History of Kent

851 Battle of Oakley

1194 Richard Lionheart Returns to England

1217 Battle of Sandwich aka Dover

1321 Siege of Leeds Castle

1360 Release of King John II of France

1376 Good Parliament

1381 Peasant's Revolt

1415 Battle of Agincourt

1460 January Raid on Sandwich

1460 June Yorkist Landing at Sandwich

1460 June Raid on Sandwich

1540 Anne of Cleves Annulment

1648 Kentish Rebellion

1665 Battle of Lowestoft

1666 Four Days' Battle

1667 Raid on the Medway

1672 Attack on the Smyrna Fleet

1672 Battle of Solebay

1673 Test Act

1688 Glorious Revolution

1710 General Election

Kent is in Home Counties.

In 633 Eanfled Deira Queen Consort Bernicia 626-685 (6) fled to the protection of Eadbald King Kent -640 in Kent.

In 633 Paulinus Archbishop of Canterbury -644 fled to the protection of Eadbald King Kent -640 at Kent.

In 676 Æthelred King Mercia -704 invaded at Kent.

In 687 Caedwalla King Wessex 659-689 (28) ravaged Kent in revenge for the death of his brother.

Around 1170 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 was born to Walter Burgh 1130-1206 (40) and Alice Unknown at Kent.

Around 1222 Margaret Burgh Countess Gloucester Countess Hertford 1222-1237 was born to Hubert Burgh Count Mortain 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 (52) and Margaret Dunkeld Countess Kent 1193-1259 (29) at Kent.

Addington Park

In 1519 Frances Neville 1519-1599 was born to Edward Neville 1471-1538 (48) and Eleanor Windsor Baroness Scrope Masham at Addington Park.

In 1548 Edward Waldegrave 1517-1561 (31) and Frances Neville 1519-1599 (29) were married at Addington Park. She a 4 x great granddaughter of King Edward III England.

Edward Neville 1471-1538 lived at Addington Park.

Allington

In 1503 Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542 was born to Henry Wyatt 1460-1537 (43) in Allington.

Around 1568 John Astley Master of the Jewel House 1507-1595 (61) was granted the castle and manor of Allington.

Ashford

On 23 Oct 1375 Elizabeth Ferrers Countess Atholl 1336-1375 (39) died. She was buried at Ashford.

Ashridge

On 25 Sep 1300 Edmund "Almain" Cornwall 2nd Earl Cornwall 1249-1300 (50) died. He was buried, heart and flesh, at Ashridge. His bones were interred at Hailes Abbey Winchcombe during a service attended by Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (61).

Aylesford

On 01 Sep 1308 Henry Grey 1st Baron Grey Codnor 1255-1308 (53) died at Aylesford. His son Richard Grey 2nd Baron Grey Codnor 1282-1335 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Grey Codnor. Joan Fitzpayn Baroness Grey Codnor 1287-1334 (21) by marriage Baron Grey Codnor.

On 14 Dec 1392 John Grey 3rd Baron Grey Codnor 1305-1392 (87) died at Aylesford. His grandson Richard Grey 4th Baron Grey Codnor 1371-1418 (21) succeeded 4th Baron Grey Codnor. Elizabeth Bassett Baroness Grey Codnor 1372-1451 (20) by marriage Baron Grey Codnor.

Bexley

Bexley Hill

John Evelyn's Diary 17 November 1666. 17 Nov 1666. I returned to Chatham, my chariot overturning on the steep of Bexley Hill, wounded me in two places on the head; my son, Jack (11), being with me, was like to have been worse cut by the glass; but I thank God we both escaped without much hurt, though not without exceeding danger.

Blendon Hall

On 12 Feb 1683 Edward Brett 1608-1683 (75) died at Blendon Hall.

Church of St Mary the Virgin

On 05 Sep 1677 Henry Oldenburg 1619-1677 (58) died at his home in Pall Mall. He was buried at the Church of St Mary the Virgin on 07 Sep 1677.

Lesnes Abbey Bexley

On 14 Jul 1179 Richard "The Loyal" Lucy 1089-1179 (90) died at Lesnes Abbey Bexley.

North Cray

John Evelyn's Diary 31 July 1660. 31 Jul 1660. I went to visit Sir Philip Warwick (50), now secretary to the Lord Treasurer (51), at his house in North Cray.

Birling

On 20 Nov 1253 William Saye 1253-1295 was born to William Saye 1209-1271 (44) and Sybil Marshal 1209-1254 (44) at Birling.

On 17 Jun 1340 William Saye 3rd Baron Say 1340-1375 was born to Geoffrey Saye 2nd Baron Say 1309-1359 (31) and Maud Beauchamp Baroness Say 1310-1366 (30) at Birling.

On 12 Dec 1574 Thomas Fane 1510-1589 (64) and Mary Neville 7th Baroness Bergavenny 3rd Baroness Despencer 1554-1626 (20) were married at Birling.

In Sep 1576 Frances Manners Baroness Bergavenny 1530-1576 (46) died at Birling.

Around 1602 Charles Neville 1602-1637 was born to Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 (22) and Mary Sackville 1584-1613 (18) at Birling.

On 15 Oct 1616 Rachel Lennard Baroness Bergavenny 1553-1616 (63) died in Birling.

On 01 Dec 1622 Edward Neville 8th Baron Bergavenny 1550-1622 (72) died. He was buried at Birling. His son Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 (42) succeeded 9th Baron Bergavenny 1C 1392. Catherine Vaux Baroness Bergavenny 1592-1649 (30) by marriage Baron Bergavenny 1C 1392.

Before 24 Dec 1641 Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 died. He was buried at Birling. His son John Neville 10th Baron Bergavenny 1614-1662 succeeded 10th Baron Bergavenny 1C 1392.

Before 07 Jun 1649 Christopher Neville 1584-1649 died. On 07 Jun 1649 Christopher Neville 1584-1649 was buried at Birling.

On 19 May 1873 Caroline Leeke Countess Abergavenny -1873 died at Birling.

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII Volume 4 1524 1530. This day, as the King came "towards evensong," the marquis of Exeter brought two great bucks from Burllyng, the best of which the King sends to your Grace. This day the King has received his Maker at the Friars', when my lord of Lincoln administered. On Tuesday the King goes to Waltham. Greenwich, Corpus Christi Day. Signed.

Bobbing

Boughton

Chilston

John Evelyn's Diary 08 May 1666. 08 May 1666. To Queensborough, where finding the Richmond frigate, I sailed to the buoy of the Nore to my Lord-General (57) and Prince Rupert (46), where was the Rendezvous of the most glorious fleet in the world, now preparing to meet the Hollander. Went to visit my cousin, Hales, at a sweetly-watered place at Chilston, near Bockton. The next morning, to Leeds Castle, once a famous hold, now hired by me of my Lord Culpeper (40) for a prison. Here I flowed the dry moat, made a new drawbridge, brought spring water into the court of the Castle to an old fountain, and took order for the repairs.

Boughton Monchelsea

On 04 Mar 1491 William Brandon 1425-1491 (66) died at Boughton Monchelsea.

Brasted

On 23 Oct 1699 John Verney 1699-1741 was born to George Verney 20th Baron Latimer 12th Baron Willoughby Broke 1659-1728 (40) and Margaret Heath Baroness Latimer Baroness Willoughby Broke at Brasted.

Broadstairs

St Peter Intra College Broadstairs

Around 1900 John Granville Cornwallis Eliot 6th Earl St Germans 1890- educated at St Peter Intra College Broadstairs.

Bromley

In 1569 Catherine Gerard 1569-1617 was born to Gilbert Gerard 1534-1593 (35) and Anne Ratclyffe 1539-1603 (30) at Bromley.

Around 1586 Barbara Calthorpe 1586- was born to Henry Calthorpe 1560-1605 (26) in Bromley.

John Evelyn's Diary 14 July 1664. 14 Jul 1664. I went to take leave of the two Mr. Howards, now going to Paris, and brought them as far as Bromley; thence to Eltham, to see Sir John Shaw's (49) new house, now building; the place is pleasant, if not too wet, but the house not well contrived; especially the roof and rooms too low pitched, and the kitchen where the cellars should be; the orangery and aviary handsome, and a very large plantation about it.

John Evelyn's Diary 27 August 1675. 27 Aug 1675. I visited the Bishop of Rochester (50), at Bromley, and dined at Sir Philip Warwick's (65), at Frogpoole.

John Evelyn's Diary 19 August 1683. 19 Aug 1683. I went to Bromley to visit our Bishop (58), and excellent neighbor, and to congratulate his now being made Archbishop of York. On the 28th, he came to take his leave of us, now preparing for his journey and residence in his province.

Bishop's Palace Bromley

On 20 May 1713 Thomas Sprat Bishop 1635-1713 (78) died of apoplexy at the Bishop's Palace Bromley. He was buried in the south side of the Chapel of St Nicholas Chapels Westminster Abbey.

Frognall House

John Evelyn's Diary 27 August 1675. 27 Aug 1675. I visited the Bishop of Rochester (50), at Bromley, and dined at Sir Philip Warwick's (65), at Frogpoole.

North Cray Bromley

On 22 Aug 1485 Robert Brandon 1410-1485 (75) died at North Cray Bromley.

Bromley Hill Place

On 15 Jan 1837 Amelia Hume Baroness Farnborough 1772-1837 (64) died at Bromley Hill Place.

Canterbury

Canterbury Cathedral

Charlton

On 01 Oct 1756 Charles George Perceval 2nd Baron Arden 1st Baron Arden Arden 1756-1840 was born to John Perceval 2nd Earl Egmont 1711-1770 (45) and Catherine Compton Countess Egmont 1731-1784 (25) at Charlton.

Wricklesmarsh Charlton

In 1604 Colonel Thomas Blount Inventor 1604- was born to Edward Blount of Middle Temple in Wricklesmarsh Charlton.

Chatham

Chiddingstone

On 03 Jun 1706 Henry Streatfield 1706-1762 was born to Henry Streatfield 1679-1747 (27) and Elizabeth Beard at Chiddingstone.

St Mary's Church Chiddingstone

Streatfield Vault St Mary's Church Chiddingstone

On 04 Apr 1762 Henry Streatfield 1706-1762 (55) died. He was buried at Streatfield Vault St Mary's Church Chiddingstone.

Chilham

Chilham Castle Chilham

Around 1190 Richard Fitzroy 1190-1246 was born illegitimately to John "Lackland" I King England 1166-1216 (23) and Adela Plantagenet in Chilham Castle Chilham.

In 1205 Fulbert de Dover 1178-1205 died at Chilham Castle Chilham.

Around 1228 Lorette Plantagenet 1228-1266 was born to Richard Fitzroy 1190-1246 (38) and Rohese de Dover 1186-1261 (42) in Chilham Castle Chilham.

Chislehurst

On 28 Dec 1510 Nicholas Bacon 1510-1579 was born to Robert Bacon 1479-1548 (31) and Isabel or Eleanor Cage 1478-1535 (32) at Chislehurst.

In 1560 Barbara Walsingham 1560-1623 was born to Thomas Walsingham 1526-1584 (34) and Dorothy Guildford at Chislehurst.

Around 1564 Mary Walsingham Baroness Pelham Laughton 1564-1624 was born to Thomas Walsingham 1526-1584 (38) and Dorothy Guildford at Chislehurst.

Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst

Scadbury Chapel Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst

On 09 Feb 1550 Edmund Walsingham 1480-1550 (70) died. He was buried at Scadbury Chapel Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst.

On 11 Aug 1630 Thomas Walsingham 1563-1630 (67) died. He was buried at Scadbury Chapel Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst.

Scadbury Chislehurst

On 24 Nov 1462 James Walsingham 1462-1540 was born at Scadbury Chislehurst.

Cobham

Cowling

On 10 Dec 1447 John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 was born to Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 (32) and Elizabeth Tuchet Baroness Cobham 1420-1464 (27) at Cowling.

On 09 Mar 1512 John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 (64) died at Cowling. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalene Cobham. His son Thomas Brooke 8th Baron Cobham -1529 succeeded 8th Baron Cobham.

Cuxton

Whornes Place Cuxton

On 21 Mar 1555 John Leveson 1555-1615 was born to Thomas Leveson 1532-1576 (23) and Ursula Gresham 1534-1574 (21) at Whornes Place Cuxton.

