History of Kent

In 633 Paulinius Italy Archbishop of Canterbury -644 fled to the protection of Eadbald King Kent -640 at Kent.

In 633 Eanfled Deira Queen Consort Bernicia 626-685 (6) fled to the protection of Eadbald King Kent -640 in Kent.

In 676 Aethelred King Mercia -704 invaded at Kent.

In 687 Caedwalla King Wessex 659-689 (28) ravaged Kent in revenge for the death of his brother.

Around 1170 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain, 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 was born to Walter Burgh 1130-1206 (40) and Alice Unknown at Kent.

Around 1222 Margaret Burgh Countess Gloucester, Countess Hertford 1222-1237 was born to Hubert Burgh Count Mortain, 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 (52) and Margaret Dunkeld Countess Kent 1193-1259 (29) at Kent.

Addington Park

In 1519 Frances Neville 1519-1599 was born to Edward Neville 1471-1538 (48) and Eleanor Windsor Baroness Scrope Masham at Addington Park.

In 1548 Edward Waldegrave -1561 and Frances Neville 1519-1599 (29) were married at Addington Park.

Edward Neville 1471-1538 lived at Addington Park.

Allington

In 1503 Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542 was born to Henry Wyatt 1460-1537 (43) in Allington.

Around 1550 based on a work of around 1540.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542.

Around 1568 John Astley Master of the Jewel House 1507-1595 (61) was granted the castle and manor of Allington.

Ash

Ashford

On 23 Oct 1375 Elizabeth Ferrers Countess Atholl 1336-1375 (39) died. She was buried at Ashford.

Ashridge

On 25 Sep 1300 Edmund "Almain" Cornwall 2nd Earl Cornwall 1249-1300 (50) died. He was buried, heart and flesh, at Ashridge. His bones were interred at Hailes Abbey, Winchcombe during a service attended by Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (61).

Aylesford

On 01 Sep 1308 Henry Grey 1st Baron Grey Codnor 1255-1308 (53) died at Aylesford. His son Richard Grey 2nd Baron Grey Codnor 1282-1335 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Grey Codnor.

On 14 Dec 1392 John Grey 3rd Baron Grey Codnor 1305-1392 (87) died at Aylesford. His grandson Richard Grey 4th Baron Grey Codnor 1371-1418 (21) succeeded 4th Baron Grey Codnor. Elizabeth Bassett Baroness Grey Codnor 1372-1451 (20) by marriage Baroness Grey Codnor.

Bayhall

Around 1430 Margaret Culpepper 1430-1488 was born to Walter Culpepper 1402-1462 (28) and Agnes Roper 1400-1457 (30) at Bayhall.

Beakesbourne

Bexley

Bexley Hill

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 November. 17 Nov 1666. I returned to Chatham, my chariot overturning on the steep of Bexley Hill, wounded me in two places on the head; my son, Jack (11), being with me, was like to have been worse cut by the glass; but I thank God we both escaped without much hurt, though not without exceeding danger.

Blendon Hall

On 12 Feb 1683 Edward Brett 1608-1683 (75) died at Blendon Hall.

Church of St Mary the Virgin

On 05 Sep 1677 Henry Oldenburg 1619-1677 (58) died at his home in Pall Mall. He was buried at the Church of St Mary the Virgin on 07 Sep 1677.

Lesnes Abbey, Bexley

On 14 Jul 1179 Richard "The Loyal" Lucy 1089-1179 (90) died at Lesnes Abbey, Bexley.

Biddenham

Before 1508 John Guildford 1507-1565 was born to George Guildford 1470-1533 and Elizabeth Mortimer at Biddenham.

Birling

On 20 Nov 1253 William Saye 1253-1295 was born to William Saye 1209- and Sybil Marshal 1209-1254 (44) at Birling.

On 17 Jun 1340 William Saye 3rd Baron Say 1340-1375 was born to Geoffrey Saye 2nd Baron Say 1309-1359 (31) and Maud Beauchamp Baroness Say 1310-1366 (30) at Birling.

On 12 Dec 1574 Thomas Fane 1510-1589 (64) and Mary Neville 7th Baroness Bergavenny, 3rd Baroness Despencer 1554-1626 (20) were married at Birling.

On Sep 1576 Frances Manners Baroness Bergavenny 1530-1576 (46) died at Birling.

Around 1602 Charles Neville 1602-1637 was born to Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 (22) and Mary Sackville 1584-1613 (18) at Birling.

On 15 Oct 1616 Rachel Lennard Baroness Bergavenny 1553-1616 (63) died in Birling.

On 01 Dec 1622 Edward Neville 8th Baron Bergavenny 1550-1622 (72) died. He was buried at Birling. His son Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 (42) succeeded 9th Baron Bergavenny (1C 1392). Catherine Vaux Baroness Bergavenny 1592-1649 (30) by marriage Baroness Bergavenny (1C 1392).

Before 24 Dec 1641 Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 died. He was buried at Birling. His son John Neville 10th Baron Bergavenny 1614-1662 succeeded 10th Baron Bergavenny (1C 1392).

Before 07 Jun 1649 Christopher Neville 1584-1649 died. On 07 Jun 1649 Christopher Neville 1584-1649 was buried at Birling.

On 19 May 1873 Caroline Leeke Countess Abergavenny -1873 died at Birling.

Bluewater

Stone Castle, Bluewater

Bobbing

In 1364 Lewis Clifford 1364-1404 was born to Roger Clifford 5th Baron Clifford 1333-1389 (30) and Maud Beauchamp Baroness Clifford 1335-1403 (29) at Bobbing.

On 08 Sep 1420 Arnold Savage 1384-1420 (36) died at Bobbing.

In 1425 John Clifford 1425-1461 was born to William Clifford 1390-1438 (35) and Elizabeth Savage Baroness Cobham 1386-1451 (39) at Bobbing.

On 19 Jan 1488 Margaret Culpepper 1430-1488 (58) died at Bobbing.

In 1494 Alexander Clifford 1429-1494 (64) died at Bobbing.

In 1673 Titus Oates 1649-1705 (23) was vicar of the parish of Bobbing.

Bobbing Court, Bobbing

In 1325 Arnold Savage 1325-1375 was born at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1384 Arnold Savage 1384-1420 was born to Arnold Savage 1358-1410 (25) at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

In 1386 Elizabeth Savage Baroness Cobham 1386-1451 was born to Arnold Savage 1358-1410 (27) at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

On 30 Nov 1429 Alexander Clifford 1429-1494 was born to Lewis Clifford 1406-1438 (23) and Anne Moleyns 1408-1441 (21) at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

In 1451 Elizabeth Savage Baroness Cobham 1386-1451 (65) died at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

In or before 1497 Richard Clifford 1505-1562 was born to Lewis Clifford 1460-1497 (37) and Mildred Bourne at Bobbing Court, Bobbing. Date based on father's death in 1497.

Around 1530 Richard Clifford 1505-1562 (33) and Anne Stafford 1517-1559 (13) were married at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1535 George Clifford 1535-1586 was born to Richard Clifford 1505-1562 (38) and Anne Stafford 1517-1559 (18) at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1560 George Clifford 1535-1586 (25) and Ursula Finch 1539-1600 (21) were married at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1561 Henry Clifford 1561-1599 was born to George Clifford 1535-1586 (26) and Ursula Finch 1539-1600 (22) at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1563 Alexander Clifford 1563-1621 was born to George Clifford 1535-1586 (28) and Ursula Finch 1539-1600 (24) at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1566 Conyers Clifford 1566-1599 was born to George Clifford 1535-1586 (31) and Ursula Finch 1539-1600 (27) at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1586 Henry Clifford 1561-1599 (25) and Jane Harlack were married at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1588 Alexander Clifford 1563-1621 (25) and Jane Saunders 1567- were married at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1594 Henry Clifford 1594-1642 was born to Alexander Clifford 1563-1621 (31) and Jane Saunders 1567- at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

Around 1597 Mary Clifford 1597- was born to Alexander Clifford 1563-1621 (34) and Jane Saunders 1567- at Bobbing Court, Bobbing.

In Oct 1659 Humfrey Tufton 1st Baronet Tufton 1584-1659 (75) died at Bobbing Court, Bobbing. His son John Tufton 2nd Baronet Tufton 1623-1685 (36) succeeded 2nd Baronet Tufton of The Mote in Kent.

St Bartholemew Church, Bobbing

South Chancel, St Bartholemew Church, Bobbing

On 29 Nov 1410 Arnold Savage 1358-1410 (52) died. He was buried at South Chancel, St Bartholemew Church, Bobbing.

Boughton

Chilston

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 May. 08 May 1666. To Queensborough, where finding the Richmond frigate, I sailed to the buoy of the Nore to my Lord-General (57) and Prince Rupert (46), where was the Rendezvous of the most glorious fleet in the world, now preparing to meet the Hollander. Went to visit my cousin, Hales, at a sweetly-watered place at Chilston, near Bockton. The next morning, to Leeds Castle, once a famous hold, now hired by me of my Lord Culpeper (40) for a prison. Here I flowed the dry moat, made a new drawbridge, brought spring water into the court of the Castle to an old fountain, and took order for the repairs.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

Boughton Monchelsea

On 04 Mar 1491 William Brandon 1425-1491 (66) died at Boughton Monchelsea.

Bore Place

In 1511 Robert Willoughby 1511-1545 was born to Thomas Willoughby 1486-1545 (25) at Bore Place.

Around 1538 Thomas Willoughby 1538-1596 was born to Robert Willoughby 1511-1545 (27) at Bore Place.

Around 1596 Thomas Willoughby 1538-1596 (58) died at Bore Place.

Brasted

On 23 Oct 1699 John Verney 1699-1741 was born to George Verney 20th Baron Latimer, 12th Baron Willoughby Broke 1659-1728 (40) and Margaret Heath Baroness Latimer, Baroness Willoughby Broke at Brasted.

Brenchley

In 1230 Thomas Culpepper 1230-1309 was born at Brenchley.

Around 1260 Thomas Culpepper 1260-1321 was born to Thomas Culpepper 1230-1309 (30) at Brenchley.

Around 1305 John Culpepper 1305-1376 was born to Thomas Culpepper 1260-1321 (45) at Brenchley.

In 1309 Thomas Culpepper 1230-1309 (79) died at Brenchley.

Broadstairs

St Peter Intra College, Broadstairs

Around 1900 John Granville Cornwallis Eliot 6th Earl St Germans 1890- educated at St Peter Intra College, Broadstairs.

Bromley

In 1569 Catherine Gerard 1569-1617 was born to Gilbert Gerard 1534-1593 (35) and Anne Ratclyffe 1539-1603 (30) at Bromley.

Around 1586 Barbara Calthorpe 1586- was born to Henry Calthorpe 1560-1605 (26) in Bromley.

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 July. 14th July 1664. I went to take leave of the two Mr. Howards, now going to Paris, and brought them as far as Bromley; thence to Eltham, to see Sir John Shaw's (49) new house, now building; the place is pleasant, if not too wet, but the house not well contrived; especially the roof and rooms too low pitched, and the kitchen where the cellars should be; the orangery and aviary handsome, and a very large plantation about it.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 August. 27 Aug 1675. I visited the Bishop of Rochester (50), at Bromley, and dined at Sir Philip Warwick's (65), at Frogpoole.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 August. 19 Aug 1683. I went to Bromley to visit our Bishop (58), and excellent neighbor, and to congratulate his now being made Archbishop of York. On the 28th, he came to take his leave of us, now preparing for his journey and residence in his province.

Bishop's Palace, Bromley

On 20 May 1713 Thomas Sprat Bishop 1635-1713 (78) died of apoplexy at the Bishop's Palace, Bromley. He was buried in the south side of the Chapel of St Nicholas, Chapels, Westminster Abbey.

Frognall House

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 August. 27 Aug 1675. I visited the Bishop of Rochester (50), at Bromley, and dined at Sir Philip Warwick's (65), at Frogpoole.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

North Cray, Bromley

On 22 Aug 1485 Robert Brandon 1410-1485 (75) died at North Cray, Bromley.

Bromley Hill Place

On 15 Jan 1837 Amelia Hume Baroness Farnborough 1772-1837 (64) died at Bromley Hill Place.

Burston

Canterbury

Battle of Oakley

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849-887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 851, which was the third after the birth of king Alfred, Ceorl, earl of Devon, fought with the men of Devon against the pagans at a place called Wiegambeorg; and the Christians gained the victory; and that same year the pagans first wintered in the island called Sheppey, which means the Sheep-isle, and is situated in the River Thames between Essex and Kent, but is nearer to Kent than to Essex; it has in it a fine monastery.
The same year also a great army of the pagans came with three hundred and fifty ships to the mouth of the River Thames, and sacked Dorobernia, which is the city of the Cantuarians, and also the city of London, which lies on the north bank of the River Thames, on the confines of Essex and Middlesex; but yet that city belongs in truth to Essex; and they put to flight Berthwulf, king of Mercia, with all the army, which he had led out to oppose them.
After these things, the aforesaid pagan host went into Surrey, which is a district situated on the south bank of the River Thames, and to the west of Kent. And Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, and his son Ethelbald, with all their army, fought a long time against them at a place called Ac-lea, i.e. the Oak-plain, and there, after a lengthened battle, which was fought with much bravery on both sides, the greater part of the pagan multitude was destroyed and cut to pieces, so that we never heard of their being so defeated, either before or since, in any country, in one day; and the Christians gained an honourable victory, and were triumphant over their graves.
In the same year king Athelstan, son of king Ethelwulf, and earl Ealhere slew a large army of pagans in Kent, at a place called Sandwich, and took nine ships of their fleet; the others escaped by flight.

On 29 Dec 1172 Hugh Lacy 4th Baron Pontefract 1134-1186 (37) visited Canterbury.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 22 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover To the Sheriff of Kent. Order to provide 75 thousands of wood and 200 quarters of charcoal for the expenses of the King's household on his return from parts beyond the sea, so that he have at Dover against the King's return 25 thousands of wood and 30 quarters of coal, and at Canterbury 30 thousands of wood and 100 quarters of coal, and at Rochester (Rofham) 20 thousands of wood and 70 quarters of coal; to be delivered by indenture to John de Sumery, scullion (scutell') of the king's household, or such as supply his place. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 24 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Canterbury. To the Sheriffs of London. Order to deliver John de la Dune, Roger de Hopton, Richard le Harpour, Roger de Soppewalle, Roger le Keu, Rober le Hunt, Thomas de Sydenham, Henry le Gardener, Thomas de la More, Philip Kemp, John le Wayt, and John le Wodeward, the men and servants of Adam de Kyngeshemede, in the King's prison of Newgate for a trespass committed by them upon the King's men at Westminster, from prison upon their finding sufficient mainpernors to have them before the King (23) or his Lieutenant in the quinzaine of the Purification of St Mary to stand to right concerning the said trespass. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Siege of Leeds Castle

In Oct 1321 Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (26) was returning from Canterbury to London. She sought accommodation at Leeds Castle which was under the protection of Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34) the wife of Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46). Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34) refused entry to the Queen killing around six of her retinue when they tried to force entry. King Edward II of England (37) commenced the Siege of Leeds Castle. Once King Edward II of England (37) gained possession of the castle, he had the garrison hanged from the battlements. Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34), her five children, and Bartholomew "The Elder" Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh 1287-1355 (34), her nephew, were imprisoned in the Tower of London.

Trial and Execution of Lord Badlesmere

On 14 Apr 1322 Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was tried by Henry Cobham 1st Baron Cobham 1260-1339 (62) at Canterbury.
Sentenced to death Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was drawn for three miles behind a horse to Blean, Canterbury, where he held property, where he was beheaded. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate, Canterbury at Canterbury and the rest of his body left hanging at Blean, Canterbury. He was buried at Whitefriars, Canterbury. His son Giles Badlesmere 2nd Baron Badlesmere 1314-1338 (7) succeeded 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Elizabeth Montagu Baroness Badlesmere, Baroness Despencer 1324-1359 by marriage Baroness Badlesmere.

On 03 Oct 1404 Joan Burghesh Baroness Mohun Dunster 1319-1404 (85) died at Guest House, Canterbury Cathedral. She was buried at Canterbury.

On 13 Oct 1566 Richard Boyle 1st Earl Cork 1566-1643 was born at Canterbury.

In 1626 James Palmer 1585-1658 (40) was elected MP Canterbury.

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 October. 12 Oct 1641. From Dover, I that night rode post to Canterbury. Here I visited the cathedral, then in great splendour, those famous windows being entire, since demolished by the fanatics. The next morning, by Sittingboume, I came to Rochester, and thence to Gravesend, where a light-horseman (as they call it) taking us in, we spent our tide as far as Greenwich. From hence, after we had a little refreshed ourselves at the College, (for by reason of the contagion then in London we balked the inns,) we came to London landing at Arundel-stairs. Here I took leave of his Lordship (56), and retired to my lodgings in the Middle Temple, being about two in the morning, the 14th of October.

Plum Pudding Riots

The Dec 1647 Plum Pudding Riots was a response to Puritan attempts to cease the celebration of Holy Days. The attempt to cancel Christmas in particular, with its twelve days of festivities, caused riots to break out in Canterbury.

John Evelyn's Diary 1650 June. 27th June 1650. I made my will, and, taking leave of my wife (15) and other friends, took horse for England, paying the messenger eight pistoles for me and my servant to Calais, setting out with seventeen in company well-armed, some Portuguese, Swiss, and French, whereof six were captains and officers. We came the first night to Beaumont; next day, to Beauvais, and lay at Pois, and the next, without dining, reached Abbeville; next, dined at Montreuil, and proceeding met a company on foot (being now within the inroads of the parties which dangerously infest this day's journey from St. Omers and the frontiers), which we drew very near to, ready and resolute to charge through, and accordingly were ordered and led by a captain of our train; but, as we were on the speed, they called out, and proved to be Scotchmen, newly raised and landed, and few among them armed. This night, we were well treated at Boulogne. The next day, we marched in good order, the passage being now exceeding dangerous, and got to Calais by a little after two. The sun so scorched my face, that it made the skin peel off.
I dined with Mr. Booth, his Majesty's agent; and, about three in the afternoon, embarked in the packet-boat; hearing there was a pirate then also setting sail, we had security from molestation, and so with a fair S. W. wind in seven hours we landed at Dover. The busy watchman would have us to the mayor to be searched, but the gentleman being in bed, we were dismissed.
Next day, being Sunday, they would not permit us to ride post, so that afternoon our trunks were visited.
The next morning, by four, we set out for Canterbury, where I met with my Lady Catherine Scott, whom that very day twelve months before I met at sea going for France; she had been visiting Sir Thomas Peyton, not far off, and would needs carry me in her coach to Gravesend. We dined at Sittingbourne, came late to Gravesend, and so to Deptford, taking leave of my lady about four the next morning.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 February. 06 Feb 1652. I embarked early in the packet boat, but put my goods in a stouter vessel. It was calm, so that we got not to Dover till eight at night. I took horse for Canterbury, and lay at Rochester; next day, to Gravesend, took a pair of oars, and landed at Sayes Court, where I stayed three days to refresh, and look after my packet and goods, sent by a stouter vessel. I went to visit my cousin, Richard Fanshawe (43), and divers other friends.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 05 Jan 1665. I arrived at Canterbury, and went to the cathedral, exceedingly well repaired since his Majesty's (34) return.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 09 Jan 1665. To Deal. 10th. To Sandwich, a pretty town, about two miles from the sea. The Mayor and officers of the Customs were very diligent to serve me. I visited the forts in the way, and returned that night to Canterbury.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 March. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 May. 13 May 1672. To Canterbury; visited Dr. Bargrave, my old fellow-traveler in Italy, and great virtuoso.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 May. 19 May 1672. Went to Margate; and, the following day, was carried to see a gallant widow, brought up a farmeress, and I think of gigantic race, rich, comely, and exceedingly industrious. She put me in mind of Deborah and Abigail, her house was so plentifully stored with all manner of country provisions, all of her own growth, and all her conveniences so substantial, neat, and well understood; she herself so jolly and hospitable; and her land so trim and rarely husbanded, that it struck me with admiration at her economy.
This town much consists of brewers of a certain heady ale, and they deal much in malt, etc. For the rest, it is raggedly built, and has an ill haven, with a small fort of little concernment, nor is the island well disciplined; but as to the husbandry and rural part, far exceeding any part of England for the accurate culture of their ground, in which they exceed, even to curiosity and emulation.
We passed by Rickborough, and in sight of Reculvers, and so through a sweet garden, as it were, to Canterbury.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 November. 12 Nov 1675. We came to Canterbury: and, next morning, to Dover.
There was in my Lady Ambassadress's company my Lady Hamilton (70), a sprightly young lady, much in the good graces of the family, wife of that valiant and worthy gentleman, George Hamilton (68), not long after slain in the wars. She had been a maid of honor to the Duchess, and now turned Papist.

On 14 Jan 1807 Henry Weekes Sculptor 1807-1877 was born in Canterbury.

On 11 Oct 1861 Elizabeth Denison Marchioness Conyngham 1769-1861 (92) died at Canterbury.

Blean, Canterbury

Trial and Execution of Lord Badlesmere

On 14 Apr 1322 Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was tried by Henry Cobham 1st Baron Cobham 1260-1339 (62) at Canterbury.
Sentenced to death Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was drawn for three miles behind a horse to Blean, Canterbury, where he held property, where he was beheaded. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate, Canterbury at Canterbury and the rest of his body left hanging at Blean, Canterbury. He was buried at Whitefriars, Canterbury. His son Giles Badlesmere 2nd Baron Badlesmere 1314-1338 (7) succeeded 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Elizabeth Montagu Baroness Badlesmere, Baroness Despencer 1324-1359 by marriage Baroness Badlesmere.

Burgh Gate, Canterbury

Trial and Execution of Lord Badlesmere

On 14 Apr 1322 Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was tried by Henry Cobham 1st Baron Cobham 1260-1339 (62) at Canterbury.
Sentenced to death Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was drawn for three miles behind a horse to Blean, Canterbury, where he held property, where he was beheaded. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate, Canterbury at Canterbury and the rest of his body left hanging at Blean, Canterbury. He was buried at Whitefriars, Canterbury. His son Giles Badlesmere 2nd Baron Badlesmere 1314-1338 (7) succeeded 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Elizabeth Montagu Baroness Badlesmere, Baroness Despencer 1324-1359 by marriage Baroness Badlesmere.

Canterbury Castle

In 1247 Nicholas Moels 1195-1268 (52) was appointed Constable Canterbury Castle.

