2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused

1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, Marriage to Jane Seymoure is in 16th Century Events.

2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, Henry VIII Tournament Accident

Letters 1536. 29 Jan 1536. On the eve of the Conversion of St. Paul, the King being mounted on a great horse to run at the lists, both fell so heavily that every one thought it a miracle he was not killed, but he sustained no injury. Thinks he might ask of fortune for what greater misfortune he is reserved, like the other tyrant who escaped from the fall of the house, in which all the rest were smothered, and soon after died.

As Master Brian left France the day after the news of the Queen's death arrived, I do not think there have been any great intrigues, and as the English have no doubt given them to understand that now they hold the Emperor in their hands, and have already received proposals from him, the French would have answered them immediately that it was they who have received proposals, and to pay them off in their own coin they have invented that which has been written to his Majesty. This is the rumour that Brian has brought. Fr., modern copy, pp. 2.

2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, Henry VIII becomes Supreme Head of the Church

Wriothesley's Chronicle. Feb 1536. This yeare, at a Parliament holden at Westminster in Februarie, was grawntedc to the Kinge and his heires for ever the first fruits of all spirituall dignities and promotions fallinge after that day, and allso the tenth parte of all spirituall promotions yearlie, to be payde to the Kinge and his heires for ever, and the King to be taken and called supreme heade of the Churche of Englande,d and so to be written in his style for ever with these wordes followinge: Henricus Dei gratiâ Rex Angliæ et Franciæ, supremum caput ecclesiæ terræ Anglicanæ, Defensor Fidei, &c

Allso it was grawnted at the same Parliament a subsidie of 12d. in the pownde, to be levied and taken of the Temporalltie, and to be payde in two yeares next followinge, and in the third yeare a fifteene and a tenth to be payde of the temporalltie allso.

Note c. Statute 26 Henry Vm. cap. 3.

Note d. See Statutes 26 Henry VIII cap. 1..

Wriothesley's Chronicle. 06 Feb 1536. This yeare also, the first Soundaie after Candlemas, being the sixt daie of Februarie, the Archbishopp of Canterberie, called Thomas Cranmer (age 46), preached at Paules Crosse [Map], my Lord Chauncelor (age 48)g being then present at his sermon, and their he approved, by scripture and by the decrees of the Popes lawes, that the Bishop of Rome, otherwise called Pope, was Antichrist, and also brought divers expositions of holie sainctes and doctors for the same; and how craftelie, and by what meanes, and how long, he had taken upon him the power of God and the aucthoritie above all princes christened, and how his aucthoritie and lawes was contrarie to scripture and the lawe of God, as he then honorably declared and approved to the cleere understanding of all the people.

Note g. Sir Thomas Audley, who had succeeded the learned Sir Thomas More as Chancellor in 1532.

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Wriothesley's Chronicle. 13 Feb 1536. The seconde sermon, being on Septuagesima Sundaie, their preached at Powles Crosse [Map] the Bishop of Rochester.a

Note a. John Hilsey, Prior of the Dominican Friars in London, appointed 4th October, 1535, to this see, then vacant by the execution of Bishop Fisher.

Wriothesley's Chronicle. 20 Feb 1536. The Sondaie of Sexagesima preached at St. Poules Crosse [Map] the Bishopp of Lincolne (age 63).b

Note b. John Longland, Chancellor of the University of Oxford, and late Canon of Windsor.