Deal

On 03 Feb 1495 Perkin Warbreck 1474-1499 (21) landed at Deal. He was driven off by supporters of the Crown and travelled to Ireland.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 30 April 1660. 30 Apr 1660. All the morning getting instructions ready for the Squadron of ships that are going to-day to the Streights, among others Captain Teddiman, Curtis, and Captain Robert Blake to be commander of the whole Squadron. After dinner to ninepins, W. Howe and I against Mr. Creed and the Captain. We lost 5s. apiece to them. After that W. Howe, Mr. Sheply and I got my Lord's leave to go to see Captain Sparling. So we took boat and first went on shore, it being very pleasant in the fields; but a very pitiful town Deal is. We went to Fuller's (the famous place for ale), but they have none but what was in the vat. After that to Poole's, a tavern in the town, where we drank, and so to boat again, and went to the Assistance, where we were treated very civilly by the Captain, and he did give us such music upon the harp by a fellow that he keeps on board that I never expect to hear the like again, yet he is a drunken simple fellow to look on as any I ever saw. After that on board the Nazeby, where we found my Lord at supper, so I sat down and very pleasant my Lord was with Mr. Creed and Sheply, who he puzzled about finding out the meaning of the three notes which my Lord had cut over the chrystal of his watch. After supper some musique. Then Mr. Sheply, W. Howe and I up to the Lieutenant's cabin, where we drank, and I and W. Howe were very merry, and among other frolics he pulls out the spigot of the little vessel of ale that was there in the cabin and drew some into his mounteere, and after he had drank, I endeavouring to dash it in his face, he got my velvet studying cap and drew some into mine too, that we made ourselves a great deal of mirth, but spoiled my clothes with the ale that we dashed up and down. After that to bed very late with drink enough in my head.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 01 May 1660. 01 May 1660. This morning I was told how the people of Deal have set up two or three Maypoles, and have hung up their flags upon the top of them, and do resolve to be very merry to-day. It being a very pleasant day, I wished myself in Hide Park. This day I do count myself to have had full two years of perfect cure for the stone, for which God of heaven be blessed. This day Captain Parker came on board, and without his expectation I had a commission for him for the Nonsuch frigate [The "Nonsuch" was a fourth-rate of thirty-two guns, built at Deptford in 1646 by Peter Pett, jun. The captain was John Parker.] (he being now in the Cheriton), for which he gave me a French pistole. Captain H. Cuttance has commission for the Cheriton. After dinner to nine-pins, and won something. The rest of the afternoon in my cabin writing and piping. While we were at supper we heard a great noise upon the Quarter Deck, so we all rose instantly, and found it was to save the coxon of the Cheriton, who, dropping overboard, could not be saved, but was drowned. To-day I put on my suit that was altered from the great skirts to little ones. To-day I hear they were very merry at Deal, setting up the King's (29) flag upon one of their maypoles, and drinking his health upon their knees in the streets, and firing the guns, which the soldiers of the Castle threatened; but durst not oppose.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 05 May 1660. 05 May 1660. All the morning very busy writing letters to London, and a packet to Mr Downing (35), to acquaint him with what had been done lately in the fleet. And this I did by my Lord's command, who, I thank him, did of himself think of doing it, to do me a kindness, for he writ a letter himself to him, thanking him for his kindness to me. All the afternoon at ninepins, at night after supper good musique, my Lord, Mr. North, I and W. Howe. After that to bed. This evening came Dr. Clarges (42) to Deal, going to the King; where the towns-people strewed the streets with herbes against his coming, for joy of his going. Never was there so general a content as there is now. I cannot but remember that our parson did, in his prayer to-night, pray for the long life and happiness of our King and dread Soveraign, that may last as long as the sun and moon endureth.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 10 May 1660. 10 May 1660. This morning came on board Mr. Pinkney and his son, going to the King with a petition finely writ by Mr. Whore, for to be the King's (29) embroiderer; for whom and Mr. Saunderson (74) I got a ship. This morning come my Lord Winchelsea and a great deal of company, and dined here. In the afternoon, while my Lord and we were at musique in the great cabin below, comes in a messenger to tell us that Mr. Edward Montagu (12), [Sir Edward Montagu's eldest son, afterwards second Earl of Sandwich, called by Pepys "The child".] my Lord's son, was come to Deal, who afterwards came on board with Mr. Pickering (42) with him. The child was sick in the evening. At night, while my Lord was at supper, in comes my Lord Lauderdale and Sir John Greenville, who supped here, and so went away. After they were gone, my Lord called me into his cabin, and told me how he was commanded to set sail presently for the King1, and was very glad thereof, and so put me to writing of letters and other work that night till it was very late, he going to bed. I got him afterwards to sign things in bed. After I had done some more work I to bed also.
Note 1. Ordered that General Montagu (34) do observe the command of His Majesty for the disposing of the fleet, in order to His Majesty's returning home to England to his kingly government: and that all proceedings in law be in His Majesty's name. Rugge's Diurnal. B.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 11 May 1660. 11 May 1660. Up very early in the morning, and so about a great deal of business in order to our going hence to-day. Burr going on shore last night made me very angry. So that I sent for Mr. Pitts to come to me from the Vice-Admiral's (45), intending not to have employed Burr any more. But Burr by and by coming and desiring humbly that I would forgive him and Pitts not coming I did set him to work. This morning we began to pull down all the State's arms in the fleet, having first sent to Dover for painters and others to come to set up the King's (29). The rest of the morning writing of letters to London which I afterwards sent by Dunne. I had this morning my first opportunity of discoursing with Dr. Clarke1, whom I found to be a very pretty man and very knowing. He is now going in this ship to the King. There dined here my Lord Crafford (64) and my Lord Cavendish (20), and other Scotchmen whom I afterwards ordered to be received on board the Plymouth, and to go along with us. After dinner we set sail from the Downs, I leaving my boy to go to Deal for my linen. In the afternoon overtook us three or four gentlemen; two of the Berties, and one Mr. Dormerhoy, a Scotch gentleman, whom I afterwards found to be a very fine man, who, telling my Lord that they heard the Commissioners were come out of London to-day, my Lord dropt anchor over against Dover Castle (which give us about thirty guns in passing), and upon a high debate with the Vice and Rear Admiral whether it were safe to go and not stay for the Commissioners, he did resolve to send Sir R. Stayner (35) to Dover, to enquire of my Lord Winchelsea, whether or no they are come out of London, and then to resolve to-morrow morning of going or not; which was done. It blew very hard all this night that I was afeard of my boy. About 11 at night came the boats from Deal, with great store of provisions, by the same token John Goods told me that above 20 of the fowls are smothered, but my boy was put on board the Northwich. To bed.
Note 1. Timothy Clarke, M. D., one of the original Fellows of the Royal Society. He was appointed one of the physicians in ordinary to Charles II on the death of Dr. Quartermaine in 1667.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 16 June 1661. 16 Jun 1661. Lord's Day. But no purser coming in the morning for them, and I hear that the Duke went last night, and so I am at a great loss what to do; and so this day (though the Lord's day) staid at home, sending Will up and down to know what to do. Sometimes thinking to continue my resolution of sending by the carrier to be at Deal on Wednesday next, sometimes to send them by sea by a vessel on purpose, but am not yet come to a resolution, but am at a very great loss and trouble in mind what in the world to do herein.
The afternoon (while Will was abroad) I spent in reading "The Spanish Gypsey", a play not very good, though commended much. At night resolved to hire a Margate Hoy, who would go away to-morrow morning, which I did, and sent the things all by him, and put them on board about 12 this night, hoping to have them as the wind now serves in the Downs to-morrow night. To-bed with some quiet of mind, having sent the things away.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 18 July 1664. 18 Jul 1664. Up, and walked to my Lord's, and there took my leave of him, he seeming very friendly to me in as serious a manner as ever in his life, and I believe he is very confident of me. He sets out this morning for Deale.
Thence to St. James's to the Duke (30), and there did our usual business. He discourses very freely of a warr with Holland, to begin about winter, so that I believe we shall come to it. Before we went up to the Duke, Sir G. Carteret (54) and I did talk together in the Parke about my Chancellor's (55) business of the timber; he telling me freely that my Chancellor (55) was never so angry with him in all his life, as he was for this business, in great passion; and that when he saw me there, he knew what it was about. And plots now with me how we may serve my Lord, which I am mightily glad of; and I hope together we may do it.
Thence to Westminster to my barber's, to have my Periwigg he lately made me cleansed of its nits, which vexed me cruelly that he should put such a thing into my hands. Here meeting his mayd Jane, that has lived with them so long, I talked with her, and sending her of an errand to Dr. Clerk's, did meet her, and took her into a little alehouse in Brewers Yard, and there did sport with her, without any knowledge of her though, and a very pretty innocent girl she is.
Thence to my Chancellor's (55), but he being busy I went away to the 'Change, and so home to dinner.
By and by comes Creed, and I out with him to Fleet Street, and he to Mr. Povy's (50), I to my Chancellor's (55), and missing him again walked to Povy's (50), and there saw his new perspective in his closet. Povy (50), to my great surprise and wonder, did here attacque me in his own and Mr. Bland's behalf that I should do for them both for the new contractors for the victualling of the garrison. Which I am ashamed that he should ask of me, nor did I believe that he was a man that did seek benefit in such poor things. Besides that he professed that he did not believe that I would have any hand myself in the contract, and yet here declares that he himself would have profit by it, and himself did move me that Sir W. Rider might join, and Ford with Gauden. I told him I had no interest in them, but I fear they must do something to him, for he told me that those of the Mole did promise to consider him.
Thence home and Creed with me, and there he took occasion to owne his obligations to me, and did lay down twenty pieces in gold upon my shelf in my closett, which I did not refuse, but wish and expected should have been more. But, however, this is better than nothing, and now I am out of expectation, and shall henceforward know how to deal with him. After discourse of settling his matters here, we went out by coach, and he 'light at the Temple, and there took final leave of me, in order to his following my Lord to-morrow.
I to my Chancellor (55), and discoursed his business with him. I perceive, and he says plainly, that he will not have any man to have it in his power to say that my Chancellor (55) did contrive the wronging the King (34) of his timber; but yet I perceive, he would be glad to have service done him therein; and told me Sir G. Carteret (54) hath told him that he and I would look after his business to see it done in the best manner for him. Of this I was glad, and so away.
Thence home, and late with my Tangier men about drawing up their agreement with us, wherein I find much trouble, and after doing as much as we could to-night, broke up and I to bed.

Calendar of State Papers Charles II Domestic Series 1664 13 Nov 1664. 13 Nov 1664. 93. Wm. Coventry (36) to [Sec. Bennet (46)]. Hopes the wind will change, and bring the Charles and the other ships out of the river; will not then fear what Opdam can do, though the men are raw, and need a little time at sea. The Ruby and Happy Return have brought some supernumeraries, but 500 more are wanted ; 200 are expected from Plymouth, but till some runaways are hanged, the ships cannot be kept well manned. Sends a list of some fit to be made examples of in the several counties where they were pressed, with the names of those who pressed them. The Dutch ship named before is brought in, and two others are stayed at Cowes by virtue of the embargo, the order in Council making no exception for foreigners, The King’s pleasure should be known therein, as the end, which is to gather seamen, does not seem to require the stopping of foreigners. Prize officers must- be sent speedily to [Portsmouth], Dover, and Deal. Those at Deal should have men in readiness to carry prizes up the river, that the men belonging to the fleet be not scattered. Persons should also be hastened to ‘take care of the sick and wounded. The Duke (31) intends to appoint Erwin captain of the ship hired to go to St. Helena; he is approved by the East India Company, which is important, trade being intermixed with convoy, and they find fault if a commander of the King’s ships bring home any little matter privately bought. The Duke has divided the fleet into squadrons, assigning to each a vice and rear adiniral; Sir John Lawson (49) and Sir Wm. Berkeley to his own, Mennes (65) and Sansum to Prince Rupert’s (44), Sir George Aiscue (48) [Ayscough] and Teddeman to the Earl of Sandwich. Hopes in a few days to be in much better order, if good men can be got. Will send a list of the squadrons. The Guernsey is damaged by running aground. Rear-Admiral Teddeman, with 4 or 5 ships, has gone to course in the Channel, and if he meet any refractory Dutchmen, will teach them their duty. The King’s declaration for encouraging seamen has much revived the men, and added to their courage. [Four pages.]

John Evelyn's Diary 09 January 1665. 09 Jan 1665. To Deal. 10th. To Sandwich, a pretty town, about two miles from the sea. The Mayor and officers of the Customs were very diligent to serve me. I visited the forts in the way, and returned that night to Canterbury.

Battle of Lowestoft

John Evelyn's Diary 08 June 1665. 08 Jun 1665. I went again to his Grace, thence to the Council, and moved for another privy seal for £20,000, and that I might have the disposal of the Savoy Hospital for the sick and wounded; all which was granted. Hence to the Royal Society, to refresh among the philosophers.
Came news of his highness's (35) victory, which indeed might have been a complete one, and at once ended the war, had it been pursued, but the cowardice of some, or treachery, or both, frustrated that. We had, however, bonfires, bells, and rejoicing in the city. Next day, the 9th, I had instant orders to repair to the Downs, so as I got to Rochester this evening. Next day I lay at Deal, where I found all in readiness: but, the fleet being hindered by contrary winds, I came away on the 12th, and went to Dover, and returned to Deal; and on the 13th, hearing the fleet was at Solbay, I went homeward, and lay at Chatham, and on the 14th, I got home. On the 15th, came the eldest son of the present Secretary of State to the French King, with much other company, to dine with me. After dinner, I went with him to London, to speak to my Lord General for more guards, and gave his Majesty (35) an account of my journey to the coasts under my inspection. I also waited on his Royal Highness (31), now come triumphant from the fleet, gotten into repair. See the whole history of this conflict in my "History of the Dutch War"..

Four Days' Battle

John Evelyn's Diary 01 June 1666. 01 Jun 1666. Being in my garden at 6 o'clock in the evening, and hearing the great guns go thick off, I took horse and rode that night to Rochester; thence next day toward the Downs and seacoast, but meeting the Lieutenant of the Hampshire frigate, who told me what passed, or rather what had not passed, I returned to London, there being no noise, or appearance at Deal, or on that coast of any engagement. Recounting this to his Majesty (36), whom I found at St. James's Park, impatiently expecting, and knowing that Prince Rupert (46) was loose about three at St. Helen's Point at N. of the Isle of Wight, it greatly rejoiced him; but he was astonished when I assured him they heard nothing of the guns in the Downs, nor did the Lieutenant who landed there by five that morning.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!.
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

Deal Castle

Samuel Pepys' Diary 09 April 1660. 09 Apr 1660. We having sailed all night, were come in sight of the Nore and South Forelands in the morning, and so sailed all day. In the afternoon we had a very fresh gale, which I brooked better than I thought I should be able to do. This afternoon I first saw France and Calais, with which I was much pleased, though it was at a distance. About five o'clock we came to the Goodwin, so to the Castles about Deal; where our Fleet lay, among whom we anchored. Great was the shout of guns from the castles and ships, and our answers, that I never heard yet so great rattling of guns. Nor could we see one another on board for the smoke that was among us, nor one ship from another. Soon as we came to anchor, the captains came from on board their ships all to us on board. This afternoon I wrote letters for my Lord to the Council, &c., which Mr. Dickering was to carry, who took his leave this night of my Lord, and Balty after I had wrote two or three letters by him to my wife and Mr. Bowyer, and had drank a bottle of wine with him in my cabin which J. Goods and W. Howe brought on purpose, he took leave of me too to go away to-morrow morning with Mr. Dickering. I lent Balty 15s. which he was to pay to my wife. It was one in the morning before we parted. This evening Mr. Sheply came on board, having escaped a very great danger upon a sand coming from Chatham.

On 14 Sep 1852 Arthur Wellesley 1st Duke Wellington 1769-1852 (83) died at Deal Castle. His son Arthur Wellesley 2nd Duke Wellington 1807-1884 (45) succeeded 2nd Duke Wellington 1C 1814. Elizabeth Hay Duchess Wellington 1820-1904 (31) by marriage Duke Wellington 1C 1814.

1648 Kentish Rebellion

The May 1648 Kentish Rebellion was, in effect, the commencement of the Second Civil War of 1648. The rebels, commanded by George Goring 1st Earl Norwich 1585-1663, raised forces across Kent. Deal Castle, Walmer Castle and Sandown Castle surrendered. The rebels then besieged Dover Castle. Parliament dispatched troops commanded by Nathaniel Rich of Stondon -1701 to suppress the rebels.

Goodwin Sands

Goodwin Sands. A 16 km sandbank at the southern end of the North Sea lying 10 km off the Deal coast in Kent, England.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 09 April 1660. 09 Apr 1660. We having sailed all night, were come in sight of the Nore and South Forelands in the morning, and so sailed all day. In the afternoon we had a very fresh gale, which I brooked better than I thought I should be able to do. This afternoon I first saw France and Calais, with which I was much pleased, though it was at a distance. About five o'clock we came to the Goodwin, so to the Castles about Deal; where our Fleet lay, among whom we anchored. Great was the shout of guns from the castles and ships, and our answers, that I never heard yet so great rattling of guns. Nor could we see one another on board for the smoke that was among us, nor one ship from another. Soon as we came to anchor, the captains came from on board their ships all to us on board. This afternoon I wrote letters for my Lord to the Council, &c., which Mr. Dickering was to carry, who took his leave this night of my Lord, and Balty after I had wrote two or three letters by him to my wife and Mr. Bowyer, and had drank a bottle of wine with him in my cabin which J. Goods and W. Howe brought on purpose, he took leave of me too to go away to-morrow morning with Mr. Dickering. I lent Balty 15s. which he was to pay to my wife. It was one in the morning before we parted. This evening Mr. Sheply came on board, having escaped a very great danger upon a sand coming from Chatham.

Deptford

Sayes Court

Trinity House

Dover

Dover Castle

Dartford

Release of King John II of France

Around 30 Jun 1360 John "The Good" II King France 1319-1364 (41) left the Tower of London and proceeded to Eltham Palace where Queen Philippa (46) had prepared a great farewell entertainment. Passing the night at Dartford, he continued towards Dover, stopping at the Maison Dieu of St Mary at Ospringe, and paying homage at the shrine of St Thomas Becket at Canterbury on 04 Jul 1360. He dined with the Black Prince (30) at Dover Castle, and reached English-held Calais on 08 Jul 1360.

Before 1543 Edward Darcy 1542-1612 was born to Arthur Darcy 1495-1561 and Mary Carew 1517-1558 at Dartford.

On 28 Oct 1612 Edward Darcy 1542-1612 (69) died at Dartford.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 November 1675. 10 Nov 1675. Being the day appointed for my Lord Ambassador (47) to set out, I met them with my coach at New Cross. There were with him my Lady his wife, and my dear friend, Mrs. Godolphin (23), who, out of an extraordinary friendship, would needs accompany my lady to Paris, and stay with her some time, which was the chief inducement for permitting my son (20) to travel, but I knew him safe under her inspection, and in regard my Lord (47) himself had promised to take him into his special favor, he having intrusted all he had to my care.
Thus we set out three coaches (besides mine), three wagons, and about forty horses. It being late, and my Lord (47) as yet but valetudinary, we got but to Dartford, the first day, the next to Sittingbourne.
At Rochester, the major, Mr. Cony, then an officer of mine for the sick and wounded of that place, gave the ladies a handsome refreshment as we came by his house.

On 30 Jan 1847 Joseph Maas Singer 1847-1886 was born in Dartford.

Dartford Priory Dartford

The History of King Richard the Third. King Edward of that name the Fourth (40), after he had lived fifty and three years, seven months, and six days, and thereof reigned two and twenty years, one month, and eight days, died at Westminster the ninth day of April, the year of our redemption, a thousand four hundred four score and three, leaving much fair issue, that is, Edward the Prince (12), thirteen years of age; Richard Duke of York, two years younger; Elizabeth (17), whose fortune and grace was after to be queen, wife unto King Henry the Seventh (26), and mother unto the Eighth; Cecily (14) not so fortunate as fair; Brigette (2), who, representing the virtue of her whose name she bore, professed and observed a religious life in Dertford, a house of cloistered Nuns; Anne (7), who was after honorably married unto Thomas (10), then Lord Howard and after Earl of Surrey; and Katherine (3), who long time tossed in either fortune—sometime in wealth, often in adversity—at the last, if this be the last, for yet she lives, is by the goodness of her nephew, King Henry the Eighth, in very prosperous state, and worthy her birth and virtue.

In 1517 Bridget York 1480-1517 (36) died at Dartford Priory Dartford.

