles' Field, Holborn for their involvement.

Holloway

Holloway Prison, Holloway

In 1915 George Reresby Sitwell 4th Baronet Sitwell 1860-1943 (54) refused to pay off his wife Ida Emily Augusta Denison Baronetess Sitwell 1864-1937 (50) 's creditors. She was jailed in Holloway Prison, Holloway.

Hornsey

Stroud Green, Hornsey

Green Man, Stroud Green, Hornsey

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Thursday 06 May 1669. Up, and by coach to Sir W. Coventry’s (41), but he gone out. I by water back to the Office, and there all the morning; then to dinner, and then to the Office again, and anon with my wife (28) by coach to take the ayre, it being a noble day, as far as the Greene Man, mightily pleased with our journey, and our condition of doing it in our own coach, and so home, and to walk in the garden, and so to supper and to bed, my eyes being bad with writing my journal, part of it, to-night.

Hounslow

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 September. 17th September, 1678. She was, accordingly, carried to Godolphin, in Cornwall, in a hearse with six horses, attended by two coaches of as many, with about thirty of her relations and servants. There accompanied the hearse her husband's brother, Sir William (38), two more of his brothers, and three sisters; her husband (33) was so overcome with grief, that he was wholly unfit to travel so long a journey, till he was more composed. I went as far as Hounslow with a sad heart; but was obliged to return upon some indispensable affairs. The corpse was ordered to be taken out of the hearse every night, and decently placed in the house, with tapers about it, and her servants attending, to Cornwall; and then was honorably interred in the parish church of Godolphin. This funeral cost not much less than £1,000.
With Mr. Godolphin (33), I looked over and sorted his lady's papers, most of which consisted of Prayers, Meditations, Sermon-notes, Discourses, and Collections on several religious subjects, and many of her own happy composing, and so pertinently digested, as if she had been all her life a student in divinity. We found a diary of her solemn resolutions, tending to practical virtue, with letters from select friends, all put into exact method. It astonished us to see what she had read and written, her youth considered.

In 1673. Unknown Artist, possibly Matthew Dixon. Portrait of Margaret Blagge Maid of Honour 1652-1678 (20).

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 October. 03 Oct 1686. Went with the Countess of Sunderland (40) to Cranbourne, a lodge and walk of my Lord Godolphin's (41) in Windsor park. There was one room in the house spared in the pulling down the old one, because the late Duchess of York was born in it; the rest was built and added to it by Sir George Carteret, Treasurer of the Navy; and since, the whole was purchased by my Lord Godolphin (41), who spoke to me to go see it, and advise what trees were fit to be cut down to improve the dwelling, being environed with old rotten pollards, which corrupt the air. It stands on a knoll which though insensibly rising, gives it a prospect over the Keep of Windsor, about three miles N. E. of it. The ground is clayey and moist; the water stark naught; the park is pretty; the house tolerable, and gardens convenient. After dinner, we came back to London, having two coaches both going and coming, of six horses apiece, which we changed at Hounslow.

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 July. 12 Jul 1688. The camp now began at Hounslow, but the nation was in high discontent.
Colonel Titus (38), Sir Henry Vane (son of him who was executed for his treason), and some other of the Presbyterians and Independent party, were sworn of the Privy Council, from hopes of thereby diverting that party from going over to the Bishops and Church of England, which now they began to do, foreseeing the design of the Papists to descend and take in their most hateful of heretics (as they at other times expressed them to be) to effect their own ends, now evident; the utter extirpation of the Church of England first, and then the rest would follow.

Hounslow Heath

On 01 Aug 1603 Matthew Browne 1563-1603 (40) was killed in a duel with John Townshend 1568-1603 at Hounslow Heath. Matthew Browne 1563-1603 (40) died the following day.

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 June. 29th June, 1678. Returned with my Lord (60) by Hounslow Heath, where we saw the newly raised army encamped, designed against France, in pretense, at least; but which gave umbrage to the Parliament. His Majesty (48) and a world of company were in the field, and the whole army in battalia; a very glorious sight. Now were brought into service a new sort of soldiers, called Grenadiers, who were dexterous in flinging hand grenades, everyone having a pouch full; they had furred caps with coped crowns like Janizaries, which made them look very fierce, and some had long hoods hanging down behind, as we picture fools. Their clothing being likewise piebald, yellow and red.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 June. 02 Jun 1686. Such storms, raine and foul weather, seldom known at this time of the yeare. The camp at Hounslow Heath, from sicknesse and other inconveniences of weather, forc'd to retire to quarters ; ye storms being succeeded by excessive hot weather, many grew sick. Greate feasting there, especialy in Lord Dunbarton's (51) quarters. There were many jealousies and discourses of what was the meaning of this incampment. A Seale this day, mostly pardons and discharges of Kn* Baronets fees, wch having ben pass'd over for so many yeares, did greatly dis oblige several families who had serv'd his Ma* (52). Lord Tirconnell (56) gon to Ireland, with greate powers and commissions, giving as much cause of talke as the camp, especialy 19 new privy councillors and judges being now made, amongst wch but three Protestants, and Tirconnell made Generall.
New Judges also here, amongst wch was Milton (70), a Papist (brother to that Milton who wrote for ye Regicides), who presum'd to take his place without passing ye Test*. Scotland refuses to grant liberty of masse to the Papists there. The French persecution more inhuman than ever. The Protestants in Savoy successfully resist the French dragoons sent to murder them.
The King's chiefe physician (45) in Scotland apostatizing from the Protestant religion, does of his own accord publish his recantation at Edinburgh.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 June. 06 Jun 1687. I visited my Lady Pierpoint, daughter to Sir John Evelyn, of Deane [in Wilts], now widow of Mr. Pierpoint, and mother of the Earl of Kingston. She was now engaged in the marriage of my cousin, Evelyn Pierpoint, her second son.
There was about this time brought into the Downs a vast treasure, which was sunk in a Spanish galleon about forty-five years ago, somewhere near Hispaniola, or the Bahama islands, and was now weighed up by some gentlemen, who were at the charge of divers, etc., to the enriching them beyond all expectation. The Duke of Albemarle's share [Governor of Jamaica] came to, I believe, £50,000. Some private gentlemen who adventured £100, gained from £8,000 to £10,000. His Majesty's tenth was £10,000.
The Camp was now again pitched at Hounslow, the Commanders profusely vying in the expense and magnificence of tents.