Canterbury Cathedral

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 6 How, both by his prayers and blessing, he recalled from death one of his clerks, who had bruised himself by a fall..
In the third year of the reign of Aldfrid, Caedwalla, king of the West Saxons, having most vigorously governed his nation for two years, quitted his crown for the sake of the Lord and an everlasting kingdom, and went to Rome, being desirous to obtain the peculiar honour of being cleansed in the baptismal font at the threshold of the blessed Apostles, for he had learned that in Baptism alone the entrance into the heavenly life is opened to mankind; and he hoped at the same time, that being made clean by Baptism, he should soon be freed from the bonds of the flesh and pass to the eternal joys of Heaven; both which things, by the help of the Lord, came to pass according as he had conceived in his mind. For coming to Rome, at the time that Sergius was pope, he was baptized on the Holy Saturday before Easter Day, in the year of our Lord 689, and being still in his white garments, he fell sick, and was set free from the bonds of the flesh on the 20th of April, and obtained an entrance into the kingdom of the blessed in Heaven. At his baptism, the aforesaid pope had given him the name of Peter, to the end, that he might be also united in name to the most blessed chief of the Apostles, to whose most holy body his pious love had led him from the utmost bounds of the earth. He was likewise buried in his church, and by the pope's command an epitaph was written on his tomb, wherein the memory of his devotion might be preserved for ever, and the readers or hearers thereof might be stirred up to give themselves to religion by the example of what he had done.
The epitaph was this:
"High estate, wealth, offspring, a mighty kingdom, triumphs, spoils, chieftains, strongholds, the camp, a home; whatsoever the valour of his sires, whatsoever himself had won, Caedwal, mighty in war, left for the love of God, that, a pilgrim king, he might behold Peter and Peter's seat, receive at his font pure waters of life, and in bright draughts drink of the shining radiance whence a quickening glory streams through all the world. And even as he gained with eager soul the prize of the new life, he laid aside barbaric rage, and, changed in heart, he changed his name with joy. Sergius the Pope bade him be called Peter, himself his father, when he rose born anew from the font, and the grace of Christ, cleansing him, bore him forthwith clothed in white raiment to the heights of Heaven. O wondrous faith of the king, but greatest of all the mercy of Christ, into whose counsels none may enter! For he came in safety from the ends of the earth, even from Britain, through many a nation, over many a sea, by many a path, and saw the city of Romulus and looked upon Peter's sanctuary revered, bearing mystic gifts. He shall walk in white among the sheep of Christ in fellowship with them; for his body is in the tomb, but his soul on high. Thou mightest deem he did but change an earthly for a heavenly sceptre, whom thou seest attain to the kingdom of Christ."
"Here was buried Caedwalla, called also Peter, king of the Saxons, on the twentieth day of April, in the second indiction, aged about thirty years, in the reign of our most pious lord, the Emperor Justinian, in the fourth year of his consulship, in the second year of the pontificate of our Apostolic lord, Pope Sergius."
When Caedwalla went to Rome, Ini (51) succeeded to the kingdom, being of the blood royal; and having reigned thirty-seven years over that nation, he in like manner left his kingdom and committed it to younger men, and went away to the threshold of the blessed Apostles, at the time when Gregory was pope, being desirous to spend some part of his pilgrimage upon earth in the neighbourhood of the holy places, that he might obtain to be more readily received into the fellowship of the saints in heaven. This same thing, about that time, was wont to be done most zealously by many of the English nation, nobles and commons, laity and clergy, men and women.
The year after that in which Caedwalla died at Rome, that is, 690 after the Incarnation of our Lord, Archbishop Theodore, of blessed memory, departed this life, being old and full of days, for he was eighty-eight years of age; which number of years he had been wont long before to foretell to his friends that he should live, the same having been revealed to him in a dream. He held the bishopric twenty-two years, and was buried in St. Peter's church, where all the bodies of the bishops of Canterbury are buried. Of whom, as well as of his fellows of the same degree, it may rightly and truly be said, that their bodies are buried in peace, and their names shall live to all generations. For to say all in few words, the English Churches gained more spiritual increase while he was archbishop, than ever before. His character, life, age, and death, are plainly and manifestly described to all that resort thither, by the epitaph on his tomb, in thirty-four heroic verses. The first whereof are these:
"Here in the tomb rests the body of the holy prelate, called now in the Greek tongue Theodore. Chief pontiff, blest high priest, pure doctrine he set forth to his disciples."
The last are as follow:
"For September had reached its nineteenth day, when his spirit went forth from the prison-bars of the flesh. Mounting in bliss to the gracious fellowship of the new life, he was united to the angelic citizens in the heights of Heaven."
Bertwald succeeded Theodore in the archbishopric, being abbot of the monastery called Racuulfe, which stands at the northern mouth of the river Genlade. He was a man learned in the Scriptures, and perfectly instructed in ecclesiastical and monastic teaching, yet in no wise to be compared to his predecessor. He was chosen bishop in the year of our Lord 692, on the first day of July, when Wictred (23) and Suaebhard were kings in Kent; but he was ordained the next year, on Sunday the 29th of June, by Godwin, metropolitan bishop of Gaul, and was enthroned on Sunday the 31st of August. Among the many bishops whom he ordained was Tobias, a man instructed in the Latin, Greek, and Saxon tongues, and otherwise of manifold learning, whom he consecrated in the stead of Gedmund, bishop of the Church of Rochester, who had died.
688. At that time the venerable servant of Christ, and priest, Egbert, who is to be named with all honour, and who, as was said before, lived as a stranger and pilgrim in Ireland to obtain hereafter a country in heaven, purposed in his mind to profit many, taking upon him the work of an apostle, and, by preaching the Gospel, to bring the Word of God to some of those nations that had not yet heard it; many of which tribes he knew to be in Germany, from whom the Angles or Saxons, who now inhabit Britain, are known to have derived their race and origin; for which reason they are still corruptly called "Garmans" by the neighbouring nation of the Britons. Such are the Frisians, the Rugini, the Danes, the Huns, the Old Saxons, and the Boructuari. There are also in the same parts many other peoples still enslaved to pagan rites, to whom the aforesaid soldier of Christ detErmined to go, sailing round Britain, if haply he could deliver any of them from Satan, and bring them to Christ; or if this might not be, he was minded to go to Rome, to see and adore the thresholds of the holy Apostles and martyrs of Christ.
But a revelation from Heaven and the working of God prevented him from achieving either of these enterprises; for when he had made choice of most courageous companions, fit to preach the Word, inasmuch as they were renowned for their good deeds and their learning, and when all things necessary were provided for the voyage, there came to him on a certain day early in the morning one of the brethren, who had been a disciple of the priest, Boisil, beloved of God, and had ministered to him in Britain, when the said Boisil was provost of the monastery of Mailros, under the Abbot Eata, as has been said above. This brother told him a vision which he had seen that night. "When after matins," said he, "I had laid me down in my bed, and was fallen into a light slumber, Boisil, that was sometime my master and brought me up in all love, appeared to me, and asked, whether I knew him? I said, ‘Yes, you are Boisil.’ He answered, ‘I am come to bring Egbert a message from our Lord and Saviour, which must nevertheless be delivered to him by you. Tell him, therefore, that he cannot perform the journey he has undertaken; for it is the will of God that he should rather go to teach the monasteries of Columba.’ "Now Columba was the first teacher of the Christian faith to the Picts beyond the mountains northward, and the first founder of the monastery in the island of Hii, which was for a long time much honoured by many tribes of the Scots and Picts. The said Columba is now by some called Columcille, the name being compounded from "Columba" and "Cella." Egbert, having heard the words of the vision, charged the brother that had told it him, not to tell it to any other, lest haply it should be a lying vision. But when he considered the matter secretly with himself, he apprehended that it was true, yet would not desist from preparing for his voyage which he purposed to make to teach those nations.
A few days after the aforesaid brother came again to him, saying that Boisil had that night again appeared to him in a vision after matins, and said, "Why did you tell Egbert so negligently and after so lukewarm a manner that which I enjoined upon you to say? Yet, go now and tell him, that whether he will or no, he must go to Columba's monasteries, because their ploughs are not driven straight; and he must bring them back into the right way." Hearing this, Egbert again charged the brother not to reveal the same to any man. Though now assured of the vision, he nevertheless attempted to set forth upon his intended voyage with the brethren. When they had put aboard all that was requisite for so long a voyage, and had waited some days for fair winds, there arose one night so violent a storm, that part of what was on board was lost, and the ship itself was left lying on its side in the sea. Nevertheless, all that belonged to Egbert and his companions was saved. Then he, saying, in the words of the prophet, "For my sake this great tempest is upon you," withdrew himself from that undertaking and was content to remain at home.
But one of his companions, called Wictbert, notable for his contempt of the world and for his learning and knowledge, for he had lived many years as a stranger and pilgrim in Ireland, leading a hermit's life in great perfection, took ship, and arriving in Frisland, preached the Word of salvation for the space of two whole years to that nation and to its king, Rathbed; but reaped no fruit of all his great labour among his barbarous hearers. Returning then to the chosen place of his pilgrimage, he gave himself up to the Lord in his wonted life of silence, and since he could not be profitable to strangers by teaching them the faith, he took care to be the more profitable to his own people by the example of his virtue.
690. When the man of God, Egbert, perceived that neither he himself was permitted to go and preach to the nations, being withheld for the sake of some other advantage to the holy Church, whereof he had been forewarned by a revelation; nor that Wictbert, when he went into those parts, had availed to do anything; he nevertheless still attempted to send holy and industrious men to the work of the Word, among whom the most notable was Wilbrord (63), a man eminent for his merit and rank as priest. They arrived there, twelve in number, and turning aside to Pippin, duke of the Franks, were gladly received by him; and as he had lately subdued the nearer part of Frisland, and expelled King Rathbed, he sent them thither to preach, supporting them at the same time with his sovereign authority, that none might molest them in their preaching, and bestowing many favours on those who consented to receive the faith. Thus it came to pass, that with the help of the Divine grace, in a short time they converted many from idolatry to the faith of Christ.
Following their example, two other priests of the English nation, who had long lived as strangers in Ireland, for the sake of the eternal country, went into the province of the Old Saxons, if haply they could there win any to Christ by their preaching. They were alike in name as in devotion, Hewald being the name of both, with this distinction, that, on account of the different colour of their hair, the one was called Black Hewald and the other White Hewald. They were both full of religious piety, but Black Hewald was the more learned of the two in Scripture. When they came into the province, these men took up their lodging in the guesthouse of a certain township-reeve, and asked of him that he would conduct them to the ealdorman who was over him, for that they had a message concerning matters of importance to communicate to him. For those Old Saxons have no king, but many ealdormen set over their nation; and when any war is on the point of breaking out, they cast lots indifferently, and on whomsoever the lot falls, him they all follow and obey during the time of war; but as soon as the war is ended, all those ealdormen are again equal in power. So the reeve received and entertained them in his house some days, promising to send them to the ealdorman who was over him, as they desired.
But when the barbarians perceived that they were of another religion,—for they continually gave themselves to singing of psalms and prayer, and daily offered up to God the Sacrifice of the saving Victim, having with them sacred vessels and a consecrated table for an altar,—they began to grow suspicious of them, lest if they should come into the presence of their ealdorman, and converse with him, they should turn his heart from their gods, and convert him to the new religion of the Christian faith; and thus by degrees all their province should be forced to change its old worship for a new. Wherefore on a sudden they laid hold of them and put them to death; and White Hewald they slew outright with the sword; but they put Black Hewald to lingering torture and tore him limb from limb in horrible fashion, and they threw their bodies into the Rhine. The ealdorman, whom they had desired to see, hearing of it, was very angry that strangers who desired to come to him had not been suffered to come; and therefore he sent and put to death all those villagers and burned their village. The aforesaid priests and servants of Christ suffered on the 3rd of October.
Miracles from Heaven were not lacking at their martyrdom. For their dead bodies, having been cast into the river by the pagans, as has been said, were carried against the stream for the space of almost forty miles, to the place where their companions were. Moreover, a long ray of light, reaching up to heaven, shone every night above them wheresoever they chanced to be, and that too in the sight of the very pagans that had slain them. Moreover, one of them appeared in a vision by night to one of his companions, whose name was Tilmon, a man of renown and of noble birth in this world, who having been a thegn had become a monk, telling him that he might find their bodies in that place, where he should see rays of light reaching from heaven to the earth. And so it befell; and their bodies being found, were buried with the honour due to martyrs; and the day of their passion or of the finding of their bodies, is celebrated in those parts with fitting veneration. Finally, Pippin, the most glorious duke of the Franks, learning these things, caused the bodies to be brought to him, and buried them with much honour in the church of the city of Cologne, on the Rhine. And it is said that a spring burst forth in the place where they were killed, which to this day affords a plentiful stream in that same place.
692. At their first coming into Frisland, as soon as Wilbrord (63) found that he had leave given him by the prince to preach there, he made haste to go to Rome, where Pope Sergius then presided over the Apostolic see, that he might undertake the desired work of preaching the Gospel to the nations, with his licence and blessing; and hoping to receive of him some relics of the blessed Apostles and martyrs of Christ; to the end, that when he destroyed the idols, and erected churches in the nation to which he preached, he might have the relics of saints at hand to put into them, and having deposited them there, might accordingly dedicate each of those places to the honour of the saint whose relics they were. He desired also there to learn or to receive many other things needful for so great a work. Having obtained his desire in all these matters, he returned to preach.
At which time, the brothers who were in Frisland, attending on the ministry of the Word, chose out of their own number a man of sober life, and meek of heart, called Suidbert, to be ordained bishop for them. He, being sent into Britain, was consecrated, at their request, by the most reverend Bishop Wilfrid, who, having been driven out of his country, chanced then to be living in banishment among the Mercians; for Kent had no bishop at that time, Theodore being dead, and Bertwald, his successor, who had gone beyond the sea to be ordained, having not yet returned to his episcopal see.
The said Suidbert, being made bishop, returned from Britain, and not long after departed to the Boructuari; and by his preaching brought many of them into the way of truth; but the Boructuari being not long after subdued by the Old Saxons, those who had received the Word were dispersed abroad; and the bishop himself with certain others went to Pippin, who, at the request of his wife, Blithryda, gave him a place of abode in a certain island on the Rhine, called in their tongue, Inlitore; there he built a monastery, which his successors still possess, and for a time dwelt in it, leading a most continent life, and there ended his days.
When they who had gone thither had spent some years teaching in Frisland, Pippin, with the consent of them all, sent the venerable Wilbrord (63) to Rome, where Sergius was still pope, desiring that he (63) might be consecrated archbishop over the nation of the Frisians; which was accordingly done, as he had made request, in the year of our Lord 696. He (63) was consecrated in the church of the Holy Martyr Cecilia, on her festival; and the said pope gave him the name of Clement, and forthwith sent him back to his bishopric, to wit, fourteen days after his arrival in the city.
Pippin gave him a place for his episcopal see, in his famous fort, which in the ancient language of those people is called Wiltaburg, that is, the town of the Wilts; but, in the Gallic tongue, Trajectum. The most reverend prelate having built a church there, and preaching the Word of faith far and near, drew many from their errors, and built many churches and not a few monasteries. For not long after he himself constituted other bishops in those parts from the number of the brethren that either came with him or after him to preach there; of whom some are now fallen asleep in the Lord; but Wilbrord (63) himself, surnamed Clement, is still living, venerable for his great age, having been thirty-six years a bishop, and now, after manifold conflicts of the heavenly warfare, he longs with all his heart for the recompense of the reward in Heaven.
696. At this time a memorable miracle, and like to those of former days, was wrought in Britain; for, to the end that the living might be roused from the death of the soul, a certain man, who had been some time dead, rose again to the life of the body, and related many memorable things that he had seen; some of which I have thought fit here briefly to describe. There was a certain householder in that district of the Northumbrians which is called Incuneningum, who led a godly life, with all his house. This man fell sick, and his sickness daily increasing, he was brought to extremity, and died in the beginning of the night; but at dawn he came to life again, and suddenly sat up, whereat all those that sat about the body weeping fled away in great terror, only his wife, who loved him better, though trembling and greatly afraid, remained with him. And he comforting her, said, "Fear not, for I am now in very deed risen from death whereof I was holden, and permitted again to live among men; nevertheless, hereafter I must not live as I was wont, but after a very different manner." Then rising immediately, he went to the oratory of the little town, and continuing in prayer till day, forthwith divided all his substance into three parts; one whereof he gave to his wife, another to his children, and the third, which he kept himself, he straightway distributed among the poor. Not long after, being set free from the cares of this world, he came to the monastery of Mailros, which is almost enclosed by the winding of the river Tweed, and having received the tonsure, went apart into a place of abode which the abbot had provided, and there he continued till the day of his death, in so great contrition of mind and mortifying of the body, that even if his tongue had been silent, his life would have declared that he had seen many things either to be dreaded or coveted, which were hidden from other men.
Thus he related what he had seen. He that led me had a countenance full of light, and shining raiment, and we went in silence, as it seemed to me, towards the rising of the summer sun. And as we walked we came to a broad and deep valley of infinite length; it lay on our left, and one side of it was exceeding terrible with raging flames, the other no less intolerable for violent hail and cold snows drifting and sweeping through all the place. Both sides were full of the souls of men which seemed to be tossed from one side to the other as it were by a violent storm; for when they could no longer endure the fervent heat, the hapless souls leaped into the midst of the deadly cold; and finding no rest there, they leaped back again to be burnt in the midst of the unquenchable flames. Now whereas an innumerable multitude of misshapen spirits were thus tormented far and near with this interchange of misery, as far as I could see, without any interval of rest, I began to think that peradventure this might be Hell, of whose intolerable torments I had often heard men talk. My guide, who went before me, answered to my thought, saying, ‘Think not so, for this is not the Hell you believe it to be.’
When he had led me farther by degrees, sore dismayed by that dread sight, on a sudden I saw the place before us begin to grow dark and filled with shadows. When we entered into them, the shadows by degrees grew so thick, that I could see nothing else, save only the darkness and the shape and garment of him that led me. As we went on ‘through the shades in the lone night,’ lo! on a sudden there appeared before us masses of foul flame constantly rising as it were out of a great pit, and falling back again into the same. When I had been led thither, my guide suddenly vanished, and left me alone in the midst of darkness and these fearful sights. As those same masses of fire, without intermission, at one time flew up and at another fell back into the bottom of the abyss, I perceived that the summits of all the flames, as they ascended were full of the spirits of men, which, like sparks flying upwards with the smoke, were sometimes thrown on high, and again, when the vapours of the fire fell, dropped down into the depths below. Moreover, a stench, foul beyond compare, burst forth with the vapours, and filled all those dark places.
Having stood there a long time in much dread, not knowing what to do, which way to turn, or what end awaited me, on a sudden I heard behind me the sound of a mighty and miserable lamentation, and at the same time noisy laughter, as of a rude multitude insulting captured enemies. When that noise, growing plainer, came up to me, I beheld a crowd of evil spirits dragging five souls of men, wailing and shrieking, into the midst of the darkness, whilst they themselves exulted and laughed. Among those human souls, as I could discern, there was one shorn like a clerk, one a layman, and one a woman. The evil spirits that dragged them went down into the midst of the burning pit; and it came to pass that as they went down deeper, I could no longer distinguish between the lamentation of the men and the laughing of the devils, yet I still had a confused sound in my ears. In the meantime, some of the dark spirits ascended from that flaming abyss, and running forward, beset me on all sides, and with their flaming eyes and the noisome fire which they breathed forth from their mouths and nostrils, tried to choke me; and threatened to lay hold on me with fiery tongs, which they had in their hands, yet they durst in no wise touch me, though they assayed to terrify me. Being thus on all sides encompassed with enemies and shades of darkness, and casting my eyes hither and thither if haply anywhere help might be found whereby I might be saved, there appeared behind me, on the way by which I had come, as it were, the brightness of a star shining amidst the darkness; which waxing greater by degrees, came rapidly towards me: and when it drew near, all those evil spirits, that sought to carry me away with their tongs, dispersed and fled.
Now he, whose approach put them to flight, was the same that led me before; who, then turning towards the right, began to lead me, as it were, towards the rising of the winter sun, and having soon brought me out of the darkness, led me forth into an atmosphere of clear light. While he thus led me in open light, I saw a vast wall before us, the length on either side, and the height whereof, seemed to be altogether boundless. I began to wonder why we went up to the wall, seeing no door in it, nor window, nor any way of ascent. But when we came to the wall, we were presently, I know not by what means, on the top of it, and lo! there was a wide and pleasant plain full of such fragrance of blooming flowers that the marvellous sweetness of the scents immediately dispelled the foul stench of the dark furnace which had filled my nostrils. So great was the light shed over all this place that it seemed to exceed the brightness of the day, or the rays of the noontide sun. In this field were innumerable companies of men clothed in white, and many seats of rejoicing multitudes. As he led me through the midst of bands of happy inhabitants, I began to think that this perchance might be the kingdom of Heaven, of which I had often heard tell. He answered to my thought, saying, ‘Nay, this is not the kingdom of Heaven, as you think.’
When we had also passed those mansions of blessed spirits, and gone farther on, I saw before me a much more beautiful light than before, and therein heard sweet sounds of singing, and so wonderful a fragrance was shed abroad from the place, that the other which I had perceived before and thought so great, then seemed to me but a small thing; even as that wondrous brightness of the flowery field, compared with this which I now beheld, appeared mean and feeble. When I began to hope that we should enter that delightful place, my guide, on a sudden stood still; and straightway turning, led me back by the way we came.
"In our return, when we came to those joyous mansions of the white-robed spirits, he said to me, ‘Do you know what all these things are which you have seen?’ I answered, ‘No,’ and then he said, ‘That valley which you beheld terrible with flaming fire and freezing cold, is the place in which the souls of those are tried and punished, who, delaying to conFess and amend their crimes, at length have recourse to repentance at the point of death, and so go forth from the body; but nevertheless because they, even at their death, conFessed and repented, they shall all be received into the kingdom of Heaven at the day of judgement; but many are succoured before the day of judgement, by the prayers of the living and their alms and fasting, and more especially by the celebration of Masses. Moreover that foul flaming pit which you saw, is the mouth of Hell, into which whosoever falls shall never be delivered to all eternity. This flowery place, in which you see this fair and youthful company, all bright and joyous, is that into which the souls of those are received who, indeed, when they leave the body have done good works, but who are not so perfect as to deserve to be immediately admitted into the kingdom of Heaven; yet they shall all, at the day of judgement, behold Christ, and enter into the joys of His kingdom; for such as are perfect in every word and deed and thought, as soon as they quit the body, forthwith enter into the kingdom of Heaven; in the neighbourhood whereof that place is, where you heard the sound of sweet singing amidst the savour of a sweet fragrance and brightness of light. As for you, who must now return to the body, and again live among men, if you will seek diligently to examine your actions, and preserve your manner of living and your words in righteousness and simplicity, you shall, after death, have a place of abode among these joyful troops of blessed souls which you behold. For when I left you for awhile, it was for this purpose, that I might learn what should become of you.’ When he had said this to me, I much abhorred returning to the body, being delighted with the sweetness and beauty of the place which I beheld, and with the company of those I saw in it. Nevertheless, I durst not ask my guide anything; but thereupon, on a sudden, I found myself, I know not how, alive among men."
Now these and other things which this man of God had seen, he would not relate to slothful men, and such as lived negligently; but only to those who, being terrified with the dread of torments, or ravished with the hope of everlasting joys, would draw from his words the means to advance in piety. In the neighbourhood of his cell lived one Haemgils, a monk, and eminent in the priesthood, whose good works were worthy of his office: he is still living, and leading a solitary life in Ireland, supporting his declining age with coarse bread and cold water. He often went to that man, and by repeated questioning, heard of him what manner of things he had seen when out of the body; by whose account those few particulars which we have briefly set down came also to our knowledge. And he related his visions to King Aldfrid, a man most learned in all respects, and was by him so willingly and attentively heard, that at his request he was admitted into the monastery above-mentioned, and received the crown of the monastic tonsure; and the said king, whensoever he came into those parts, very often went to hear him. At that time the abbot and priest Ethelwald,846 a man of godly and sober life, presided over that monastery. He now occupies the episcopal see of the church of Lindisfarne, leading a life worthy of his degree.
He had a place of abode assigned him apart in that monastery, where he might give himself more freely to the service of his Creator in continual prayer. And inasmuch as that place was on the banks of the river, he was wont often to go into the same for the great desire he had to do penance in his body, and oftentimes to plunge in it, and to continue saying psalms or prayers in the same as long as he could endure it, standing still, while the waves flowed over him, sometimes up to the middle, and sometimes even to the neck in water; and when he went ashore, he never took off his cold, wet garments till they grew warm and dry on his body. And when in the winter the cracking pieces of ice were floating about him, which he had himself sometimes broken, to make room to stand or plunge in the river, and those who beheld it would say, "We marvel, brother Drythelm (for so he was called), that you are able to endure such severe cold;" he answered simply, for he was a simple and sober-spirited man, "I have seen greater cold." And when they said, "We marvel that you choose to observe so hard a rule of continence," he replied, "I have seen harder things." And so, until the day of his calling hence, in his unwearied desire of heavenly bliss, he subdued his aged body with daily fasting, and forwarded the salvation of many by his words and life.
704 to 709. But contrarywise there was a man in the province of the Mercians, whose visions and words, but not his manner of life, were of profit to others, though not to himself. In the reign of Coenred, who succeeded Ethelred, there was a layman who was a king's thegn, no less acceptable to the king for his outward industry, than displeasing to him for his neglect of his own soul. The king diligently admonished him to conFess and amend, and to forsake his evil ways, lest he should lose all time for repentance and amendment by a sudden death. But though frequently warned, he despised the words of salvation, and promised that he would do penance at some future time. In the meantime, falling sick he betook himself to his bed, and was tormented with grievous pains. The king coming to him (for he loved the man much) exhorted him, even then, before death, to repent of his offences. But he answered that he would not then conFess his sins, but would do it when he was recovered of his sickness, lest his companions should upbraid him with having done that for fear of death, which he had refused to do in health. He thought he spoke very bravely, but it afterwards appeared that he had been miserably deceived by the wiles of the Devil.
The disease increasing, when the king came again to visit and instruct him, he cried out straightway with a lamentable voice, "What will you now? What are you come for? for you can no longer do aught for my profit or salvation." The king answered, "Say not so; take heed and be of sound mind." "I am not mad," replied he, "but I now know the worst and have it for certain before my eyes." "What is that?" said the king. "Not long since," said he, "there came into this room two fair youths, and sat down by me, the one at my head, and the other at my feet. One of them drew forth a book most beautiful, but very small, and gave it me to read; looking into it, I there found all the good actions I had ever done in my life written down, and they were very few and inconsiderable. They took back the book and said nothing to me. Then, on a sudden, appeared an army of evil spirits of hideous countenance, and they beset this house without, and sitting down filled the greater part of it within. Then he, who by the blackness of his gloomy face, and his sitting above the rest, seemed to be the chief of them, taking out a book terrible to behold, of a monstrous size, and of almost insupportable weight, commanded one of his followers to bring it to me to read. Having read it, I found therein most plainly written in hideous characters, all the crimes I ever committed, not only in word and deed, but even in the least thought; and he said to those glorious men in white raiment who sat by me, ‘Why sit ye here, since ye know of a surety that this man is ours?’ They answered, ‘Ye speak truly; take him and lead him away to fill up the measure of your damnation.’ This said, they forthwith vanished, and two wicked spirits arose, having in their hands ploughshares, and one of them struck me on the head, and the other on the foot. And these ploughshares are now with great torment creeping into the inward parts of my body, and as soon as they meet I shall die, and the devils being ready to snatch me away, I shall be dragged into the dungeons of hell."
Thus spoke that wretch in his despair, and soon after died, and now in vain suffers in eternal torments that penance which he failed to suffer for a short time with the fruits of forgiveness. Of whom it is manifest, that (as the blessed Pope Gregory writes of certain persons) he did not see these things for his own sake, since they did not avail him, but for the sake of others, who, knowing of his end, should be afraid to put off the time of repentance, whilst they have leisure, lest, being prevented by sudden death, they should perish impenitent. And whereas he saw diverse books laid before him by the good and evil spirits, this was done by Divine dispensation, that we may keep in mind that our deeds and thoughts are not scattered to the winds, but are all kept to be examined by the Supreme Judge, and will in the end be shown us either by friendly angels or by the enemy. And whereas the angels first drew forth a white book, and then the devils a black one; the former a very small one, the latter one very great; it is to be observed, that in his first years he did some good actions, all which he nevertheless obscured by the evil actions of his youth. If, contrarywise, he had taken care in his youth to correct the errors of his boyhood, and by well-doing to put them away from the sight of God, he might have been admitted to the fellowship of those of whom the Psalm says, "Blessed are those whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered." This story, as I learned it of the venerable Bishop Pechthelm, I have thought good to set forth plainly, for the salvation of such as shall read or hear it.
704 to 709. I myself knew a brother, would to God I had not known him, whose name I could mention if it were of any avail, dwelling in a famous monastery, but himself living infamously. He was oftentimes rebuked by the brethren and elders of the place, and admonished to be converted to a more chastened life; and though he would not give ear to them, they bore with him long and patiently, on account of their need of his outward service, for he was a cunning artificer. But he was much given to drunkenness, and other pleasures of a careless life, and more used to stop in his workshop day and night, than to go to church to sing and pray and hear the Word of life with the brethren. For which reason it befell him according to the saying, that he who will not willingly humble himself and enter the gate of the church must needs be led against his will into the gate of Hell, being damned. For he falling sick, and being brought to extremity, called the brethren, and with much lamentation, like one damned, began to tell them, that he saw Hell opened, and Satan sunk in the depths thereof; and Caiaphas, with the others that slew our Lord, hard by him, delivered up to avenging flames. "In whose neighbourhood," said he, "I see a place of eternal perdition prepared for me, miserable wretch that I am." The brothers, hearing these words, began diligently to exhort him, that he should repent even then, whilst he was still in the flesh. He answered in despair, "There is no time for me now to change my course of life, when I have myself seen my judgement passed."
Whilst uttering these words, he died without having received the saving Viaticum, and his body was buried in the farthest parts of the monastery, nor did any one dare either to say Masses or sing psalms, or even to pray for him. Oh how far asunder hath God put light from darkness! The blessed Stephen, the first martyr, being about to suffer death for the truth, saw the heavens opened, and the glory of God, and Jesus standing on the right hand of God; and where he was to be after death, there he fixed the eyes of his mind, that he might die the more joyfully. But this workman, of darkened mind and life, when death was at hand, saw Hell opened, and witnessed the damnation of the Devil and his followers; he saw also, unhappy wretch! his own prison among them, to the end that, despairing of salvation, he might himself die the more miserably, but might by his perdition afford cause of salvation to the living who should hear of it. This befell of late in the province of the Bernicians, and being noised abroad far and near, inclined many to do penance for their sins without delay. Would to God that this also might come to pass through the reading of our words!
703. At this time a great part of the Scots in Ireland, and some also of the Britons in Britain, by the grace of God, adopted the reasonable and ecclesiastical time of keeping Easter. For when Adamnan, priest and abbot of the monks that were in the island of Hii, was sent by his nation on a mission to Aldfrid, king of the English, he abode some time in that province, and saw the canonical rites of the Church. Moreover, he was earnestly admonished by many of the more learned sort, not to presume to live contrary to the universal custom of the Church, either in regard to the observance of Easter, or any other ordinances whatsoever, with those few followers of his dwelling in the farthest corner of the world. Wherefore he so changed his mind, that he readily preferred those things which he had seen and heard in the English churches, to the customs which he and his people had hitherto followed. For he was a good and wise man, and excellently instructed in knowledge of the Scriptures. Returning home, he endeavoured to bring his own people that were in Hii, or that were subject to that monastery, into the way of truth, which he had embraced with all his heart; but he could not prevail. He sailed over into Ireland, and preaching to those people, and with sober words of exhortation making known to them the lawful time of Easter, he brought back many of them, and almost all that were free from the dominion of those of Hii, from the error of their fathers to the Catholic unity, and taught them to keep the lawful time of Easter.
Returning to his island, after having celebrated the canonical Easter in Ireland, he was instant in preaching the Catholic observance of the season of Easter in his monastery, yet without being able to achieve his end; and it so happened that he departed this life before the next year came round, the Divine goodness so ordaining it, that as he was a great lover of peace and unity, he should be taken away to everlasting life before he should be obliged, on the return of the season of Easter, to be at greater variance with those that would not follow him into the truth.
This same man wrote a book concerning the holy places, of great profit to many readers; his authority was the teaching and dictation of Arculf, a bishop of Gaul, who had gone to Jerusalem for the sake of the holy places; and having wandered over all the Promised Land, travelled also to Damascus, Constantinople, Alexandria, and many islands in the sea, and returning home by ship, was cast upon the western coast of Britain by a great tempest. After many adventures he came to the aforesaid servant of Christ, Adamnan, and being found to be learned in the Scriptures, and acquainted with the holy places, was most gladly received by him and gladly heard, insomuch that whatsoever he said that he had seen worthy of remembrance in the holy places, Adamnan straightway set himself to commit to writing. Thus he composed a work, as I have said, profitable to many, and chiefly to those who, being far Removed from those places where the patriarchs and Apostles lived, know no more of them than what they have learnt by reading. Adamnan presented this book to King Aldfrid, and through his bounty it came to be read by lesser persons. The writer thereof was also rewarded by him with many gifts and sent back into his country. I believe it will be of advantage to our readers if we collect some passages from his writings, and insert them in this our History.
705. In the year of our Lord 705, Aldfrid, king of the Northumbrians, died before the end of the twentieth year of his reign. His son Osred, a boy about eight years of age, succeeding him in the throne, reigned eleven years. In the beginning of his reign, Haedde, bishop of the West Saxons, departed to the heavenly life; for he was a good man and a just, and his life and doctrine as a bishop were guided rather by his innate love of virtue, than by what he had gained from books. The most reverend bishop, Pechthelm, of whom we shall speak hereafter in the proper place, and who while still deacon or monk was for a long time with his successor Aldhelm, was wont to relate that many miracles of healing have been wrought in the place where he died, through the merit of his sanctity; and that the men of that province used to carry the dust thence for the sick, and put it into water, and the drinking thereof, or sprinkling with it, brought health to many sick men and beasts; so that the holy dust being frequently carried away, a great hole was made there.
Upon his death, the bishopric of that province was divided into two dioceses. One of them was given to Daniel, which he governs to this day; the other to Aldhelm, wherein he presided most vigorously four years; both of them were fully instructed, as well in matters touching the Church as in the knowledge of the Scriptures. Aldhelm, when he was as yet only a priest and abbot of the monastery which is called the city of Maildufus, by order of a synod of his own nation, wrote a notable book against the error of the Britons, in not celebrating Easter at the due time, and in doing divers other things contrary to the purity of doctrine and the peace of the church; and through the reading of this book many of the Britons, who were subject to the West Saxons, were led by him to adopt the Catholic celebration of our Lord's Paschal Feast. He likewise wrote a famous book on Virginity, which, after the example of Sedulius, he composed in twofold form, in hexameters and in prose. He wrote some other books, being a man most instructed in all respects, for he had a polished style, and was, as I have said, of marvellous learning both in liberal and ecclesiastical studies. On his death, Forthere was made bishop in his stead, and is living at this time, being likewise a man very learned in the Holy Scriptures.
Whilst they administered the bishopric, it was detErmined by a synodal decree, that the province of the South Saxons, which till that time belonged to the diocese of the city of Winchester, where Daniel then presided, should itself have an episcopal see, and a bishop of its own. Eadbert, at that time abbot of the monastery of Bishop Wilfrid, of blessed memory, called Selaeseu, was consecrated their first bishop. On his death, Eolla succeeded to the office of bishop. He also died some years ago, and the bishopric has been vacant to this day.