Long Reach

Samuel Pepys' Diary 23 March 1660. 23 Mar 1660. Up early, carried my Lord's will in a black box to Mr. William Montagu (42) for him to keep for him. Then to the barber's and put on my cravat there. So to my Lord again, who was almost ready to be gone and had staid for me. Hither came Gilb. Holland, and brought me a stick rapier and Shelston a sugar-loaf, and had brought his wife who he said was a very pretty woman to the Ship tavern hard by for me to see but I could not go. Young Reeve also brought me a little perspective glass which I bought for my Lord, it cost me 8s. So after that my Lord in Sir H. Wright's (23) coach with Captain Isham, Mr. Thomas, John Crew, W. Howe, and I in a Hackney to the Tower, where the barges staid for us; my Lord and the Captain in one, and W. Howe and I, &c., in the other, to the Long Reach, where the Swiftsure lay at anchor; (in our way we saw the great breach which the late high water had made, to the loss of many £1000 to the people about Limehouse.) Soon as my Lord on board, the guns went off bravely from the ships. And a little while after comes the Vice-Admiral Lawson (45), and seemed very respectful to my Lord, and so did the rest of the Commanders of the frigates that were thereabouts. I to the cabin allotted for me, which was the best that any had that belonged to my Lord. I got out some things out of my chest for writing and to work presently, Mr. Burr and I both. I supped at the deck table with Mr. Sheply. We were late writing of orders for the getting of ships ready, &c.; and also making of others to all the seaports between Hastings and Yarmouth, to stop all dangerous persons that are going or coming between Flanders and there. After that to bed in my cabin, which was but short; however I made shift with it and slept very well, and the weather being good I was not sick at all yet, I know not what I shall be.

East Peckham

Diary of Isabella Twysden 1645. 08 Feb 1645. the 8 febri, I. came to peckham great with child, and ride all the waye a hors back, and I thank god had no hurt.
NOTE. She rode on a pillion behind George Stone the manservant, and after Charles's birth she never regained her former strength. In the East Peckham Register Charles's Baptism is dated March 7th.

On 02 Nov 1752 Philip Twysden Bishop Raphoe 1713-1752 (39) died at Jermyn Street. Possibly East Peckham. Somewhat curously his death was embroiled in a scandal that suggested he had, as a result of his impeecunious situation, been shot whilst attempting to rob a stagecoch.

Roydon Hall East Peckham

Diary of Isabella Twysden 1645 1651: Introduction. Isabella was the third and youngest daughter of Sir Nicholas Saunder (79) of Nonsuch, near Swell in Surrey. Born in 1605, she married in 1635 and died in 1657. Sir Roger (44) was thirty-seven at the time of his marriage.
Sir Roger's mother liked to be attended by a young lady in waiting, and Isabella Saunder (37) was performing this function in 1633, possibly because her father (79) had ruined himself over the New River, Isabella inherited the heraldic achievements of the Saunder family, as her only brother died unmarried, but was heir to nothing else.
Sir Nicholas had been a partner with Sir Hugh Myddleton when in 1607-13 he carried out the New River Scheme for providing London with water. Straitness of circumstances seems to have made Lady Isabella very careful over household management and keeping accounts.
Sir Roger was arrested in April 1642 and imprisoned by the Parliament for his share in supporting the Petition of Kent, which asked that all things should be done according to law. His estates were sequestrated and Lady Isabella was granted a fifth part of the incomings for her maintenance at Roydon Hall. His Journal is printed in the first four volumes of Archceologia Cantiana. In Additional MSS. 34161 there is a letter written by Sir Roger, dated May 1642.
"My dear hart, I inquire by you of what state the derre are, and wonder much they are so backward they thriving most in such weather. I thank thee for thy sugar cakes my good hart which will be very useful to me. I cannot enough commend my brother Thomas usage of me so full of love and care as is imaginable, farewell again and again, my own dear hart whom I never knew what it was to be parted from tyl now"..

St Michael's Church East Peckham

In 1657 Isabella Saunders Diarist 1605-1657 (52) died. She was buried at St Michael's Church East Peckham.

Eastchurch

Around 1304 Robert Cheney 1304-1362 was born to William Cheney 1275-1322 (29) and Margaret Shurland 1281-1308 (23) at Eastchurch.

On 12 Apr 1362 Robert Cheney 1304-1362 (58) died at Eastchurch.

In 1390 Alice Cheney 1390- was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (38) at Eastchurch.

In 1392 Simon Cheney 1392-1455 was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (40) at Eastchurch.

Around 1442 John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (27) at Eastchurch. When his tomb was opened in the 18th Century his thighbone was measured at 21 inches making his height an estimated six feet eight inches.

In 1467 John Cheney 1415-1467 (52) died at Eastchurch.

Shurland Eastchurch

In 1308 Margaret Shurland 1281-1308 (27) died at Shurland Eastchurch.

Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch

Around 1281 Margaret Shurland 1281-1308 was born to Robert Shurland 1250- at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1352 Richard Cheney 1352-1392 was born to Robert Cheney 1304-1362 (48) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1386 William Cheney 1386-1442 was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (34) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

In 1392 Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (40) died at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1413 Margery Cheney 1413- was born to William Cheney 1386-1442 (27) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1415 John Cheney 1415-1467 was born to William Cheney 1386-1442 (29) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

In 1444 William Cheney 1444-1487 was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (29) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1449 Edmond Cheney 1449- was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (34) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1453 Margaret Cheney 1453- was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (38) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

In 1459 Edward Cheney 1459- was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (44) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1463 Alexander Cheney 1463- was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (48) at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Around 1513 John Cheney 1513-1558 was born to Thomas Cheney Treasurer 1485-1558 (28) and Frideswide Frowyk -1528 at Shurland House Shurland Eastchurch.

Eastwell

On 24 Feb 1683 John Finch 6th Earl Winchilsea 1683-1729 was born to Heneage Finch 3rd Earl Winchilsea 1628-1689 (55) and Elizabeth Ayres Countess Winchelsea -1745. He was christened on 06 Mar 1683 at Eastwell.

Eastwell Park Eastwell

On 29 Oct 1875 Marie Windsor 1875-1938 was born to Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (31) and Maria Holstein Gottorp Romanov 1853-1920 (22) at Eastwell Park Eastwell.

On 20 Apr 1884 Beatrice Windsor Duchess Galliera 1884-1966 was born to Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (39) and Maria Holstein Gottorp Romanov 1853-1920 (30) at Eastwell Park Eastwell.

The Most Eastwell

In 1520 Elizabeth Cromer 1475-1520 (45) died at The Most Eastwell.

Erith

Samuel Pepys' Diary 13 June 1661. 13 Jun 1661. I went up and down to Alderman Backwell's (43), but his servants not being up, I went home and put on my gray cloth suit and faced white coat, made of one of my wife's pettycoates, the first time I have had it on, and so in a riding garb back again and spoke with Mr. Shaw at the Alderman's, who offers me £300 if my Lord pleases to buy this cloth with, which pleased me well.
So to the Wardrobe and got my Lord to order Mr. Creed to imprest so much upon me to be paid by Alderman Backwell (43). So with my Lord to Whitehall by water, and he having taken leave of the King, comes to us at his lodgings and from thence goes to the garden stairs and there takes barge, and at the stairs was met by Sir R. Slingsby (50), who there took his leave of my Lord, and I heard my Lord thank him for his kindness to me, which Sir Robert answered much to my advantage.
I went down with my Lord in the barge to Deptford, and there went on board the Dutch yacht and staid there a good while, W. Howe not being come with my Lord's things, which made my Lord very angry. By and by he comes and so we set sayle, and anon went to dinner, my Lord and we very merry; and after dinner I went down below and there sang, and took leave of W. Howe, Captain Rolt, and the rest of my friends, then went up and took leave of my Lord, who give me his hand and parted with great respect.
So went and Captain Ferrers with me into our wherry, and my Lord did give five guns, all they had charged, which was the greatest respect my Lord could do me, and of which I was not a little proud. So with a sad and merry heart I left them sailing pleasantly from Erith, hoping to be in the Downs tomorrow early. We toward London in our boat. Pulled off our stockings and bathed our legs a great while in the river, which I had not done some years before.
By and by we come to Greenwich, and thinking to have gone on the King's yacht, the King was in her, so we passed by, and at Woolwich went on shore, in the company of Captain Poole of Jamaica and young Mr. Kennersley, and many others, and so to the tavern where we drank a great deal both wine and beer.
So we parted hence and went home with Mr. Falconer, who did give us cherrys and good wine. So to boat, and young Poole took us on board the Charity and gave us wine there, with which I had full enough, and so to our wherry again, and there fell asleep till I came almost to the Tower, and there the Captain and I parted, and I home and with wine enough in my head, went to bed.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 04 August 1662. 04 Aug 1662. Up by four o'clock in the morning and walked to the Dock, where Commissioner Pett (51) and I took barge and went to the guardships and mustered them, finding them but badly manned; thence to the Sovereign, which we found kept in good order and very clean, which pleased us well, but few of the officers on board.
Thence to the Charles, and were troubled to see her kept so neglectedly by the boatswain Clements, who I always took for a very good officer; it is a very brave ship.
Thence to Upnor Castle, and there went up to the top, where there is a fine prospect, but of very small force; so to the yard, and there mustered the whole ordinary, where great disorder by multitude of servants and old decrepid men, which must be remedied.
So to all the storehouses and viewed the stores of all sorts and the hemp, where we found Captain Cocke's (45) (which he came down to see along with me) very bad, and some others, and with much content (God forgive me) I did hear by the Clerk of the Ropeyard how it was by Sir W. Batten's (61) private letter that one parcel of Alderman Barker's' was received.
At two o'clock to dinner to the Hill-house, and after dinner dispatched many people's business, and then to the yard again, and looked over Mr. Gregory's and Barrow's houses to see the matter of difference between them concerning an alteration that Barrow would make, which I shall report to the board, but both their houses very pretty, and deserve to be so, being well kept.
Then to a trial of several sorts of hemp, but could not perform it here so well as at Woolwich, but we did do it pretty well.
So took barge at the dock and to Rochester, and there Captain Cocke (45) and I and our two men took coach about 8 at night and to Gravesend, where it was very dark before we got thither to the Swan; and there, meeting with Doncaster, an old waterman of mine above bridge, we eat a short supper, being very merry with the drolling, drunken coachman that brought us, and so took water. It being very dark, and the wind rising, and our waterman unacquainted with this part of the river, so that we presently cast upon the Essex shore, but got off again, and so, as well as we could, went on, but I in such fear that I could not sleep till we came to Erith, and there it begun to be calm, and the stars to shine, and so I began to take heart again, and the rest too, and so made shift to slumber a little. Above Woolwich we lost our way, and went back to Blackwall, and up and down, being guided by nothing but the barking of a dog, which we had observed in passing by Blackwall, and so, [Continued tomorrow]

Samuel Pepys' Diary 24 December 1663. 24 Dec 1663. Up betimes; and though it was a most foggy morning, and cold, yet with a gally down to Eriffe, several times being at a loss whither we went. There I mustered two ships of the King's, lent by him to the Guiny Company, which are manned better than ours at far less wages.
Thence on board two of the King's, one of them the "Leopard", Captain Beech, who I find an able and serious man. He received me civilly, and his wife was there, a very well bred and knowing woman, born at Antwerp, but speaks as good English as myself, and an ingenious woman. Here was also Sir G. Carteret's (53) son, who I find a pretty, but very talking man, but good humour.
Thence back again, entertaining myself upon my sliding rule with great content, and called at Woolwich, where Mr. Chr. Pett (43) having an opportunity of being alone did tell me his mind about several things he thought I was offended with him in, and told me of my kindness to his assistant. I did give him such an answer as I thought was fit and left him well satisfied, he offering to do me all the service, either by draughts or modells that I should desire.
Thence straight home, being very cold, but yet well, I thank God, and at home found my wife making mince pies, and by and by comes in Captain Ferrers to see us, and, among other talke, tells us of the goodness of the new play of "Henry VIII", which makes me think [it] long till my time is out; but I hope before I go I shall set myself such a stint as I may not forget myself as I have hitherto done till I was forced for these months last past wholly to forbid myself the seeing of one. He gone I to my office and there late writing and reading, and so home to bed.

John Evelyn's Diary 29 September 1665. 29 Sep 1665. To Erith, to quicken the sale of the prizes lying there, with order to the commissioner who lay on board till they should be disposed of, £5,000 being proportioned for my quarter. Then I delivered the Dutch Vice-Admiral, who was my prisoner, to Mr. Lowman of the Marshalsea, he giving me bond in £500 to produce him at my call. I exceedingly pitied this brave unhappy person, who had lost with these prizes £40,000 after twenty years' negotiation [trading] in the East Indies. I dined in one of these vessels, of 1,200 tons, full of riches.

John Evelyn's Diary 13 May 1668. 13 May 1668. Invited by that expert commander, Captain Cox, master of the lately built "Charles II" now the best vessel of the fleet, designed for the Duke of York (34), I went to Erith, where we had a great dinner.

Eynesford

Reginald Cobham 1237- died at Eynesford.

Faversham

Glorious Revolution

John Evelyn's Diary 13 December 1688. 13 Dec 1688. The King (55) flies to sea, puts in at Faversham for ballast; is rudely treated by the people; comes back to Whitehall.
The Prince of Orange (38) is advanced to Windsor, is invited by the King (55) to St. James's, the messenger sent was the Earl of Faversham (47), the General of the Forces, who going without trumpet, or passport, is detained prisoner by the Prince (38), who accepts the invitation, but requires his Majesty (38) to retire to some distant place, that his own guards may be quartered about the palace and city. This is taken heinously and the King (38) goes privately to Rochester; is persuaded to come back; comes on the Sunday; goes to mass, and dines in public, a Jesuit saying grace (I was present).

Faversham Abbey Faversham

After 17 Aug 1153 Eustace Blois IV Count Boulogne 1130-1153 was buried at Faversham Abbey Faversham.

Ospringe

Gillingham

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!.
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

Goudhurst

In 1424 John Culpepper 1424-1480 was born to Walter Culpepper 1402-1462 (22) and Agnes Roper 1400-1457 (24) at Goudhurst.

Before 02 Dec 1457 Alexander Culpepper 1460-1541 was born to John Culpepper 1424-1480 and Agnes Gaynsford 1426-1457 at Goudhurst. Based on his mother's death in 1457.

Before 02 Dec 1457 Agnes Gaynsford 1426-1457 died at Goudhurst.

On 24 Nov 1462 Walter Culpepper 1402-1462 (60) died at Goudhurst.

On 22 Dec 1480 John Culpepper 1424-1480 (56) died at Goudhurst.

On 21 Jun 1541 Alexander Culpepper 1460-1541 (83) died at Goudhurst.

Bedgebury Goudhurst

Around 1509 William Culpepper 1509-1559 was born to Walter Culpepper 1465-1515 (51) at Bedgebury Goudhurst.

On 24 Feb 1718 Rachel Hungerford Viscountess Falkland 1635-1718 (83) died at Bedgebury Goudhurst.

Bedgebury Manor Bedgebury Goudhurst

In 1682 James Hayes 1637-1694 (45) bought from Thomas Culpepper at Bedgebury Manor Bedgebury Goudhurst.

Gravesend

Greenwich

Palace of Placentia

Groombridge

On 24 Jun 1618 Philip Packer Lawyer Architect 1618-1686 was born to John Packer Clerk to the Privy Seal 1572-1649 (45) in Groombridge.

On or before 11 Mar 1624 Katherine Packer of Shelingford Lady Gell 1624-1671 was born to John Packer Clerk to the Privy Seal 1572-1649 (51) in Groombridge. She was baptised on 11 Mar 1624 in Westminster Abbey.

Battle of Agincourt

John Evelyn's Diary 06 August 1674. 06 Aug 1674. I went to Groombridge, to see my old friend, Mr. Packer (56); the house built within a moat, in a woody valley. The old house had been the place of confinement of the Duke of Orleans, taken by one Waller (whose house it then was) at the Battle of Agincourt, now demolished, and a new one built in its place, though a far better situation had been on the south of the wood, on a graceful ascent. At some small distance, is a large chapel, not long since built by Mr. Packer's father, on a vow he made to do it on the return of King Charles I out of Spain, 1625, and dedicated to St. Charles, but what saint there was then of that name I am to seek, for, being a Protestant, I conceive it was not Borromeo.
I went to see my farm at Ripe, near Lewes.

Groombridge Place

Around 1395 Richard Waller 1395-1462 was born at Groombridge Place.

Battle of Agincourt

John Evelyn's Diary 06 August 1674. 06 Aug 1674. I went to Groombridge, to see my old friend, Mr. Packer (56); the house built within a moat, in a woody valley. The old house had been the place of confinement of the Duke of Orleans, taken by one Waller (whose house it then was) at the Battle of Agincourt, now demolished, and a new one built in its place, though a far better situation had been on the south of the wood, on a graceful ascent. At some small distance, is a large chapel, not long since built by Mr. Packer's father, on a vow he made to do it on the return of King Charles I out of Spain, 1625, and dedicated to St. Charles, but what saint there was then of that name I am to seek, for, being a Protestant, I conceive it was not Borromeo.
I went to see my farm at Ripe, near Lewes.

Grovehurst

In 1539 Ursula Finch 1539-1600 was born to Roger Finch 1510-1539 (29) at Grovehurst.

Halling

In 1184 Richard de Dover Archbishop of Canterbury -1184 died at Halling.

Harrietsham

In 1575 Thomas Culpepper 1575-1662 was born to Francis Culpepper 1538-1591 (37) and Joan Pordage at Harrietsham.