Osterley Park, Hounslow

In 1654 William Waller 1597-1668 (57) bought at Osterley Park, Hounslow.

Isleworth

In 1462 Richard Pole 1462-1504 was born to Geoffrey Pole 1430-1474 (32) and Edith St John 1430- at Isleworth.

In 1462 Eleanor Pole 1462- was born to Geoffrey Pole 1430-1474 (32) and Edith St John 1430- at Isleworth.

On 05 Sep 1733 Philip Stanhope 4th Earl Chesterfield 1694-1773 (38) and Petronilla Melusine Schulenburg Countess Chesterfield 1693-1778 (40) were married at Isleworth. Petronilla Melusine Schulenburg Countess Chesterfield 1693-1778 (40) by marriage Countess Chesterfield.

Syon Park, Isleworth

Syon House, Syon Park, Isleworth

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 July. 07 Jul 1665. To London, to Sir William Coventry (37); and so to Sion, where his Majesty (35) sat at Council during the contagion: when business was over, I viewed that seat belonging to the Earl of Northumberland, built out of an old nunnery, of stone, and fair enough, but more celebrated for the garden than it deserves; yet there is excellent wall-fruit, and a pretty fountain; nothing else extraordinary.

William III Creation of New Lords

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 February. 28 Feb 1692. Lord Marlborough (41) having used words against the King (41), and been discharged from all his great places, his wife (31) was forbidden the Court, and the Princess of Denmark (27) was desired by the Queen (29) to dismiss her from her service; but she refusing to do so, goes away from Court to Sion house. Divers new Lords made: Sir Henry Capel (53), Sir William Fermor (43), etc. Change of Commissioners in the Treasury. The Parliament adjourned, not well satisfied with affairs. The business of the East India Company, which they would have reformed, let fall. The Duke of Norfolk (37) does not succeed in his endeavor to be divorced.

Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of John Churchill 1st Duke Marlborough 1650-1722 known as The Triumph of the John, 1st Duke of Marlborough.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

On 08 Jun 1775 Algernon Percy 1st Earl Beverley 1750-1830 (25) and Isabella Susan Burrell Countess Beverley 1750-1812 (24) were married at Syon House, Syon Park, Isleworth.

On 28 Apr 1820 Frances Julia Burrell Duchess Northumberland 1752-1820 (67) died at Syon House, Syon Park, Isleworth. He buried in the Northumberland Vault, Westminster Abbey.

Little Stanmore

Cannons House, Little Stanmore

On 09 Aug 1744 James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 (71) died at Cannons House, Little Stanmore. He was buried at Chandos Mausoleum, Church of St Lawrence, Whitchurch Lan, Little Stanmore. His son Henry Brydges 2nd Duke Chandos 1708-1771 (36) succeeded 2nd Duke Chandos (1C 1719), 2nd Earl Carnarvon (2C 1714), 10th Baron Chandos of Sudeley, 4th Baronet Wilton. Mary Bruce Duchess Chandos 1710-1738 by marriage Duchess Chandos (1C 1719).

Before 1690. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Mary Lake 1668-1712. Frequently described as 'Mary Lake Duchess of Chandos' Mary died two years before her husband James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 was created Duke on 19 Oct 1714.

Whitchurch Lan, Little Stanmore

Church of St Lawrence, Whitchurch Lan, Little Stanmore

Chandos Mausoleum, Church of St Lawrence, Whitchurch Lan, Little Stanmore

On 15 Sep 1712 Mary Lake 1668-1712 (44) died. She was buried at Chandos Mausoleum, Church of St Lawrence, Whitchurch Lan, Little Stanmore.

Before 1690. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Mary Lake 1668-1712. Frequently described as 'Mary Lake Duchess of Chandos' Mary died two years before her husband James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 was created Duke on 19 Oct 1714.