On 12 Jun 1020 Aelfstan aka Lyfing Unknown Archbishop of Canterbury -1020 died. He was buried at Canterbury Cathedral.

On 29 Dec 1079 Robert the Lotharingian -1095 was consecrated Bishop of Hereford by Lanfranc Archbishop of Canterbury 1005-1089 (74) at Canterbury Cathedral.

On 22 Dec 1163 Robert Melun Bishop of Hereford 1100-1167 (63) was consecrated Bishop of Hereford by Thomas Becket Archbishop of Canterbury 1119-1170 (44) at Canterbury Cathedral.

Murder of Thomas a Becket

On 29 Dec 1170 Thomas Becket Archbishop of Canterbury 1119-1170 (51) was murdered at Canterbury Cathedral by four knights on behalf of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (37).

Wedding of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence

On 14 Jan 1236 Henry III King England 1207-1272 (28) and Eleanor Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (13) were married at Canterbury Cathedral by Edmund Rich Archbishop of Canterbury 1174-1240 (61).

Release of King John II of France

Around 30 June 1360 John "The Good" II King France 1319-1364 (41) left the Tower of London and proceeded to Eltham Palace where Queen Philippa (46) had prepared a great farewell entertainment. Passing the night at Dartford, he continued towards Dover, stopping at the Maison Dieu of St Mary at Ospringe, and paying homage at the shrine of St Thomas Becket at Canterbury on 04 July 1360. He dined with the Black Prince (30) at Dover Castle, and reached English-held Calais on 08 July 1360.

Death of the Black Prince

On 08 Jun 1376 Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince Wales 1330-1376 (45) died of dysentery at Westminster Palace. He was buried in Canterbury Cathedral.

Peasant's Revolt

On 14 Jun 1381 the rebels gained access to the Tower Hill capturing Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Princess Wales 1328-1385 (52), the future Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (14), Joan Holland Duchess York 1380-1484 (1) and Simon Sudbury Archbishop of Canterbury 1316-1381 (65).
Simon Sudbury Archbishop of Canterbury 1316-1381 (65) was beheaded at Tower Hill. He was buried at Canterbury Cathedral.

On 31 Jul 1396 William de Courtenay Archbishop Canterbury 1342-1396 (54) died at Maidstone. He was buried in the quire of Canterbury Cathedral.

After 22 Mar 1421 Thomas Lancaster 1st Duke Clarence 1388-1421 was buried at Canterbury Cathedral.

John Neville married Isabel Ingaldsthorpe

On 25 Apr 1457 John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 and Isabel Ingaldsthorpe 1441-1476 (16) were married (he was her second-cousin once-removed) by Cardinal Thomas Bourchier 1418-1486 (39) at Canterbury Cathedral during the John Neville married Isabel Ingaldsthorpe.

On 30 Mar 1486 Cardinal Thomas Bourchier 1418-1486 (68) died at Knole House, Knole, Sevenoaks. He was buried at Canterbury Cathedral.

Thomas Becket Shrine destroyed

On Sep 1538 Henry VIII (47) ordered Thomas of Becket's shrine at Canterbury Cathedral to be destroyed. Both an attack on the Catholic Church, and a means to generate revenue; Thomas' shrine was covered in precious metals and stones. Two huges chests, each requiring six men to carry, were required to remove the treasure.

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 October. 12 Oct 1641. From Dover, I that night rode post to Canterbury. Here I visited the cathedral, then in great splendour, those famous windows being entire, since demolished by the fanatics. The next morning, by Sittingboume, I came to Rochester, and thence to Gravesend, where a light-horseman (as they call it) taking us in, we spent our tide as far as Greenwich. From hence, after we had a little refreshed ourselves at the College, (for by reason of the contagion then in London we balked the inns,) we came to London landing at Arundel-stairs. Here I took leave of his Lordship (56), and retired to my lodgings in the Middle Temple, being about two in the morning, the 14th of October.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 05 Jan 1665. I arrived at Canterbury, and went to the cathedral, exceedingly well repaired since his Majesty's (34) return.

In 1683 Charles Kirkoven 1st Earl Bellomont 1643-1683 (39) died. He was buried at Canterbury Cathedral.

Crypt, Canterbury Cathedral

Chancel, Canterbury Cathedral

Death of King Henry IV

On 20 Mar 1413 Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (45) died in the Jerusalem Chamber, Cheyneygates, Westminster Abbey in Westminster Abbey confirming a prophesy that he would die in Jerusalem. His son Henry V King England 1386-1422 (26) succeeded V King England: Plantagenet Lancaster. His sons Henry V King England 1386-1422 (26) and Humphrey Lancaster 1st Duke Gloucester 1390-1447 (22) were present. He Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (45) was buried in the Chancel of Canterbury Cathedral.

Corona, Canterbury Cathedral

North Side Corona, Corona, Canterbury Cathedral

On 17 Nov 1558 Cardinal Reginald Pole 1500-1558 (58) died at London. He was buried at North Side Corona, Corona, Canterbury Cathedral.

Dean's Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral

On 08 Oct 1672 Thomas Turner Dean Canterbury 1591-1672 (81) died. He was buried in the Dean's Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral.

Guest House, Canterbury Cathedral

On 03 Oct 1404 Joan Burghesh Baroness Mohun Dunster 1319-1404 (85) died at Guest House, Canterbury Cathedral. She was buried at Canterbury.

Lady Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral

Chapel of St Benedict, Lady Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral

After 926 the remains of Athelm Archishop Canterbury -926 were moved to the Chapel of St Benedict, Lady Chapel, Canterbury Cathedral.

North Transept, Canterbury Cathedral

After 926 the remains of Athelm Archishop Canterbury -926 were moved to the North Transept, Canterbury Cathedral.

Church of St John the Baptist, Canterbury

In 926 Athelm Archishop Canterbury -926 died. He was buried in the Church of St John the Baptist, Canterbury.

St Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury

Charles I and Henrietta Maria's First Meeting

On 13 Jun 1625 Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (24) and Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15) met for the first time at St Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury. .

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Whitefriars, Canterbury

Trial and Execution of Lord Badlesmere

On 14 Apr 1322 Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was tried by Henry Cobham 1st Baron Cobham 1260-1339 (62) at Canterbury.
Sentenced to death Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46) was drawn for three miles behind a horse to Blean, Canterbury, where he held property, where he was beheaded. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate, Canterbury at Canterbury and the rest of his body left hanging at Blean, Canterbury. He was buried at Whitefriars, Canterbury. His son Giles Badlesmere 2nd Baron Badlesmere 1314-1338 (7) succeeded 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Elizabeth Montagu Baroness Badlesmere, Baroness Despencer 1324-1359 by marriage Baroness Badlesmere.

Castle Badlesmere

In 1310 Maud Badlesmere Countess Oxford 1310-1366 was born to Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (34) and Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (22) at Castle Badlesmere.

In 1313 Elizabeth Badlesmere Countess Northampton 1313-1356 was born to Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (37) and Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (25) at Castle Badlesmere.

Charlton

On 01 Oct 1756 Charles George Perceval 2nd Baron Arden, 1st Baron Arden Arden 1756-1840 was born to John Perceval 2nd Earl Egmont 1711-1770 (45) and Catherine Compton Countess Egmont 1731-1784 (25) at Charlton.

Wricklesmarsh, Charlton

In 1604 Colonel Thomas Blount Inventor 1604- was born to Edward Blount of Middle Temple in Wricklesmarsh, Charlton.

Chatham

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 May. On the 19 May 1641, we made a short excursion to Rochester, and having seen the cathedral, went to Chatham to see the HMS Royal Sovereign, a glorious vessel of burden lately built there, being for defence and ornament, the richest that ever spread cloth before the wind. She carried an hundred brass cannon, and was 1200 tons; a rare sailer, the work of the famous Phineas Pett, inventor of the frigate-fashion of building, to this day practised. But what is to be deplored as to this vessel is, that it cost his Majesty (10) the affections of his subjects, perverted by the malcontent great ones, who took occasion to quarrel for his having raised a very slight tax for the building of this, and equipping the rest of the navy without an act of Parliament; though, by the suffrages of the major part of the Judges, the King (10) might legally do in times of imminent danger, of which his Majesty (10) was best apprised. But this not satisfying a jealous party, it was condemned as unprecedential, and not justifiable as to the Royal prerogative; and, accordingly, the Judges were Removed out of their places, fined, and imprisoned.

John Evelyn's Diary 1663 August. 10th August 1663. We returned by Sir Norton's, whose house is likewise in a park. This gentleman is a worthy person, and learned critic, especially in Greek and Hebrew. Passing by Chatham, we saw his Majesty's (33) Royal Navy, and dined at Commissioner Pett's (43), master-builder there, who showed me his study and models, with other curiosities belonging to his art. He is esteemed for the most skillful shipbuilder in the world. He hath a pretty garden and banqueting house, pots, statues, cypresses, resembling some villas about Rome. After a great feast we rode post to Gravesend, and, sending the coach to London, came by barge home that night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 11 Jan 1665. To Rochester, when I took order to settle officers at Chatham.

Loss of The London

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1665 March. 08 Mar 1665. … though a bitter cold day, yet I rose, and though my pain and tenderness in my testicle remains a little, yet I do verily think that my pain yesterday was nothing else, and therefore I hope my disease of the stone may not return to me, but void itself in pissing, which God grant, but I will consult my physitian.
This morning is brought me to the office the sad newes of "The London," in which Sir J. Lawson’s men were all bringing her from Chatham to The Hope, and thence he was to go to sea in her; but a little a’this side the buoy of the Nower, she suddenly blew up. About 24 [men] and a woman that were in the round-house and coach saved; the rest, being above 300, drowned: the ship breaking all in pieces, with 80 pieces of brass ordnance. She lies sunk, with her round-house above water. Sir J. Lawson hath a great loss in this of so many good chosen men, and many relations among them. I went to the ’Change, where the news taken very much to heart. So home to dinner, and Mr. Moore with me. Then I to Gresham College, and there saw several pretty experiments, and so home and to my office, and at night about 11 home to supper and to bed. See Loss of The London.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Admiral John Lawson 1615-1665 (50). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Battle of Lowestoft

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 June. 08 Jun 1665. I went again to his Grace, thence to the Council, and moved for another privy seal for £20,000, and that I might have the disposal of the Savoy Hospital for the sick and wounded; all which was granted. Hence to the Royal Society, to refresh among the philosophers.
Came news of his highness's (35) victory, which indeed might have been a complete one, and at once ended the war, had it been pursued, but the cowardice of some, or treachery, or both, frustrated that. We had, however, bonfires, bells, and rejoicing in the city. Next day, the 9th, I had instant orders to repair to the Downs, so as I got to Rochester this evening. Next day I lay at Deal, where I found all in readiness: but, the fleet being hindered by contrary winds, I came away on the 12th, and went to Dover, and returned to Deal; and on the 13th, hearing the fleet was at Solbay, I went homeward, and lay at Chatham, and on the 14th, I got home. On the 15th, came the eldest son of the present Secretary of State to the French King, with much other company, to dine with me. After dinner, I went with him to London, to speak to my Lord General for more guards, and gave his Majesty (35) an account of my journey to the coasts under my inspection. I also waited on his Royal Highness (31), now come triumphant from the fleet, gotten into repair. See the whole history of this conflict in my "History of the Dutch War.".

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 June. 30 Jun 1665. To Chatham; and, 1st July, to the fleet with Lord Sandwich (39), now Admiral, with whom I went in a pinnace to the Buoy of the Nore, where the whole fleet rode at anchor; went on board the Prince, of ninety brass ordnance, haply the best ship in the world, both for building and sailing; she had 700 men. They made a great huzza, or shout, at our approach, three times. Here we dined with many noblemen, gentlemen, and volunteers, served in plate and excellent meat of all sorts. After dinner, came his Majesty, the Duke (31), and Prince Rupert (45). Here I saw the King (35) knight Captain Custance for behaving so bravely in the late fight. It was surprising to behold the good order, decency, and plenty of all things in a vessel so full of men. The ship received a hundred cannon shot in her body. Then I went on board the Charles, to which after a gun was shot off, came all the flag officers to his Majesty (35), who there held a General Council, which determined that his Royal Highness (35) should adventure himself no more this summer. I came away late, having seen the most glorious fleet that ever spread sails. We returned in his Majesty's (35) yacht with my Lord Sandwich (39) and Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, landing at Chatham on Sunday morning.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 September. 05 Sep 1665. To Chatham, to inspect my charge, with £900 in my coach.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 October. 17 Oct 1665. I went to Gravesend; next day to Chatham; thence to Maidstone, in order to the march of 500 prisoners to Leeds Castle, which I had hired of Lord Culpeper (39). I was earnestly desired by the learned Sir Roger Twisden (68), and Deputy-Lieutenants, to spare Maidstone from quartering any of my sick flock. Here, Sir Edward Brett (57) sent me some horse to bring up the rear. This country, from Rochester to Maidstone and the Downs, is very agreeable for the prospect.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 March. 13 Mar 1666. To Chatham, to view a place designed for an Infirmary.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 March. 24 Mar 1666. Sent £2,000 to Chatham.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 June. 15 Jun 1666. I went to Chatham. 16th. In the Jemmy yacht (an incomparable sailer) to sea, arrived by noon at the fleet at the Buoy at the Nore, dined with Prince Rupert (46) and the General (57).