Hartlip

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!.
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

Haudlo

Around 1267 John Haudlo 1267-1346 was born to Richard Haudlo at Haudlo.

Robert Haudlo was born to Richard Haudlo at Haudlo.

William Haudlo was born to Richard Haudlo at Haudlo.

Hever

Hever Castle

In 1462 Geoffrey Boleyn Lord Mayor London 1406-1463 (56) purchased at Hever Castle.

Around 1477 Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539 was born to William Boleyn 1451-1505 (26) and Margaret Butler 1465-1537 (12) at Hever Castle.

Anne of Cleves Annulment

On 09 Jul 1540 Henry VIII's (49) marriage to Anne of Cleves (24) was annulled. He gave her a generours settlement including Richmond Palace and Hever Castle. She was given precedence above all other women other than the King's wife future wives and daughters, referring to her thereafter as The King's Sister. She lived seventeen more years outliving Henry's two next wives Catherine Howard Queen Consort England 1523-1542 (17) and Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548 (27), and Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553 (2).

In 1626 Charles Waldegrave 3rd Baronet Waldegrave of Hever Castle 1626-1684 was born to Henry Waldegrave 2nd Baronet 1598-1658 (28) and Anne Paston 1600-1658 (26) at Hever Castle.

High Halden

Hales Place High Halden

Around 1325 Robert Hales 1325-1390 was born at Hales Place High Halden.

Hollingbourne

On 31 May 1591 Francis Culpepper 1538-1591 (53) died at Hollingbourne.

Before 16 Sep 1630 Philippa Snelling -1630 died. She was buried on 16 Sep 1630 at Hollingbourne.

On 21 Mar 1635 Thomas Culpepper 2nd Baron Culpepper 1635-1689 was born to John Culpepper 1st Baron Culpeper 1600-1660 (35) and Judith Culpeper 1606-1653 (29) in Hollingbourne.

In Jan 1662 Thomas Culpepper 1575-1662 (87) died at Hollingbourne.

In Feb 1709 Elizabeth Culpepper 1632-1709 (76) died in Hollingbourne.

Hoo St Werburgh Kent

In 1614 Peter Gunning Bishop 1614-1684 was born to Peter Gunning 1585-1615 (29) at Hoo St Werburgh Kent.

Ingham

Isle of Sheppey

Battle of Oakley

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 851, which was the third after the birth of king Alfred, Ceorl, earl of Devon, fought with the men of Devon against the pagans at a place called Wiegambeorg; and the Christians gained the victory; and that same year the pagans first wintered in the island called Sheppey, which means the Sheep-isle, and is situated in the River Thames between Essex and Kent, but is nearer to Kent than to Essex; it has in it a fine monastery.
The same year also a great army of the pagans came with three hundred and fifty ships to the mouth of the River Thames, and sacked Dorobernia, which is the city of the Cantuarians, and also the city of London, which lies on the north bank of the River Thames, on the confines of Essex and Middlesex; but yet that city belongs in truth to Essex; and they put to flight Berthwulf, king of Mercia, with all the army, which he had led out to oppose them.
After these things, the aforesaid pagan host went into Surrey, which is a district situated on the south bank of the River Thames, and to the west of Kent. And Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, and his son Ethelbald, with all their army, fought a long time against them at a place called Ac-lea, i.e. the Oak-plain, and there, after a lengthened battle, which was fought with much bravery on both sides, the greater part of the pagan multitude was destroyed and cut to pieces, so that we never heard of their being so defeated, either before or since, in any country, in one day; and the Christians gained an honourable victory, and were triumphant over their graves.
In the same year king Athelstan, son of king Ethelwulf, and earl Ealhere slew a large army of pagans in Kent, at a place called Sandwich, and took nine ships of their fleet; the others escaped by flight.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 07 April 1660. 07 Apr 1660. This day, about nine o'clock in the morning, the wind grew high, and we being among the sands lay at anchor; I began to be dizzy and squeamish. Before dinner my Lord sent for me down to eat some oysters, the best my Lord said that ever he ate in his life, though I have ate as good at Bardsey. After dinner, and all the afternoon I walked upon the deck to keep myself from being sick, and at last about five o'clock, went to bed and got a caudle made me, and sleep upon it very well. This day Mr. Sheply went to Sheppy.

Cheney Spitts

Samuel Pepys' Diary 06 April 1660. 06 Apr 1660. This morning came my brother-in-law Balty to see me, and to desire to be here with me as Reformado, ["a broken or disbanded officer".] which did much trouble me. But after dinner (my Lord using him very civilly, at table) I spoke to my Lord, and he presented me a letter to Captain Stokes for him that he should be there. All the day with him walking and talking, we under sail as far as the Spitts. In the afternoon, W. Howe and I to our viallins, the first time since we came on board. This afternoon I made even with my Lord to this day, and did give him all the money remaining in my hands. In the evening, it being fine moonshine, I staid late walking upon the quarter-deck with Mr. Cuttance, learning of some sea terms; and so down to supper and to bed, having an hour before put Balty into Burr's cabin, he being out of the ship.

Queenborough Isle of Sheppey

Samuel Pepys' Diary 05 September 1663. 05 Sep 1663. Up betimes and to my viall awhile, and so to the office, and there sat, and busy all the morning.
So at noon to the Exchange, and so home to dinner, where I met Creed, who dined with me, and after dinner mightily importuned by Captain Hicks, who came to tell my wife the names and story of all the shells, which was a pretty present he made her the other day. He being gone, Creed, my wife, and I to Cornhill, and after many tryalls bought my wife a chintz, that is, a painted Indian callico, for to line her new study, which is very pretty.
So home with her, and then I away (Creed being gone) to Captain Minors upon Tower Hill, and there, abating only some impertinence of his, I did inform myself well in things relating to the East Indys; both of the country and the disappointment the King (33) met with the last voyage, by the knavery of the Portugall Viceroy, and the inconsiderablenesse of the place of Bombaim1, if we had had it. But, above all things, it seems strange to me that matters should not be understood before they went out; and also that such a thing as this, which was expected to be one of the best parts of the Queen's (24) portion, should not be better understood; it being, if we had it, but a poor place, and not really so as was described to our King in the draught of it, but a poor little island; whereas they made the King (33) and Chancellor (54), and other learned men about the King (33), believe that that, and other islands which are near it, were all one piece; and so the draught was drawn and presented to the King (33), and believed by the King (33) and expected to prove so when our men came thither; but it is quite otherwise.
Thence to my office, and after several letters writ, home to supper and to bed, and took a pill.
I hear this day that Sir W. Batten (62) was fain to put ashore at Queenborough with my Lady, who has been so sick she swears never to go to sea again. But it happens well that Holmes is come home into the Downes, where he will meet my Lady, and it may be do her more good than she looked for. He brings news of the peace between Tangier and the Moors, but the particulars I know not. He is come but yesterday.
Note 1. Bombay, which was transferred to the East India Company in 1669. The seat of the Western Presidency of India was removed from Surat to Bombay in 1685-87.

John Evelyn's Diary 08 May 1666. 08 May 1666. To Queensborough, where finding the Richmond frigate, I sailed to the buoy of the Nore to my Lord-General (57) and Prince Rupert (46), where was the Rendezvous of the most glorious fleet in the world, now preparing to meet the Hollander. Went to visit my cousin, Hales, at a sweetly-watered place at Chilston, near Bockton. The next morning, to Leeds Castle, once a famous hold, now hired by me of my Lord Culpeper (40) for a prison. Here I flowed the dry moat, made a new drawbridge, brought spring water into the court of the Castle to an old fountain, and took order for the repairs.

1672 Battle of Solebay

John Evelyn's Diary 02 June 1672. 02 Jun 1672. Trinity Sunday, I passed at Rochester; and, on the 5th, there was buried in the Cathedral Monsieur Rabiniére, Rear Admiral of the French squadron, a gallant person, who died of the wounds he received in the fight. This ceremony lay on me, which I performed with all the decency I could, inviting the Mayor and Aldermen to come in their formalities. Sir Jonas Atkins was there with his guards; and the Dean and Prebendaries: one of his countrymen pronouncing a funeral oration at the brink of his grave, which I caused to be dug in the choir. This is more at large described in the "Gazette" of that day; Colonel Reymes (58), my colleague in commission, assisting, who was so kind as to accompany me from London, though it was not his district; for indeed the stress of both these wars lay more on me by far than on any of my brethren, who had little to do in theirs. I went to see Upnor Castle, which I found pretty well defended, but of no great moment.
Next day I sailed to the fleet, now riding at the buoy of the "Nore", where I met his Majesty (42), the Duke (38), Lord Arlington (54), and all the great men, in the "Charles", lying miserably shattered; but the miss of Lord Sandwich redoubled the loss to me, and showed the folly of hazarding so brave a fleet, and losing so many good men, for no provocation but that the Hollanders exceeded us in industry, and in all things but envy.
At Sheerness, I gave his Majesty (42) and his Royal Highness (38) an account of my charge, and returned to Queenborough; next day dined at Major Dorel's, Governor of Sheerness; thence, to Rochester; and the following day, home.

Queenborough Castle

Good Parliament

In 1376 John Savile of Shelley and Golcar 1325-1399 (51) was elected MP Yorkshire in the Good Parliament. During the Good Parliament, he was sufficiently trusted to conduct Thomas Caterton from Queenborough Castle for interrogation before Parliament. Caterton had been appealed for treason by Sir John Annesley, and the court party, including Gaunt (35), was anxious to protect him from attack. In the event, they were able to hold off the opposition, despite some damning revelations about their conduct of the war-effort. The duke (35) himself was singled out for particular criticism, and during the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 he fled into Scotland, leaving his Savoy Palace to be destroyed by the London mob. Gaunt (35) was, understandably, reluctant to cross the border again without the protection of a sizeable bodyguard. In late Jun 1376, therefore, his leading retainers in the north were instructed to provide an escort for his journey to Knaresborough. Not only did John Savile of Shelley and Golcar 1325-1399 (51) mobilize a personal retinue of ten men-at-arms and 40 archers; he also helped to suppress the rebellion in the north by serving on two commissions for the punishment of insurgents.

In 1477 William Cheney 1444-1487 (33) was appointed Constable Queenborough Castle.

On 01 Mar 1617 Edward Hoby 1560-1617 (57) died at Queenborough Castle.

Francis Cheney 1481-1513 was appointed Governor of Queenborough Castle.

Sheerness

John Evelyn's Diary 17 June 1666. 17 Jun 1666. Came his Majesty (36), the Duke (57), and many Noblemen. After Council, we went to prayers. My business being dispatched, I returned to Chatham, having lain but one night in the Royal Charles; we had a tempestuous sea. I went on shore at Sheerness, where they were building an arsenal for the fleet, and designing a royal fort with a receptacle for great ships to ride at anchor; but here I beheld the sad spectacle, more than half that gallant bulwark of the Kingdom miserably shattered, hardly a vessel entire, but appearing rather so many wrecks and hulls, so cruelly had the Dutch mangled us. The loss of the Prince, that gallant vessel, had been a loss to be universally deplored, none knowing for what reason we first engaged in this ungrateful war; we lost besides nine or ten more, and near 600 men slain and 1,100 wounded, 2,000 prisoners; to balance which, perhaps we might destroy eighteen or twenty of the enemy's ships, and 700 or 800 poor men.

John Evelyn's Diary 28 June 1667. 28 Jun 1667. I went to Chatham, and thence to view not only what mischief the Dutch had done; but how triumphantly their whole fleet lay within the very mouth of the Thames, all from the North Foreland, Margate, even to the buoy of the Nore — a dreadful spectacle as ever Englishmen saw, and a dishonor never to be wiped off! Those who advised his Majesty (37) to prepare no fleet this spring deserved—I know what—but—.
Here in the river off Chatham, just before the town, lay the carcase of the "London" (now the third time burnt), the "Royal Oak", "James", etc., yet smoking; and now, when the mischief was done, we were making trifling forts on the brink of the river. Here were yet forces, both of horse and foot, with General Middleton (59) continually expecting the motions of the enemy's fleet. I had much discourse with him, who was an experienced commander, I told him I wondered the King (37) did not fortify Sheerness and the Ferry; both abandoned.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 July 1668. 23 Jul 1668. At the Royal Society, were presented divers glossa petras, and other natural curiosities, found in digging to build the fort at Sheerness. They were just the same as they bring from Malta, pretending them to be viper's teeth, whereas, in truth, they are of a shark, as we found by comparing them with one in our repository.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!.
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

1672 Battle of Solebay

John Evelyn's Diary 02 June 1672. 02 Jun 1672. Trinity Sunday, I passed at Rochester; and, on the 5th, there was buried in the Cathedral Monsieur Rabiniére, Rear Admiral of the French squadron, a gallant person, who died of the wounds he received in the fight. This ceremony lay on me, which I performed with all the decency I could, inviting the Mayor and Aldermen to come in their formalities. Sir Jonas Atkins was there with his guards; and the Dean and Prebendaries: one of his countrymen pronouncing a funeral oration at the brink of his grave, which I caused to be dug in the choir. This is more at large described in the "Gazette" of that day; Colonel Reymes (58), my colleague in commission, assisting, who was so kind as to accompany me from London, though it was not his district; for indeed the stress of both these wars lay more on me by far than on any of my brethren, who had little to do in theirs. I went to see Upnor Castle, which I found pretty well defended, but of no great moment.
Next day I sailed to the fleet, now riding at the buoy of the "Nore", where I met his Majesty (42), the Duke (38), Lord Arlington (54), and all the great men, in the "Charles", lying miserably shattered; but the miss of Lord Sandwich redoubled the loss to me, and showed the folly of hazarding so brave a fleet, and losing so many good men, for no provocation but that the Hollanders exceeded us in industry, and in all things but envy.
At Sheerness, I gave his Majesty (42) and his Royal Highness (38) an account of my charge, and returned to Queenborough; next day dined at Major Dorel's, Governor of Sheerness; thence, to Rochester; and the following day, home.

The Nore. A sandbank at the mouth of the Thames Estuary, near the town of Sheerness. It marks the point where the River Thames meets the North Sea.

Swale Isle of Sheppey

Minster on Sheppey Abbey Swale Isle of Sheppey

Seaxburh Wuffingas Queen Consort Kent -699 founded Minster on Sheppey Abbey Swale Isle of Sheppey.

Swale Minster Swale Isle of Sheppey

St Katherine's Chapel Swale Minster Swale Isle of Sheppey

On 03 Jan 1559 Thomas Cheney Treasurer 1485-1558 was buried at St Katherine's Chapel Swale Minster Swale Isle of Sheppey.

Isle of Thanet

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 864, the pagans wintered in the isle of Thanet, and made a firm treaty with the men of Kent, who promised them money for adhering to their covenant; but the pagans, like cunning foxes, burst from their camp by night, and setting at naught their engagements, and spurning at the promised money, which they knew was less than they could get by plunder, they ravaged all the eastern coast of Kent.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!.
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1.

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9. Eodem quoque anno Ealhere comes, cum Cantuariis, et Huda, cum Suthriis, contra paganorum exercitum in insula, quae dicitur in Saxonica lingua Tenet, Britannico autem sermone Ruim, animose et acriter belligeraverunt, et primitus Christiani victoriam habuerunt, prolongatoque diu proelio ibidem ex utraque parte plurimi ceciderunt et in aqua mersi suffocati sunt, et comites illi ambo ibidem occubuerunt. Necnon et eodem anno Æthelwulfus, Occidentalium Saxonum rex, post Pascha filiam suam Burgredo Merciorum regi in villa regia, quae dicitur Cippanhamme, nuptiis regaliter factis, ad reginam dedit.
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9 The same year also, earl Ealhere, with the men of Kent, and Iluda with the men of Surrey, fought bravely and resolutely against an army of the pagans, in the island, which is called in the Saxon tongue, Tenet, but Ruim in the British language. The battle lasted a long time, and many fell on both sides, and also were drowned in the water; and both the earls were there slain. In the same year also, after Easter, Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, gave His daughter to Burhred, king of the Mercians, and the marriage was celebrated royally at the royal villa of Chippenham.
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Leeds Castle

In 1312 Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (36) was appointed Constable Leeds Castle.

Siege of Leeds Castle

In Oct 1321 Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (26) was returning from Canterbury to London. She sought accommodation at Leeds Castle which was under the protection of Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34) the wife of Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46). Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34) refused entry to the Queen killing around six of her retinue when they tried to force entry. King Edward II of England (37) commenced the Siege of Leeds Castle. Once King Edward II of England (37) gained possession of the castle, he had the garrison hanged from the battlements. His wife Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34), her five children (Margery Badlesmere Baroness Ros Helmsley 1308-1363 (13), Maud Badlesmere Countess Oxford 1310-1366 (11), Elizabeth Badlesmere Countess Northampton 1313-1356 (8), Giles Badlesmere 2nd Baron Badlesmere 1314-1338 (6) and Margaret Badlesmere Baroness Tibetot 1315-), and Bartholomew "The Elder" Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh 1287-1355 (34), her nephew, were imprisoned in the Tower of London.