On 16 Jul 1735 Cassandra Willoughby Duchess Chandos 1670-1735 (65) died. He was buried at Chandos Mausoleum, Church of St Lawrence, Whitchurch Lan, Little Stanmore.

On 09 Aug 1744 James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 (71) died at Cannons House, Little Stanmore. He was buried at Chandos Mausoleum, Church of St Lawrence, Whitchurch Lan, Little Stanmore. His son Henry Brydges 2nd Duke Chandos 1708-1771 (36) succeeded 2nd Duke Chandos (1C 1719), 2nd Earl Carnarvon (2C 1714), 10th Baron Chandos of Sudeley, 4th Baronet Wilton. Mary Bruce Duchess Chandos 1710-1738 by marriage Duchess Chandos (1C 1719).

Ludgate

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 07 Sep 1666. I went this morning on foot from Whitehall as far as London Bridge, through the late Fleet street, Ludgate hill by St. Paul's, Cheapside, Exchange, Bishops-gate, Aldersgate, and out to Moorfields, thence through Cornhill, etc., with extraordinary difficulty, clambering over heaps of yet smoking rubbish, and frequently mistaking where I was; the ground under my feet so hot, that it even burnt the soles of my shoes. In the meantime, his Majesty (36) got to the Tower by water, to demolish the houses about the graff, which, being built entirely about it, had they taken fire and attacked the White Tower, where the magazine of powder lay, would undoubtedly not only have beaten down and destroyed all the bridge, but sunk and torn the vessels in the river, and rendered the demolition beyond all expression for several miles about the country.
At my return, I was infinitely concerned to find that goodly Church, St. Paul's — now a sad ruin, and that beautiful portico (for structure comparable to any in Europe, as not long before repaired by the late King) now rent in pieces, flakes of large stones split asunder, and nothing remaining entire but the inscription in the architrave showing by whom it was built, which had not one letter of it defaced! It was astonishing to see what immense stones the heat had in a manner calcined, so that all the ornaments, columns, friezes, capitals, and projectures of massy Portland stone, flew off, even to the very roof, where a sheet of lead covering a great space (no less than six acres by measure) was totally melted. The ruins of the vaulted roof falling, broke into St. Faith's, which being filled with the magazines of books belonging to the Stationers, and carried thither for safety, they were all consumed, burning for a week following. It is also observable that the lead over the altar at the east end was untouched, and among the divers. Monuments the body of one bishop remained entire. Thus lay in ashes that most venerable church, one of the most ancient pieces of early piety in the Christian world, besides near one hundred more. The lead, ironwork, bells, plate, etc., melted, the exquisitely wrought Mercers' Chapel, the sumptuous Exchange, the august fabric of Christ Church, all the rest of the Companies' Halls, splendid buildings, arches, entries, all in dust; the fountains dried up and ruined, while the very waters remained boiling; the voragos of subterranean cellars, wells, and dungeons, formerly warehouses, still burning in stench and dark clouds of smoke; so that in five or six miles traversing about I did not see one load of timber unconsumed, nor many stones but what were calcined white as snow.
The people, who now walked about the ruins, appeared like men in some dismal desert, or rather, in some great city laid waste by a cruel enemy; to which was added the stench that came from some poor creatures' bodies, beds, and other combustible goods. Sir Thomas Gresham's statue, though fallen from its niche in the Royal Exchange, remained entire, when all those of the King (36)s since the Conquest were broken to pieces. Also the standard in Cornhill, and Queen Elizabeth's effigies, with some arms on Ludgate, continued with but little detriment, while the vast iron chains of the city streets, hinges, bars, and gates of prisons, were many of them melted and reduced to cinders by the vehement heat. Nor was I yet able to pass through any of the narrow streets, but kept the widest; the ground and air, smoke and fiery vapor, continued so intense, that my hair was almost singed, and my feet insufferably surbated. The by-lanes and narrow streets were quite filled up with rubbish; nor could one have possibly known where he was, but by the ruins of some Church, or Hall, that had some remarkable tower, or pinnacle remaining.
I then went towards Islington and Highgate, where one might have seen 200,000 people of all ranks and degrees dispersed, and lying along by their heaps of what they could save from the fire, deploring their loss; and, though ready to perish for hunger and destitution, yet not asking one penny for relief, which to me appeared a stranger sight than any I had yet beheld. His Majesty (36) and Council indeed took all imaginable care for their relief, by proclamation for the country to come in, and refresh them with provisions.
In the midst of all this calamity and confusion, there was, I know not how, an alarm begun that the French and Dutch, with whom we were now in hostility, were not only landed, but even entering the city. There was, in truth, some days before, great suspicion of those two nations joining; and now that they had been the occasion of firing the town. This report did so terrify, that on a sudden there was such an uproar and tumult that they ran from their goods, and, taking what weapons they could come at, they could not be stopped from falling on some of those nations whom they casually met, without sense or reason. The clamor and peril grew so excessive, that it made the whole Court amazed, and they did with infinite pains and great difficulty, reduce and appease the people, sending troops of soldiers and guards, to cause them to retire into the fields again, where they were watched all this night. I left them pretty quiet, and came home sufficiently weary and broken. Their spirits thus a little calmed, and the affright abated, they now began to repair into the suburbs about the city, where such as had friends, or opportunity, got shelter for the present to which his Majesty's (36) proclamation also invited them.
Still, the plague continuing in our parish, I could not, without danger, adventure to our church.