Wriothesley's Chronicle. 27 Feb 1536. The Soundaie of Quinquegesima, being the 27th daie of Februarie and Leepe yeare, a.d. 1536, preached at Paules Crosse [Map] the Bushoppe of Durhame, named Dr. Dunstall (age 62),c sometime Bishopp of London, and afore that, being Master of the Rolls; and their were present at his sermon the Archbishopp of Canterberie (age 46) with eight other bishopps, sitting at the crosse before the preacher; and the Lorde Chauncellor of Englande (age 48), the Duke of Norfolke (age 63), the Duke of Suffolke, with six Erles and divers other lordes, stoode behinde the preacher within the pulpitt, and also fower monkes of the Charterhouse of London were brought to the said sermon, which denied the King (age 44) to be supreame heade of the Church of Englande. And their the said preacher declared the profession of the Bishopp of Rome when he is elected Pope, according to the confirmation of eight universall general counsells, which were congregate for the faith of all Christendome; and everie Pope taketh an othe on the articles, promising to observe, keepe, and hould all that the said counsells confirmed, and to dampne all that they dampned; and how he, contrarie to his oth, hath usurped his power and aucthoritie over all Christendome; and also how uncharitably he had handled our Prince, King Henrie the Eight (age 44), in marying [him to] his brother's wife, contrarie to Godes lawes and also against his owne promise and decrees, which he opened by scriptures and by the cannons of the Appostles; and also how everie Kinge hath the highe power under God, and ought to be the supreame head over all spirituall prelates, which was a goodlie and gracious hearing to all the audience being their present at the same sermon. And in his prayers he said, after this manner, ye shall pray for the universall church of all Christendome, and especiall for the prosperous estate of our Soveraigne and Emperour King Henrie the Eight, being the onelie supreame head of this realme of Englande; and he declared also in his said sermon how that the Cardinalls of Rome bee but curattes and decons of the cittie and province of Bome, and how that everie curate of any parrish have as much power as they have, according to scripture, save onelie that the Pope of Rome hath made them so high aucthorities onelie for to ezhalt his name and power in Christen realmes for covetousnes, as by his owne decrees he evidentlie their approved.

Note c. Cuthbert Tunstall (age 62), translated from London 25th March, 1530.

2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, 1536 Sweating Sickness Outbreak

Letters 1536. 01 Apr 1536. R. O. 608. John Husee to Lady Lisle (age 42).

I have written to my Lord at large how everything stands. I have done as much as I can for my life. I received your letters by Mr. Porter's servant, which I will deliver at my coming to London, and send you a speedy answer of lord Dawbeney's letter, and see the other conveyed into Devonshire, for I know Mr. Roolles is gone long since. As to the book, I have received none, and you do not write by whom you send it. Mr. Danastre will do all the law will bear. Mr. Basset is merry, and wants a horse against his riding into the country, and also money. Mr. George was a little unwell, but is better. I am sorry the plague is beginning there. At my return to London I will do my best to send your gentlewoman, who, I hope, will be there before Easter. I cannot yet meet with Thomas Seller. He has been with Mr. Basset two or three times. You will receive by Goodalle your kirtle with sleeves of the Queen's (age 35) gift. Campion and Mr. Skut have been with me for money; also the broiderer and the saddler. Dover, 1 April. Hol., p. 1. Add.

Letters 1536. 02 May 1536. R. O. 789. Thomas Warley to Lady Lisle (age 42).

I was at Lincoln's Inn on Saturday last with my master, your son (age 16), who is in good health and desires your blessing, which he is worthy to have, as he is a towardly gentleman and a wise. As I knew that two gentlemen of the Inner Temple, named Nedam, died last week of the sickness, I advised Mr. Basset to go to Mr. Danaster's in the country; but he said he was not afraid, and was far enough from the contagious air, and would wait till your Ladyship sends him a gelding. Bremelcome, who waits on him, is an honest man and gives diligent attendance. Mr. Danastre thanks you for the wine and other pleasures, and says if he sees any danger he will remove Mr. Bassett.