In Oct 1321 Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (34) refused entry to Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (26) at Leeds Castle.

On 01 Mar 1378 John Devereux 1st Baron Devereux 1337-1393 (41) was appointed Constable Leeds Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 17 October 1665. 17 Oct 1665. I went to Gravesend; next day to Chatham; thence to Maidstone, in order to the march of 500 prisoners to Leeds Castle, which I had hired of Lord Culpeper (39). I was earnestly desired by the learned Sir Roger Twysden (68), and Deputy-Lieutenants, to spare Maidstone from quartering any of my sick flock. Here, Sir Edward Brett (57) sent me some horse to bring up the rear. This country, from Rochester to Maidstone and the Downs, is very agreeable for the prospect.

John Evelyn's Diary 08 May 1666. 08 May 1666. To Queensborough, where finding the Richmond frigate, I sailed to the buoy of the Nore to my Lord-General (57) and Prince Rupert (46), where was the Rendezvous of the most glorious fleet in the world, now preparing to meet the Hollander. Went to visit my cousin, Hales, at a sweetly-watered place at Chilston, near Bockton. The next morning, to Leeds Castle, once a famous hold, now hired by me of my Lord Culpeper (40) for a prison. Here I flowed the dry moat, made a new drawbridge, brought spring water into the court of the Castle to an old fountain, and took order for the repairs.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 November 1666. 15 Nov 1666. To Leeds Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 August 1667. 24 Aug 1667. I was appointed, with the rest of my brother commissioners, to put in execution an order of Council for freeing the prisoners at war in my custody at Leeds Castle, and taking off his Majesty's (37) extraordinary charge, having called before us the French and Dutch agents. The peace was now proclaimed, in the usual form, by the heralds-at-arms.

On 01 Nov 1831 Fiennes Cornwallis 1831-1867 was born to Charles Wykeham Martin 1801-1870 (30) and Jemima Mann at Leeds Castle.

Ralph St Leger 1430-1470 was appointed Constable Leeds Castle.

Lewisham

John Evelyn's Diary 14 March 1652. 14 Mar 1652. I went to Lewisham, where I heard an honest sermon on 1 Cor. II 5-7, being the first Sunday I had been at church since my return, it being now a rare thing to find a priest of the Church of England in a parish pulpit, most of which were filled with Independents and Fanatics.

Brookmill

John Evelyn's Diary 28 April 1668. 28 Apr 1668. To London, about the purchase of Ravensbourne Mills, and land around it, in Upper Deptford, of one Mr. Becher.

New Cross

John Evelyn's Diary 10 November 1675. 10 Nov 1675. Being the day appointed for my Lord Ambassador (47) to set out, I met them with my coach at New Cross. There were with him my Lady his wife, and my dear friend, Mrs. Godolphin (23), who, out of an extraordinary friendship, would needs accompany my lady to Paris, and stay with her some time, which was the chief inducement for permitting my son (20) to travel, but I knew him safe under her inspection, and in regard my Lord (47) himself had promised to take him into his special favor, he having intrusted all he had to my care.
Thus we set out three coaches (besides mine), three wagons, and about forty horses. It being late, and my Lord (47) as yet but valetudinary, we got but to Dartford, the first day, the next to Sittingbourne.
At Rochester, the major, Mr. Cony, then an officer of mine for the sick and wounded of that place, gave the ladies a handsome refreshment as we came by his house.

Sydenham Wells

John Evelyn's Diary 02 September 1675. 02 Sep 1675. I went to see Dulwich College, being the pious foundation of one Alleyn, a famous comedian, in King James's time. The chapel is pretty, the rest of the hospital very ill contrived; it yet maintains divers poor of both sexes. It is in a melancholy part of Camberwell parish. I came back by certain medicinal Spa waters, at a place called Sydenham Wells, in Lewisham parish, much frequented in summer.

Linton

On 27 Aug 1862 William Archer Amherst 3rd Earl Amherst 1836-1910 (26) and Julia Mann Countess Amherst were married at Linton.

Loring Hall

On 12 Aug 1822 Robert Stewart 2nd Marquess Londonderry 1769-1822 (53) committed suicide at Loring Hall. His brother Charles William Vane 3rd Marquess Londonderry 1778-1854 (44) succeeded 3rd Marquess Londonderry. Frances Vane Tempest Marchioness Londonderry 1800-1865 (22) by marriage Marquess Londonderry.

Lullingstone

Castle Lullingstone Lullingstone

In 1540 Catherine Hart 1540-1602 was born to Percival Hart 1496-1580 (44) at Castle Lullingstone Lullingstone.

Maidstone

In 1385 Richard Woodville 1385-1441 was born to John Woodville 1341-1403 (44) at Maidstone.

On 31 Jul 1396 William de Courtenay Archbishop Canterbury 1342-1396 (54) died at Maidstone. He was buried in the quire of Canterbury Cathedral.

In 1405 Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469 was born to Richard Woodville 1385-1441 (20) and Joan Bittelsgate 1390-1448 (15) at Maidstone.

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. On 05 Jun 1461. Westminster Palace. Grant for life to Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury (43), of the custody of the lordship, manor and park of Langle by Maydeston, co Kent, rendering 5 marks yearly. By K (19).

Around Jul 1595 John Astley Master of the Jewel House 1507-1595 (88) died in Maidstone. He was buried in All Saints Church Maidstone.

John Evelyn's Diary 17 October 1665. 17 Oct 1665. I went to Gravesend; next day to Chatham; thence to Maidstone, in order to the march of 500 prisoners to Leeds Castle, which I had hired of Lord Culpeper (39). I was earnestly desired by the learned Sir Roger Twysden (68), and Deputy-Lieutenants, to spare Maidstone from quartering any of my sick flock. Here, Sir Edward Brett (57) sent me some horse to bring up the rear. This country, from Rochester to Maidstone and the Downs, is very agreeable for the prospect.

In 1897 Edith Cavell Nurse 1865-1915 (31) was sent to assist with the typhoid outbreak at Maidstone for which she subsequently was awarded the Maidstone Medal.

All Saints Church Maidstone

On 18 Jul 1565 Katherine "Kat" Champernowne 1502-1565 (63) died. She was buried in All Saints Church Maidstone.

Around Jul 1595 John Astley Master of the Jewel House 1507-1595 (88) died in Maidstone. He was buried in All Saints Church Maidstone.

Maidstone Grammar School Maidstone

Around 1592 Francis Fane 1st Earl Westmoreland 1580-1629 (11) educated at Maidstone Grammar School Maidstone.

Maidstone Prison Maidstone

Peasant's Revolt

Around Jun 1381 John Ball 1338-1381 was released from Maidstone Prison Maidstone by the Kentish rebels. He then preached to the rebels at Blackheath: "When Adam delved and Eve span, Who was then the gentleman? From the beginning all men by nature were created alike, and our bondage or servitude came in by the unjust oppression of naughty men. For if God would have had any bondmen from the beginning, he would have appointed who should be bond, and who free. And therefore I exhort you to consider that now the time is come, appointed to us by God, in which ye may (if ye will) cast off the yoke of bondage, and recover liberty". When the rebels had dispersed, Ball was taken prisoner at Coventry, given a trial in which, unlike most, he was permitted to speak.

Sutton Valence Maidstone

On 29 Aug 1347 John Hastings 2nd Earl Pembroke 1347-1375 was born to Laurence Hastings 1st Earl Pembroke 1319-1348 (28) and Agnes Mortimer 1317-1368 (30) at Sutton Valence Maidstone.

Around 1522 Constance Clifford 1522-1600 was born to Nicholas Clifford 1490- and Maria Harper 1500-1581 (22) at Sutton Valence Maidstone.

Around 1531 Mildred Clifford 1531- was born to Nicholas Clifford 1490- and Maria Harper 1500-1581 (31) at Sutton Valence Maidstone.

Sutton Valence Castle Sutton Valence Maidstone

John Hastings 2nd Earl Pembroke 1347 1375. Quartered 1&4  2&3 . Valence for his birthplace Sutton Valence Castle, and was a great great grandson of William Valence 1st Earl Pembroke -1296. Source.

The Mote Maidstone

In 1799 Charles Marsham 1st Earl Romney 1744-1811 (54) entertained when the King reviewed about six thousand of the Kentish Volunteers at The Mote Maidstone.

On 09 Sep 1812 Sophia Pitt Baroness Romney -1812 died in childbirth at The Mote Maidstone.

Malling

Leybourne Manor Malling

Around 1281 Idonea Leybourne Baroness Say 1281-1322 was born to William Leybourne 1st Baron Leybourne 1242-1309 (39) at Leybourne Manor Malling.

On 15 Apr 1322 Idonea Leybourne Baroness Say 1281-1322 (41) died at Leybourne Manor Malling.

Margate

Samuel Pepys' Diary 23 September 1660. 23 Sep 1660. Lord's Day. my wife got up to put on her mourning to-day and to go to Church this morning. I up and set down my journall for these 5 days past. This morning came one from my father's (59) with a black cloth coat, made of my short cloak, to walk up and down in. To church my wife and I, with Sir W. Batten (59), where we heard of Mr. Mills a very good sermon upon these words, "So run that ye may obtain". After dinner all alone to Westminster. At Whitehall I met with Mr. Pierce and his wife (she newly come forth after childbirth) both in mourning for the Duke of Gloucester. She went with Mr. Child to Whitehall chapel and Mr. Pierce with me to the Abbey, where I expected to hear Mr. Baxter or Mr. Rowe preach their farewell sermon, and in Mr. Symons's pew I sat and heard Mr. Rowe. Before sermon I laughed at the reader, who in his prayer desires of God that He would imprint his word on the thumbs of our right hands and on the right great toes of our right feet. In the midst of the sermon some plaster fell from the top of the Abbey, that made me and all the rest in our pew afeard, and I wished myself out. After sermon with Mr. Pierce to Whitehall, and from thence to my Lord, but Diana did not come according to our agreement. So calling at my father's (59) (where my wife had been this afternoon but was gone home) I went home. This afternoon, the King having news of the Princess being come to Margate, he and the Duke of York went down thither in barges to her.

John Evelyn's Diary 28 June 1667. 28 Jun 1667. I went to Chatham, and thence to view not only what mischief the Dutch had done; but how triumphantly their whole fleet lay within the very mouth of the Thames, all from the North Foreland, Margate, even to the buoy of the Nore — a dreadful spectacle as ever Englishmen saw, and a dishonor never to be wiped off! Those who advised his Majesty (37) to prepare no fleet this spring deserved—I know what—but—.
Here in the river off Chatham, just before the town, lay the carcase of the "London" (now the third time burnt), the "Royal Oak", "James", etc., yet smoking; and now, when the mischief was done, we were making trifling forts on the brink of the river. Here were yet forces, both of horse and foot, with General Middleton (59) continually expecting the motions of the enemy's fleet. I had much discourse with him, who was an experienced commander, I told him I wondered the King (37) did not fortify Sheerness and the Ferry; both abandoned.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!.
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

John Evelyn's Diary 14 May 1672. 14 May 1672. To Dover; but the fleet did not appear till the 16th, when the Duke of York (38) with his and the French squadron, in all 170 ships (of which above 100 were men-of-war), sailed by, after the Dutch, who were newly withdrawn. Such a gallant and formidable navy never, I think, spread sail upon the seas. It was a goodly yet terrible sight, to behold them as I did, passing eastward by the straits between Dover and Calais in a glorious day. The wind was yet so high, that I could not well go aboard, and they were soon got out of sight. The next day, having visited our prisoners and the Castle, and saluted the Governor, I took horse for Margate. Here, from the North Foreland Lighthouse top (which is a pharos, built of brick, and having on the top a cradle of iron, in which a man attends a great sea-coal fire all the year long, when the nights are dark, for the safeguard of sailors), we could see our fleet as they lay at anchor. The next morning, they weighed, and sailed out of sight to the N. E.

John Evelyn's Diary 19 May 1672. 19 May 1672. Went to Margate; and, the following day, was carried to see a gallant widow, brought up a farmeress, and I think of gigantic race, rich, comely, and exceedingly industrious. She put me in mind of Deborah and Abigail, her house was so plentifully stored with all manner of country provisions, all of her own growth, and all her conveniences so substantial, neat, and well understood; she herself so jolly and hospitable; and her land so trim and rarely husbanded, that it struck me with admiration at her economy.
This town much consists of brewers of a certain heady ale, and they deal much in malt, etc. For the rest, it is raggedly built, and has an ill haven, with a small fort of little concernment, nor is the island well disciplined; but as to the husbandry and rural part, far exceeding any part of England for the accurate culture of their ground, in which they exceed, even to curiosity and emulation.
We passed by Rickborough, and in sight of Reculvers, and so through a sweet garden, as it were, to Canterbury.

North Foreland Lighthouse

John Evelyn's Diary 14 May 1672. 14 May 1672. To Dover; but the fleet did not appear till the 16th, when the Duke of York (38) with his and the French squadron, in all 170 ships (of which above 100 were men-of-war), sailed by, after the Dutch, who were newly withdrawn. Such a gallant and formidable navy never, I think, spread sail upon the seas. It was a goodly yet terrible sight, to behold them as I did, passing eastward by the straits between Dover and Calais in a glorious day. The wind was yet so high, that I could not well go aboard, and they were soon got out of sight. The next day, having visited our prisoners and the Castle, and saluted the Governor, I took horse for Margate. Here, from the North Foreland Lighthouse top (which is a pharos, built of brick, and having on the top a cradle of iron, in which a man attends a great sea-coal fire all the year long, when the nights are dark, for the safeguard of sailors), we could see our fleet as they lay at anchor. The next morning, they weighed, and sailed out of sight to the N. E.

Mersham

Diary of Isabella Twysden 1645. 13 Apr 1645. the 13 aprill there begane a rising in Kent about mersam and thereabouts, but it was presently laid being but a few.

Milstead

Higham Milstead

Around 1455 Amy Cheney 1455- was born to Robert Cheney 1421-1488 (34) at Higham Milstead.

Around 1457 Humphrey Cheney 1457-1526 was born to Robert Cheney 1421-1488 (36) at Higham Milstead.

In 1490 John Cheney 1490-1545 was born to Humphrey Cheney 1457-1526 (33) at Higham Milstead.

Around 1524 Richard Cheney 1524-1591 was born to John Cheney 1490-1545 (34) at Higham Milstead.

On 03 Jun 1526 Humphrey Cheney 1457-1526 (69) died at Higham Milstead.

In 1545 John Cheney 1490-1545 (55) died at Higham Milstead.

John Cheney was born to Josias Cheney at Higham Milstead.

Orpington

In 1628 Richard Spencer 1593-1661 (34) and Mary Sandya were married. He was buried at Orpington.

Patrixbourne

St Marys Church Patrixbourne

On 02 Jun 1882 George Henry Conyngham 3rd Marquess Conyngham 1825-1882 (57) died at Belgrave Square, Belgravia, Westminster. He was buried at St Marys Church Patrixbourne.

Patrixborne Cheyne

In 1295 Alexander Cheney 1248-1295 (47) died at Patrixborne Cheyne.

Pembury

In 1376 John Culpepper 1305-1376 (71) died at Pembury.

Penshurst

In 1417 William IV Sidney 1417-1477 was born at Penshurst.

In 1477 William IV Sidney 1417-1477 (60) died at Penshurst.

Before 1485 Nicholas Pakenham 1484- was born to Hugh Pakenham 1470-1512 at Penshurst.

In 1485 Anne Pakenham 1485-1544 was born to Hugh Pakenham 1470-1512 (15) at Penshurst.

Around 1520 Lucy Sidney 1520-1591 was born to William Sidney 1482-1554 (38) and Anne Pakenham 1485-1544 (35) at Penshurst.

On 22 Oct 1544 Anne Pakenham 1485-1544 (59) died at Penshurst.

On 11 Feb 1554 William Sidney 1482-1554 (72) died at Penshurst. He was buried at St John the Baptist Church Penshurst.

Penshurst Place Penshurst

On 18 Sep 1501 Henry Stafford 1st Baron Stafford 1501-1563 was born to Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham 1478-1521 (23) and Eleanor Percy Duchess Buckingham -1530 at Penshurst Place Penshurst.

In 1531 Frances Sidney Countess Sussex 1531-1589 was born to William Sidney 1482-1554 (49) and Anne Pakenham 1485-1544 (46) at Penshurst Place Penshurst.

On 21 Oct 1554 John Dudley 2nd Earl Warwick 1527-1554 (27) died at Penshurst Place Penshurst. His brother Ambrose Dudley 3rd Earl Warwick 1530-1590 (24) succeeded 3rd Earl Warwick 2C 1547, 3rd Viscount Lisle 5C 1543. Elizabeth Tailboys Countess Warwick 1520-1563 (32) by marriage Earl Warwick 2C 1547.