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 June. 17 Jun 1666. Came his Majesty (36), the Duke (57), and many Noblemen. After Council, we went to prayers. My business being dispatched, I returned to Chatham, having lain but one night in the Royal Charles; we had a tempestuous sea. I went on shore at Sheerness, where they were building an arsenal for the fleet, and designing a royal fort with a receptacle for great ships to ride at anchor; but here I beheld the sad spectacle, more than half that gallant bulwark of the Kingdom miserably shattered, hardly a vessel entire, but appearing rather so many wrecks and hulls, so cruelly had the Dutch mangled us. The loss of the Prince, that gallant vessel, had been a loss to be universally deplored, none knowing for what reason we first engaged in this ungrateful war; we lost besides nine or ten more, and near 600 men slain and 1,100 wounded, 2,000 prisoners; to balance which, perhaps we might destroy eighteen or twenty of the enemy's ships, and 700 or 800 poor men.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 November. 17 Nov 1666. I returned to Chatham, my chariot overturning on the steep of Bexley Hill, wounded me in two places on the head; my son, Jack (11), being with me, was like to have been worse cut by the glass; but I thank God we both escaped without much hurt, though not without exceeding danger.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 June. 08 Jun 1667. To London, alarmed by the Dutch, who were fallen on our fleet at Chatham, by a most audacious enterprise, entering the very river with part of their fleet, doing us not only disgrace, but incredible mischief in burning several of our best men-of-war lying at anchor and moored there, and all this through our unaccountable negligence in not setting out our fleet in due time. This alarm caused me, fearing the enemy might venture up the Thames even to London (which they might have done with ease, and fired all the vessels in the river, too), to send away my best goods, plate, etc., from my house to another place. The alarm was so great that it put both country and city into fear, panic, and consternation, such as I hope I shall never see more; everybody was flying, none knew why or whither. Now, there were land forces dispatched with the Duke of Albemarle (58), Lord Middleton (59), Prince Rupert (47), and the Duke (33), to hinder the Dutch coming to Chatham, fortifying Upnor Castle, and laying chains and bombs; but the resolute enemy broke through all, and set fire on our ships, and retreated in spite, stopping up the Thames, the rest of the fleet lying before the mouth of it.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 June. 28 Jun 1667. I went to Chatham, and thence to view not only what mischief the Dutch had done; but how triumphantly their whole fleet lay within the very mouth of the Thames, all from the North Foreland, Margate, even to the buoy of the Nore — a dreadful spectacle as ever Englishmen saw, and a dishonor never to be wiped off! Those who advised his Majesty (37) to prepare no fleet this spring deserved—I know what—but—
Here in the river off Chatham, just before the town, lay the carcase of the "London" (now the third time burnt), the "Royal Oak", the "James", etc., yet smoking; and now, when the mischief was done, we were making trifling forts on the brink of the river. Here were yet forces, both of horse and foot, with General Middleton (59) continually expecting the motions of the enemy's fleet. I had much discourse with him, who was an experienced commander, I told him I wondered the King (37) did not fortify Sheerness and the Ferry; both abandoned.

Calendar of State Papers Charles II 1667. Oct 1667 101. Sir Wm. Coventry (39) to Pepys (34). Besides the 30,000l. received by Lord Anglesey from the East India Company on the seamen's wages, the Treasury Comrs. are sure of 20,000l. more from them on another assignment before January, which is intended for wages, so are desirous that he should pay in the river as well as at Chatham, as fast as he can, to cut off the growing charge, beginning first with those ships where the least money will cut off the most charge. No day, except Sunday, should be neglected in this work, and the certificates be returned to the Treasury chamber of what money is weekly paid. [Adm. Paper.].

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 March. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 May. 11 May 1672. Went to Chatham. 12th. Heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral.

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 May. 08 May 1688. His Majesty (54), alarmed by the great fleet of the Dutch (while we had a very inconsiderable one), went down to Chatham; their fleet was well prepared, and out, before we were in any readiness, or had any considerable number to have encountered them, had there been occasion, to the great reproach of the nation; while being in profound peace, there was a mighty land army, which there was no need of, and no force at sea, where only was the apprehension; but the army was doubtless kept and increased, in order to bring in and countenance Popery, the King beginning to discover his intention, by many instances pursued by the Jesuits, against his first resolution to alter nothing in the Church Establishment, so that it appeared there can be no reliance on Popish promises.

John Evelyn's Diary 1696 January. 02 Feb 1696. An extraordinary wet season, though temperate as to cold. The "Royal Sovereign" man-of-war burned at Chatham. It was built in 1637, and having given occasion to the levy of ship money was perhaps the cause of all the after troubles to this day. An Earthquake in Dorsetshire by Portland, or rather a sinking of the ground suddenly for a large space, near the quarries of stone, hindering the conveyance of that material for the finishing St. Paul's.

In 1697 HMS Sovereign was burnt to the waterline at Chatham.

Chatham Dockyard

On 11 Apr 1693 HMS Sussex was launched at Chatham Dockyard.

Chiddingstone

On 03 Jun 1706 Henry Streatfield 1706-1762 was born to Henry Streatfield 1679-1747 (27) and Elizabeth Beard at Chiddingstone.

St Mary's Church, Chiddingstone

Streatfield Vault, St Mary's Church, Chiddingstone

On 04 Apr 1762 Henry Streatfield 1706-1762 (55) died. He was buried at Streatfield Vault, St Mary's Church, Chiddingstone.

Chilham

Chilham Castle, Chilham

Around 1190 Richard Fitzroy 1190-1246 was born illegitimately to John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 (23) and Adela Plantagenet in Chilham Castle, Chilham.

In 1205 Fulbert de Dover 1178-1205 died at Chilham Castle, Chilham.

Around 1228 Lorette Plantagenet 1228-1266 was born to Richard Fitzroy 1190-1246 (38) and Rohese de Dover 1186-1261 (42) in Chilham Castle, Chilham.

Chislehurst

On 28 Dec 1510 Nicholas Bacon 1510-1579 was born to Robert Bacon 1479-1548 (31) and Isabel or Eleanor Cage 1478-1535 (32) at Chislehurst.

In 1560 Barbara Walsingham 1560-1623 was born to Thomas Walsingham 1526-1584 (34) and Dorothy Guildford at Chislehurst.

Around 1564 Mary Walsingham Baronetess Pelham Laughton 1564-1624 was born to Thomas Walsingham 1526-1584 (38) and Dorothy Guildford at Chislehurst.

Church of St Nicholas, Chislehurst

Scadbury Chapel, Church of St Nicholas, Chislehurst

On 09 Feb 1550 Edmund Walsingham 1480-1550 (70) died. He was buried at Scadbury Chapel, Church of St Nicholas, Chislehurst.

On 11 Aug 1630 Thomas Walsingham 1563-1630 (67) died. He was buried at Scadbury Chapel, Church of St Nicholas, Chislehurst.

Scadbury, Chislehurst

On 24 Nov 1462 James Walsingham 1462-1540 was born at Scadbury, Chislehurst.

Cobham

Around 1220 John Cobham 1220-1252 was born at Cobham.

In 1237 Reginald Cobham 1237- was born to John Cobham 1220-1252 (17) and Joan Neville at Cobham.

On 25 Dec 1240 John Cobham Chief Baron 1240-1300 was born to John Cobham 1220-1252 (20) and Maude Joan Fitzbenedict at Cobham.

Around 1242 Henry Cobham 1242-1316 was born to John Cobham 1220-1252 (22) and Maude Joan Fitzbenedict at Cobham.

In 1252 John Cobham 1220-1252 (32) died at Cobham.

Around 1276 Ralph Cobham 1276-1326 was born to John Cobham Chief Baron 1240-1300 (35) and Joan Septvans at Cobham.

Before 1285 John Cobham 2nd Baron Cobham 1285-1355 was born to Henry Cobham 1st Baron Cobham 1260-1339 and Maud Moreville Baroness Cobham 1264-1285 at Cobham.

On Mar 1300 John Cobham Chief Baron 1240-1300 (59) died at Cobham.

Around 1321 John Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham 1321-1408 was born to John Cobham 2nd Baron Cobham 1285-1355 (36) and Joan Beauchamp 1305-1343 (16) at Cobham.

Around 1337 Joan Cobham 1337-1357 was born to John Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham 1321-1408 (16) and Margaret Courtenay Baroness Cobham -1385 at Cobham. Date adjusted from 1316 since her father was born around 1321 and her future husband in 1339.

On 25 Feb 1355 John Cobham 2nd Baron Cobham 1285-1355 (70) died at Cobham. His son John Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham 1321-1408 (34) succeeded 3rd Baron Cobham. Margaret Courtenay Baroness Cobham -1385 by marriage Baroness Cobham.

Before 1404 Joan Braybrooke 5th Baroness Cobham 1403-1442 was born to Reginald Braybrooke 1356-1405 and Joan Pole 4th Baroness Cobham -1434 at Cobham.

On 06 Jun 1464 Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 (49) died at Cobham. He was buried at Cobham. His son John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 (16) succeeded 7th Baron Cobham.

On 03 Oct 1701 Joseph Williamson Secretary of State 1633-1701 (68) died in Cobham. He was buried in Westminster Abbey. He left £6,000 and his library to Queen's College, Oxford.

Cobham Church, Cobham

On 20 Sep 1405 Reginald Braybrooke 1356-1405 (49) died at Sluys. He was buried at Cobham Church, Cobham.

On 13 Jan 1434 Joan Pole 4th Baroness Cobham -1434 died. She was buried at Cobham Church, Cobham. Her daughter Joan Braybrooke 5th Baroness Cobham 1403-1442 (30) succeeded 5th Baron Cobham.

St Mary Magdalene, Cobham

On 09 Mar 1512 John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 (64) died at Cowling. He was buried at St Mary Magdalene, Cobham. His son Thomas Brooke 8th Baron Cobham -1529 succeeded 8th Baron Cobham.

St Mary Magdalene New Churchyard, St Mary Magdalene, Cobham

On 19 Jul 1529 Thomas Brooke 8th Baron Cobham -1529 died. He was buried at St Mary Magdalene New Churchyard, St Mary Magdalene, Cobham. His son George Brooke 9th Baron Cobham 1497-1558 (32) succeeded 9th Baron Cobham. Anne Braye Baroness Cobham 1501- by marriage Baroness Cobham.

Cooling

Cowling

On 10 Dec 1447 John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 was born to Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 (32) and Elizabeth Tuchet Baroness Cobham 1420-1464 (27) at Cowling.

On 09 Mar 1512 John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 (64) died at Cowling. He was buried at St Mary Magdalene, Cobham. His son Thomas Brooke 8th Baron Cobham -1529 succeeded 8th Baron Cobham.

Cuxton

Whornes Place, Cuxton

On 21 Mar 1555 John Leveson 1555-1615 was born to Thomas Leveson 1532-1576 (23) and Ursula Gresham 1534-1574 (21) at Whornes Place, Cuxton.

Deal

On 03 Feb 1495 Perkin Warbreck 1474-1499 (21) landed at Deal. He was driven off by supporters of the Crown and travelled to Ireland.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 09 Jan 1665. To Deal. 10th. To Sandwich, a pretty town, about two miles from the sea. The Mayor and officers of the Customs were very diligent to serve me. I visited the forts in the way, and returned that night to Canterbury.

Battle of Lowestoft

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 June. 08 Jun 1665. I went again to his Grace, thence to the Council, and moved for another privy seal for £20,000, and that I might have the disposal of the Savoy Hospital for the sick and wounded; all which was granted. Hence to the Royal Society, to refresh among the philosophers.
Came news of his highness's (35) victory, which indeed might have been a complete one, and at once ended the war, had it been pursued, but the cowardice of some, or treachery, or both, frustrated that. We had, however, bonfires, bells, and rejoicing in the city. Next day, the 9th, I had instant orders to repair to the Downs, so as I got to Rochester this evening. Next day I lay at Deal, where I found all in readiness: but, the fleet being hindered by contrary winds, I came away on the 12th, and went to Dover, and returned to Deal; and on the 13th, hearing the fleet was at Solbay, I went homeward, and lay at Chatham, and on the 14th, I got home. On the 15th, came the eldest son of the present Secretary of State to the French King, with much other company, to dine with me. After dinner, I went with him to London, to speak to my Lord General for more guards, and gave his Majesty (35) an account of my journey to the coasts under my inspection. I also waited on his Royal Highness (31), now come triumphant from the fleet, gotten into repair. See the whole history of this conflict in my "History of the Dutch War.".

Four Days' Battle

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 June. 01 Jun 1666. Being in my garden at 6 o'clock in the evening, and hearing the great guns go thick off, I took horse and rode that night to Rochester; thence next day toward the Downs and seacoast, but meeting the Lieutenant of the Hampshire frigate, who told me what passed, or rather what had not passed, I returned to London, there being no noise, or appearance at Deal, or on that coast of any engagement. Recounting this to his Majesty (36), whom I found at St. James's Park, impatiently expecting, and knowing that Prince Rupert (46) was loose about three at St. Helen's Point at N. of the Isle of Wight, it greatly rejoiced him; but he was astonished when I assured him they heard nothing of the guns in the Downs, nor did the Lieutenant who landed there by five that morning.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 March. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

Deal Castle

On 14 Sep 1852 Arthur Wellesley 1st Duke Wellington 1769-1852 (83) died at Deal Castle. His son Arthur Wellesley 2nd Duke Wellington 1807-1884 (45) succeeded 2nd Duke Wellington (1C 1814). Elizabeth Hay Duchess Wellington 1820-1904 (31) by marriage Duchess Wellington (1C 1814).

1648 Kentish Rebellion

The May 1648 Kentish Rebellion was, in effect, the commencement of the Second Civil War of 1648. The rebels, commanded by George Goring 1st Earl Norwich 1585-1663, raised forces across Kent. Deal Castle, Walmer Castle and Sandown Castle surrendered. The rebels then besieged Dover Castle. Parliament dispatched troops commanded by Nathaniel Rich of Stondon -1701 to suppress the rebels.

Deptford

On Jan 1362 Thomas Manny 1357-1362 (5) drowned in a well at Deptford.

Battle of Blackheath aka Cornish Rebellion

On 17 Jun 1497 Edward Stafford 2nd Earl Wiltshire 1470-1499 (27), Henry Willoughby 1451-1528 (46) and Thomas Fiennes 8th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1472-1534 (25) fought at Deptford at the Battle of Blackheath aka Cornish Rebellion.
Giles Brugge 6th Baron Chandos 1462-1511 (35), John Hussey 1st Baron Hussey Sleaford 1465-1537 (32), Robert Sheffield 1461-1518 (35), Edward Stanhope 1462-1487 and Robert Constable 1478-1537 (19) were knighted.
John Dinham 1st Baron Dinham 1433-1501 (64) acted as judge.
Thomas West 8th Baron De La Warr, 5th Baron West 1457-1525 (40) commanded.

On 17 Jun 1497 Richard Guildford 1450-1506 (47) was created Knight Banneret at Deptford during the Battle of Blackheath aka Cornish Rebellion.

On 10 Oct 1615 Roger Boyle 1606-1615 (9) died at Deptford.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 March. 09 Mar 1652. I went to Deptford, where I made preparation for my settlement, no more intending to go out of England, but endeavor a settled life, either in this or some other place, there being now so little appearance of any change for the better, all being entirely in the rebels' hands; and this particular habitation and the estate contiguous to it (belonging to my father-in-law, actually in his Majesty's (21) service) very much suffering for want of some friend to rescue it out of the power of the usurpers, so as to preserve our interest, and take some care of my other concerns, by the advice and endeavor of my friends I was advised to reside in it, and compound with the soldiers. This I was besides authorized by his Majesty (21) to do, and encouraged with a promise that what was in lease from the Crown, if ever it pleased God to restore him, he would secure to us in fee farm. I had also addresses and cyphers, to correspond with his Majesty (21) and Ministers abroad: upon all which inducements, I was persuaded to settle henceforth in England, having now run about the world, most part out of my own country, near ten years. I therefore now likewise meditated sending over for my wife (17), whom as yet I had left at Paris.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 March. 15 Mar 1652. I saw the "Diamond" and "Ruby" launched in the Dock at Deptford, carrying forty-eight brass cannon each; Cromwell (52) and his grandees present, with great acclamations.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 July. 19th July 1661. We tried our Diving-Bell, or engine, in the water dock at Deptford, in which our curator continued half an hour under water; it was made of cast lead, let down with a strong cable.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 January. 25th January 1662. I dined with the Trinity Company at their house, that corporation being by charter fixed at Deptford.

On 27 Mar 1666 HMS Defiance was launched at Deptford in the presence of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (35).

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 June. 17 Jun 1667. This night, about two o'clock, some chips and combustible matter prepared for some fire-ships, taking flame in Deptford-yard, made such a blaze, and caused such an uproar in the Tower (it being given out that the Dutch fleet was come up, and had landed their men and fired the Tower), as had liked to have done more mischief before people would be persuaded to the contrary and believe the accident. Everybody went to their arms. These were sad and troublesome times..

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 March. 03 Mar 1668. Was launched at Deptford, that goodly vessel, "The Charles" I was near his Majesty (37). She is longer than the "Sovereign," and carries 110 brass cannon; she was built by old Shish (63), a plain, honest carpenter, master-builder of this dock, but one who can give very little account of his art by discourse, and is hardly capable of reading, yet of great ability in his calling. The family have been ship carpenters in this yard above 300 years.

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 April. 28 Apr 1668. To London, about the purchase of Ravensbourne Mills, and land around it, in Upper Deptford, of one Mr. Becher.

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1669 May. Tuesday 04 May 1669. Up, and to the office, and then my wife (28) being gone to see her mother at Deptford, I before the office sat went to the Excise Office, and thence being alone stepped into Duck Lane, and thence tried to have sent a porter to Deb.’s (18), but durst not trust him, and therefore having bought a book to satisfy the bookseller for my stay there, a 12d. book, Andronicus of Tom Fuller, I took coach, and at the end of Jewen Street next Red Cross Street I sent the coachman to her lodging, and understand she is gone for Greenwich to one Marys’s, a tanner’s, at which I, was glad, hoping to have opportunity to find her out; and so, in great fear of being seen, I to the office, and there all the morning, dined at home, and presently after dinner comes home my wife (28), who I believe is jealous of my spending the day, and I had very good fortune in being at home, for if Deb. (18) had been to have been found it is forty to one but I had been abroad, God forgive me. So the afternoon at the office, and at night walked with my wife (28) in the garden, and my Lord Brouncker (49) with us, who is newly come to W. Pen’s (48) lodgings; and by and by comes Mr. Hooke (33); and my Lord (43), and he, and I into my Lord’s lodgings, and there discoursed of many fine things in philosophy, to my great content, and so home to supper and to bed.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 August. 05 Aug 1670. There was sent me by a neighbor a servant maid, who, in the last month, as she was sitting before her mistress at work, felt a stroke on her arm a little above the wrist for some height, the smart of which, as if struck by another hand, caused her to hold her arm awhile till somewhat mitigated; but it put her into a kind of convulsion, or rather hysteric fit. A gentleman coming casually in, looking on her arm, found that part powdered with red crosses, set in most exact and wonderful order, neither swelled nor depressed, about this shape, [Note. Diamond shape] not seeming to be any way made by artifice, of a reddish color, not so red as blood, the skin over them smooth, the rest of the arm livid and of a mortified hue, with certain prints, as it were, of the stroke of fingers. This had happened three several times in July, at about ten days' interval, the crosses beginning to wear out, but the successive ones set in other different, yet uniform order. The maid seemed very modest, and came from London to Deptford with her mistress, to avoid the discourse and importunity of curious people. She made no gain by it, pretended no religious fancies; but seemed to be a plain, ordinary, silent, working wench, somewhat fat, short, and high-colored. She told me divers divines and physicians had seen her, but were unsatisfied; that she had taken some remedies against her fits, but they did her no good; she had never before had any fits; once since, she seemed in her sleep to hear one say to her that she should tamper no more with them, nor trouble herself with anything that happened, but put her trust in the merits of Christ only.
This is the substance of what she told me, and what I saw and curiously examined. I was formerly acquainted with the impostorious nuns of Loudun, in France, which made such noise among the Papists; I therefore thought this worth the notice. I remember Monsieur Monconys19 (that curious traveler and a Roman Catholic) was by no means satisfied with the stigmata of those nuns, because they were so shy of letting him scrape the letters, which were Jesus, Maria, Joseph (as I think), observing they began to scale off with it, whereas this poor wench was willing to submit to any trial; so that I profess I know not what to think of it, nor dare I pronounce it anything supernatural.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 May. 25 May 1671. I dined at a feast made for me and my wife (36) by the Trinity House, for our passing a fine of the land which Sir R. Browne (66), my wife (36)'s father, freely gave to found and build their college, or almshouses on, at Deptford, it being my wife (36)'s after her father's decease. It was a good and charitable work and gift, but would have been better bestowed on the poor of that parish, than on the seamen's widows, the Trinity House being very rich, and the rest of the poor of the parish exceedingly indigent.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 May. 31 May 1675. I went with Lord Ossory (40) to Deptford, where we chose him Master of the Trinity Company.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 February. 12 Feb 1683. This morning I received the news of the death of my father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne (78), Knt. and Bart., who died at my house at Sayes Court this day at ten in the morning, after he had labored under the gout and dropsy for nearly six months, in the 78th year of his age. The funeral was solemnized on the 19th at Deptford, with as much decency as the dignity of the person, and our relation to him, required; there being invited the Bishop of Rochester (58), several noblemen, knights, and all the fraternity of the Trinity House, of which he had been Master, and others of the country. The vicar preached a short but proper discourse on Psalm xxxix. 10, on the frailty of our mortal condition, concluding with an ample and well-deserved eulogy on the defunct, relating to his honorable birth and ancestors, education, learning in Greek and Latin, modern languages, travels, public employments, signal loyalty, character abroad, and particularly the honor of supporting the Church of England in its public worship during its persecution by the late rebels' usurpation and regicide, by the suffrages of divers Bishops, Doctors of the Church, and others, who found such an asylum in his house and family at Paris, that in their disputes with the Papists (then triumphing over it as utterly lost) they used to argue for its visibility and existence from Sir R. Browne's chapel and assembly there. Then he spoke of his great and loyal sufferings during thirteen years' exile with his present Majesty (52), his return with him in the signal year 1660; his honorable employment at home, his timely Recess to recollect himself, his great age, infirmities, and death.
He gave to the Trinity Corporation that land in Deptford on which are built those almshouses for twenty-four widows of emerited seamen. He was born the famous year of the Gunpowder Treason, in 1605, and being the last [male] of his family, left my wife (48), his only daughter, heir. His grandfather, Sir Richard Browne, was the great instrument under the great Earl of Leicester (favorite to Queen Elizabeth) in his government of the Netherland. He was Master of the Household to King James, and Cofferer; I think was the first who regulated the compositions through England for the King (52)'s household, provisions, progresses,49 etc., which was so high a service, and so grateful to the whole nation, that he had acknowledgments and public thanks sent him from all the counties; he died by the rupture of a vein in a vehement speech he made about the compositions in a Parliament of King James. By his mother's side he was a Gunson, Treasurer of the Navy in the reigns of Henry VIII., Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth, and, as by his large pedigree appears, related to divers of the English nobility. Thus ended this honorable person, after so many changes and tossings to and fro, in the same house where he was born. "Lord teach us so to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom!"
By a special clause in his will, he ordered that his body should be buried in the churchyard under the southeast window of the chancel, adjoining to the burying places of his ancestors, since they came out of Essex into Sayes Court, he being much offended at the novel custom of burying everyone within the body of the church and chancel; that being a favor heretofore granted to martyrs and great persons; this excess of making churches charnel houses being of ill and irreverend example, and prejudicial to the health of the living, besides the continual disturbance of the pavement and seats, and several other indecencies. Dr. Hall, the pious Bishop of Norwich, would also be so interred, as may be read in his testament.

John Evelyn's Diary 1689 July. 11 Jul 1689. I dined at Lord Clarendon's, it being his lady's wedding day, when about three in the afternoon there was an unusual and violent storm of thunder, rain, and wind; many boats on the Thames were overwhelmed, and such was the impetuosity of the wind as to carry up the waves in pillars and spouts most dreadful to behold, rooting up trees and ruining some houses. The Countess of Sunderland (43) afterward told me that it extended as far as Althorpe at the very time, which is seventy miles from London. It did no harm at Deptford, but at Greenwich it did much mischief.