Water Skynner, who was post to the Lord Chancellor, came over in good season, for on Sunday before mass the King made him post for the abbeys which are to be put down, with fees and wages as other posts, which he had not before. I send by Burdoke, of Calais, a letter from Mr. Wait, of the Temple. I did not know of Mr. Huggan's death till Mr. Vice-treasurer was departed. If I had, I would have proved him for the room, and given him a satin gown. I wrote by Collins that the King would have been at Rochester tonight, but he has changed his mind, which was not known till Sunday at 11 o'clock, and will go to Dover next week. The Council sit daily, so that suitors must abide their good hour. I delivered an abridgement and particulars of my bill of supplication to the King. I live in hope, fed with sweet words, and make all the means I can to be despatched. I trust my Lord and you will take no displeasure at my long absence, which is sore against my will. The arbitrators between Hastyngs and me find that he is indebted to me, but they stay to make their award, as he says he cannot pay. "Robert Whettell brags freshly in the court in a coat of crimson taffata, cut and lined with yellow sarcenet, a shirt wrought with gold, his hosen scarlet, the breeches crimson velvet, cut and edged and lined with yellow sarcenet, his shoes crimson velvet, and likewise his sword, girdle, and scabbard, a cloak of red frisado, a scarlet cap, with feathers red and yellow; he hath many lookers on." Lovell's room, for which I labored to my Lord and you, has been given since my being here. I am sorry to hear of the sickness in Calais. London, 2 May 1536.

Here is a priest named Sir Richard Chicheley, B.D., well seen in physic, astronomy, and surgery, and can sing his plain song well, and is well apparelled. He would fain serve my Lord and you in Calais, if you would help him to a chantry and meat and drink. He demands no more. If he were there, I think Philbert and he would reason of physic. Also, he says, he is cunning in stilling of waters.

Hol., pp. 4. Add.: In Calais.

2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, Betrothal of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour

Letters 1536. 20 May 1536. Vienna Archives. 926. Chapuys to Granvelle.

Wrote yesterday very fully to the Emperor and Granvelle. Has just been informed, the bearer of this having already mounted, that Mrs. Semel [Queen Jane Seymour (age 27)] came secretly by river this morning to the King's lodging, and that the promise and betrothal (desponsacion) was made at 9 o'clock. The King means it to be kept secret till Whitsuntide; but everybody begins already to murmur by suspicion, and several affirm that long before the death of the other (deceased) there was some arrangement which sounds ill in the ears of the people; who will certainly be displeased at what has been told me, if it be true, viz., that yesterday the King, immediately on receiving news of the decapitation of the putain (deceased) entered his barge and went to the said Semel (age 27), whom he has lodged a mile from him, in a house by the river. Cannot write to the Emperor for the haste of the courier, but will send particulars to him shortly. London, 20 May 1536.Fr., from a modern copy, p. 1.

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On 20 May 1536 Henry VIII (age 44) and Queen Jane Seymour (age 27) were betrothed the day after Anne Boleyn had been beheaded.

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Letters 1536. Hears he has already espoused another lady [Queen Jane Seymour (age 27)], who is a good Imperialist (I know not if she will continue), and to whom he paid great attention before the death of the other. As none but the organist [Mark Smeaton (deceased)] confessed, nor herself either, people think he invented this device to get rid of her. Any how, not much wrong can be done to her, even in being suspected as méchante, for that has long been her character. It is to be hoped, if hope be a right thing to entertain about such acts, that when he is tired of this one he will find some occasion of getting rid of her. I think wives will hardly be well contented if such customs become general. Although I have no desire to put myself in this danger, yet being of the feminine gender I will pray with the others that God may keep us from it.

Fr., from a modern copy, pp. 2. Headed: "Extrait d'une lettre de la Reine d'Hongrie au Roy des Romains en date du 25 Mai 1536."

Letters 1536. 30 May. R. O. 993. William Marche to Lord Lisle (age 72).

Your letter was delivered on Monday after my departure from Calais, and Mr. Secretary made me answer that he had given you a full answer to its contents. Mr. Boysse and I are at your commands, if we can do anything further. As to the horsemill, Mr. Dawnce told me it may not be set upon the King's ground, but if he had set it upon his own freehold it might have passed well enough. This day the King is known to be married unto one Mrs. Jane Semar [Queen Jane Seymour (age 27)], Sir John Semar's (age 62) daughter; and my lord William [Howard] this day came out of Scotland in post and merry. London, 30 May 1536.

Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.

2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, Marriage of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour

Hall's Chronicle 1536. 30 May 1536. The week before Whitsuntide the King (age 44) married lady Jane (age 27) daughter to the right worshipful Sir John Seymor (age 62) knight, which at Whitsuntide was openly showed as Queen.

2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, 1536 Neville Triple Wedding

On 02 Jul 1536 three weddings between the Neville, and Manners and Vere families, were celebrated at one mass at Holywell Priory [Map]:

Henry Neville 5th Earl of Westmoreland (age 11) and Anne Manners Countess of Westmoreland (age 9) were married. They were half fourth cousins. She a great x 5 granddaughter of King Edward III of England. She the daughter of Thomas Manners 1st Earl of Rutland (age 44) and Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland (age 41). He the son of Ralph Neville 4th Earl of Westmoreland (age 38) and Katherine Stafford Countess of Westmoreland (age 37).

Henry Manners 2nd Earl of Rutland (age 9) and Margaret Neville Countess Rutland were married. They were half fourth cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of King Edward III of England. She the daughter of Ralph Neville 4th Earl of Westmoreland (age 38) and Katherine Stafford Countess of Westmoreland (age 37). He the son of Thomas Manners 1st Earl of Rutland (age 44) and Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland (age 41).

John de Vere 16th Earl of Oxford (age 20) and Dorothy Neville Countess of Oxford were married. She the daughter of Ralph Neville 4th Earl of Westmoreland (age 38) and Katherine Stafford Countess of Westmoreland (age 37). He the son of John de Vere 15th Earl of Oxford (age 65) and Elizabeth Trussell Countess of Oxford.

Those present included Thomas Audley 1st Baron Audley Walden (age 48), Thomas Howard 3rd Duke of Norfolk (age 63), Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 52), Henry Grey 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 19), Henry Courtenay 1st Marquess Exeter (age 40), John de Vere 15th Earl of Oxford (age 65) and Ralph Neville 4th Earl of Westmoreland (age 38).

2nd Millennium, 16th Century Events, 1536-Death of Catherine of Aragon and Execution of Anne Boleyn and her Co-accused, Pilgrimage of Grace

Hall's Chronicle 1536. Around Jun 1536.After this book which passed by the King’s authority with the consent of the clergy, was published, the which contained certain articles of religion necessary to be taught unto the people, and among other it specially treated of no more than three sacraments, where always the people had bene taught seven sacraments, and beside this book, certain injunctions were that time given whereby a number of their holy days was abrogated and specially such as fell in the harvest time, the keeping of which was much to the hinderance of the gathering in of corn, hay, fruit, and other such like necessary and profitable commodities.

Around Oct 1536 the North rose against religious policies of Henry VIII (age 45). Thomas Audley 1st Baron Audley Walden (age 48) condemned the traitors. John Neville 3rd Baron Latimer (age 42) was implicated. Thomas Howard 3rd Duke of Norfolk (age 63), Henry Howard (age 20) and Edmund Knyvet (age 28) undertook the suppression of the rebels.

On 12 May 1537 Abbot Adam Sedbar (age 35) was captured. He was imprisoned in the Beauchamp Tower, Tower of London [Map] where his inscribed name on the wall "ADAM SEDBAR. ABBAS JOREVALL 1537" can still be seen.

Around 30 May 1537 the Abbots of Fountains Abbey [Map], Marmaduke Bradley, and Gisborough Priory [Map], Robert Pursglove, were hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn [Map] for their role in the Pilgrimage of Grace. Their heads were displayed on London Bridge [Map].

On 02 Jun 1537 Abbot Adam Sedbar (age 35) and Prior William Wood were hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn [Map] for their role in the Pilgrimage of Grace. Their heads were displayed on London Bridge [Map].

On 20 Nov 1539 Nicholas Tempest of Holmeside (age 53) was hanged for his part in the Pilgrimage of Grace.