On 30 Nov 1554 Philip Sidney 1554-1586 was born to Henry Sidney KG 1529-1586 (25) and Mary Dudley 1530-1586 (24) at Penshurst Place Penshurst.

John Evelyn's Diary 09 July 1652. 09 Jul 1652. We went to see Penshurst, the Earl of Leicester's, famous once for its gardens and excellent fruit, and for the noble conversation which was wont to meet there, celebrated by that illustrious person, Sir Philip Sidney (33), who there composed divers of his pieces. It stands in a park, is finely watered, and was now full of company, on the marriage of my old fellow-collegiate, Mr. Robert Smith, who married my Lady Dorothy Sidney (35), widow of the Earl of Sunderland.
One of the men who robbed me was taken; I was accordingly summoned to appear against him; and, on the 12th, was in Westminster Hall, but not being bound over, nor willing to hang the fellow, I did not appear, coming only to save a friend's bail; but the bill being found, he was turned over to the Old Bailey. In the meantime, I received a petition from the prisoner, whose father I understood was an honest old farmer in Kent. He was charged, with other crimes, and condemned, but reprieved. I heard afterward that, had it not been for his companion, a younger man, he would probably have killed me. He was afterward charged with some other crime, but, refusing to plead, was pressed to death.

On 14 Feb 1680 John Sidney 6th Earl of Leicester 1680-1737 was born to Robert Sidney 4th Earl of Leicester 1649-1702 (31) and Elizabeth Egerton Countess Leicester 1653-1709 (26) at Penshurst Place Penshurst.

On 27 Sep 1737 John Sidney 6th Earl of Leicester 1680-1737 (57) died at Penshurst Place Penshurst. He was buried at St John the Baptist Church Penshurst. His brother Jocelyn Sidney 7th Earl of Leicester 1682-1743 (55) succeeded 7th Earl of Leicester 4C 1618, 7th Viscount Lisle 6C 1605.

Rainham

Around 1385 Margery Cheney 1385-1408 was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (33) at Rainham.

Ramsgate

On 05 Mar 1830 Augusta Murray Duchess Sussex 1768-1830 (62) died at Ramsgate.

Reculver

John Evelyn's Diary 19 May 1672. 19 May 1672. Went to Margate; and, the following day, was carried to see a gallant widow, brought up a farmeress, and I think of gigantic race, rich, comely, and exceedingly industrious. She put me in mind of Deborah and Abigail, her house was so plentifully stored with all manner of country provisions, all of her own growth, and all her conveniences so substantial, neat, and well understood; she herself so jolly and hospitable; and her land so trim and rarely husbanded, that it struck me with admiration at her economy.
This town much consists of brewers of a certain heady ale, and they deal much in malt, etc. For the rest, it is raggedly built, and has an ill haven, with a small fort of little concernment, nor is the island well disciplined; but as to the husbandry and rural part, far exceeding any part of England for the accurate culture of their ground, in which they exceed, even to curiosity and emulation.
We passed by Rickborough, and in sight of Reculvers, and so through a sweet garden, as it were, to Canterbury.

Reculver Abbey

Anglo Saxon Chronicle 650 699. 669. This year King Egbert gave to Bass, a mass-priest, Reculver — to build a minster upon.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 8 How when Archbishop Theodore died Bertwald succeeded him as archbishop and among many others whom he ordained he made the learned Tobias bishop of the church of Rochester. [690 a.d.]. Bertwald succeeded Theodore in the archbishopric, being abbot of the monastery called Racuulfe, which stands at the northern mouth of the river Genlade. He was a man learned in the Scriptures, and perfectly instructed in ecclesiastical and monastic teaching, yet in no wise to be compared to his predecessor. He was chosen bishop in the year of our Lord 692, on the first day of July, when Wictred (23) and Suaebhard were kings in Kent; but he was ordained the next year, on Sunday the 29th of June, by Godwin, metropolitan bishop of Gaul, and was enthroned on Sunday the 31st of August. Among the many bishops whom he ordained was Tobias, a man instructed in the Latin, Greek, and Saxon tongues, and otherwise of manifold learning, whom he consecrated in the stead of Gedmund, bishop of the Church of Rochester, who had died.

Before 784 Ealmund King Kent was appointed King Kent. The only contemporary evidence of him is an abstract of a charter dated 784 in which Ealmund granted land to the Abbot of Reculver.

Reigate

On 12 Jan 1573 William Howard 1st Baron Howard 1510-1573 (63) died at Hampton Court Palace. He was buried at Reigate. His son Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624 (37) succeeded 2nd Baron Howard of Effingham 1C 1554. Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 (23) by marriage Baron Howard of Effingham 1C 1554.

Around 08 Dec 1577 John Poyntz 1577-1617 was born to William Poyntz 1542-1601 (35) at Reigate.

In 18 May 1581 Margaret Gamage Baroness Howard 1515-1581 (66) died in Reigate.

John Evelyn's Diary 21 August 1655. 21 Aug 1655. I went to Ryegate, to visit Mrs. Cary, at my Lady Peterborough's (33), in an ancient monastery well in repair, but the park much defaced; the house is nobly furnished. The chimney-piece in the great chamber, carved in wood, was of Henry VIII., and was taken from a house of his in Bletchingley. At Ryegate, was now the Archbishop of Armagh, the learned James Usher (74), whom I went to visit. He received me exceeding kindly. In discourse with him, he told me how great the loss of time was to study much the Eastern languages; that, excepting Hebrew, there was little fruit to be gathered of exceeding labor; that, besides some mathematical books, the Arabic itself had little considerable; that the best text was the Hebrew Bible; that the Septuagint was finished in seventy days, but full of errors, about which he was then writing; that St. Hierome's was to be valued next the Hebrew; also that the seventy translated the Pentateuch only, the rest was finished by others; that the Italians at present understood but little Greek, and Kircher was a mountebank; that Mr. Selden's best book was his "Titles of Honor"; that the church would be destroyed by sectaries, who would in all likelihood bring in Popery. In conclusion he recommended to me the study of philology, above all human studies; and so, with his blessing, I took my leave of this excellent person, and returned to Wotton.

On 21 Mar 1656 James Ussher Primate of Ireland 1581-1656 (75) died at the house of Elizabeth Howard Countess Peterborough 1603-1671 (53) in Reigate.

On 13 Nov 1733 Charlotte Herbert Viscountess Windsor 1676-1733 (57) died at Reigate.

Rochester

Rochester Cathedral

Rolvenden

Cranbrook Rolvenden

In 1430 John Guildford 1430-1493 was born at Cranbrook Rolvenden.

Around 1450 Richard Guildford 1450-1506 was born to John Guildford 1430-1493 (20) at Cranbrook Rolvenden.

Romney

In 1601 Thomas Lake 1561-1630 (39) was elected MP New Romney.

After 17 Mar 1664 Charles Berkeley 1st Earl Falmouth 1630-1665 was elected MP New Romney.

Battle of Lowestoft

In 1665 Henry Brouncker 3rd Viscount Brounckner 1627-1688 (38) was elected MP New Romney which seat he held until 21 Apr 1668 when he was expelled from the House of Commons when charges were brought against him, for allowing the Dutch fleet to escape during the Battle of Lowestoft, and for ordering the sails of the English fleet to be slackened in the name of the Duke of York (31). This was essentially an act of treason. Such a military decision, taken without the Duke's (31) authority, was an incident seemingly without parallel, especially as his apparent motive was simply that he was fatigued with the stress and noise of the battle.

In 1668 Charles Sedley 5th Baronet 1639-1701 (28) was elected MP New Romney.

In 1690 Charles Sedley 5th Baronet 1639-1701 (50) was elected MP New Romney.

In 1696 Charles Sedley 5th Baronet 1639-1701 (56) was elected MP New Romney.

1710 General Election

In 1710 Robert Furnese 2nd Baronet Waldershare 1687-1733 (22) was elected MP New Romney during the 1710 General Election.

In 1807 George Ashburnham 1785-1813 (21) was elected MP New Romney.

In 1818 Richard Erle Drax Grosvenor 1762-1819 (55) was elected MP New Romney.

On 08 Feb 1819 Richard Erle Drax Grosvenor 1762-1819 (56) died. His son Richard Erle Drax Grosvenor 1797-1828 (21) succeeded MP New Romney.

In 1830 William Howard 1781-1843 (48) was elected MP New Romney.

Sandwich

Battle of Oakley

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 851, which was the third after the birth of king Alfred, Ceorl, earl of Devon, fought with the men of Devon against the pagans at a place called Wiegambeorg; and the Christians gained the victory; and that same year the pagans first wintered in the island called Sheppey, which means the Sheep-isle, and is situated in the River Thames between Essex and Kent, but is nearer to Kent than to Essex; it has in it a fine monastery.
The same year also a great army of the pagans came with three hundred and fifty ships to the mouth of the River Thames, and sacked Dorobernia, which is the city of the Cantuarians, and also the city of London, which lies on the north bank of the River Thames, on the confines of Essex and Middlesex; but yet that city belongs in truth to Essex; and they put to flight Berthwulf, king of Mercia, with all the army, which he had led out to oppose them.
After these things, the aforesaid pagan host went into Surrey, which is a district situated on the south bank of the River Thames, and to the west of Kent. And Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, and his son Ethelbald, with all their army, fought a long time against them at a place called Ac-lea, i.e. the Oak-plain, and there, after a lengthened battle, which was fought with much bravery on both sides, the greater part of the pagan multitude was destroyed and cut to pieces, so that we never heard of their being so defeated, either before or since, in any country, in one day; and the Christians gained an honourable victory, and were triumphant over their graves.
In the same year king Athelstan, son of king Ethelwulf, and earl Ealhere slew a large army of pagans in Kent, at a place called Sandwich, and took nine ships of their fleet; the others escaped by flight.

In Sep 1015 Canute aka Cnut King England 995-1035 (20) landed at Sandwich.

Richard Lionheart Returns to England

On 13 Mar 1194 Richard "Lionheart" I King England 1157-1199 (36) and his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine Queen Consort Franks and England 1122-1204 (72) landed in England at Sandwich.

Battle of Sandwich aka Dover

On 24 Aug 1217 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 (47) commanded the King's forces at Sandwich during the Battle of Sandwich aka Dover. French re-enforcements had left Calais to join with the future Prince Louis's (29) forces who were in short supply following the Second Battle of Lincoln. Hubert Burgh's men routed the French ships. The battle marked the end of Prince Louis's (29)  invasion with the Treaty of Kingston aka Lambeth being signed shortly afterwards.

In Jan 1266 Roger Leybourne 1215-1271 (51) was captured at Sandwich.

Before May 1332 Eleanor of Woodstock Plantagenet 1318-1355 left Sandwich for her marriage with a trouseau of a wedding gown of Spanish cloth, caps, gloves, shoes, a bed, rare spices and loaves of sugar. She was well received in Guelders.

1460 January Raid on Sandwich

Patent Rolls Henry VI 1452 1461. Membrane 27d. 10 Dec 1459. Coventry. Commission to Richard Wydevyle of Ryvers (54), knight, Thomas Broun, knight, and the mayor of Sandwich to take near Sandwich the muster of the men at arms and archers ordered to go on the safe keeping of the sea in the company of Gervase Clyfton, knight, and to certify the king thereof in Chancery. By K.
Commission to Thomas Kyryell (63), knight, John Cheyne, knight, Thomas Broun, knight, John Seyncler, esquire, and Richard Dalafeld, esquire, to take near Sandwich the muster of the men at arms and archers ordered to go on the safe-keeping of the sea in the company of Richard Wydevyle of Ryvers (54), knight, as above. By K.

On 15 Jan 1460 Yorkist forces commanded by John Dynham 1st Baron Dynham 1433-1501 (27) and Richard "Kingmaker" Neville 16th Earl Warwick 6th Earl Salisbury 1428-1471 (32) raided Sandwich capturing a number of Lancastrian ships. In addition, the Woodville family: Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469 (55), his wife Jacquetta of Luxemburg Duchess Bedford 1415-1472 (45) and their son Anthony Woodville 2nd Earl Rivers 1440-1483 (20) were captured.

Patent Rolls Henry VI 1452 1461. Membrane 17d. 08 May 1460. Commission to Thomas Kiriell (64), knight, John Cheyne, knight, Thomas Westminster. Broun, knight, John Fogge, Robert Home and William Hexstall, to take near Sandwich the muster of all men at arms and archers ordered to go with Henry, duke of Exeter (29), on the safe-keeping of the sea to resist the king's rebels and enemies, and to certify the king thereof in Chancery.

1460 June Raid on Sandwich

Around 05 Jun 1460 when the relief expedition led by Osbert Mountfort -1460 was ready to to leave Sandwich for Guines, waiting only for a fair wind, the Yorkists John Dynham 1st Baron Dynham 1433-1501 (27), John Wenlock 1st Baron Wenlock 1400-1471, William Neville Baron Fauconberg (55) crossed from Calais and attacked Sandwich killing many of Osbert's men. Osbert Mountfort -1460 was captured. William Neville Baron Fauconberg (55) remained at Sandwich is preparation for the subsequent landing by Yorkist forces at the end of the month.

1460 June Yorkist Landing at Sandwich

On 26 Jun 1460 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) and Richard "Kingmaker" Neville 16th Earl Warwick 6th Earl Salisbury 1428-1471 (32) landed at Sandwich.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 26 June 1660. 26 Jun 1660. My Lord dined at his lodgings all alone to-day. I went to Secretary Nicholas (67)1 to carry him my Lord's resolutions about his title, which he had chosen, and that is Portsmouth2. I met with Mr. Throgmorton, a merchant, who went with me to the old Three Tuns, at Charing Cross, who did give me five pieces of gold for to do him a small piece of service about a convoy to Bilbo, which I did. In the afternoon, one Mr. Watts came to me, a merchant, to offer me £500 if I would desist from the Clerk of the Acts place. I pray God direct me in what I do herein. Went to my house, where I found my father, and carried him and my wife to Whitefriars, and myself to Puddlewharf, to the Wardrobe, to Mr. Townsend, who went with me to Backwell, the goldsmith's, and there we chose £100 worth of plate for my Lord to give Secretary Nicholas. Back and staid at my father's (59), and so home to bed.
Note 1. Sir Edward Nicholas (67), Secretary of State to Charles I and II. He was dismissed from his office through the intrigues of Lady Castlemaine (19) in 1663. He died 1669, aged seventy-seven.
Note 2. Montagu changed his mind, and ultimately took his title from the town of Sandwich, leaving that of Portsmouth for the use of a King's (30) mistress (10).

John Evelyn's Diary 09 January 1665. 09 Jan 1665. To Deal. 10th. To Sandwich, a pretty town, about two miles from the sea. The Mayor and officers of the Customs were very diligent to serve me. I visited the forts in the way, and returned that night to Canterbury.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.
24 Mar 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man enduring it with incredible patience, without being bound to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second operation cost the poor creature his life.
Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and ambition of Princes, cause in the world!.
25 Mar 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover, Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate. Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his Majesty (41) sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of the wounded, I came back through a country the best cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen, every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflicting spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of triumph.
Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham. On the 30th heard a sermon in Rochester Cathedral, and so got to Sayes Court on the first of April.

Richborough

John Evelyn's Diary 19 May 1672. 19 May 1672. Went to Margate; and, the following day, was carried to see a gallant widow, brought up a farmeress, and I think of gigantic race, rich, comely, and exceedingly industrious. She put me in mind of Deborah and Abigail, her house was so plentifully stored with all manner of country provisions, all of her own growth, and all her conveniences so substantial, neat, and well understood; she herself so jolly and hospitable; and her land so trim and rarely husbanded, that it struck me with admiration at her economy.
This town much consists of brewers of a certain heady ale, and they deal much in malt, etc. For the rest, it is raggedly built, and has an ill haven, with a small fort of little concernment, nor is the island well disciplined; but as to the husbandry and rural part, far exceeding any part of England for the accurate culture of their ground, in which they exceed, even to curiosity and emulation.
We passed by Rickborough, and in sight of Reculvers, and so through a sweet garden, as it were, to Canterbury.

Scott's Hall

John Evelyn's Diary 16 July 1663. 16 Jul 1663. A most extraordinary wet and cold season.
Sir George Carteret (53), Treasurer of the Navy, had now married his daughter, Caroline, to Sir Thomas Scott (25), of Scott's Hall, in Kent. This gentleman was thought to be the son of Prince Rupert (43).

John Evelyn's Diary 02 August 1663. 02 Aug 1663. This evening I accompanied Mr. Treasurer and Vice-Chamberlain Carteret (53) to his lately married son-in-law's, Sir Thomas Scott (25), to Scott's Hall. We took barge as far as Gravesend, and thence by post to Rochester, whence in coach and six horses to Scott's Hall; a right noble seat, uniformly built, with a handsome gallery. It stands in a park well stored, the land fat and good. We were exceedingly feasted by the young knight, and in his pretty chapel heard an excellent sermon by his chaplain. In the afternoon, preached the learned Sir Norton Knatchbull (who has a noble seat hard by, and a plantation of stately fir trees). In the churchyard of the parish church I measured an overgrown yew tree, that was eighteen of my paces in compass, out of some branches of which, torn off by the winds, were sawed divers goodly planks.