Ludgate Prison, Ludgate

In 1617 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 (70) was briefly imprisoned in Ludgate Prison, Ludgate after standing surety for the debt of another, and being unable to produce the amount.

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 December. 24 Dec 1673. Visited the prisoners at Ludgate, taking orders about the releasing of some.

Ludgate Street, Ludgate

Creed Lane, Ludgate Street, Ludgate

In 1713 James "Athenian" Stuart 1713-1788 was born in Creed Lane, Ludgate Street, Ludgate.

Mansfield

Mary le Strand

After 20 Feb 1616 George Tuchet 1st Earl Castlehaven 1551-1617 and Elizabeth Noel Countess Castlehaven were married at Mary le Strand. Elizabeth Noel Countess Castlehaven by marriage Baroness Audley Heighley in Staffordshire, Baron Tuchet.

On 18 Dec 1743 Mary Beauclerk 1743- was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 02 Sep 1745 Henry Beauclerk 1745-1817 was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 17 Dec 1746 Charlotte Beauclerk 1746- was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 08 Jan 1748 Martha Beauclerk 1747- was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 27 Oct 1749 Anne Beauclerk 1749-1809 was baptised at Mary le Strand.

Monkden Hadleigh

On 31 Jul 1616 Roger Wilbraham 1553-1616 (62) died in Monkden Hadleigh. He was buried in St Mary the Virgin Church, Monkden Hadleigh.

St Mary the Virgin Church, Monkden Hadleigh

On 31 Jul 1616 Roger Wilbraham 1553-1616 (62) died in Monkden Hadleigh. He was buried in St Mary the Virgin Church, Monkden Hadleigh.

Old Ford

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Friday 07 May 1669. Up, and by coach to W. Coventry’s (41); and there to talk with him a great deal with great content; and so to the Duke of York (35), having a great mind to speak to him about Tangier; but, when I come to it, his interest for my Lord Middleton (61)Excise Office, having by private vows last night in prayer to God Almighty cleared my mind for the present of the thoughts of going to Deb. (18) at Greenwich, which I did long after. I passed by Guildhall, which is almost finished, and saw a poor labourer carried by, I think, dead with a fall, as many there are, I hear. So home to dinner, and then to the office a little, and so to see my Lord Brouncker (49), who is a little ill of the gout; and there Madam Williams told me that she heard that my wife (28) was going into France this year, which I did not deny, if I can get time, and I pray God I may. But I wondering how she come to know it, she tells me a woman that my wife (28) spoke to for a maid, did tell her so, and that a lady that desires to go thither would be glad to go in her company. Thence with my wife (28) abroad, with our coach, most pleasant weather; and to Hackney, and into the marshes, where I never was before, and thence round about to Old Ford and Bow; and coming through the latter home, there being some young gentlewomen at a door, and I seeming not to know who they were, my wife’s (28) jealousy told me presently that I knew well enough it was that damned place where Deb. (18) dwelt, which made me swear very angrily that it was false, as it was, and I carried [her] back again to see the place, and it proved not so, so I continued out of humour a good while at it, she being willing to be friends, so I was by and by, saying no more of it. So home, and there met with a letter from Captain Silas Taylor (44), and, with it, his written copy of a play that he hath wrote, and intends to have acted. — It is called "The Serenade or Disappointment," which I will read, not believing he can make any good of that kind. He did once offer to show Harris (35) it, but Harris (35) told him that he would judge by one Act whether it were good or no, which is indeed a foolish saying, and we see them out themselves in the choice of a play after they have read the whole, it being sometimes found not fit to act above three times; nay, and some that have been refused at one house is found a good one at the other. This made Taylor (44) say he would not shew it him, but is angry, and hath carried it to the other house, and he thinks it will be acted there, though he tells me they are not yet agreed upon it. But I will find time to get it read to me, and I did get my wife (28) to begin a little to-night in the garden, but not so much as I could make any judgment of it. So home to supper and to bed.

Ossulston

Osterley Park

On 31 May 1915 Victor Albert George Child-Villiers 7th Earl Jersey 1845-1915 (70) died at Osterley Park.

Ruislip Chapel

On 06 Oct 1272 Edmund "Almain" Cornwall 2nd Earl Cornwall 1249-1300 (22) and Margaret Clare Countess Cornwall were married at Ruislip Chapel.

St Pancras

On Apr 1797 John Webb 5th Baronet Webb 1742-1797 (54) died. He was buried at St Pancras. His nephew Thomas Webb 6th Baronet Webb succeeded 6th Baronet Webb of Odstock in Wiltshire. Frances Charlotte Dillon-Lee Baronetess Webb, Baronetess Heathcote 1780-1819 (17) by marriage Lady Webb of Odstock in Wiltshire.