John Evelyn's Diary 1695 May. 05 May 1695. I came to Deptford from Wotton, in order to the first meeting of the Commissioners for endowing an hospital for seamen at Greenwich; it was at the Guildhall, London. Present, the Archbishop of Canterbury (58), Lord Keeper, Lord Privy Seal, Lord Godolphin (49), Duke of Shrewsbury (34), Duke of Leeds (63), Earls of Dorset (52) and Monmouth (37), Commissioners of the Admiralty and Navy, Sir Robert Clayton, Sir Christopher Wren (71), and several more. The Commission was read by Mr. Lowndes, Secretary to the Lords of the Treasury, Surveyor-General.

John Evelyn's Diary 1696 May. 06 May 1696. I went to Lambeth, to meet at dinner the Countess of Sunderland (54) and divers ladies. We dined in the Archbishop's wife's apartment with his Grace (59), and stayed late; yet I returned to Deptford at night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1696 June. 01 Jun 1696. I went to Deptford to dispose of our goods, in order to letting the house for three years to Vice Admiral Benbow (43), with condition to keep up the garden. This was done soon after.

Around 1682 Thomas Murray 1663-1735 (19). Portrait of Edward Russell 1st Earl Orford 1653-1727 (29) and Captain John Benbow (28), and Admiral Ralph Delavall (41) .

John Evelyn's Diary 1699. Aug 1699. I drank the Shooters' Hill waters. At Deptford, they had been building a pretty new church. The Bishop of St. David's (62) [Watson] deprived for simony. The city of Moscow burnt by the throwing of squibs.

On 20 Jul 1833 Other Archer Windsor 6th Earl Plymouth 1789-1833 (44) died aboard his yacht at Deptford.

Times Newspaper Marriages. 21 Feb 1930. THE DUKE OF WESTMINSTER AND MISS PONSONBY. The marriage of the Duke of Westminster (50) and Miss Loelia Mary Ponsonby (28), daughter of Sir Frederick (62) and Lady Ponsonby, of Great Tangley Manor, Guildford, and St. James's Palace, took place at Prince's-row Register Office yesterday. Among those present were Mr. Winston Churchill (55), Lady Serena James (28), Mrs Walter Rubens, Colonel (65) and Mrs. Guy Wyndham, Captain and Mrs. Cowes, Mrs. Basil Kerr, 2ir. and Mrs. George Drunmaond, and AMr. and Mrs. Richard Guinness. The Duke and Duchess left for their honey- uoon in the Duke's steam yacht the Cutty i Sark, wlhich was moored at Deptford.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. After he had settled at Deptford, which was in the time of Cromwell, he kept up a constant correspondence with Sir Richard Browne (his father-in-law), the King's Ambassador at Paris; and though his connection must have been known, it does not appear that he met with any interruption from the government here. Indeed, though he remained a decided Royalist, he managed so well as to have intimate friends even among those nearly connected with Cromwell; and to this we may attribute his being able to avoid taking the Covenant, which he says he never did take. In 1659, he published "An Apology for the Royal Party"; and soon after printed a paper which was of great service to the King, entitled "The Late News, or Message from Brussels Unmasked," which was an answer to a pamphlet designed to represent the King in the worst light.

Almshouses, Deptford

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 February. 12 Feb 1683. This morning I received the news of the death of my father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne (78), Knt. and Bart., who died at my house at Sayes Court this day at ten in the morning, after he had labored under the gout and dropsy for nearly six months, in the 78th year of his age. The funeral was solemnized on the 19th at Deptford, with as much decency as the dignity of the person, and our relation to him, required; there being invited the Bishop of Rochester (58), several noblemen, knights, and all the fraternity of the Trinity House, of which he had been Master, and others of the country. The vicar preached a short but proper discourse on Psalm xxxix. 10, on the frailty of our mortal condition, concluding with an ample and well-deserved eulogy on the defunct, relating to his honorable birth and ancestors, education, learning in Greek and Latin, modern languages, travels, public employments, signal loyalty, character abroad, and particularly the honor of supporting the Church of England in its public worship during its persecution by the late rebels' usurpation and regicide, by the suffrages of divers Bishops, Doctors of the Church, and others, who found such an asylum in his house and family at Paris, that in their disputes with the Papists (then triumphing over it as utterly lost) they used to argue for its visibility and existence from Sir R. Browne's chapel and assembly there. Then he spoke of his great and loyal sufferings during thirteen years' exile with his present Majesty (52), his return with him in the signal year 1660; his honorable employment at home, his timely Recess to recollect himself, his great age, infirmities, and death.
He gave to the Trinity Corporation that land in Deptford on which are built those almshouses for twenty-four widows of emerited seamen. He was born the famous year of the Gunpowder Treason, in 1605, and being the last [male] of his family, left my wife (48), his only daughter, heir. His grandfather, Sir Richard Browne, was the great instrument under the great Earl of Leicester (favorite to Queen Elizabeth) in his government of the Netherland. He was Master of the Household to King James, and Cofferer; I think was the first who regulated the compositions through England for the King (52)'s household, provisions, progresses,49 etc., which was so high a service, and so grateful to the whole nation, that he had acknowledgments and public thanks sent him from all the counties; he died by the rupture of a vein in a vehement speech he made about the compositions in a Parliament of King James. By his mother's side he was a Gunson, Treasurer of the Navy in the reigns of Henry VIII., Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth, and, as by his large pedigree appears, related to divers of the English nobility. Thus ended this honorable person, after so many changes and tossings to and fro, in the same house where he was born. "Lord teach us so to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom!"
By a special clause in his will, he ordered that his body should be buried in the churchyard under the southeast window of the chancel, adjoining to the burying places of his ancestors, since they came out of Essex into Sayes Court, he being much offended at the novel custom of burying everyone within the body of the church and chancel; that being a favor heretofore granted to martyrs and great persons; this excess of making churches charnel houses being of ill and irreverend example, and prejudicial to the health of the living, besides the continual disturbance of the pavement and seats, and several other indecencies. Dr. Hall, the pious Bishop of Norwich, would also be so interred, as may be read in his testament.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

Around 1575 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (42).

Around 1575 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (42) wearing his Garter Collar.

Sayes Court

In 1605 Richard Browne 1st Baronet Deptford 1605-1683 was born to Christopher Browne in Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1647 October. 14th October, 1647. To Sayes Court, at Deptford, in Kent (since my house), where I found Mr. Pretyman, my wife's (12) uncle, who had charge of it and the estate about it, during my father-in-law's residence in France. On the 15th, I again occupied my own chambers in the Middle Temple.

Siege of Colchester

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 May. 30th May 1648. There was a rising now in Kent, my Lord of Norwich (63) being at the head of them. Their first rendezvous was in Broome-field, next my house at Sayes Court, whence they went to Maidstone, and so to Colchester, where was that memorable siege.

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 August. 28th August 1648. To London from Sayes Court, and saw the celebrated follies of Bartholomew Fair.

Trial of Charles I

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 January. 22d January 1649. I went through a course of chemistry, at Sayes Court. Now was the Thames frozen over, and horrid tempests of wind.
The villany of the rebels proceeding now so far as to try, condemn, and murder our excellent King (48) on the 30th of this month, struck me with such horror, that I kept the day of his martyrdom a fast, and would not be present at that execrable wickedness; receiving the sad account of it from my brother George (31), and Mr. Owen, who came to visit me this afternoon, and recounted all the circumstances.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 February. 16th February 1649. Paris being now strictly besieged by the Prince de Condé (27), my wife (14) being shut up with her father (44) and mother (39), I wrote a letter of consolation to her: and, on the 22d, having recommended Obadiah Walker (33), a learned and most ingenious person, to be tutor to, and travel with, Mr. Hillyard's two sons, returned to Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 July. 2d July 1649. I went from Wotton to Godstone (the residence of Sir John Evelyn (58)), where was also Sir John Evelyn of Wilts. (47), when I took leave of both Sir Johns and their ladies. Mem. the prodigious memory of Sir John of Wilts' (47) daughter, since married to Mr. W. Pierrepont [Note. Mr R Pierrepoint], and mother of the present Earl of Kingston. I returned to Sayes Court this night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 February. 06 Feb 1652. I embarked early in the packet boat, but put my goods in a stouter vessel. It was calm, so that we got not to Dover till eight at night. I took horse for Canterbury, and lay at Rochester; next day, to Gravesend, took a pair of oars, and landed at Sayes Court, where I stayed three days to refresh, and look after my packet and goods, sent by a stouter vessel. I went to visit my cousin, Richard Fanshawe (43), and divers other friends.

Indemnity and Oblivion Act

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 April. 05 Apr 1652. My brother George (34) brought to Sayes Court Cromwell's (52) Act of Oblivion to all that would submit to the Government.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 July. 30 Jul 1652. I took advice about purchasing Sir Richard's (47) interest of those who had bought Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 January. 01 Jan 1653. I set apart in preparation for the Blessed Sacrament, which the next day Mr. Owen administered to me and all my family in Sayes Court, preaching on John vi. 32, 33, showing the exceeding benefits of our blessed Savior taking our nature upon him. He had christened my son and churched my wife (18) in our own house as before noticed.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 January. 17 Jan 1653. I began to set out the oval garden at Sayes Court, which was before a rude orchard, and all the rest one entire field of 100 acres, without any hedge, except the hither holly hedge joining to the bank of the mount walk. This was the beginning of all the succeeding gardens, walks, groves, inclosures, and plantations there.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 January. 21 Jan 1653. I went to London, and sealed some of the writings of my purchase of Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 February. 19 Feb 1653. I planted the orchard at Sayes Court; new moon, wind west.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 February. 22 Feb 1653. Was perfected the sealing, livery, and seisin of my purchase of Sayes Court. My brother (35), George Glanville, Mr. Scudamore, Mr. Offley, Co. William Glanville (son to Sergeant Glanville, sometime Speaker of the House of Commons), Co. Stephens, and several of my friends dining with me. I had bargained for £3,200, but I paid £3,500.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 October. 11 Oct 1653. My son, John Stansfield, was born, being my second child, and christened by the name of my mother's father, that name now quite extinct, being of Cheshire. Christened by Mr. Owen, in my library, at Sayes Court, where he afterward churched my wife (18), I always making use of him on these occasions, because the parish minister dared not have officiated according to the form and usage of the Church of England, to which I always adhered.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 October. 25 Oct 1653. Mr. Owen preached in my library at Sayes Court on Luke xviii. 7, 8, an excellent discourse on the unjust judge, showing why Almighty God would sometimes be compared by such similitudes. He afterward administered to us all the Holy Sacrament.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 March. 29 Mar 1654. That excellent man, Mr. Owen, preached in my library on Matt. xxviii. 6, a resurrection sermon, and after it we all received the Holy Communion.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 July. 13 Jul 1654. We all dined at that most obliging and universally-curious Dr. Wilkins's (40), at Wadham College. He was the first who showed me the transparent apiaries, which he had built like castles and palaces, and so ordered them one upon another, as to take the honey without destroying the bees. These were adorned with a variety of dials, little statues, vanes, etc.; and, he was so abundantly civil, finding me pleased with them, to present me with one of the hives which he had empty, and which I afterward had in my garden at Sayes Court, where it continued many years, and which his Majesty (24) came on purpose to see and contemplate with much satisfaction. He had also contrived a hollow statue, which gave a voice and uttered words by a long, concealed pipe that went to its mouth, while one speaks through it at a good distance. He had, above in his lodgings and gallery, variety of shadows, dials, perspectives, and many other artificial, mathematical, and magical curiosities, a waywiser, a thermometer, a monstrous magnet, conic, and other sections, a balance on a demi-circle; most of them of his own, and that prodigious young scholar Mr. Christopher Wren, who presented me with a piece of white marble, which he had stained with a lively red, very deep, as beautiful as if it had been natural.
Thus satisfied with the civilities of Oxford, we left it, dining at Farringdon, a town which had been newly fired during the wars; and, passing near the seat of Sir Walter Pye, we came to Cadenham.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 October. 3d October, 1654. Having dined here, we passed through Bishop Stortford, a pretty watered town, and so by London, late home to Sayes Court, after a journey of 700 miles, but for the variety an agreeable refreshment after my turmoil and building.

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 September. 30th September 1655. Sir Nicholas Crisp (56) came to treat with me about his vast design of a mole to be made for ships in part of my grounds at Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1656 April. 12th April 1656. Mr. Berkeley (7) and Mr. Robert Boyle (29) (that excellent person and great virtuoso), Dr. Taylor (43), and Dr. Wilkins (42), dined with me at Sayes Court, when I presented Dr. Wilkins (42) with my rare burning-glass. In the afternoon, we all went to Colonel Blount's, to see his newly-invented plows.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 August. 18th August 1658. To Sir Ambrose Browne, at Betchworth Castle, in that tempestuous wind which threw down my greatest trees at Sayes Court, and did so much mischief all over England. It continued the whole night; and, till three in the afternoon of the next day, in the southwest, and destroyed all our winter fruit.

John Evelyn's Diary 1660 November. 27th November, 1660. Came down the Clerk Comptroller (33) [of the Green Cloth] by the Lord Steward's appointment, to survey the land at Sayes Court, on which I had pretense, and to make his report.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 March. 8th March 1661. I went to my Lord Chancellor's (52), and delivered to him the state of my concernment at Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 May. 2d May 1661. I had audience of my Lord Chancellor (52) about my title to Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1661 June. 4th June 1661. Came Sir Charles Harbord (21), his Majesty's (31) surveyor, to take an account of what grounds I challenged at Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 February. 17th February 1662. I went with my Lord of Bristol (49) to see his house at Wimbledon, newly bought of the Queen-Mother (52), to help contrive the garden after the modern. It is a delicious place for prospect and the thickets, but the soil cold and weeping clay. Returned that evening with Sir Henry Bennett (44).
This night was buried in Westminster Abbey the Queen of Bohemia, after all her sorrows and afflictions being come to die in the arms of her nephew, the King (31); also this night and the next day fell such a storm of hail, thunder, and lightning, as never was seen the like in any man's memory, especially the tempest of wind, being southwest, which subverted, besides huge trees, many houses, innumerable chimneys (among others that of my parlor at Sayes Court), and made such havoc at land and sea, that several perished on both. Divers lamentable fires were also kindled at this time; so exceedingly was God's hand against this ungrateful and vicious nation and Court.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

After 07 Feb 1612 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662. Elizabeth's standing collar of reticella is worked with the Royal coat of arms with its lion and unicorn supporters. She wears a gown of Italian silk brocade. The black armband is thought to be a sign of mourning for her brother Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales who died on 07 Feb 1612.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 February. 20th February 1662. I returned home to repair my house, miserably shattered by the late tempest.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 March. 24th March 1662. I returned home with my whole family, which had been most part of the winter, since October, at London, in lodgings near the Abbey of Westminster.

John Evelyn's Diary 1663 May. 30th May 1663. This morning was passed my lease of Sayes Court from the Crown, for the finishing of which I had been obliged to make such frequent journeys to London. I returned this evening, having seen the Russian Ambassador (18) take leave of their Majesties with great solemnity.

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 March. 4th March 1664. Came to dine with me the Earl of Lauderdale (47), his Majesty's (33) great favorite, and Secretary of Scotland; the Earl of Teviot (38); my Lord Viscount Brouncker (53), President of the Royal Society; Dr. Wilkins (50), Dean of Ripon; Sir Robert Murray (56), and Mr. Hooke (28), Curator to the Society.
This spring I planted the Home field and West field about Sayes Court with elms, being the same year that the elms were planted by his Majesty (33) in Greenwich Park.

1664 Comet

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 December. 22d December, 1664. I went to the launching of a new ship of two bottoms, invented by Sir William Petty (41), on which were various opinions; his Majesty (34) being present, gave her the name of the "Experiment": so I returned home, where I found Sir Humphry Winch (42), who spent the day with me.
This year I planted the lower grove next the pond at Sayes Court. It was now exceedingly cold, and a hard, long, frosty season, and the comet was very visible.

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 August. 14 Aug 1668. His Majesty (38) was pleased to grant me a lease of a slip of ground out of Brick Close, to enlarge my fore-court, for which I now gave him thanks; then, entering into other discourse, he talked to me of a new varnish for ships, instead of pitch, and of the gilding with which his new yacht was beautified. I showed his Majesty (38) the perpetual motion sent to me by Dr. Stokes, from Cologne; and then came in Monsieur Colbert (43), the French Ambassador.

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 September. 17 Sep 1668. I entertained Signor Muccinigo, the Venetian Ambassador, of one of the noblest families of the State, this being the day of making his public entry, setting forth from my house with several gentlemen of Venice and others in a very glorious train. He staid with me till the Earl of Anglesea (54) and Sir Charles Cotterell (53) (Master of the Ceremonies) came with the King (38)'s barge to carry him to the Tower, where the guns were fired at his landing; he then entered his Majesty's (38) coach, followed by many others of the nobility. I accompanied him to his house, where there was a most noble supper to all the company, of course. After the extraordinary compliments to me and my wife (33), for the civilities he received at my house, I took leave and returned. He is a very accomplished person. He is since Ambassador at Rome.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 January. 18 Jan 1671. This day I first acquainted his Majesty (40) with that incomparable young man, Gibbon (22), whom I had lately met with in an obscure place by mere accident, as I was walking near a poor solitary thatched house, in a field in our parish, near Sayes Court. I found him shut in; but looking in at the window, I perceived him carving that large cartoon, or crucifix, of Tintoretto, a copy of which I had myself brought from Venice, where the original painting remains. I asked if I might enter; he opened the door civilly to me, and I saw him about such a work as for the curiosity of handling, drawing, and studious exactness, I never had before seen in all my travels. I questioned him why he worked in such an obscure and lonesome place; he told me it was that he might apply himself to his profession without interruption, and wondered not a little how I found him out. I asked if he was unwilling to be made known to some great man, for that I believed it might turn to his profit; he answered, he was yet but a beginner, but would not be sorry to sell off that piece; on demanding the price, he said £100. In good earnest, the very frame was worth the money, there being nothing in nature so tender and delicate as the flowers and festoons about it, and yet the work was very strong; in the piece was more than one hundred figures of men, etc. I found he was likewise musical, and very civil, sober, and discreet in his discourse. There was only an old woman in the house. So, desiring leave to visit him sometimes, I went away.
Of this young artist (22), together with my manner of finding him out, I acquainted the King (40), and begged that he would give me leave to bring him and his work to Whitehall Palace, for that I would adventure my reputation with his Majesty (40) that he had never seen anything approach it, and that he would be exceedingly pleased, and employ him. The King (40) said he would himself go see him. This was the first notice his Majesty (40) ever had of Mr. Gibbon (22).

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 January. 12 Jan 1672. His Majesty (41) renewed us our lease of Sayes Court pastures for ninety-nine years, but ought, according to his solemn promise (as I hope he will still perform), have passed them to us in fee-farm.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 March. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 April. 28 Apr 1676. My wife (41) entertained her Majesty (45) at Deptford, for which the Queen (37) gave me thanks in the withdrawing room at Whitehall.
The University of Oxford presented me with the "Marmora Oxoniensia Arundeliana"; the Bishop of Oxford writing to desire that I would introduce Mr. Prideaux, the editor (a young man most learned in antiquities) to the Duke of Norfolk (49), to present another dedicated to his Grace (49), which I did, and we dined with the Duke (49) at Arundel House, and supped at the Bishop of Rochester's (51) with Isaac Vossius.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

On 01 Mar 1682 John Evelyn 1st Baronet Wotton 1682-1731 was born to John The Younger Evelyn 1655-1699 (27) at Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1682 March. 01 Mar 1682. My second grandchild was born, and christened the next day by our vicar at Sayes Court, by the name of John. I beseech God to bless him!.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 February. 12 Feb 1683. This morning I received the news of the death of my father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne (78), Knt. and Bart., who died at my house at Sayes Court this day at ten in the morning, after he had labored under the gout and dropsy for nearly six months, in the 78th year of his age. The funeral was solemnized on the 19th at Deptford, with as much decency as the dignity of the person, and our relation to him, required; there being invited the Bishop of Rochester (58), several noblemen, knights, and all the fraternity of the Trinity House, of which he had been Master, and others of the country. The vicar preached a short but proper discourse on Psalm xxxix. 10, on the frailty of our mortal condition, concluding with an ample and well-deserved eulogy on the defunct, relating to his honorable birth and ancestors, education, learning in Greek and Latin, modern languages, travels, public employments, signal loyalty, character abroad, and particularly the honor of supporting the Church of England in its public worship during its persecution by the late rebels' usurpation and regicide, by the suffrages of divers Bishops, Doctors of the Church, and others, who found such an asylum in his house and family at Paris, that in their disputes with the Papists (then triumphing over it as utterly lost) they used to argue for its visibility and existence from Sir R. Browne's chapel and assembly there. Then he spoke of his great and loyal sufferings during thirteen years' exile with his present Majesty (52), his return with him in the signal year 1660; his honorable employment at home, his timely Recess to recollect himself, his great age, infirmities, and death.
He gave to the Trinity Corporation that land in Deptford on which are built those almshouses for twenty-four widows of emerited seamen. He was born the famous year of the Gunpowder Treason, in 1605, and being the last [male] of his family, left my wife (48), his only daughter, heir. His grandfather, Sir Richard Browne, was the great instrument under the great Earl of Leicester (favorite to Queen Elizabeth) in his government of the Netherland. He was Master of the Household to King James, and Cofferer; I think was the first who regulated the compositions through England for the King (52)'s household, provisions, progresses,49 etc., which was so high a service, and so grateful to the whole nation, that he had acknowledgments and public thanks sent him from all the counties; he died by the rupture of a vein in a vehement speech he made about the compositions in a Parliament of King James. By his mother's side he was a Gunson, Treasurer of the Navy in the reigns of Henry VIII., Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth, and, as by his large pedigree appears, related to divers of the English nobility. Thus ended this honorable person, after so many changes and tossings to and fro, in the same house where he was born. "Lord teach us so to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom!"
By a special clause in his will, he ordered that his body should be buried in the churchyard under the southeast window of the chancel, adjoining to the burying places of his ancestors, since they came out of Essex into Sayes Court, he being much offended at the novel custom of burying everyone within the body of the church and chancel; that being a favor heretofore granted to martyrs and great persons; this excess of making churches charnel houses being of ill and irreverend example, and prejudicial to the health of the living, besides the continual disturbance of the pavement and seats, and several other indecencies. Dr. Hall, the pious Bishop of Norwich, would also be so interred, as may be read in his testament.

On 12 Feb 1683 Richard Browne 1st Baronet Deptford 1605-1683 (78) died in Sayes Court.

Popish Plot

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 June. 28 Jun 1683. After the Popish Plot, there was now a new and (as they called it) a Protestant Plot discovered, that certain Lords and others should design the assassination of the King (53) and the Duke (49) as they were to come from Newmarket, with a general rising of the nation, and especially of the city of London, disaffected to the present Government. Upon which were committed to the Tower, the Lord Russell (43), eldest son of the Earl of Bedford (66), the Earl of Essex, Mr. Algernon Sidney (60), son to the old Earl of Leicester, Mr. Trenchard, Hampden, Lord Howard of Escrick, and others. A proclamation was issued against my Lord Grey, the Duke of Monmouth (34), Sir Thomas Armstrong, and one Ferguson, who had escaped beyond sea; of these some were said to be for killing the King (53), others for only seizing on him, and persuading him to new counsels, on the pretense of the danger of Popery, should the Duke live to succeed, who was now again admitted to the councils and cabinet secrets. The Lords Essex (60) and Russell (43) were much deplored, for believing they had any evil intention against the King (53), or the Church; some thought they were cunningly drawn in by their enemies for not approving some late counsels and management relating to France, to Popery, to the persecution of the Dissenters, etc. They were discovered by the Lord Howard of Escrick and some false brethren of the club, and the design happily broken; had it taken effect, it would, to all appearance, have exposed the Government to unknown and dangerous events; which God avert!
Was born my granddaughter at Sayes Court, and christened by the name of Martha Maria, our Vicar officiating. I pray God bless her, and may she choose the better part!.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 February. 04 Feb 1684. I went to Says Court to see how the frost had dealt with my garden, where I found many of the greenes and rare plantes utterly destroied. The oranges and mirtills very sick, the rosemary and laurells dead to all appearance, but ye cypress likely to indure It.