Sevenoaks

Sheldwich

Shipbourne

In 1534 Richard Clement of Ingham Mote 1482-1538 (52) was imprisoned in the Fleet Prison for having used excessive force in his roile as Justice of the Peace Kent during a property dispute in Shipbourne between the rector and Robert Brenner of Hadlow, a servant of Edward Guildford 1474-1534 (60) who was the father-in-law of John Dudley 1504-1553 (30), the future Duke of Northumberland.

On 18 Dec 1679 Frances Wray was buried at Shipbourne.

On 28 Oct 1723 Christopher Vane 1st Baron Barnard 1653-1723 (70) died at Shipbourne. His son Gilbert Vane 2nd Baron Barnard 1678-1753 (45) succeeded 2nd Baron Barnard.

Sissinghurst

In 1535 Cicely Baker Countess Dorset 1535-1615 was born to John Baker 1488-1558 (47) in Sissinghurst.

Sittingbourne

In 1599 Henry Clifford 1561-1599 (38) died at Sittingbourne.

John Evelyn's Diary 12 October 1641. 12 Oct 1641. From Dover, I that night rode post to Canterbury. Here I visited the cathedral, then in great splendour, those famous windows being entire, since demolished by the fanatics. The next morning, by Sittingboume, I came to Rochester, and thence to Gravesend, where a light-horseman (as they call it) taking us in, we spent our tide as far as Greenwich. From hence, after we had a little refreshed ourselves at the College, (for by reason of the contagion then in London we balked the inns,) we came to London landing at Arundel-stairs. Here I took leave of his Lordship (56), and retired to my lodgings in the Middle Temple, being about two in the morning, the 14th of October.

John Evelyn's Diary 06 November 1643. 06 Nov 1643. Lying by the way from Wotton at Sir Ralph Whitfield's, at Blechingley (whither both my brothers had conducted me), I arrived at London on the 7th, and two days after took boat at the Tower-wharf, which carried me as far as Sittingbourne, though not without danger, I being only in a pair of oars, exposed to a hideous storm: but it pleased God that we got in before the peril was considerable. From thence, I went by post to Dover, accompanied with one Mr. Thicknesse, a very dear friend of mine.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 November 1675. 10 Nov 1675. Being the day appointed for my Lord Ambassador (47) to set out, I met them with my coach at New Cross. There were with him my Lady his wife, and my dear friend, Mrs. Godolphin (23), who, out of an extraordinary friendship, would needs accompany my lady to Paris, and stay with her some time, which was the chief inducement for permitting my son (20) to travel, but I knew him safe under her inspection, and in regard my Lord (47) himself had promised to take him into his special favor, he having intrusted all he had to my care.
Thus we set out three coaches (besides mine), three wagons, and about forty horses. It being late, and my Lord (47) as yet but valetudinary, we got but to Dartford, the first day, the next to Sittingbourne.
At Rochester, the major, Mr. Cony, then an officer of mine for the sick and wounded of that place, gave the ladies a handsome refreshment as we came by his house.

Staplehurst

On 16 Apr 1866 Henry Hoare of Staplehurst 1807-1866 (59) died at Staplehurst.

Sternborough

Around 1295 Reginald Cobham 1st Baron Cobham Sternborough 1295-1361 was born to Reginald Cobham 1237- and Joan Devereux 1290- at Sternborough.

On 13 Apr 1358 Henry Grey 1331-1392 (27) and Joan Cobham 1345-1396 (13) were married at Sternborough.

Stirling

On 24 Sep 1366 Elizabeth Saye 5th Baroness Say 1366-1399 was born to William Saye 3rd Baron Say 1340-1375 (26) and Beatrice Brewes Baroness Say 1352-1383 (14) at Stirling.

Teston

Barham Court

On 18 Sep 1762 Diana Middleton 2nd Baroness Barham 1762-1823 was born to Admiral Charles Middleton 1st Baron Barham 1726-1813 (35) at Barham Court and Margaret Gambier -1792.

Tonbridge

Tunbridge Wells

In 1302 Richard Stafford 1302-1372 was born to Edmund Stafford 1st Baron Stafford 1272-1308 (29) and Margaret Basset 1280-1337 (22) at Tunbridge Wells.

John Evelyn's Diary 29 June 1652. 29 Jun 1652. I returned to Tunbridge, and again drank the water, till 10th of July.
We went to see the house of my Lord Clanrickarde (48) at Summer hill, near Tunbridge (now given to that villain, Bradshawe (50), who condemned the King (22)). 'Tis situated on an eminent hill, with a park; but has nothing else extraordinary.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 August 1661. 15 Aug 1661. I went to Tunbridge Wells, my wife (26) being there for the benefit of her health. Walking about the solitudes, I greatly admired the extravagant turnings, insinuations, and growth of certain birch trees among the rocks.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 22 July 1663. 22 Jul 1663. Up, and by and by comes my uncle Thomas (68), to whom I paid £10 for his last half year's annuity, and did get his and his son's hand and seal for the confirming to us Piggott's mortgage, which was forgot to be expressed in our late agreement with him, though intended, and therefore they might have cavilled at it, if they would.
Thence abroad calling at several places upon some errands, among others to my brother Tom's (29) barber and had my hair cut, while his boy played on the viallin, a plain boy, but has a very good genius, and understands the book very well, but to see what a shift he made for a string of red silk was very pleasant.
Thence to my Lord Crew's. My Lord not being come home, I met and staid below with Captain Ferrers, who was come to wait upon my Lady Jemimah to St. James's, she being one of the four ladies that hold up the mantle at the christening this afternoon of the Duke's (29) child (a boy). In discourse of the ladies at Court, Captain Ferrers tells me that my Baroness Castlemaine's (22) is now as great again as ever she was; and that her going away was only a fit of her own upon some slighting words of the King (33), so that she called for her coach at a quarter of an hour's warning, and went to Richmond; and the King (33) the next morning, under pretence of going a-hunting, went to see her and make friends, and never was a-hunting at all. After which she came back to Court, and commands the King (33) as much as ever, and hath and doth what she will. No longer ago than last night, there was a private entertainment made for the King (33) and Queen (24) at the Duke of Buckingham's (35), and she: was not invited: but being at my Lady Suffolk's (41), her aunt's (where my Lady Jemimah and Lord Sandwich (37) dined) yesterday, she was heard to say, "Well; much good may it do them, and for all that I will be as merry as they:" and so she went home and caused a great supper to be prepared. And after the King (33) had been with the Queen (24) at Wallingford House, he came to my Baroness Castlemaine's (22), and was there all night, and my Lord Sandwich (37) with him, which was the reason my Lord lay in town all night, which he has not done a great while before. He tells me he believes that, as soon as the King (33) can get a husband for Mrs. Stewart (16) however, my Baroness Castlemaine's (22) nose will be out of joynt; for that she comes to be in great esteem, and is more handsome than she. I found by his words that my Lord Sandwich (37) finds some pleasure in the country where he now is, whether he means one of the daughters of the house or no I know not, but hope the contrary, that he thinks he is very well pleased with staying there, but yet upon breaking up of the Parliament, which the King (33) by a message to-day says shall be on Monday next, he resolves to go.
Ned Pickering, the coxcomb, notwithstanding all his hopes of my Lord's assistance, wherein I am sorry to hear my Lord has much concerned himself, is defeated of the place he expected under the Queen (24). He came hither by and by and brought some jewells for my Lady Jem. to put on, with which and her other clothes she looks passing well. I staid and dined with my Lord Crew, who whether he was not so well pleased with me as he used to be, or that his head was full of business, as I believe it was, he hardly spoke one word to me all dinner time, we dining alone, only young Jack Crew, Sir Thomas's son, with us.
After dinner I bade him farewell. Sir Thomas I hear has gone this morning ill to bed, so I had no mind to see him.
Thence homewards, and in the way first called at Wotton's, the shoemaker's, who tells me the reason of Harris's' going from Sir Wm. Davenant's (57) house, that he grew very proud and demanded £20 for himself extraordinary, more than Betterton (27) or any body else, upon every new play, and £10 upon every revive; which with other things Sir W. Davenant (57) would not give him, and so he swore he would never act there more, in expectation of being received in the other House; but the King (33) will not suffer it, upon Sir W. Davenant's (57) desire that he would not, for then he might shut up house, and that is true. He tells me that his going is at present a great loss to the House, and that he fears he hath a stipend from the other House privately. He tells the that the fellow grew very proud of late, the King (33) and every body else crying him up so high, and that above Betterton (27), he being a more ayery man, as he is indeed. But yet Betterton (27), he says, they all say do act: some parts that none but himself can do.
Thence to my bookseller's, and found my Waggoners done. The very binding cost me 14s., but they are well done, and so with a porter home with them, and so by water to Ratcliffe, and there went to speak with Cumberford the platt-maker, and there saw his manner of working, which is very fine and laborious. So down to Deptford, reading Ben Jonson's "Devil is an asse", and so to see Sir W. Pen (42), who I find walking out of doors a little, but could not stand long; but in doors and I with him, and staid a great while talking, I taking a liberty to tell him my thoughts in things of the office; that when he comes abroad again, he may know what to think of me, and to value me as he ought. Walked home as I used to do, and being weary, and after some discourse with Mr. Barrow, who came to see and take his leave of me, he being to-morrow to set out toward the Isle of Man, I went to bed.
This day I hear that the Moores have made some attaques upon the outworks of Tangier; but my Lord Tiviott; with the loss of about 200 men, did beat them off, and killed many of them.
To-morrow the King (33) and Queen (24) for certain go down to Tunbridge. But the King (33) comes back again against Monday to raise the Parliament.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 27 July 1663. 27 Jul 1663. Up in the morning about 7 o'clock, and after a little study, resolved of riding to the Wells to look for our dogg, which we did, but could hear nothing; but it being much a warmer day than yesterday there was great store of gallant company, more than then, to my greater pleasure. There was at a distance, under one of the trees on the common, a company got together that sung. I, at the distance, and so all the rest being a quarter of a mile off, took them for the Waytes, so I rode up to them, and found them only voices, some citizens met by chance, that sung four or five parts excellently. I have not been more pleased with a snapp of musique, considering the circumstances of the time and place, in all my life anything so pleasant. We drank each of us, three cupps, and so, after riding up to the horsemen upon the hill, where they were making of matches to run, we went away and to Yowell, where we found our breakfast, the remains of our supper last night hashed, and by and by, after the smith had set on two new shoes to Creed's horse, we mounted, and with little discourse, I being intent upon getting home in time, we rode hard home, observing Mr. Gauden's house, but not calling there (it being too late for me to stay, and wanting their dog too). The house stands very finely, and has a graceful view to the highway. Set up our horses at Fox Hall, and I by water (observing the King's barge attending his going to the House this day) home, it being about one o'clock.
So got myself ready and shifting myself, and so by water to Westminster, and there came most luckily to the Lords' House as the House of Commons were going into the Lord's House, and there I crowded in along with the Speaker (46), and got to stand close behind him, where he made his speech to the King (33) (who sat with his crown on and robes, and so all the Lords in their robes, a fine sight); wherein he told his Majesty what they have done this Parliament, and now offered for his royall consent. The greatest matters were a bill for the Lord's day (which it seems the Lords have lost, and so cannot be passed, at which the Commons are displeased); the bills against Conventicles and Papists (but it seems the Lords have not passed them), and giving his Majesty four entire subsidys; which last, with about twenty smaller Acts, were passed with this form: The Clerk of the House reads the title of the bill, and then looks at the end and there finds (writ by the King (33) I suppose) "Le Roy le veult", and that he reads. And to others he reads, "Soit fait comme vous desirez". And to the Subsidys, as well that for the Commons, I mean the layety, as for the Clergy, the King (33) writes, "Le Roy remerciant les Seigneurs, &c., Prelats, &c., accepte leur benevolences".
The Speaker's speech was far from any oratory, but was as plain (though good matter) as any thing could be, and void of elocution. After the bills passed, the King (33), sitting on his throne, with his speech writ in a paper which he held in his lap, and scarce looked off of it, I thought, all the time he made his speech to them, giving them thanks for their subsidys, of which, had he not need, he would not have asked or received them; and that need, not from any extravagancys of his, he was sure, in any thing, but the disorders of the times compelling him to be at greater charge than he hoped for the future, by their care in their country, he should be: and that for his family expenses and others, he would labour however to retrench in many things convenient, and would have all others to do so too. He desired that nothing of old faults should be remembered, or severity for the same used to any in the country, it being his desire to have all forgot as well as forgiven. But, however, to use all care in suppressing any tumults, &c.; assuring them that the restless spirits of his and their adversaries have great expectations of something to be done this summer. And promised that though the Acts about Conventicles and Papists were not ripe for passing this Session, yet he would take care himself that neither of them should in this intervall be encouraged to the endangering of the peace; and that at their next meeting he would himself prepare two bills for them concerning them.
So he concluded, that for the better proceeding of justice he did think fit to make this a Session, and to prorogue them to the 16th of March next. His speech was very plain, nothing at all of spirit in it, nor spoke with any; but rather on the contrary imperfectly, repeating many times his words though he read all which I was sorry to see, it having not been hard for him to have got all the speech without book. So they all went away, the King (33) out of the House at the upper end, he being by and by to go to Tunbridge to the Queen (24); and I in the Painted Chamber spoke with my Lord Sandwich (38) while he was putting off his robes, who tells me he will now hasten down into the country, as soon as he can get some money settled on the Wardrobe.
Here meeting Creed, he and I down to the Hall, and I having at Michell's shop wrote a little letter to Mr. Gauden, to go with his horse, and excusing my not taking leave or so much as asking after the old lady the widow when we came away the other day from them, he and I over the water to Fox Hall, and there sent away the horse with my letter, and then to the new Spring Garden, walking up and down, but things being dear and little attendance to be had we went away, leaving much brave company there, and so to a less house hard by, where we liked very well their Codlin tarts, having not time, as we intended, to stay the getting ready of a dish of pease. And there came to us an idle boy to show us some tumbling tricks, which he did very well, and the greatest bending of his body that ever I observed in my life.
Thence by water to White Hall, and walked over the Park to St. James's; but missed Mr. Coventry (35), he not being within; and so out again, and there the Duke was coming along the Pell-Mell. It being a little darkish, I staid not to take notice of him, but we went directly back again. And in our walk over the Park, one of the Duke's footmen came running behind us, and came looking just in our faces to see who we were, and went back again. What his meaning is I know not, but was fearful that I might not go far enough with my hat off, though methinks that should not be it, besides, there were others covered nearer than myself was, but only it was my fear.
So to White Hall and by water to the Bridge, and so home to bed, weary and well pleased with my journey in all respects. Only it cost me about 20s., but it was for my health, and I hope will prove so, only I do find by my riding a little swelling to rise just by my anus. I had the same the last time I rode, and then it fell again, and now it is up again about the bigness of the bag of a silkworm, makes me fearful of a rupture. But I will speak to Mr. Hollyard (54) about it, and I am glad to find it now, that I may prevent it before it goes too far.