Stepney

On 05 Aug 1447 John Holland 2nd Duke Exeter 1395-1447 (52) died at Stepney. He was buried at the Church of St Katharine's by the Tower, Tower Hill. His son Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter 1430-1475 (17) succeeded 3rd Duke Exeter (1C 1397), 3rd Earl Huntingdon (4C 1388). Anne York Duchess Exeter 1439-1476 (7) by marriage Duchess Exeter (1C 1397).

On 28 Aug 1558 George Darcy 1st Baron Darcy Aston -1558 died at Stepney. His son John Darcy 2nd Baron Darcy Aston 1540-1602 (18) succeeded 2nd Baron Darcy Aston.

Whitechapel, Stepney

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 March. 16 Mar 1683. I went to see Sir Josiah Child's (52) prodigious cost in planting walnut trees about his seat, and making fish ponds, many miles in circuit, in Epping Forest, in a barren spot, as oftentimes these suddenly monied men for the most part seat themselves. He from a merchant's apprentice, and management of the East India Company's stock, being arrived to an estate (it is said) of £200,000; and lately married his daughter (17) to the eldest son (22) of the Duke of Beaufort, late Marquis of Worcester, with £50,000 portional present, and various expectations.
I dined at Mr. Houblon's (53), a rich and gentle French merchant, who was building a house in the Forest, near Sir J. Child's (52), in a place where the late Earl of Norwich dwelt some time, and which came from his lady, the widow of Mr. Baker. It will be a pretty villa, about five miles from Whitechapel.

Stratford

On 25 Dec 1475 Elizabeth Howard Countess Oxford 1410-1475 (65) died at Stratford.

Syon Abbey

On 23 Nov 1541 Catherine Howard (18) was stripped of her title as Queen and imprisoned at Syon Abbey.

Tottenham

On 08 Sep 1644 John Coke 1563-1644 (81) died at his home in Tottenham.

Around 1623. Unknown Artist. Portrait of John Coke 1563-1644 (59).

See Tottenham High Cross

Turham Green

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Wednesday 19 May 1669. With my coach to St. James’s; and there finding the Duke of York (35) gone to muster his men, in Hyde Park, I alone with my boy thither, and there saw more, walking out of my coach as other gentlemen did, of a soldier’s trade, than ever I did in my life: the men being mighty fine, and their Commanders, particularly the Duke of Monmouth (20); but me-thought their trade but very easy as to the mustering of their men, and the men but indifferently ready to perform what was commanded, in the handling of their arms. Here the news was first talked of Harry Killigrew’s being wounded in nine places last night, by footmen, in the highway, going from the Park in a hackney-coach towards Hammersmith, to his house at Turnham Greene: they being supposed to be my Lady Shrewsbury’s (27) men, she being by, in her (27) coach with six horses; upon an old grudge of his saying openly that he had lain with her. Thence by and by to White Hall, and there I waited upon the King (38) and Queen (59) all dinner-time, in the Queen’s lodgings, she being in her white pinner and apron, like a woman with child; and she seemed handsomer plain so, than dressed. And by and by, dinner done, I out, and to walk in the Gallery, for the Duke of York’s (35) coming out; and there, meeting Mr. May (47), he took me down about four o’clock to Mr. Chevins’s (67) lodgings, and all alone did get me a dish of cold chickens, and good wine; and I dined like a prince, being before very hungry and empty. By and by the Duke of York (35) comes, and readily took me to his closet, and received my petition, and discoursed about my eyes, and pitied me, and with much kindness did give me his consent to be absent, and approved of my proposition to go into Holland to observe things there, of the Navy; but would first ask the King’s (38) leave, which he anon did, and did tell me that the King (38) would be a good master to me, these were his words, about my eyes, and do like of my going into Holland, but do advise that nobody should know of my going thither, but pretend that I did go into the country somewhere, which I liked well. Glad of this, I home, and thence took out my wife (34), and to Mr. Holliard’s (60) about a swelling in her cheek, but he not at home, and so round by Islington and eat and drink, and so home, and after supper to bed. In discourse this afternoon, the Duke of York (35) did tell me that he was the most amazed at one thing just now, that ever he was in his life, which was, that the Duke of Buckingham (41) did just now come into the Queen’s (59) bed-chamber, where the King (38) was, and much mixed company, and among others, Tom Killigrew (57), the father of Harry, who was last night wounded so as to be in danger of death, and his man is quite dead; and [Buckingham (41)] there in discourse did say that he had spoke with some one that was by (which all the world must know that it must be his whore, my Lady Shrewsbury (27)), who says that they did not mean to hurt, but beat him, and that he did run first at them with his sword; so that he do hereby clearly discover that he knows who did it, and is of conspiracy with them, being of known conspiracy with her, which the Duke of York (35) did seem to be pleased with, and said it might, perhaps, cost him his life in the House of Lords; and I find was mightily pleased with it, saying it was the most impudent thing, as well as the most foolish, that ever he knew man do in all his life.

Around 1749. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Whitehall and the Privy Garden from Richmond House.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

In 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (38). Portrait of Thomas Killigrew 1612-1683 (25) and (probably) William Crofts 1st Baron Crofts 1611-1677 (27).