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 April. 04 Apr 1684. I return'd home with my family to my house at Says Court, after five months residence in London ; hardly the least appearance of any Spring.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 August. 22 Aug 1687. Returned home to Sayes Court from Wotton, having been five weeks absent with my brother and friends, who entertained us very nobly. God be praised for his goodness, and this refreshment after my many troubles, and let his mercy and providence ever preserve me. Amen.

John Evelyn's Diary 1694 May. 04 May 1694. I went this day with my wife (59) and four servants from Sayes Court, removing much furniture of all sorts, books, pictures, hangings, bedding, etc., to furnish the apartment my brother (76) assigned me, and now, after more than forty years, to spend the rest of my days with him at Wotton, where I was born; leaving my house at Deptford full furnished, and three servants, to my son-in-law Draper, to pass the summer in, and such longer time as he should think fit to make use of it.

John Evelyn's Diary 1698. 30 Jan 1698. The imprisonment of the great banker, Duncombe: censured by Parliament; acquitted by the Lords; sent again to the Tower by the Commons.
The Czar of Muscovy being come to England, and having a mind to see the building of ships, hired my house at Sayes Court, and made it his court and palace, newly furnished for him by the King (47).

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

John Evelyn's Diary 1698. 21 Apr 1698. The Czar went from my house to return home. An exceedingly sharp and cold season.

John Evelyn's Diary 1698. 09 Jun 1698. To Deptford, to see how miserably the Czar had left my house, after three months making it his Court. I got Sir Christopher Wren (74), the King's surveyor, and Mr. London, his gardener, to go and estimate the repairs, for which they allowed £150 in their report to the Lords of the Treasury. I then went to see the foundation of the Hall and Chapel at Greenwich Hospital.

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 24 May 1700. I went from Dover street to Wotton, for the rest of the summer, and removed thither the rest of my goods from Sayes Court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1701. 18 Mar 1701. I let Sayes Court to Lord Carmarthen (42), son to the Duke of Leeds (69). 28th. I went to the funeral of my sister Draper, who was buried at Edmonton in great state. Dr. Davenant displeased the clergy now met in Convocation by a passage in his book, p. 40.

John Evelyn's Diary 1703. 07 Dec 1703. I removed to Dover Street, where I found all well; but houses, trees, garden, etc., at Sayes Court, suffered very much.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. When the Czar of Muscovy came to England, in 1698, proposing to instruct himself in the art of shipbuilding, he was desirous of having the use of Sayes Court, in consequence of its vicinity to the King's dockyard at Deptford. This was conceded; but during his stay he did so much damage that Mr. Evelyn had an allowance of £150 for it. He especially regrets the mischief done to his famous holly hedge, which might have been thought beyond the reach of damage. But one of Czar Peter's favorite recreations had been to demolish the hedges by riding through them in a wheelbarrow.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. October, 1699, his elder brother, George Evelyn, dying without male issue, aged eighty-three, he succeeded to the paternal estate; and in May following, he quitted Sayes Court and went to Wotton, where he passed the remainder of his life, with the exception of occasional visits to London, where he retained a house. In the great storm of 1703, he mentions in his last edition of the "Sylva," above one thousand trees were blown down in sight of his residence.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 January. 1st January 1648-49. I had a lodging and some books at my father-in-law's house, Sayes Court.

Brick Close

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 August. 14 Aug 1668. His Majesty (38) was pleased to grant me a lease of a slip of ground out of Brick Close, to enlarge my fore-court, for which I now gave him thanks; then, entering into other discourse, he talked to me of a new varnish for ships, instead of pitch, and of the gilding with which his new yacht was beautified. I showed his Majesty (38) the perpetual motion sent to me by Dr. Stokes, from Cologne; and then came in Monsieur Colbert (43), the French Ambassador.

St Paul's Church, Deptford

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 January. 25 Jan 1654. Died my son, J. Stansfield, of convulsion fits; buried at Deptford on the east corner of the church, near his mother's great-grandfather, and other relatives.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 February. 15th February 1658. The afflicting hand of God being still upon us, it pleased him also to take away from us this morning my youngest son, George, now seven weeks languishing at nurse, breeding teeth, and ending in a dropsy. God's holy will be done! He was buried in Deptford Church, the 17th following.

John Evelyn's Diary 1681 September. 06 Sep 1681. Died my pretty grandchild, and was interred on the 8th [at Deptford].

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 February. 12 Feb 1683. This morning I received the news of the death of my father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne (78), Knt. and Bart., who died at my house at Sayes Court this day at ten in the morning, after he had labored under the gout and dropsy for nearly six months, in the 78th year of his age. The funeral was solemnized on the 19th at Deptford, with as much decency as the dignity of the person, and our relation to him, required; there being invited the Bishop of Rochester (58), several noblemen, knights, and all the fraternity of the Trinity House, of which he had been Master, and others of the country. The vicar preached a short but proper discourse on Psalm xxxix. 10, on the frailty of our mortal condition, concluding with an ample and well-deserved eulogy on the defunct, relating to his honorable birth and ancestors, education, learning in Greek and Latin, modern languages, travels, public employments, signal loyalty, character abroad, and particularly the honor of supporting the Church of England in its public worship during its persecution by the late rebels' usurpation and regicide, by the suffrages of divers Bishops, Doctors of the Church, and others, who found such an asylum in his house and family at Paris, that in their disputes with the Papists (then triumphing over it as utterly lost) they used to argue for its visibility and existence from Sir R. Browne's chapel and assembly there. Then he spoke of his great and loyal sufferings during thirteen years' exile with his present Majesty (52), his return with him in the signal year 1660; his honorable employment at home, his timely Recess to recollect himself, his great age, infirmities, and death.
He gave to the Trinity Corporation that land in Deptford on which are built those almshouses for twenty-four widows of emerited seamen. He was born the famous year of the Gunpowder Treason, in 1605, and being the last [male] of his family, left my wife (48), his only daughter, heir. His grandfather, Sir Richard Browne, was the great instrument under the great Earl of Leicester (favorite to Queen Elizabeth) in his government of the Netherland. He was Master of the Household to King James, and Cofferer; I think was the first who regulated the compositions through England for the King (52)'s household, provisions, progresses,49 etc., which was so high a service, and so grateful to the whole nation, that he had acknowledgments and public thanks sent him from all the counties; he died by the rupture of a vein in a vehement speech he made about the compositions in a Parliament of King James. By his mother's side he was a Gunson, Treasurer of the Navy in the reigns of Henry VIII., Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth, and, as by his large pedigree appears, related to divers of the English nobility. Thus ended this honorable person, after so many changes and tossings to and fro, in the same house where he was born. "Lord teach us so to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom!"
By a special clause in his will, he ordered that his body should be buried in the churchyard under the southeast window of the chancel, adjoining to the burying places of his ancestors, since they came out of Essex into Sayes Court, he being much offended at the novel custom of burying everyone within the body of the church and chancel; that being a favor heretofore granted to martyrs and great persons; this excess of making churches charnel houses being of ill and irreverend example, and prejudicial to the health of the living, besides the continual disturbance of the pavement and seats, and several other indecencies. Dr. Hall, the pious Bishop of Norwich, would also be so interred, as may be read in his testament.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853 (41). Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

Around 1575 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (42).

Around 1575 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (42) wearing his Garter Collar.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 August. 28 Aug 1683. My sweet little grandchild, Martha Maria, died, and on the 29th was buried in the parish church.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 March. 07 Mar 1685. My daughter Mary (20) was taken with the small pox, and there soon was found no hope of her recovery. A very greate affliction to me : but God's holy will be done.
10 Mar 1685. She receiv'd the blessed Sacrament; after which, disposing herselfe to suffer what God should detErmine to inflict, she bore the remainder of her sicknesse with extraordinary patience and piety, and more than ordinary resignation and blessed frame of mind. She died the 14th, to our unspeakable sorrow and affliction, and not to ours onely, but that of all who knew her, who were many of the best quality, greatest and most virtuous persons. The justnesse of her stature, person, comelinesse of countenance, gracefull nesse of motion, unaffected tho' more than ordinary beautifull, were the least of her ornaments compared with those of her mind. Of early piety, singularly religious, spending a part of every day in private devotion, reading and other vertuous exereises; she had collected and written out many of the most usefull and judicious periods of the books she read in a kind of common-place, as out of Dr. Hammond on the New Testament, and most of the best practical treatises. She had read and digested a considerable deale of history and of places. The French tongue was as familiar to her as English; she understood Italian, and was able to render a laudable account of what she read and observed, to which assisted a most faithful memory and discernment; and she did make very prudent and discreete reflexions upon what she had observed of the conversations among which she had at any time ben, which being continualy of persons of the best quality, she thereby improved. She had an excellent voice, to which she play'd a thorough-bass on the harpsichord, in both which she arived to that perfection, that of the schollars of those two famous masters Signors Pietro and Bartholomeo she was esteem'd the best; for the sweetnesse of her voice and management of it added such an agreeablenesse to her countenance, without any constraint or concerne, that when she sung, it was as charming to the eye as to the eare; this I rather note, because it was a universal remarke, and for which so many noble and judicious persons in musiq desired to heare her, the last being at Lord Arundel's of Wardour (see above). What shall 1 say, or rather not say, of the cheerefullness and agreeablenesse of her humour ? condescending to the meanest servant in the family, or others, she still kept up respect, without the least pride. She would often reade to them, examine, instruct, and pray with them if they were sick, so as she was exceedingly beloved of every body. Piety was so prevalent an ingredient in her constitution (as I may say) that even amongst equals and superiors she no sooner became intimately acquainted, but she would endeavour to improve them, by insinuating something of religious, and that tended to bring them to a love of devotion; she had one or two confidents with whom she used to passe whole dayes In fasting, reading and prayers, especialy before the monethly communion and other solemn occasions. She abhorr'd flattery, and tho' she had aboundance of witt, the raillery was so innocent and ingenuous that it was most agreeable; she sometimes would see a play, but since the stage grew licentious, express'd herselfe weary of them, and the time spent at the theater was an unaccountable vanity. She never play'd at cards without extreame importunity and for the company, but this was so very seldome that I cannot number it among any thing she could name a fault. No one could read prose or verse better or with more judgment; and as she read, so she writ, not only most correct orthography, with that maturitie of judgment and exactnesse of the periods, choice of expressions, and familiarity of stile, that some letters of hers have astonish'd me and others to whom she has occasionally written. She had a talent of rehersing any comical part or poeme, as to them she might be decently free with was more pleasing than heard on yb theater; she daunc'd with the greatest grace I had ever seene, and so would her master say, who was Monsr Isaac; but she seldome shew'd that perfection, save in the gracefullnesse of her carriage, which was with an aire of spritely modestie not easily to be described. Nothing affected, but natural and easy as well in her deportment as in her discourse, which was always materiall, not trifling, and to which the extraordinary sweetnesse of her tone, even in familiar speaking, was very charming. Nothing was so pretty as her descending to play with little children, whom she would caresse and humour with greate delight. But she most affected to be with grave and sober men, of whom she might learne something, and improve herselfe. I have ben assisted by her in reading and praying by me; comprehensive of uncommon notions, curious of knowing every thing to some excesse, had I not sometimes repressed it. Nothing was so delightfull to her as to go into my study, where she would willingly have spent whole dayes, for as I sayd she had read aboundance of history, and all the best poets, even Terence, Plautus, Homer, Virgil, Horace, Ovid; all the best romances and modern poemes; she could compose happily, and put in pretty symbols, as in the Mundus Mulie bris, wherein is an enumeration of the immense variety of the modes and ornaments belonging to the sex; but all these are vaine trifles to the virtues which adorn'd her soule; she was sincerely religious, most dutifull to her parents, whom she lov'd with an affection temper'd with greate esteeme, so as we were easy and free^ and never were so well pleas'd as when she was with us, nor needed we other conversation; she was kind to her sisters, and was still improving them by her constant course of piety. Oh deare, sweete, and desireable child, how shall I part with all this goodness and virtue without the bittemesse of sorrow and reluctancy of a tender parent! Thy affection, duty, and love to me was that of a friend as well as a child. Nor lesse deare to thy mother, whose example and tender care of thee was unparellel'd, nor was thy returne to her lesse conspicuous; Oh ! how she mourns thy loss! how desolate hast thou left us! To the grave shall we both carry thy memory!
God alone (in whose bosom thou art at rest and happy !) give us to resigne thee and all our contentments (for thou indeede wert all in this world) to his blessed pleasure ! Let him be glorified by our submission, and give us grace to blesse him for the graces he planted in thee, thy virtuous life, pious and holy death, which is indeede the onely comfort of our soules, hastening thro' the infinite love and mercy of the Lord Jesus to be shortly with thee, deare child, and with thee and those blessed saints like thee, glorifye the Redeemer of the world to all eternity ! Amen !
It was in the 19th year of her age that this sicknesse happen'd to her. An accident contributed to this disease; she had an apprehension of it in particular, and which struck her but two days before she came home, by an imprudent gentlewoman whom she went with Lady Falkland to visite, who after they had ben a good while in the house, told them she had a servant sick of the small pox (who indeede died the next day); this my poore child acknowledg'd made an impression on her spirits. There were foure gentlemen of quality offering to treate with me about marriage, and I freely gave her her owne choice, knowing her discretion. She showed great indifference to marrying at all, for truly, says she to her mother (the other day), were I assur'd of your life and my deare father's, never would I part from you; I love you and this home, where we serve God, above all things, nor ever shall I be so happy; I know and consider the vicissitudes of the world, I have some experience of its vanities, and but for decency more than inclination, and that you judge it expedient for me, I would not change my condition, but rather add the fortune you designe me to my sisters, and keepe up the reputation of our family, This was so discreetly and sincerely utter'd that it could not but proceede from an extraordinary child, and one who lov'd her parents beyond example.
At London she tooke this fatal disease, and the occasion of her being there was this; my Lord Viscount Falkland's (29) Lady having ben our neighbour (as he was Treasurer of the Navy), she tooke so greate an affection to my daughter, that when they went back in the autumn to the Citty, nothing would satisfie their incessant importunity but letting her accompany my Lady, and staying sometime with her; it was with yc greatest reluctance I complied. Whilst she was there, my Lord (29) being musical, when I saw my Lady would not part with her till Christmas, I was not unwilling she should improve the opportunity of learning of Signr Pietro, who had an admirable way both of composure and teaching. It was the end of February before I could prevail with my Lady to part with her; but my Lord going into Oxfordshire to stand for Knight of the Shire there, she express'd her wish to come home, being tir'd of ye vain and empty conversation of the towne, ye theatres, the court, and trifling visites wch consum'd so much precious time, and made her sometimes misse of that regular course of piety that gave her ye greatest satisfaction. She was weary of this life, and I think went not thrice to Court all this time, except when her mother or I carried her. She did not affect shewing herselfe, she knew ye Court well, and pass'd one summer in it at Windsor with Lady Tuke one of the Queene's women of the bed chamber (a most virtuous relation of hers); she was not fond of that glittering scene, now become abominably licentious, though there was a designe of Lady Rochester (39) and Lady Clarendon to have made her a maid of honour to the Queene as soon as there was a vacancy. But this she did not set her heart upon, nor in deede on any thing so much as the service of God, a quiet and regular life, and how she might improve herselfe in the most necessary accomplishments, and to wch she was ariv'd at so greate a measure. This is y° little history and imperfect character of my deare child, whose piety, virtue, and incomparable endowments deserve a. Monument more durable than brasse and marble. Precious is the memorial of the just.
Much I could enlarge on every peribd of this hasty account, but that I ease and discharge my overcoming passion for the present, so many things worthy an excellent Christian and dutifull child crowding upon me. Never can I say enough, oh deare, my deare child, whose memory is so precious to me! This deare child was born at Wotton in the same house and chamber in which I first drew my breath, my wife (50) having retir'd to my brother there in the great sicknesse that yeare upon the first of that moneth, and neere the ve'ry houre that I was borne, upon the last : viz. October. 16 March. She was interr'd in the South-east end of the Church at Deptford, neere her grandmother and severall of my younger children and relations. My desire was she should have ben carried and layed among my own parents and relations at Wotton, where I desire to be interr'd myselfe, when God shall call me out of this uncertaine transitory life, but some circumstances did not permit it. Our vicar Dr. Holden preach'd her funeral sermon on 1 Phil. 21. "For to me to live is Christ and to die is gaine," upon which he made an apposite discourse, as those who heard it assur'd me (for griefe suffer'd me not to be present), concluding with a modest recital of her many virtues and signal piety, so as to draw both teares and admiration from the hearers. I was not altogether unwilling that something of this sort should be spoken, for the edification and encouragement of other young people. Divers noble persons honour'd her funeral, some in person, others sending their coaches, of wch there were six or seven with six horses, viz. the Countesse of Sunderland (39), Earle of Clarendon, Lord Godolphin (39), Sr Stephen Fox (57), Sr Wm Godolphin, Viscount Falkland, and others. There were distributed amongst her friends about 60 rings. Thus liv'd, died, and was buried the joy of my life, and ornament of her sex and of my poore family ! God Almighty of his infinite mercy grant me the grace thankfully to resigne myselfe and all I have, or had, to his Divine pleasure, and in his good time, restoring health and comfort to my family : " teach me so to number my days that I may apply my heart to wisdom," be prepar'd for my dissolution, and that into the hands of my blessed Saviour I may recommend my spirit ! Amen !
On looking into her closet, it is incredible what a number of collections she had made from historians, poetes, travellers, &c. but above all devotions, contemplations, and resolutions on these contemplations, found under her hand in a booke most methodicaly dispos'd; prayers, meditations, and devotions on particular occasions, with many pretty letters to her confidants; one to a divine (not nam'd) to whom she writes that he would be her ghostly father, and would not despise her for her many errors and the imperfections of her youth, but beg of God to give her courage to acquaint him with all her faults, imploring his assistance and spiritual directions. I well remember she had often desir'd me to recommend her to such a person, but I did not think fit to do it as yet, seeing her apt to be scrupulous, and knowing the great innocency and integrity of her life. It is astonishing how one who had acquir'd such substantial and practical knowledge in other ornamental parts of education, especialy music both vocal and instrumental, In dauncing, paying and receiving visites, and necessary conversation, could accomplish halfe of what she has left; but as she never affected play or cards, which consume a world of precious time, so she was in continual exercise, which yet abated nothing of her most agreeable conversation. But she was a little miracle while she liv'd, and so she died!.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 August. 27 Aug 1685. My daughter Elizabeth (17) died of the small pox, soon after having married a young man, nephew of Sir John Tippett, surveyor of the Navy, and one of the Commissioners. The 30th she was buried in the Church at Deptford. Thus in lesse than six moneths were we deprived of two children for our unworthinesse and causes best knowne to God, whom I beseeche from the bottome of my heart that he will give us grace to make that right use of all these chastisements, that we may become better, and entirely submitt in all things to his infinite wise disposal. Amen.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 April. 10 Apr 1687. In the last week there was issued a Dispensation from all obligations and tests, by which Dissenters and Papists especially had public liberty of exercising their several ways of worship, without incurring the penalty of the many Laws and Acts of Parliament to the contrary. This was purely obtained by the Papists, thinking thereby to ruin the Church of England, being now the only church which so admirably and strenuously opposed their superstition. There was a wonderful concourse of people at the Dissenters' meeting house in this parish, and the parish church [Deptford] left exceedingly thin. What this will end in, God Almighty only knows; but it looks like confusion, which I pray God avert.

John Evelyn's Diary 1689 January. 31 Jan 1689. At our church (the next day being appointed a thanksgiving for deliverance by the Prince of Orange (38), with prayers purposely composed), our lecturer preached in the afternoon a very honest sermon, showing our duty to God for the many signal deliverances of our Church, without touching on politics.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

Trinity House

Execution of Deceased Regicides

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1661 January. 30 Jan 1661..Fast day1. The first time that this day hath been yet observed: and Mr. Mills made a most excellent sermon, upon "Lord forgive us our former iniquities;" speaking excellently of the justice of God in punishing men for the sins of their ancestors.
Home, and John Goods comes, and after dinner I did pay him 30l. for my Lady (36), and after that Sir W. Pen (39) and I into Moorfields and had a brave talk, it being a most pleasant day, and besides much discourse did please ourselves to see young Davis and Whitton, two of our clerks, going by us in the field, who we observe to take much pleasure together, and I did most often see them at play together.
Back to the Old James in Bishopsgate Street, where Sir W. Batten and Sir Wm. Rider met him about business of the Trinity House. So I went home, and there understand that my mother is come home well from Brampton, and had a letter from my brother John, a very ingenious one, and he therein begs to have leave to come to town at the Coronacion.
Then to my Lady Batten’s; where wife (20) and she are lately come back again from being abroad, and seeing of Cromwell, Ireton, and Bradshaw hanged and buried at Tyburn. Then I home.
Note 1. 30 Jan the anniversary of the execution of Charles I and was regarded as a Fast Day.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 April. 19 Apr 1665. Invited to a great dinner at the Trinity House, where I had business with the Commissioners of the Navy, and to receive the second £5,000, impressed for the service of the sick and wounded prisoners.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 June. 11 Jun 1666. Trinity Monday, after a sermon, applied to the remeeting of the Corporation of the Trinity-House, after the late raging and wasting pestilence: I dined with them in their new room in Deptford, the first time since it was rebuilt.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 June. 19 Jun 1671. To a splendid dinner at the great room in Deptford Trinity House, Sir Thomas Allen [Note. Possibly Thomas Allen 1st Baronet 1633-1690 (38), Thomas Allen 1603-1681 (68).] chosen Master, and succeeding the Earl of Craven (63).

Dover

Henry II travels to Normandy

On 10 Jan 1156 Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (22) crossed from Dover to Wissant. Richard "The Loyal" Lucy 1089-1179 (67) was appointed Regent in Henry's absence. Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (34) was placed in the care of Theobald of Bec Archbishop of Canterbury 1090-1161 (66) and John of Salisbury Bishop Chartres 1118-1180 (38). Her party included her sister Petronilla Poitiers 1125-1193 (31).

In 1187 Eustace Fiennes 1112-1187 (75) died at Dover.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 08 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23) To the Sheriff of Leicester. Order to cause a coroner for that county to be elected in place of John de Noveray, of Burton, lately elected in the late King's reign, who is insufficiently qualified.
Memorandum, that on Sunday before the Feast of St Vincent the Martyr [22 Jan], at Dover in the King's chamber in the Priory of St Martin, Dover, in the evening (crepsusculo noctis), in the presence of William Inge, knight, William de Melton and Adam de Osgoodby, clerks, John Langton Bishop of Chichester -1337Sir William Melton to be carried with him in the wardrobe beyond sea; and the King straightaway delivered by his own hand another seal of his shortly before made anew at London for the government of the realm in the King's absence in a red bag (bursa) sealed with the seal of William Inge to the chancellor. With which seal the chancellor caused writs to be sealed, after the King's passage, in the hospital of Domus Dei, under the testimony of Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24) then Keeper of the realm of England, on the Monday next following, on which day the King in the early morning (summo mane) passed the sea at Dover.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 22 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. Robert Terry, of Whytefield, imprisoned at Northampton for the death of Galianus de Bek, has letters to the Sheriff of Nottingham to bail him until the first assize. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 22 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover To the Sheriff of Kent. Order to provide 75 thousands of wood and 200 quarters of charcoal for the expenses of the King's household on his return from parts beyond the sea, so that he have at Dover against the King's return 25 thousands of wood and 30 quarters of coal, and at Canterbury 30 thousands of wood and 100 quarters of coal, and at Rochester (Rofham) 20 thousands of wood and 70 quarters of coal; to be delivered by indenture to John de Sumery, scullion (scutell') of the king's household, or such as supply his place. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

King Edward II and Isabella of France arrive in England

Fine Rolls Edward II. On 07 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23) and Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (13) returned from their wedding in Boulogne-sur-Mer to Dover.