Samuel Pepys' Diary 11 August 1663. 11 Aug 1663. Up and to my office, whither, by and by, my brother Tom (29) came, and I did soundly rattle him for his neglecting to see and please the Joyces as he has of late done. I confess I do fear that he do not understand his business, nor will do any good in his trade, though he tells me that he do please every body and that he gets money, but I shall not believe it till I see a state of his accounts, which I have ordered him to bring me before he sees me any more. We met and sat at the office all the morning, and at noon I to the 'Change, where I met James Pearce Surgeon, who tells me that the King (33) comes to towne this day, from Tunbridge, to stay a day or two, and then fetch the Queen (24) from thence, who he says is grown a very debonnaire lady, and now hugs him, and meets him gallopping upon the road, and all the actions of a fond and pleasant lady that can be, that he believes has a chat now and then of Mrs. Stewart (16), but that there is no great danger of her, she being only an innocent, young, raw girl; but my Baroness Castlemaine's (22), who rules the King (33) in matters of state, and do what she list with him, he believes is now falling quite out of favour.
After the Queen (24) is come back she goes to the Bath; and so to Oxford, where great entertainments are making for her.
This day I am told that my Lord Bristoll (50) hath warrants issued out against him, to have carried him to the Tower; but he is fled away, or hid himself. So much the Chancellor (54) hath got the better of him.
Upon the 'Change my brother, and Will bring me word that Madam Turner (40) would come and dine with me to-day, so I hasted home and found her and Mrs. Morrice there (The. Joyce being gone into the country), which is the reason of the mother rambling. I got a dinner for them, and after dinner my uncle Thomas (68) and aunt Bell came and saw me, and I made them almost foxed with wine till they were very kind (but I did not carry them up to my ladies).
So they went away, and so my two ladies and I in Mrs. Turner's (40) coach to Mr. Povy's (49), who being not within, we went in and there shewed Mrs. Turner (40) his perspective and volary1, and the fine things that he is building of now, which is a most neat thing.
Thence to the Temple and by water to Westminster; and there Morrice and I went to Sir R. Long's (63) to have fetched a niece of his, but she was not within, and so we went to boat again and then down to the bridge, and there tried to find a sister of Mrs. Morrice's, but she was not within neither, and so we went through bridge, and I carried them on board the King's pleasure-boat, all the way reading in a book of Receipts of making fine meats and sweetmeats, among others to make my own sweet water, which made us good sport.
So I landed them at Greenwich, and there to a garden, and gave them fruit and wine, and so to boat again, and finally, in the cool of the evening, to Lyon Kee2, the tide against us, and so landed and walked to the Bridge, and there took a coach by chance passing by, and so I saw them home, and there eat some cold venison with them, and drunk and bade them good night, having been mighty merry with them, and I think it is not amiss to preserve, though it cost me a little, such a friend as Mrs. Turner (40).
So home and to bed, my head running upon what to do to-morrow to fit things against my wife's coming, as to buy a bedstead, because my brother John is here, and I have now no more beds than are used.
Note 1. A large birdcage, in which the birds can fly about; French 'voliere'. Ben Jonson uses the word volary.
Note 2. Lion Key, Lower Thames Street, where the famous Duchess of Suffolk in the time of Bishop Gardiner's persecution took boat for the continent. James, Duke of York (29), also left the country from this same place on the night of April 20th, 1648, when he escaped from St. James's Palace.

John Evelyn's Diary 28 April 1665. 28 Apr 1665. I went to Tunbridge, to see a solemn exercise at the free-school there.
Having taken orders with my marshal about my prisoners, and with the doctor and chirurgeon to attend the wounded enemies, and of our own men, I went to London again, and visited my charge, several with legs and arms off; miserable objects, God knows.

1673 Test Act

John Evelyn's Diary 25 July 1673. 25 Jul 1673. I went to Tunbridge Wells, to visit my Lord Clifford (42), late Lord Treasurer, who was there to divert his mind more than his body; it was believed that he had so engaged himself to the Duke (39), that rather than take the Test, without which he was not capable of holding any office, he would resign that great and honorable station. This, I am confident, grieved him to the heart, and at last broke it; for, though he carried with him music, and people to divert him, and, when I came to see him, lodged me in his own apartment, and would not let me go from him, I found he was struggling in his mind; and being of a rough and ambitious nature, he could not long brook the necessity he had brought on himself, of submission to this conjuncture. Besides, he saw the Dutch war, which was made much by his advice, as well as the shutting up of the Exchequer, very unprosperous. These things his high spirit could not support. Having stayed here two or three days, I obtained leave of my Lord to return.
In my way, I saw my Lord of Dorset's (50) house at Knowle, near Sevenoaks, a great old-fashioned house.

1672 Attack on the Smyrna Fleet

John Evelyn's Diary 18 August 1673. 18 Aug 1673. My Lord Clifford (43), being about this time returned from Tunbridge, and preparing for Devonshire, I went to take my leave of him at Wallingford House; he was packing up pictures, most of which were of hunting wild beasts and vast pieces of bull-baiting, bear-baiting, etc. I found him in his study, and restored to him several papers of state, and others of importance, which he had furnished me with, on engaging me to write the "History of the Holland War", with other private letters of his acknowledgments to my Lord Arlington (55), who from a private gentleman of a very noble family, but inconsiderable fortune, had advanced him from almost nothing. The first thing was his being in Parliament, then knighted, then made one of the Commissioners of sick and wounded, on which occasion we sat long together; then, on the death of Hugh Pollard, he was made Comptroller of the Household and Privy Councillor, yet still my brother Commissioner; after the death of Lord Fitz-Harding, Treasurer of the Household, he, by letters to Lord Arlington (55), which that Lord showed me, begged of his Lordship to obtain it for him as the very height of his ambition. These were written with such submissions and professions of his patronage, as I had never seen any more acknowledging. The Earl of Southampton then dying, he was made one of the Commissioners of the Treasury. His Majesty (43) inclining to put it into one hand, my Lord Clifford (43), under pretense of making all his interest for his patron, my Lord Arlington (55), cut the grass under his feet, and procured it for himself, assuring the King (43) that Lord Arlington (55) did not desire it. Indeed, my Lord Arlington (55) protested to me that his confidence in Lord Clifford (43) made him so remiss and his affection to him was so particular, that he was absolutely minded to devolve it on Lord Clifford (43), all the world knowing how he himself affected ease and quiet, now growing into years, yet little thinking of this go-by. This was the great ingratitude Lord Clifford (43) showed, keeping my Lord Arlington (55) in ignorance, continually assuring him he was pursuing his interest, which was the Duke's (39) into whose great favor Lord Clifford (43) was now gotten; but which certainly cost him the loss of all, namely, his going so irrevocably far in his interest.
For the rest, my Lord Clifford (43) was a valiant, incorrupt gentleman, ambitious, not covetous; generous, passionate, a most constant, sincere friend, to me in particular, so as when he laid down his office, I was at the end of all my hopes and endeavors. These were not for high matters, but to obtain what his Majesty (43) was really indebted to my father-in-law, which was the utmost of my ambition, and which I had undoubtedly obtained, if this friend had stood. Sir Thomas Osborn (41), who succeeded him, though much more obliged to my father-in-law and his family, and my long and old acquaintance, being of a more haughty and far less obliging nature, I could hope for little; a man of excellent natural parts; but nothing of generous or grateful.
Taking leave of my Lord Clifford (43), he wrung me by the hand, and, looking earnestly on me, bid me God-b'ye, adding, "Mr. Evelyn, I shall never see thee more". "No!" said I, "my Lord, what's the meaning of this? I hope I shall see you often, and as great a person again". "No, Mr. Evelyn, do not expect it, I will never see this place, this city, or Court again", or words of this sound. In this manner, not without almost mutual tears, I parted from him; nor was it long after, but the news was that he was dead, and I have heard from some who I believe knew, he made himself away, after an extraordinary melancholy. This is not confidently affirmed, but a servant who lived in the house, and afterward with Sir Robert Clayton (44), Lord Mayor, did, as well as others, report it, and when I hinted some such thing to Mr. Prideaux, one of his trustees, he was not willing to enter into that discourse.
It was reported with these particulars, that, causing his servant to leave him unusually one morning, locking himself in, he strangled himself with his cravat upon the bed-tester; his servant, not liking the manner of dismissing him, and looking through the keyhole (as I remember), and seeing his master hanging, broke in before he was quite dead, and taking him down, vomiting a great deal of blood, he was heard to utter these words: "Well; let men say what they will, there is a God, a just God above"; after which he spoke no more. This, if true, is dismal. Really, he was the chief occasion of the Dutch war, and of all that blood which was lost at Bergen in attacking the Smyrna fleet, and that whole quarrel.
This leads me to call to mind what my Lord Chancellor Shaftesbury (52) affirmed, not to me only, but to all my brethren the Council of Foreign Plantations, when not long after, this accident being mentioned as we were one day sitting in Council, his Lordship told us this remarkable passage: that, being one day discoursing with him when he was only Sir Thomas Clifford, speaking of men's advancement to great charges in the nation, "Well", says he, "my Lord, I shall be one of the greatest men in England. Don't impute what I say either to fancy, or vanity; I am certain that I shall be a mighty man; but it will not last long; I shall not hold it, but die a bloody death". "What", says my Lord, "your horoscope tells you so?" "No matter for that, it will be as I tell you". "Well", says my Lord Chancellor Shaftesbury (52), "if I were of that opinion, I either would not be a great man, but decline preferment, or prevent my danger"..
This my Lord affirmed in my hearing before several gentlemen and noblemen sitting in council at Whitehall. And I the rather am confident of it, remembering what Sir Edward Walker (62) (Garter King at Arms) had likewise affirmed to me a long time before, even when he was first made a Lord; that carrying his pedigree to Lord Clifford on his being created a peer, and, finding him busy, he bade him go into his study and divert himself there till he was at leisure to discourse with him about some things relating to his family; there lay, said Sir Edward, on his table, his horoscope and nativity calculated, with some writing under it, where he read that he should be advanced to the highest degree in the state that could be conferred upon him, but that he should not long enjoy it, but should die, or expressions to that sense; and I think, (but cannot confidently say) a bloody death. This Sir Edward affirmed both to me and Sir Richard Browne; nor could I forbear to note this extraordinary passage in these memoirs.

Bayham Abbey Tunbridge Wells

On 06 Aug 1866 George Pratt 2nd Marquess Camden 1799-1866 (67) died at Bayham Abbey Tunbridge Wells (his country seat). His son John Charles Pratt 3rd Marquess Camden 1840-1872 (26) succeeded 3rd Marquess Camden.

Greystones Tunbridge Wells

On 15 Feb 1922 Olivia Montagu Countess Tankerville 1830-1922 (91) died at Greystones Tunbridge Wells. She was buried at Chillingham Glendale.

Summerhill House Tunbridge Wells

John Evelyn's Diary 29 June 1652. 29 Jun 1652. I returned to Tunbridge, and again drank the water, till 10th of July.
We went to see the house of my Lord Clanrickarde (48) at Summer hill, near Tunbridge (now given to that villain, Bradshawe (50), who condemned the King (22)). 'Tis situated on an eminent hill, with a park; but has nothing else extraordinary.

Tunstall

Around 1416 William Cromer 1416-1450 was born in Tunstall.

Around 1435 James Cromer 1435-1502 was born to William Cromer 1416-1450 and Elizabeth Fiennes 1420-1459 (15) at Tunstall.

In 1502 James Cromer 1435-1502 (67) died at Tunstall.

Upnor Castle

Samuel Pepys' Diary 04 August 1662. 04 Aug 1662. Up by four o'clock in the morning and walked to the Dock, where Commissioner Pett (51) and I took barge and went to the guardships and mustered them, finding them but badly manned; thence to the Sovereign, which we found kept in good order and very clean, which pleased us well, but few of the officers on board.
Thence to the Charles, and were troubled to see her kept so neglectedly by the boatswain Clements, who I always took for a very good officer; it is a very brave ship.
Thence to Upnor Castle, and there went up to the top, where there is a fine prospect, but of very small force; so to the yard, and there mustered the whole ordinary, where great disorder by multitude of servants and old decrepid men, which must be remedied.
So to all the storehouses and viewed the stores of all sorts and the hemp, where we found Captain Cocke's (45) (which he came down to see along with me) very bad, and some others, and with much content (God forgive me) I did hear by the Clerk of the Ropeyard how it was by Sir W. Batten's (61) private letter that one parcel of Alderman Barker's' was received.
At two o'clock to dinner to the Hill-house, and after dinner dispatched many people's business, and then to the yard again, and looked over Mr. Gregory's and Barrow's houses to see the matter of difference between them concerning an alteration that Barrow would make, which I shall report to the board, but both their houses very pretty, and deserve to be so, being well kept.
Then to a trial of several sorts of hemp, but could not perform it here so well as at Woolwich, but we did do it pretty well.
So took barge at the dock and to Rochester, and there Captain Cocke (45) and I and our two men took coach about 8 at night and to Gravesend, where it was very dark before we got thither to the Swan; and there, meeting with Doncaster, an old waterman of mine above bridge, we eat a short supper, being very merry with the drolling, drunken coachman that brought us, and so took water. It being very dark, and the wind rising, and our waterman unacquainted with this part of the river, so that we presently cast upon the Essex shore, but got off again, and so, as well as we could, went on, but I in such fear that I could not sleep till we came to Erith, and there it begun to be calm, and the stars to shine, and so I began to take heart again, and the rest too, and so made shift to slumber a little. Above Woolwich we lost our way, and went back to Blackwall, and up and down, being guided by nothing but the barking of a dog, which we had observed in passing by Blackwall, and so, [Continued tomorrow]

1667 Raid on the Medway

John Evelyn's Diary 08 June 1667. 08 Jun 1667. To London, alarmed by the Dutch, who were fallen on our fleet at Chatham, by a most audacious enterprise, entering the very river with part of their fleet, doing us not only disgrace, but incredible mischief in burning several of our best men-of-war lying at anchor and moored there, and all this through our unaccountable negligence in not setting out our fleet in due time. This alarm caused me, fearing the enemy might venture up the Thames even to London (which they might have done with ease, and fired all the vessels in the river, too), to send away my best goods, plate, etc., from my house to another place. The alarm was so great that it put both country and city into fear, panic, and consternation, such as I hope I shall never see more; everybody was flying, none knew why or whither. Now, there were land forces dispatched with the Duke of Albemarle (58), Lord Middleton (59), Prince Rupert (47), and the Duke (33), to hinder the Dutch coming to Chatham, fortifying Upnor Castle, and laying chains and bombs; but the resolute enemy broke through all, and set fire on our ships, and retreated in spite, stopping up the Thames, the rest of the fleet lying before the mouth of it.

1672 Battle of Solebay

John Evelyn's Diary 02 June 1672. 02 Jun 1672. Trinity Sunday, I passed at Rochester; and, on the 5th, there was buried in the Cathedral Monsieur Rabiniére, Rear Admiral of the French squadron, a gallant person, who died of the wounds he received in the fight. This ceremony lay on me, which I performed with all the decency I could, inviting the Mayor and Aldermen to come in their formalities. Sir Jonas Atkins was there with his guards; and the Dean and Prebendaries: one of his countrymen pronouncing a funeral oration at the brink of his grave, which I caused to be dug in the choir. This is more at large described in the "Gazette" of that day; Colonel Reymes (58), my colleague in commission, assisting, who was so kind as to accompany me from London, though it was not his district; for indeed the stress of both these wars lay more on me by far than on any of my brethren, who had little to do in theirs. I went to see Upnor Castle, which I found pretty well defended, but of no great moment.
Next day I sailed to the fleet, now riding at the buoy of the "Nore", where I met his Majesty (42), the Duke (38), Lord Arlington (54), and all the great men, in the "Charles", lying miserably shattered; but the miss of Lord Sandwich redoubled the loss to me, and showed the folly of hazarding so brave a fleet, and losing so many good men, for no provocation but that the Hollanders exceeded us in industry, and in all things but envy.
At Sheerness, I gave his Majesty (42) and his Royal Highness (38) an account of my charge, and returned to Queenborough; next day dined at Major Dorel's, Governor of Sheerness; thence, to Rochester; and the following day, home.

Waddenhall

In 1390 William Haute 1390-1462 was born to Nicholas Haute 1357-1417 (32) at Waddenhall.

Walmer

On 30 Jan 1805 Philip Stanhope 5th Earl Stanhope 1805-1875 was born to Philip Henry Stanhope 4th Earl Stanhope 1781-1855 (23) and Catherine Lucy Smith Countess Stanhope -1843 at Walmer.

Walmer Castle

Around 1705. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743 (46). Portrait of Prince George of Denmark 1st Duke Cumberland 1653-1708 (51). Walmer Castle.

Around 1705. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743 (46). Portrait of Mary Preston Marchioness Powis -1724. Walmer Castle.

1648 Kentish Rebellion

The May 1648 Kentish Rebellion was, in effect, the commencement of the Second Civil War of 1648. The rebels, commanded by George Goring 1st Earl Norwich 1585-1663, raised forces across Kent. Deal Castle, Walmer Castle and Sandown Castle surrendered. The rebels then besieged Dover Castle. Parliament dispatched troops commanded by Nathaniel Rich of Stondon -1701 to suppress the rebels.

West Greenwich

On 16 Sep 1295 William Saye 1253-1295 (41) died at West Greenwich.

West Malling

Fartherwell Hall West Malling

On 22 Apr 1908 Edward Vesey Bligh 1829-1908 (79) died at Fartherwell Hall West Malling.

Wingham

In 1540 Thomas Palmer 1st Baronet Palmer 1540-1626 was born to Henry Palmer at Wingham.

On 07 Jan 1626 Thomas Palmer 1st Baronet Palmer 1540-1626 (86) died at Barnet. He was buried at Wingham. His grandson Thomas Palmer 2nd Baronet Palmer -1656 succeeded 2nd Baronet Palmer of Wingham 1C 1661.

On 20 Apr 1656 Thomas Palmer 2nd Baronet Palmer -1656 died at Wingham. His son Henry Palmer 3rd Baronet Palmer -1706 succeeded 3rd Baronet Palmer of Wingham 1C 1661.

Thomas Palmer 2nd Baronet Palmer -1656 was born to Thomas Palmer 1575-1608 at Wingham.

Woolwich

Wye