Tyburn

Execution of Roger Mortimer

On 29 Nov 1330 Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (43) was hanged naked at Tyburn accused of assuming royal power and of various other high misdemeanours. His body hung at the gallows for two days and nights. His grandson Roger Mortimer 2nd Earl March 1328-1360 (2) succeeded 2nd Earl March (1C 1328), 4th Baron Mortimer Wigmore.

Epiphany Rising

On 05 Feb 1400 Bernard Brocas 1354-1400 (46) was beheaded at Tyburn.

On 29 Jul 1460 Thomas Browne Lord Treasurer Lord Chancellor 1402-1460 (58) was beheaded at Tyburn.

Stafford and Lovell Rebellion

Around Apr 1486 the Stafford and Lovell Rebellion was an armed uprising against Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (29). With the failure of the plot Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (30) fled to Margaret Duchess of Burgundy 1446-1503 (39) in Flanders.
On 08 Jul 1486 Humphrey Stafford 1426-1486 (60) and Thomas Stafford -1486 was executed at Tyburn.

Around 1520 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Trial and Execution of Perkin Warbreck and Edward Earl of Warwick

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1499. This yeare, in June, deceased the third sonne of the Kinge (1) named Duke of Somersett and was buried at Westminster. Perkin Werbeck (25) putt to death at Tybume Note. 22 Nov 1499; and the Earle of Warwyke (23), Sonne to the Duke of Clarence, who had bene kept in the Tower from the age of 11 years unto the end of 14 yeares, was beheaded at the Tower Hill Note. See Trial and Execution of Perkin Warbreck and Edward Earl of Warwick. A great pestilence throughout all England.

On 23 Nov 1499 Perkin Warbreck 1474-1499 (25) was hanged at Tyburn during the Trial and Execution of Perkin Warbreck and Edward Earl of Warwick.

On 05 Feb 1523 Agnes Cotell 1485-1523 (38) and William Mathewe were hanged at Tyburn for the murder of her first husband.

Execution of the Fitzgeralds

On 03 Feb 1537 the six Fitzgeralds, nephew and five uncles, Thomas "Silken" Fitzgerald 10th Earl Kildare 1513-1537 (24), James Fitzgerald 1496-1537 (41), Oliver Fitzgerald 1496-1537 (41), Richard Fitzgerald -1537, John Fitzgerald -1537 and Walter Fitzgerald 1496-1537 (41) were executed at Tyburn.
Gerald "Wizard Earl" Fitzgerald 11th Earl Kildare 1525-1585 (12) succeeded 11th Earl Kildare.

Bigod's Rebellion

On 02 Jun 1537 Thomas Percy 1504-1537 (33), Francis Bigod 1507-1537 (29), and John Bulmer -1537 and Ralph Bulmer -1537 were hanged at Tyburn.

On 12 Jul 1537 Robert Aske 1500-1537 (37) was hanged at York. William Lumley -1537 and Nicholas Tempest 1480-1537 (57) were hanged at Tyburn.

On 20 Dec 1538 Edward Arden -1538 was executed at Tyburn.

In Aug 1540 Giles Heron 1504-1540 (36) was hanged at Tyburn for treason; not clear what his crime was?.

Trial of Thomas Fiennes 9th Baron Dacre

On 29 Jun 1541 Thomas Fiennes 9th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1515-1541 (26) was hanged at Tyburn.

Catherine Howard Tyburn Executions

On 10 Dec 1541. At Tyburn ....
Francis Dereham (28) was hanged.
Thomas Culpepper 1514-1541 (27) was beheaded. He was buried at St Sepulchre-without-Newgate, Holborn.

On 14 Feb 1601 Thomas Lee 1551-1601 (50) was hanged at Tyburn.

1641 Irish Rebellion

In 1645 Connor Maguire 2nd Baron of Enniskillen 1616-1645 (29) was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.

Trial and Execution of the Regicides

On 19 Oct 1660 at Tyburn ...
Daniel Axtell Regicide 1622-1660 (38) was hanged, drawn and quartered. His head was set on Westminster Hall.
Francis Hacker Regicide -1660 was hanged. His body was returned to his friends for burial.