07 Feb 1308. Be it remembered that on Wednesday after the Purification, Edward II (23), the king, returning from beyond seas, to wit, from Boulogne-sur-Mer, where he took to wife Isabel (13), daughter of the king of France (39), touched at Dover in his barge about the ninth hour [1500], Hugh le Despenser (46) and the lord of Castellione of Gascony being in his company, and the queen a little afterward touched there with certain ladies accompanying her, and because the great seal which had been taken with him beyond seas then remained in the keeping of the keeper of the wardrobe who could not arrive on that day, no writ was sealed from the hour of the king's coming until Friday following on which day the bishop of Chichester, chancellor, about the ninth hour [1500] delivered to the king in his chamber in Dover castle the seal used in England during the king's absence, and the king, receiving the same, delivered it to William de Melton (33), controller of the wardrobe, and forthwith delivered with his own hand to the chancellor the great seal under the seal of J. de Benstede, keeper of the wardrobe, and Master John Painter Fraunceis, in the presence of Thomas, earl of Lancaster (30), Peter, earl of Cornwall (24), and Hugh le Despenser (46), William Martyn and William Inge, knights, and Adam de Osgodby, clerk ; and the chancellor on that day after lunch in his room (hospicio) in God's House, Dover, sealed writs with the great seal.

Coronation of Edward II and Isabella

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 08 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. To William Leybourne. Order to attend the king's coronation with his wife on Sunday next after the feast of St Valentine.
The like to seventy others in various counties.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 09 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. To Alice, late wife of Roger Bigod, earl of Norfolk and Marshall of England. Order to meet the king at Dover on his return from France with his consort about Sunday next after the Feast of the Purification of St Mary. Witnessed by Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).
The like to:
Elizabeth, countess of Hereford and Essex (25).
Henry de Lancastre (27)
Robert de Monte Alto
Almaric de Sancto Amando[Ibid]
To R Archbishop of Canterbury (63). Order to attend the king's coronaion on Sunday next after the feast of St Valentine [14 Feb] at Westminster, to execute what pertains to his office.
To the Sheriff of Surrey. Order to proclaim in market towns, etc., that no knight, esquire, or other shall, under pain of forfeiture, pressure to tourney or make jousts or bordices (torneare, justos seu burdseicas facere), or otherwise go armed at Croydon or elsewhere before the king's coronation.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XIV - The coronation of king Edward the third. 01 Feb 1327. AFTER that the most part of the company of Hainault were departed and sir John Hainault (39) lord of Beaumont tarried, the queen (32) gave leave to her people to depart, saving a certain noble knights, the which she kept still about her and her son to counsel them, and commanded all then that departed to be at London the next Christmas, for as then she was determined to keep open court, and all they promised her so to do. And when Christmas was come, she held a great court. And thither came dukes,' earls, barons, knights, and all the nobles of the realm, with prelates and burgesses of good towns; and at this assembly it was advised that the realm could not long endure without a head and a chief lord. Then they put in writing all the deeds of the king (42) who was in prison, and all that he had done by evil counsel, and all his usages and evil behavings, and how evil he had governed his realm, the which was read openly in plain audience, to the intent that the noble sages of the realm might take thereof good advice, and to fall at accord how the realm should be governed from thenceforth. And when all the cases and deeds that the king had done and consented to, and all his behaving and usages were read and well understanded, the barons and knights and all the counsels of the realm drew them apart to counsel ; and the most part of them accorded, and namely the great lords and nobles with the burgesses of the good towns, according as they had heard say and knew themselves the most part of his deeds. Wherefore they concluded that such a man (42) was not worthy to be a king, nor to bear a crown royal, nor to have the name of a king. But they all accorded that Edward (14) his eldest son, who was there present and was rightful heir, should be crowned king instead of his father, so that he would take good counsel, sage and true, about him, so than it was before, and that the old king his father (42) should be well and honestly kept as long as he lived, according to his estate. And thus as it was agreed by all the nobles, so it was accomplished ; and then was crowned with a crown royal at the palace of Westminster beside London the young king Edward the third (14), who in his, days after was right fortunate and happy in arms. This coronation was in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVI., on Christmasday [Note. Other sources day 01 Feb 1327], and as then the young king was about the age of sixteen ; and they held the feast till the Conversion of Saint Paul following, and in the meantime greatly was feasted sir John of Hainault (39) and all the princes and nobles of his country, and was given to him and to his company many rich jewels. And so he and his company in great feast and solace both with lords and ladies tarried till the Twelfth day. And then sir John of Hainault (39) heard tidings how that the king of Bohemia (30) and the earl of Hainault (41) his brother and other great plenty of lords of France had ordained to be at Conde at a great feast and tourney that was there cried. Then would sir John of Hainault no longer abide for no prayer, so great desire he had to be at the said tourney, and to see the earl his brother and other lords of his country, and specially the right noble king in largess the gentle Charles king of Bohemia. When the young king Edward (14) and the queen (32) his mother and the barons saw that he would no longer tarry, and that their request could not avail, they gave him leave sore against their wills, and the king (14) by the counsel of the queen (32) his mother did give him four hundred marks sterlings of rent heritable to hold of him in fee, to be paid every year in the town of Bruges, and also did give to Philip of Chateaux, his chief esquire and his sovereign counsellor, a hundred mark of rent yearly, to be paid at the said place, and also delivered him much money to pay therewith the costs of him and of his company, till he come into his own country, and caused him to be conducted with many noble knights to Dover, and there delivered hint all his passage free. And to the ladies that were come into England with the queen (32), and namely to the countess of Garennes, who was sister to the earl of Bar, and to divers other ladies and damosels, there were given many fair and rich jewels at their departing. And when sir John of Hainault was departed from the young king Edward, and all his company, and were come to Dover, they entered incontinent into their ships to pass the sea, to the intent to come betimes to the said tourney; and there went with him fifteen young lusty knights of England, to go to this tourney with him and to acquaint them with the strange lords and knights that should be there, and they had great honour of all the company that tourneyed at that time at Conde.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XV - How that king Robert de Bruce of Scotland defied king Edward. AFTER that sir John of Hainault (39) was departed from king Edward (14), he and the queen (32) his mother governed the realm by the counsel of the earl of Kent (25), uncle to the king, and by the counsel of sir Roger Mortimer (39), who had great lands in England to the sum of seven hundred pounds of rent yearly. And they both were banished and chased out of England with the queen (32), as ye have heard before. Also they used much after the counsel of sir Thomas Wake (30), and by the advice of other who were reputed for the most sagest of the realm. Howbeit there were some had envy thereat, the which never died in England, and also it reigneth and will reign in divers other countries. Thus passed forth the winter and the Lent season till Easter, and then the king (14) and the queen (32) and all the realm was in good peace all this season. Then so it fortuned that king Robert of Scotland (52), who had been right hardy and had suffered much travail against Englishmen, and oftentimes he had been chased and discomfited in the time of king Edward the first, grandfather to this young king Edward the third (14), he was as then become very old and ancient, and sick (as it was said) of the great evil and malady. When he knew the adventures that was fallen in England, how that the old king Edward the second (42) was taken and deposed down from his regaly and his crown, and certain of his counsellors beheaded and put to destruction, as ye have heard herebefore, then he bethought him that he would defy the young king Edward the third (14), because he was young and that the barons of the realm were not all of one accord, as it was said : therefore he [thought] the better to speed in his purpose to conquer part of England. And so about Easter in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. he sent his defiance to the young king Edward the third and to all the realm, sending them word how that he would enter into the realm of England and bren before him as he had done beforetime at such season as the discomfiture was at the castle of Stirling, whereas the Englishmen received great damage. When the king of England (14) and his council perceived that they were defied, they caused it to be known over all the realm, and commanded that all the nobles and all other should be ready apparelled every man after his estate, and that they should be by Ascension-day next after at the town of York, standing northward. The king sent much people before to keep the frontiers against Scotland, and sent a great ambassade to sir John of Hainault (39), praying him right affectuously that he would help to succour and to keep company with him in his voyage against the Scots, and that he world be with him at the Ascensionday next after at York, with such company as he might get of men of war in those parts. When sir John of Hainault lord of Beaumont (39) heard the king's (14) desire, he sent straight his letters and his messengers in every place whereas he thought to recover or attain to have any company of men of war, in Flanders, in Hainault, in Brabant, and in other places, desiring them that in their best apparel for the war they would meet him at Wissant, for to go over the sea with him into England. And all such as he sent unto came to him with a glad cheer, and divers other that heard thereof, in trust to attain to as much honour as they had that were with him in England before at the other voyage. So that by that time the said lord Beaumont (39) was come to Wissant, there was ready ships for him and his company, brought out of England. And so they took shipping and passed over the sea and arrived at Dover, and so then ceased not to ride till: they came within three days of Pentecost to the town of York, whereas the king (14) and the queen (32) his mother and all his lords were with great host tarrying the coming of sir John of Hainault (39), and had sent many before of their men of arms, archers and common people of the good towns and villages ; and as people resorted, they were caused to be lodged two or three leagues off, all about in the country. And on a day thither came sir John of Hainault (39) and his company, who were right welcome and well received both of the king (14), of the queen his mother, and of all other barons, and to them was delivered the suburbs of the city to lodge in. And to sir John of Hainault was delivered an abbey of white monks for him and his household. There came with him out of Hainault the lord of Enghien, who was called sir Gaultier, and sir Henry lord d'Antoing, and the lord of Fagnolle, and sir Fastres du Roeulx, sir Robert de Bailleul, and sir Guilliam de Bailleul his brother, and the lord of Havreth, chatelain of Mons, sir Allard de Briffeuil, sir Michael de Ligne, sir John de Montigny the younger and his brother, sir Sanses de Boussoit, the lord of Gommegnies, sir Perceval de Semeries, the lord of Beaurieu and the lord of Floyon. Also of the country of Flanders there was sir Hector of Vilain, sir John de Rhodes, sir Wu there was sir John le Belt and sir Henry his brother, sir Godfrey de la Chapelle, sir Hugh d'Ohey, sir John de Libyne, sir Lambert d'Oupey, and sir Gilbert de Herck: and out of Cambresis and Artois there were come certain knights of their own good wills to advance their bodies: so that sir John of Hainault had well in his company five hundred men of arms, well apparelled and richly mounted. And after the feast of Pentecost came thither sir Guilliam de Juliers (28), who was after duke of Juliers after the decease of his father, and sir Thierry of Heinsberg, who was after earl of Loos, and with them a right fair rout, and all to keep company with the gentle knight sir John of Hainault lord Beaumont.

Battle of Stanhope Park

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XVIII - How the king of England made his first journey against the Scots. 03 Aug 1327. Battle of Stanhope Park. And when they had well rested them and taken repast, then the trumpet sounded to horse, and every man mounted, and the banners and standards followed this new-made knight, every battle by itself in good order, through mountains and dales, ranged as well as they might, ever ready apparelled to fight ; and they rode and made such haste that about noon they were so near the Scots that each of them might clearly see other. And as soon as the Scots saw them, they issued out of their lodges afoot, and ordained three great battles in the availing of the hill, and at the foot of this mountain there ran a great river full of great rocks and stones, so that none might pass over without great danger or jeopardy ; and though the Englishmen had passed over the river, yet was there no place nor room between the hill and the river to set the battle in good order. The Scots had stablished their two first battles at the two corners of the mountain, joining to the rocks, so that none might well mount upon the hill to assail them, but the Scots were ever ready to beat with stones the assailants, if they passed the river. And when the lords of England saw the behaving and the manner of the Scots, they made all their people to alight afoot and to put off their spurs, and arranged three great battles, as they had done before, and there were made many new knights. And when their battles were set in good order, then some of the lords of England brought their young king a-horseback before all the battles of the host, to the intent to give thereby the more courage to all his people, the which king in full goodly manner prayed and required them right graciously that every man would pain them to do their best to save his honour and common weal of his realm. And it was commanded upon pain of death that were so near together that they might know each other's arms. Then the host stood still to take other counsel. And some of the host mounted on good horses and rode forth to skirmish with them and to behold the passage of the river and to see the countenance of their enemies more nearer. And there were heralds of arms sent to the Scots, giving them knowledge, if that they would come and pass the river to fight with them in the plain field, they would draw back from the river and give them sufficient place to arrange their battles either the same day or else the next, as they would choose themselves, or else to let them do likewise and they would come over to them. And when the Scots heard this, they took counsel among themselves, and anon they answered the heralds, how they would do neither the one nor the other, and said, `Sirs, your king and his lords see well how we be here in this realm and have brent and wasted the country as we have passed through, and if they be displeased therewith, let them amend it when they will, for here we will abide as long as it shall please us.' And as soon as the king of England (14) heard that answer, it was incontinent cried that all the host should lodge there that night without reculing back. And so the host lodged there that night with much pain on the hard ground and stones, always still armed. They had no stakes nor rods to tie withal their horses, nor forage, nor bush to make withal any fire. And when they were thus lodged, then the Scots caused some of their people to keep still the field, whereas they had ordained their battles; and the remnant went to their lodgings, and they made such fires that it was marvel to behold. And between the day and the night they made a marvellous great bruit, with blowing of horns all at once, that it seemed properly that all the devils of hell had been there. Thus these two hosts were lodged that night, the which was Saint Peter's night in the beginning of August the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. And the next morning the lords of England heard mass and ranged again their battles as they had done the day before; and the Scots in like wise ordered their battles. Thus both the hosts stood still in battle till it was noon. The Scots made never semblant to come to the English host to fight with them, nor in like wise the Englishmen to them ; for they could not approach together without great damage. There were divers companions a-horseback that passed the river, and some afoot, to scrimmish with the Scots, and in likewise some of the Scots brake out and scrimmished with them; so that there were divers on both parties slain, wounded and taken prisoners. And after that noon was past, the lords of England commanded every man to draw to their lodging, for they saw well the Scots would not fight with them. And in like manner thus they did three days together, and the Scots in like case kept still their mountains. Howbeit there was scrimmishing on both parties, and divers slain and prisoners taken. And every night the Scots made great fires and great bruit with shouting and blowing of horns. The intention of the Englishmen was to hold the Scots there in manner as besieged (for they could not fight with them thereas they were), thinking to have famished them. And the Englishmen knew well by such prisoners as they had taken that the Scots had neither bread, wine nor salt, nor other purveyance, save of beasts they had great plenty, the which they had taken in the country and might eat at their pleasure without bread, which was an evil diet, for they lacked oaten meal to make cakes withal, as is said before;' the which diet some of the Englishmen used when they had need, specially borderers when they make roads into Scotland. And in the morning the fourth day the Englishmen looked' on the mountain whereas the Scots were, and they could see no creature, for the Scots were departed at midnight. Then was there sent men a-horseback and afoot over the river to know where they were become; and about noon lodged, and drew to that part, embattled in good order, and lodged them on another hill against the Scots, and ranged their battles and made semblant to have come to them. Then the Scots issued out of their lodges and set their battles along the river side against them ; but they would never come toward the English host, and the Englishmen could not go to them, without they would have been slain or taken at advantage. Thus they lodged each against other the space of eighteen days; and oftentimes the king of England sent to them his heralds of arms, offering them that if they would come and fight with him, he would give them place sufficient on the plain ground to pitch their field; or else let them give him room and place, and he assured them that he would come over the river and fight with them but the Scots would never agree thereto. Thus both the hosts suffered much pain and travail the space that they lay so near together: and the first night that the English host was thus lodged on the second mountain the lord William Douglas took with him about two hundred men of arms and passed the river far off from the host, so that he was not perceived, and suddenly he brake into the English host about midnight crying, 'Douglas! Douglas! Ye shall all die, thieves of England!' and he slew, or he ceased, three hundred men, some in their beds and some scant ready ; and he strake his horse with the spurs and came to the king's (14) own tent, always crying ,Douglas!' and strake asunder two or three cords of the king's tent and so departed, and in that retreat he lost some of his men. Then he returned again to the Scots, so that there was no more done but every night the English host made good and sure watch, for they doubted making of skryes ; and ever the most part of-the host lay in their harness ; and every day there were scrimmisbes made, and men slain on both parties: and in conclusion, the last day of~twenty-four, there was a Scottish knight taken, who against his will shewed to the lords of England what state and condition the Scots were in : he was so sore examined that for fear of his life he shewed how the lords of Scotland were accorded among themselves that the same night every man should be ready armed, and to follow the banners of the lord William Douglas, and every man to keep him secret. But the knight could not shew them what they intended to do. Then the lords of England drew them to council, and there it was thought among them that the Scots. might in the night time come and assail their host on both sides, to adventure themselves either to live or die, for they could endure no longer the famine that was among them. Then the English lords ordained three great battles, and so stood in three parties without their lodgings, and made great fires, thereby to see the better, and caused all their pages to keep their lodgings and horses. Thus they stood still all that night armed, every man under his own standard and banner ; and in the breaking of the day two trumpets of Scotland met with the English scout-watch, who took the trumpets and brought them before the king of England and his council, and then they said openly, 'Sirs, what do ye watch here? Ye lose but your time, for on the jeopardy of our heads the Scots are gone and departed before midnight, and they are at the least by this time three or four mile on their way ; and they left us two behind to the intent that we should shew this to you.' Then the English lords said that it were but a folly to follow the Scots, for they saw well they could not overtake them: yet for doubt of deceiving they kept still the two trumpets privily, and caused their battles to stand still arranged till it was near prime. And when they saw for truth that the Scots were departed, then every man had leave to retray to their lodging, and the lords took counsel to determine what should be hest to do. And in the meantime divers of the English host mounted on their horses and passed. over the river, and came to the mountain whereas the Scots bad been ; and there they found more than five hundred greatbeasts ready slain, because the Scots could not drive them before their host and because that the Englishmen should have but small profit of them. Also there they found three hundred cauldrons made of beasts' skins with the hair still on them, strained on stakes over the fire, full of water and full of flesh to be sodden, and more than a thousand spits full of flesh to be roasted, and more than ten thousand old shoes made of raw leather with the hair still on them, the which the Scots had left behind them ; also there they found five poor Englishmen prisoners, bound fast to certain trees, and some of their legs broken.' Then they were loosed and let go : and then they returned again, and by that time all the host was dislodged: and it was ordained by the king and by the advice of his council that the whole host should follow the marshals' banners and draw homeward into England. And so they did, and at the last came into a fair meadow, whereas they found forage sufficient for their horses and carriages,2 whereof they had great need, for they were nigh so feeble that it should have been great pain for them to have gone any further. The English chronicle saith that the Scots had been fought withal, an sir Roger Mortimer, a lord of England, had not betrayed the king; for he took meed and money of the Scots, to the intent they might depart privily by night unfought withal, as it may be seen more plainly in the English chronicle, and divers other matters, the which I pass over at this time and follow mine author. 3 And so then the next day the host dislodged again and went forth, and about noon they came to a great abbey two mile from the city of Durham; and there the king lodged, and the host there about in the fields, whereas they found forage sufficient for themselves and for their horses. And the next day the host lay there still, and the king went to the city of Durham to see the church, and there he offered.4 And in this city every man found their own carriages, the which they had left thirty-two days before in a wood at mid-night, when they followed the Scots first, as it bath been skewed before; for the burgesses and people of Durham had found and brought them into their town at their own costs and charges. And all these carriages were set in void granges and barns in safe-guard, and on every man's carriage his own cognisance or arms, whereby every man might know his own. And the lords and gentlemen were glad when they had thus found their carriages. Thus they abode two days in the city of Durham, and the host round about, for they could not all lodge within the city ; and there their horses were new shod. And then they took their way to the city of York, and so within three days they came thither; and there the king found the queen his mother, who received him with great joy, and so did all other ladies, damosels, burgesses and commons of the city. The king gave licence to all manner of people, every man to draw homeward to their own countries. And the king thanked greatly the earls, barons and knights of their good counsel and aid that they had done to him in his journey ; and he retained still with him sir John of Hainault and all his company, who were greatly feasted by the queen and all other ladies. Then the knights and other strangers of his company made a bill of their horses and such other stuff as they had lost in that journey, and delivered it to the king's council, every man by itself; and in trust of the king's promise, sir John of Hainault lord Beaumont bound himself to all his company that they should be content for everything comprised in their own bills within a short space them, the which ships with their stuff arrived at Sluys in Flanders. And sir John of Hainault and his company took their leave of the king, of the old queen, of the earl of Kent, of the earl of Lancaster and of all the other barons, who greatly did honour them. And the king caused twelve knights and two hundred men of arms to company them, for doubt of the archers of England, of whom they were not well assured, for they must needs pass through the bishopric of Lincoln. Thus departed sir John of Hainault (39) and his rout in the conduct of these knights. and rode so long in their journey that they came to Dover, and there entered into the sea in ships and vessels that they found ready there apparelled for them. Then the English knights departed from thence, and returned to their own houses; And the Hainowes arrived at Wissant, and there they sojourned two days in making ready their horses and harness. And in the meantime sir John of Hainault (39) and some of his company rode a pilgrimage to our Lady of Boulogne ; and after they returned into Hainault, and departed each from other to their own houses and countries. Sir John of Hainault (39) rode to the earl his brother (41), who was at Valenciennes, who received him joyously, for greatly he loved him, to whom he recounted all his tidings, that ye have heard herebefore.

Death of Edward II

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XIX - How king Edward was married to my lady Philippa of Hainault. Jun 1328. IT was not long after but that the king (15) and the queen (33) his mother, the earl of Kent (26) his uncle, the earl of Lancaster (47), sir Roger Mortimer (40) and all the barons of England, and by the advice of the king's council, they sent a bishop' and two knights bannerets, with two notable clerks, to sir John of Hainault (40), praying him to be a mean that their lord the young king of England might have in marriage one of the earl's (42) daughters of Hainault, his brother (42), named Philippa (13) ; for the king and all the nobles of the realm had rather have her than any other lady, for the love of him. Sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont feasted and honoured greatly these ambassadors, and brought them to Valenciennes to the earl his brother, who honourably received them and made them such cheer, that it were over long here to rehearse. And when they had skewed the content of their message, the earl (42) said, 'Sirs, I thank greatly the king (15) your prince and the queen (33) his mother and all other lords of England, sith they have sent such sufficient personages as ye be to do me such honour as to treat for the marriage ; to the which request I am well agreed, if our holy father the pope will consent thereto'-. with the which answer these ambassadors were right well content. Then they sent two knights and two clerks incontinent to the pope, to Avignon, to purchase a dispensation for this marriage to be had ; for without the pope's licence they might not marry, for [by] the lineage of France they were so near of kin as at the third degree, for the two mothers [Note. Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (33) and Joan Valois Count Zeeland, Count Holland, Count Avesnes, Count Hainault 1294-1342 (34)] were cousin-germans issued of two brethren. And when these ambassadors were come to the pope, and their requests and considerations well heard, our holy father the pope with all the whole college consented to this marriage, and so feasted them. And then they departed and came again to Valenciennes with their bulls. Then this marriage was concluded and affirmed on both parties. Then was there devised and purveyed for their apparel and for all things honourable that belonged to such a lady, who should be queen of England: and there this princess was married by a sufficient procuration brought from the king of England ; and after all feasts and triumphs done, then this young queen entered into the sea at Wissant, and arrived with all her company at Dover. And sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont, her uncle, did conduct her to the city of London, where there was made great feast, and many nobles of England, ... queen was crowned. And there was also great jousts, tourneys, dancing, carolling and great feasts every day, the which endured the, space of three weeks. The English chronicle saith this marriage and coronation of the queen was done at York with much honour, the Sunday in the even of the Conversion of Saint Paul, in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. In the which chronicle is shewed many other things of the ruling of the realm, and of the death of king Edward of Caernarvon, and divers other debates that were within the realm, as in the same chronicle more plainly it appeareth : the which the author of this book speaketh no word of, because peradventure he knew it not ; for it was hard for a stranger to know all things. But according to his writing this young queen Philippa (13) abode still in England with a small company of any persons of her own country, saving one who was named Watelet of Manny (18), who abode still with the queen and was, her carver, and after did so many great prowesses in divers places, that it were hard to make mention of them all.

On 03 Aug 1355 Bartholomew "The Elder" Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh 1287-1355 (68) died at Dover. His son Bartholomew "The Younger" Burghesh 2nd Baron Burghesh 1328-1369 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Burghesh (2C 1330). Cecily Weyland Baroness Burghesh by marriage Baroness Burghesh (2C 1330).