Execution of Deceased Regicides

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1661 January. 30 Jan 1661..Fast day1. The first time that this day hath been yet observed: and Mr. Mills made a most excellent sermon, upon "Lord forgive us our former iniquities;" speaking excellently of the justice of God in punishing men for the sins of their ancestors.
Home, and John Goods comes, and after dinner I did pay him 30l. for my Lady (36), and after that Sir W. Pen (39) and I into Moorfields and had a brave talk, it being a most pleasant day, and besides much discourse did please ourselves to see young Davis and Whitton, two of our clerks, going by us in the field, who we observe to take much pleasure together, and I did most often see them at play together.
Back to the Old James in Bishopsgate Street, where Sir W. Batten and Sir Wm. Rider met him about business of the Trinity House. So I went home, and there understand that my mother is come home well from Brampton, and had a letter from my brother John, a very ingenious one, and he therein begs to have leave to come to town at the Coronacion.
Then to my Lady Batten’s; where my wife (26) and she are lately come back again from being abroad, and seeing of Cromwell, Ireton, and Bradshaw hanged and buried at Tyburn. Then I home.
Note 1. 30 Jan the anniversary of the execution of Charles I and was regarded as a Fast Day.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 January. 30th January, 1661. Was the first solemn fast and day of humiliation to deplore the sins which had so long provoked God against this afflicted church and people, ordered by Parliament to be annually celebrated to expiate the guilt of the execrable murder of the late King.
This day (Oh, the stupendous and inscrutable judgments of God!) were the carcasses of those arch-rebels, Cromwell, Bradshawe (the judge who condemned his Majesty (30)), and Ireton (son-in-law to the Usurper), dragged out of their superb tombs in Westminster among the King (30)s, to Tyburn, and hanged on the gallows there from nine in the morning till six at night, and then buried under that fatal and ignominious. Monument in a deep pit; thousands of people who had seen them in all their pride being spectators. Look back at October 22, 1658, and be astonished! and fear God and honor the King (30); but meddle not with them who are given to change!.

On 01 Jul 1661 Henry Mildmay 1593-1668 (68) was sentenced and degraded from his honours and titles and to be drawn every year on the anniversary of the king's sentence (27 Jan) upon a sledge through the streets to and under the gallows at Tyburn, with a rope about his neck, and so back to the Tower of London, there to remain a prisoner during his life.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 July. 20 Jul 1683. Several of the conspirators of the lower form were executed at Tyburn; and the next day.

Argyll's Rising

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 May. 22 May 1685. In the morning I went with a French gentleman, and my Lord Privy Seale, to the House of Lords, where we were plac'd by his lordship next the Bar, just below yc Bishops, very commodiously both for hearing and seeing. After a short space came in ye Queene (26) and Princesse of Denmark (20), and stood next above the Archbishops, at the side of the House on the right hand of the throne. In the interim divers of the Lords, who had not finish'd before, tooke the Test and usual Oathes, so that her Ma*, the Spanish and other Ambassadors, who stood behind the throne, heard the Pope and worship of the Virgin Mary, &c. renounc'd very decently, as likewise the prayers which follow'd, standing all the while. Then came in the King (51), the Crowne on his head, and being seated, the Commons were introduced, and the House being full, he drew forth a paper containing his speech, which he read distinctly enough, to this effect : " That he resolv'd to call a Parliament from the moment of his brother's decease, as the best meanes to settle all the concernes of the Nation, so as to be most easy and happy to himselfe and his subjects; that he would confirme whatever he had said in his declaration at the first Council concerning his opinion of the principles of the Church of England, for their loyaltie, and would defend and support it, and preserve its government as by law now establish'd; that, as he would invade no man's property, so he would never depart from his owne prerogative; and as he had ventur'd his life in defence of the Nation, so he would proceede to do still; that, having given this assurance of his care of our Religion (his word was your Religion) and Property (wch he had not said by chance but solemnly), so he doubted not of suitable returnes of his subjects duty and kindnesse, especialy as to settling his Revenue for life, for yte many weighty necessities of go vernment, weh he would not suffer to be precarious; that some might possibly suggest that it were better to feede and supply him from time to time only, out of their inclination to frequent Parliaments, but that that would be a very improper method to take with him, since the best way to engage him to meete oftener would be always to use him well, and therefore he expected their compliance speedily, that this Session being but short, they might meet againe to satisfaction." At every period of this the House gave loud shouts. Then he acquainted them with that morning's news of Argyle's (56) being landed in the West High lands of Scotland from Holland, and the treasonous declaration he had published, which he would communicate to them, and that he should take the best care he could it should meete with the reward It deserv'd, not questioning the Parliament's zeale and readinesse to assist him as he desir'd; at which there follow'd another Vive le Roi, and so his Ma* retlr'd.
So soone as ye Commons were return'd and had put themselves into a grand Committee, they immediately put the question, and unanimously voted the Revenue to his Ma* for life. Mr. Seymour made a bold speech against many Elections, and would have had those members who (he pretended) were obnoxious, to withdraw, till they had clear'd the matter of their being legally return'd; but no one seconded him. The truth is, there were many of the new members whose Elections and Returns were universally censur'd, many of them being persons of no condition or interest in the Nation, or places for which they serv'd, especially in Devon, Cornwall, Norfolk, &c. said to have ben recommended by the Court and from the effect of the new charters changing ye electors. It was reported that Lord Bath (56) carried down with him [into Cornwall] no fewer than 15 charters, so that some call'd him the Prince Elector; whence Seymour told the House in his speech that if this was digested, they might introduce what religion and lawes they pleas'd, and that tho' he never gave heed to ye feares and jealousies of the people before, he now was really apprehensive of Popery. By the printed list of Members of 505 there did not appeare to be above 135 who had ben in former Parliaments, especialy that lately held at Oxford. In ye Lords House Lord Newport (65) made an exception against two or three young Peeres, who wanted some moneths, and some only four or five daies of being of age.
The Popish Lords who had ben sometime before releas'd from their confinement about the Plot, were now discharg'd of their impeachment, of wch I gave Lord Arundel of Wardour (52) joy.
Oates (35), who had but two dayes before ben pilloried at severall places and whipt at ye carts taile from Newgate to Aldgate, was this day plac'd on a sledge, being not able to go by reason of so late scourging, and dragg'd from prison to Tyburn, and whipt againe all ye way, which some thought to be very severe and extraordinary; but if he was guilty of the perjuries, and so of the death of many innocents, as I feare he was, his punishment was but what he deserv'd. I chanc'd to pass just as execution was doing on him. A strange revolution!.

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. Francois de Troy 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

John Evelyn's Diary 1690 December. 20 Dec 1690. Dr. Hough (39), President of Magdalen College, Oxford, who was displaced with several of the Fellows for not taking the oath imposed by King James, now made a Bishop. Most of this month cold and frost. One Johnson (42), a Knight, was executed at Tyburn for being an accomplice with Campbell (30), brother to Lord Argyle (32), in stealing a young heiress (13).

On 23 Dec 1690 John Johnston 3rd Baronet Caskiebean 1648-1690 (42) was executed at Tyburn for having assisted Captain James Campbell 1660-1713 (30) in the abduction of.

In 1691 John Ashton Jacobite -1691 was hanged at Tyburn.

John Evelyn's Diary 1696 April. 19 Apr 1696. Great offense taken at the three ministers who absolved Sir William Perkins and Friend at Tyburn. One of them (Snatt) was a son of my old schoolmaster. This produced much altercation as to the canonicalness of the action.

1715 Battle of Preston

The 1715 Battle of Preston was the final action of the 1715 Jacobite Rebellion. It commenced on 09 Nov 1715 when Jacobite cavalry entered Preston. Royalist troops arrived in number over the next few days surrounding Preston forcing the Jaocbite surrender. 1463 were taken prisoner of which 463 were English. The Scottish prisoners included:
George Seton 5th Earl of Winton 1678-1749. The only prisoner to plead not guilty, sentenced to death, escaped from the Tower of London on 04 Aug 1716 around nine in the evening. Travelled to France then to Rome.
On 24 Feb 1716 William Gordon 6th Viscount Kenmure 1672-1716 was beheaded on Tower Hill.
William Maxwell 5th Earl Nithsale 1676-1744. On 09 Feb 1716 he was sentenced to be executed on 24 Feb 1716. The night before his wife (35) effected his escape from the Tower of London by exchanging his clothes with those of her maid. They travelled to Paris then to Rome where the court of James "Old Pretender" Stewart 1688-1766 (26) was.
James Radclyffe 3rd Earl Derwentwater 1689-1716 (25) was imprisoned in the Tower of London. He was examined by the Privy Council on 10 Jan 1716 and impeached on 19 Jan 1716. He pleaded guilty in the expectation of clemency. He was attainted and condemned to death. Attempts were made to procure his pardon. His wife Anna Maria Webb Countess Derwentwater 1692-1723 (23), her sister Mary Webb Countess Waldegrave 1695-1719 (20) [Note. Assumed to be her sister Mary], their aunt Anne Brudenell Duchess Richmond 1671-1722 (44), Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 appealed to George I King Great Britain and Ireland 1660-1727 (54) in person without success. On 24 Feb 1716 James Radclyffe 3rd Earl Derwentwater 1689-1716 (25) was beheaded on Tower Hill.
William Murray 2nd Lord Nairne 1665-1726 was tried on 09 Feb 1716 for treason, found guilty, attainted, and condemned to death. He survived long enough to benefit from the Indemnity Act of 1717.
On 14 May 1716 Henry Oxburgh -1716 was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. He was buried at Church of St Gile's in the Fields. His head was spiked on Temple Bar.
The trials and sentences were overseen by the Lord High Steward William Cowper 1st Earl Cowper 1665-1723 (50) for which he subsequently received his Earldom.

On 05 May 1760 Laurence Shirley 4th Earl Ferrers 1720-1760 (39) was hanged at Tyburn (the last peer to be hanged). His brother Washington Shirley 5th Earl Ferrers 1722-1778 (37) succeeded 5th Earl Ferrers.

Uxbridge

Treaty of Uxbridge

In 1645 Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (39) was appointed Commissioner at Uxbridge during the Treaty of Uxbridge.

In 1634. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (28).

In 1650. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (44).

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 October. 17th October, 1664. I went with my Lord Viscount Cornbury, to Cornbury, in Oxfordshire, to assist him in the planting of the park, and bear him company, with Mr. Belin and Mr. May (43), in a coach with six horses; dined at Uxbridge, lay at Wycombe.

On 11 Oct 1905 Archibald John Stuart-Wortley 1849-1905 (56) died at Uxbridge.

West Drayton

On 09 Nov 1734 Frances Pierrepoint Baroness Paget Beaudasert -1734 was buried at West Drayton.

Hillingdon, West Drayton

On 15 Dec 1864 Algernon Frederick Greville 1798-1864 (65) died at Hillingdon, West Drayton.

St John the Baptist's Church, Hillingdon, West Drayton

Whitchurch

In 1633 Arthur Lake 1598-1633 (35) died at Whitchurch.