Release of King John II of France

Around 30 June 1360 John "The Good" II King France 1319-1364 (41) left the Tower of London and proceeded to Eltham Palace where Queen Philippa (46) had prepared a great farewell entertainment. Passing the night at Dartford, he continued towards Dover, stopping at the Maison Dieu of St Mary at Ospringe, and paying homage at the shrine of St Thomas Becket at Canterbury on 04 July 1360. He dined with the Black Prince (30) at Dover Castle, and reached English-held Calais on 08 July 1360.

On 21 Aug 1463 Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (35) arrived at Dover with Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (21).

Henry VIII Meeting with Charles V Holy Roman Emperor

On May 1522 Henry VIII (30) met with Charles Habsburg-Spain V Holy Roman Emperor 1500-1558 (22) at Dover. William Blount 4th Baron Mountjoy 1478-1534 (44), William Compton 1482-1528 (40), John Marney 2nd Baron Marney 1484-1525 (37) and John Vere 15th Earl Oxford 1471-1540 (51) were present. Henry VIII Meeting with Charles V Holy Roman Emperor.

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

1548. Titian Painter 1488-1576 (60). Equestrian Portrait of Charles Habsburg-Spain V Holy Roman Emperor 1500-1558 (47).

1519. Bernard Van Orley Painter 1491-1541 (32). Portrait of Charles Habsburg-Spain V Holy Roman Emperor 1500-1558 (18).

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 October. 10 Oct 1641. I went by waggon, accompanied with a jovial commissary, to Dunkirk, the journey being made all on the sea-sands. On our arrival, we first viewed the court of guards, the works, the town-house, and the new church; the latter is very beautiful within; and another, wherein they showed us an excellent piece of Our Saviour's bearing the Cross. The harbour, in two channels, coming up to the town, was choked vrith a multitude of prizes.
From hence, the next day, I marched three, English miles towards the packet-boat, being a pretty frigate of six guns, which embarked us for England about three in the afternoon.
At our going off, the fort, against which our pinnace anchored, saluted my Lord Marshal (56) with twelve gi'eat guns, which we answered with three. Not having the wind favourable, we anchored that night before Calais. About midnight, we weighed; and, at four in the morning, though not far from Dover, we could not make the pier till four that afternoon, the wind proving contrary and driving us westward; but at last we got on shore, October the 12th.

John Evelyn's Diary 1643 November. 6th November, 1643. Lying by the way from Wotton at Sir Ralph Whitfield's, at Blechingley (whither both my brothers had conducted me), I arrived at London on the 7th, and two days after took boat at the Tower-wharf, which carried me as far as Sittingbourne, though not without danger, I being only in a pair of oars, exposed to a hideous storm: but it pleased God that we got in before the peril was considerable. From thence, I went by post to Dover, accompanied with one Mr. Thicknesse, a very dear friend of mine.

John Evelyn's Diary 1647 October. 4th October, 1647. I sealed and declared my will, and that morning went from Paris, taking my journey through Rouen, Dieppe, Ville-dieu, and St. Vallerie, where I stayed one day with Mr. Waller (41), with whom I had some affairs, and for which cause I took this circle to Calais, where I arrived on the 11th, and that night embarking in a packet boat, was by one o'clock got safe to Dover; for which I heartily put up my thanks to God who had conducted me safe to my own country, and been merciful to me through so many aberrations. Hence, taking post, I arrived at London the next day at evening, being the 2d of October, new style.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 July. 12th July 1649. It was about three in the afternoon, I took oars for Gravesend., accompanied by my cousin, Stephens, and sister, Glanville, who there supped with me and returned; whence I took post immediately to Dover, where I arrived by nine in the morning; and, about eleven that night, went on board a barque guarded by a pinnace of eight guns; this being the first time the Packet-boat had obtained a convoy, having several times before been pillaged. We had a good passage, though chased for some hours by a pirate, but he dared not attack our frigate, and we then chased him till he got under the protection of the castle at Calais. It was a small privateer belonging to the Prince of Wales. I carried over with me my servant, Richard Hoare, an incomparable writer of several hands, whom I afterward preferred in the Prerogative Office, at the return of his Majesty. Lady Catherine Scott, daughter of the Earl of Norwich (64), followed us in a shallop, with Mr. Arthur Slingsby (26), who left England incognito. At the entrance of the town, the Lieutenant Governor, being on his horse with the guards, let us pass courteously. I visited Sir Richard Lloyd, an English gentleman, and walked in the church, where the ornament about the high altar of black marble is very fine, and there is a good picture of the Assumption. The citadel seems to be impregnable, and the whole country about it to be laid under water by sluices for many miles.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 February. 06 Feb 1652. I embarked early in the packet boat, but put my goods in a stouter vessel. It was calm, so that we got not to Dover till eight at night. I took horse for Canterbury, and lay at Rochester; next day, to Gravesend, took a pair of oars, and landed at Sayes Court, where I stayed three days to refresh, and look after my packet and goods, sent by a stouter vessel. I went to visit my cousin, Richard Fanshawe (43), and divers other friends.

On 25 May 1660 Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (29) arrived at Dover.

John Evelyn's Diary 1660 June. 4th June 1660. I received letters of Sir Richard Browne's (55) landing at Dover, and also letters from the Queen (50), which I was to deliver at Whitehall, not as yet presenting myself to his Majesty (30), by reason of the infinite concourse of people. The eagerness of men, women, and children, to see his Majesty (30), and kiss his hands, was so great, that he had scarce leisure to eat for some days, coming as they did from all parts of the nation; and the King (30) being as willing to give them that satisfaction, would have none kept out, but gave free access to all sorts of people.
Addressing myself to the Duke (26), I was carried to his Majesty (30), when very few noblemen were with him, and kissed his hands, being very graciously received. I then returned home, to meet Sir Richard Browne (55), who came not till the 8th, after nineteen years exile, during all which time he kept up in his chapel the Liturgy and Offices of the Church of England, to his no small honor, and in a time when it was so low, and as many thought utterly lost, that in various controversies both with Papists and Sectaries, our divines used to argue for the visibility of the Church, from his chapel and congregation.
I was all this week to and fro at court about business.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 04 Jan 1665. I went in a coach, it being excessive sharp frost and snow, toward Dover and other parts of Kent, to settle physicians, chirurgeons, agents, marshals, and other officers in all the sea ports, to take care of such as should be set on shore, wounded, sick, or prisoners, in pursuance of our commission reaching from the North Foreland, in Kent, to Portsmouth, in Hampshire. The rest of the ports in England were allotted to the other Commissioners. That evening I came to Rochester, where I delivered the Privy Council's letter to the Mayor to receive orders from me.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 06 Jan 1665. To Dover, where Colonel Stroode (37), Lieutenant of the Castle, having received the letter I brought him from the Duke of Albemarle (56), made me lodge in it, and I was splendidly treated, assisting me from place to place. Here I settled my first Deputy. The Mayor and officers of the Customs were very civil to me.

Battle of Lowestoft

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 June. 08 Jun 1665. I went again to his Grace, thence to the Council, and moved for another privy seal for £20,000, and that I might have the disposal of the Savoy Hospital for the sick and wounded; all which was granted. Hence to the Royal Society, to refresh among the philosophers.
Came news of his highness's (35) victory, which indeed might have been a complete one, and at once ended the war, had it been pursued, but the cowardice of some, or treachery, or both, frustrated that. We had, however, bonfires, bells, and rejoicing in the city. Next day, the 9th, I had instant orders to repair to the Downs, so as I got to Rochester this evening. Next day I lay at Deal, where I found all in readiness: but, the fleet being hindered by contrary winds, I came away on the 12th, and went to Dover, and returned to Deal; and on the 13th, hearing the fleet was at Solbay, I went homeward, and lay at Chatham, and on the 14th, I got home. On the 15th, came the eldest son of the present Secretary of State to the French King, with much other company, to dine with me. After dinner, I went with him to London, to speak to my Lord General for more guards, and gave his Majesty (35) an account of my journey to the coasts under my inspection. I also waited on his Royal Highness (31), now come triumphant from the fleet, gotten into repair. See the whole history of this conflict in my "History of the Dutch War.".

1670 Secret Treaty of Dover

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 May. 26 May 1670. Receiving a letter from Mr. Philip Howard (41), Lord Almoner to the Queen, that Monsieur Evelin, first physician to Madame (who was now come to Dover to visit the King (39) her brother), was come to town, greatly desirous to see me; but his stay so short, that he could not come to me, I went with my brother (52) to meet him at the Tower, where he was seeing the magazines and other curiosities, having never before been in England: we renewed our alliance and friendship, with much regret on both sides that, he being to return toward Dover that evening, we could not enjoy one another any longer. How this French family, Ivelin, of Evelin, Normandy, a very ancient and noble house is grafted into our pedigree, see in the collection brought from Paris, 1650.

1670 Death of Henrietta Stewart

On 30 Jun 1670 Princess Henrietta Stewart Duchess Orléans 1644-1670 (sister of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (40)) died at the Château de Saint-Cloud. Her death came shortly after she had visited Dover. She had suffered pains in her side for a number of years. The evening before she consumed a glass of chicory water after which she immediately cried out that she had been posisoned.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 March. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 May. 14 May 1672. To Dover; but the fleet did not appear till the 16th, when the Duke of York (38) with his and the French squadron, in all 170 ships (of which above 100 were men-of-war), sailed by, after the Dutch, who were newly withdrawn. Such a gallant and formidable navy never, I think, spread sail upon the seas. It was a goodly yet terrible sight, to behold them as I did, passing eastward by the straits between Dover and Calais in a glorious day. The wind was yet so high, that I could not well go aboard, and they were soon got out of sight. The next day, having visited our prisoners and the Castle, and saluted the Governor, I took horse for Margate. Here, from the North Foreland Lighthouse top (which is a pharos, built of brick, and having on the top a cradle of iron, in which a man attends a great sea-coal fire all the year long, when the nights are dark, for the safeguard of sailors), we could see our fleet as they lay at anchor. The next morning, they weighed, and sailed out of sight to the N. E.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 November. 12 Nov 1675. We came to Canterbury: and, next morning, to Dover.
There was in my Lady Ambassadress's company my Lady Hamilton (70), a sprightly young lady, much in the good graces of the family, wife of that valiant and worthy gentleman, George Hamilton (68), not long after slain in the wars. She had been a maid of honor to the Duchess, and now turned Papist.

On 01 Dec 1690 Philip Yorke 1st Earl Hardwicke 1690-1764 was born to Philip Yorke 1651-1721 (39) at Dover.

Hall's Chronicle Henry VII 7th Year Aug 1491 - Jul 1492. Shortely after that kyng Henry had taryed a conuenient space, he transfreted and arryued at Douer, and so came to his maner of Grenewiche. And this was the yere of our lorde a. M.CCCC.xciii. and y. vii. yere of his troubleous reigne. Also in this soiournynge and be segynge of Boleyne (whiche \ve spake of before) there was few or none kylled, sauyng onely John Savage knyght, which goyng preuely out of hys pauylion with syr Ihon Hiseley, roade about the walles to viewe and se their strength, was sodeynly intercepted and taken of hys enemies. And he beyng inflamed withy re, although he were captyue, of his high courage disdeyned to be taken of suche vileynes, defended his life toy vttennost and was manfullv (I will notsaye wilfully) slayne and oppressed, albeit syr Ihon Riseley fled fro theim & escaped their daunger.

Around 1520 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Charge of the Light Brigade

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter VII: My Marriage. Among those who came to our house at 8 Upper Grosvenor Street, the Earl of Cardigan was my father's particular friend, and in consequence we saw a great deal of him. Lord Cardigan has sometimes been described as a favourite of fortune, for he possessed great wealth, great personal attractions, and he was much liked by the late Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Commanding the 11th Hussars, he was the first person to welcome the Prince at Dover when he arrived to marry the Queen, and his regiment was afterwards known as Prince Albert's own Hussars.
His Lordship was a typical soldier, and after the Crimean War there was perhaps no more popular hero in all England. So much has been written about him that it is unnecessary for me to retail matters that are well known. I have often been asked whether he confided to me anything particular about the Charge of the Light Brigade, but the truth is that he never seemed to attach any importance to the part he played. Such matters are the property of the historian, and as his widow I am naturally his greatest admirer.

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26).

Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (53). Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (39).

Charlton Green, Dover

Dover Castle

After 1191 Geoffrey Plantagenet Archbishop of York 1152-1212 was imprisoned by William Longchamp Bishop of Ely -1197 at Dover Castle.

Before 1202 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain, 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 was appointed Count Mortain (Mortagne), and as Constable Dover Castle, Constable Windsor Castle, Constable Chinon Castle.

In 1246 Nicholas Moels 1195-1268 (51) was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

King Edward II and Isabella of France arrive in England

Fine Rolls Edward II. On 07 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23) and Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (13) returned from their wedding in Boulogne-sur-Mer to Dover.

07 Feb 1308. Be it remembered that on Wednesday after the Purification, Edward II (23), the king, returning from beyond seas, to wit, from Boulogne-sur-Mer, where he took to wife Isabel (13), daughter of the king of France (39), touched at Dover in his barge about the ninth hour [1500], Hugh le Despenser (46) and the lord of Castellione of Gascony being in his company, and the queen a little afterward touched there with certain ladies accompanying her, and because the great seal which had been taken with him beyond seas then remained in the keeping of the keeper of the wardrobe who could not arrive on that day, no writ was sealed from the hour of the king's coming until Friday following on which day the bishop of Chichester, chancellor, about the ninth hour [1500] delivered to the king in his chamber in Dover castle the seal used in England during the king's absence, and the king, receiving the same, delivered it to William de Melton (33), controller of the wardrobe, and forthwith delivered with his own hand to the chancellor the great seal under the seal of J. de Benstede, keeper of the wardrobe, and Master John Painter Fraunceis, in the presence of Thomas, earl of Lancaster (30), Peter, earl of Cornwall (24), and Hugh le Despenser (46), William Martyn and William Inge, knights, and Adam de Osgodby, clerk ; and the chancellor on that day after lunch in his room (hospicio) in God's House, Dover, sealed writs with the great seal.

In 1324 Henry Cobham 1st Baron Cobham 1260-1339 (64) was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

Release of King John II of France

Around 30 June 1360 John "The Good" II King France 1319-1364 (41) left the Tower of London and proceeded to Eltham Palace where Queen Philippa (46) had prepared a great farewell entertainment. Passing the night at Dartford, he continued towards Dover, stopping at the Maison Dieu of St Mary at Ospringe, and paying homage at the shrine of St Thomas Becket at Canterbury on 04 July 1360. He dined with the Black Prince (30) at Dover Castle, and reached English-held Calais on 08 July 1360.

In 1370 Richard Pembridge 1320-1375 (50) was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

In 1373 William Latimer 4th Baron Latimer Corby 1330-1381 (42) was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

In 1384 Simon Burley 1340-1388 (44) was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

On 12 Mar 1388 John Devereux 1st Baron Devereux 1337-1393 (51) was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

In 1392 John Beaumont 4th Baron Beaumont 1361-1396 (31) was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

In Feb 1397 John Beaufort 1st Marquess Somerset, Dorset 1373-1410 (24) was appointed Admiral of the Irish Fleet, Constable Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports.

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 07 May 1461. Middleham Castle, Middleham. Grant for life to the king's kinsman Richard (33), earl of Warwick, of the office of constable of the king's castle of Dover, and al rents and services called 'castelwarde', and herbage and advowsons pertaining to the same, and the wardenship of the Cinque Ports and all forfeitures, 'shares', wreck of sea and other profits; and also 300l yearly for the sustenances of himself and priests, servants, watchmen, and other officers there, in the same manner as Humphey, late Duke of Gloucester, viz 146l frin the wards pertaining to the castle and 154l from the fee farm of the town of Southampton. By other latters patent.

On 26 Aug 1573 Thomas Fane 1510-1589 (63) was knighted at Dover Castle.

In 1663 John Strode 1627-1686 (35) was appointed Lieutenant Dover Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 January. 06 Jan 1665. To Dover, where Colonel Stroode (37), Lieutenant of the Castle, having received the letter I brought him from the Duke of Albemarle (56), made me lodge in it, and I was splendidly treated, assisting me from place to place. Here I settled my first Deputy. The Mayor and officers of the Customs were very civil to me.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 April. 02 Apr 1686. Sir Edward Hales (41), a papist, made Governor of Dover Castle .

1648 Kentish Rebellion

The May 1648 Kentish Rebellion was, in effect, the commencement of the Second Civil War of 1648. The rebels, commanded by George Goring 1st Earl Norwich 1585-1663, raised forces across Kent. Deal Castle, Walmer Castle and Sandown Castle surrendered. The rebels then besieged Dover Castle. Parliament dispatched troops commanded by Nathaniel Rich of Stondon -1701 to suppress the rebels.

Richard Grey 1202-1271 was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

Thomas Fitzalan 10th Earl Surrey, 12th Earl Arundel 1381-1415 was appointed Constable Dover Castle.

Chapel, Dover Castle

On 15 Jun 1614 Henry Howard 1st Earl of Northampton 1540-1614 (74) died. He was buried at Chapel, Dover Castle.

1624. Unknown Artist. Portrait of Henry Howard 1st Earl of Northampton 1540-1614.

Priory of St Martin, Dover

Death of King Stephen

On 25 Oct 1154 Stephen I King England 1094-1154 (60) died at Priory of St Martin, Dover. His first-cousin once-removed Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (21) succeeded II King England: Plantagenet Angevin. His son Eustace Blois IV Count Boulogne 1130-1153 succeeded IV Count Boulogne.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 08 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23) To the Sheriff of Leicester. Order to cause a coroner for that county to be elected in place of John de Noveray, of Burton, lately elected in the late King's reign, who is insufficiently qualified.
Memorandum, that on Sunday before the Feast of St Vincent the Martyr [22 Jan], at Dover in the King's chamber in the Priory of St Martin, Dover, in the evening (crepsusculo noctis), in the presence of William Inge, knight, William de Melton and Adam de Osgoodby, clerks, John Langton Bishop of Chichester -1337Sir William Melton to be carried with him in the wardrobe beyond sea; and the King straightaway delivered by his own hand another seal of his shortly before made anew at London for the government of the realm in the King's absence in a red bag (bursa) sealed with the seal of William Inge to the chancellor. With which seal the chancellor caused writs to be sealed, after the King's passage, in the hospital of Domus Dei, under the testimony of Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24) then Keeper of the realm of England, on the Monday next following, on which day the King in the early morning (summo mane) passed the sea at Dover.

Dartford

Release of King John II of France

Around 30 June 1360 John "The Good" II King France 1319-1364 (41) left the Tower of London and proceeded to Eltham Palace where Queen Philippa (46) had prepared a great farewell entertainment. Passing the night at Dartford, he continued towards Dover, stopping at the Maison Dieu of St Mary at Ospringe, and paying homage at the shrine of St Thomas Becket at Canterbury on 04 July 1360. He dined with the Black Prince (30) at Dover Castle, and reached English-held Calais on 08 July 1360.

Before 1543 Edward Darcy 1542-1612 was born to Arthur Darcy 1495-1561 and Mary Carew 1517-1558 at Dartford.

On 28 Oct 1612 Edward Darcy 1542-1612 (69) died at Dartford.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 November. 10 Nov 1675. Being the day appointed for my Lord Ambassador (47) to set out, I met them with my coach at New Cross. There were with him my Lady his wife, and my dear friend, Mrs. Godolphin (23), who, out of an extraordinary friendship, would needs accompany my lady to Paris, and stay with her some time, which was the chief inducement for permitting my son (20) to travel, but I knew him safe under her inspection, and in regard my Lord (47) himself had promised to take him into his special favor, he having intrusted all he had to my care.
Thus we set out three coaches (besides mine), three wagons, and about forty horses. It being late, and my Lord (47) as yet but valetudinary, we got but to Dartford, the first day, the next to Sittingbourne.
At Rochester, the major, Mr. Cony, then an officer of mine for the sick and wounded of that place, gave the ladies a handsome refreshment as we came by his house.

In 1673. Unknown Artist, possibly Matthew Dixon. Portrait of Margaret Blagge Maid of Honour 1652-1678 (20).

On 30 Jan 1847 Joseph Maas Singer 1847-1886 was born in Dartford.

Dartford Priory, Dartford

The History of King Richard the Third. King Edward of that name the Fourth (40), after he had lived fifty and three years, seven months, and six days, and thereof reigned two and twenty years, one month, and eight days, died at Westminster the ninth day of April, the year of our redemption, a thousand four hundred four score and three, leaving much fair issue, that is, Edward the Prince (12), thirteen years of age; Richard Duke of York, two years younger; Elizabeth (17), whose fortune and grace was after to be queen, wife unto King Henry the Seventh (26), and mother unto the Eighth; Cecily (14) not so fortunate as fair; Brigette (2), who, representing the virtue of her whose name she bore, proFessed and observed a religious life in Dertford, a house of cloistered Nuns; Anne (7), who was after honorably married unto Thomas (10), then Lord Howard and after Earl of Surrey; and Katherine (3), who long time tossed in either fortune—sometime in wealth, often in adversity—at the last, if this be the last, for yet she lives, is by the goodness of her nephew, King Henry the Eighth, in very prosperous state, and worthy her birth and virtue.

Around 1675 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503. From a work of 1500.

Around 1520 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

In 1517 Bridget York 1480-1517 (36) died at Dartford Priory, Dartford.

East Farleigh

In 1317 Geoffrey Culpepper 1317-1390 was born to Walter Culpepper 1266-1321 (51) at East Farleigh.

In 1366 John Culpepper 1366-1414 was born to William Culpepper 1342-1402 (24) at East Farleigh.

East Peckham

On 02 Nov 1752 Philip Twysden Bishop Raphoe 1713-1752 (39) died at Jermyn Street. Possibly East Peckham. Somewhat curously his death was embroiled in a scandal that suggested he had, as a result of his impeecunious situation, been shot whilst attempting to rob a stagecoch.

Roydon Hall, East Peckham

Eastchurch

Around 1304 Robert Cheney 1304-1362 was born to William Cheney 1275-1322 (29) and Margaret Shurland 1281-1308 (23) at Eastchurch.

On 12 Apr 1362 Robert Cheney 1304-1362 (58) died at Eastchurch.

In 1390 Alice Cheney 1390- was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (38) at Eastchurch.

In 1392 Simon Cheney 1392-1455 was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (40) at Eastchurch.

Around 1442 John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (27) at Eastchurch. When his tomb was opened in the 18th Century his thighbone was measured at 21 inches making his height an estimated six feet eight inches.

In 1467 John Cheney 1415-1467 (52) died at Eastchurch.

Eastwell

On 24 Feb 1683 John Finch 6th Earl Winchilsea 1683-1729 was born to Heneage Finch 3rd Earl Winchilsea 1628-1689 (55) and Elizabeth Ayres Countess Winchelsea -1745. He was christened on 06 Mar 1683 at Eastwell.

Eastwell Park, Eastwell

On 29 Oct 1875 Marie Windsor 1875-1938 was born to Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (31) and Maria Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov 1853-1920 (22) at Eastwell Park, Eastwell.

Around 1871. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (65). Portrait of Maria Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov 1853-1920 (17).

On 20 Apr 1884 Beatrice Windsor Duchess Galliera 1884-1966 was born to Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (39) and Maria Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov 1853-1920 (30) at Eastwell Park, Eastwell.

The Most, Eastwell

In 1520 Elizabeth Cromer 1475-1520 (45) died at The Most, Eastwell.

Erith

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 September. 29 Sep 1665. To Erith, to quicken the sale of the prizes lying there, with order to the commissioner who lay on board till they should be disposed of, £5,000 being proportioned for my quarter. Then I delivered the Dutch Vice-Admiral, who was my prisoner, to Mr. Lowman of the Marshalsea, he giving me bond in £500 to produce him at my call. I exceedingly pitied this brave unhappy person, who had lost with these prizes £40,000 after twenty years' negotiation [trading] in the East Indies. I dined in one of these vessels, of 1,200 tons, full of riches.

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 May. 13 May 1668. Invited by that expert commander, Captain Cox, master of the lately built "Charles II" now the best vessel of the fleet, designed for the Duke of York (34), I went to Erith, where we had a great dinner.