Biography of Jane Pepys 1623-1686

Paternal Family Tree: Pepys

In 1623 Jane Pepys was born to John Pepys of Ashtead (age 47).

In 1650 John Turner (age 37) and Jane Pepys (age 27) were married.

In 1652 [her father] John Pepys of Ashtead (age 76) died.

In 1652 [her daughter] Theophila Turner was born to [her husband] John Turner (age 39) and Jane Pepys (age 29).

In or after 1653 [her daughter] Betty Turner was born to [her husband] John Turner (age 40) and Jane Pepys (age 30).

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1660. Saturday. At my office as I was receiving money of the probate of wills, in came Mrs. Turner (age 37), [her daughter] Theoph. (age 8), Madame Morrice, and Joyce, and after I had done I took them home to my house and Mr. Hawly came after, and I got a dish of steaks and a rabbit for them, while they were playing a game or two at cards. In the middle of our dinner a messenger from Mr. Downing came to fetch me to him, so leaving Mr. Hawly there, I went and was forced to stay till night in expectation of the French Embassador, who at last came, and I had a great deal of good discourse with one of his gentlemen concerning the reason of the difference between the zeal of the French and the Spaniard. After he was gone I went home, and found my friends still at cards, and after that I went along with them to Dr. Whores (sending my wife (age 19) to Mrs. Jem's to a sack-posset), where I heard some symphony and songs of his own making, performed by Mr. May, Harding, and Mallard. Afterwards I put my friends into a coach, and went to Mrs. Jem's, where I wrote a letter to my Lord by the post, and had my part of the posset which was saved for me, and so we went home, and put in at my Lord's (age 34) lodgings, where we staid late, eating of part of his turkey pie, and reading of Quarles' Emblems. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jan 1660. Sunday. In the morning I went to Mr. Gunning's (age 46), where a good sermon, wherein he showed the life of Christ, and told us good authority for us to believe that Christ did follow his father's trade, and was a carpenter till thirty years of age. From thence to my father's (age 58) to dinner, where I found my wife (age 19), who was forced to dine there, we not having one coal of fire in the house, and it being very hard frosty weather. In the afternoon my father (age 58), he going to a man's to demand some money due to my Aunt Bells my wife (age 19) and I went to Mr. Mossum's (age 43), where a strange doctor made a very good sermon. From thence sending my wife (age 19) to my father's (age 58), I went to Mrs. Turner's (age 37), and staid a little while, and then to my father's (age 58), where I found Mr. Sheply, and after supper went home together. Here I heard of the death of Mr. Palmer, and that he was to be buried at Westminster [Map] tomorrow.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1660. Sunday. I went in the morning to Mr. Messum's, where I met with W. Thurburn and sat with him in his pew. A very eloquent sermon about the duty of all to give good example in our lives and conversation, which I fear he himself was most guilty of not doing. After sermon, at the door by appointment my wife met me, and so to my father's (age 59) to dinner, where we had not been to my shame in a fortnight before. After dinner my father (age 59) shewed me a letter from Mr. Widdrington, of Christ's College, in Cambridge, wherein he do express very great kindness for my brother (age 19), and my father (age 59) intends that my brother shall go to him. To church in the afternoon to Mr. Herring, where a lazy poor sermon. And so home with Mrs. Turner (age 37) and sitting with her a while we went to my father's (age 59) where we supt very merry, and so home. This day I began to put on buckles to my shoes, which I have bought yesterday of Mr. Wotton.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1660. To my father's (age 59) to supper, where I heard by my brother Tom (age 26) how W. Joyce would the other day have Mr. Pierce and his wife to the tavern after they were gone from my house, and that he had so little manners as to make Tom (age 26) pay his share notwithstanding that he went upon his account, and by my father (age 59) I understand that my uncle Fenner and my aunt were much pleased with our entertaining them. After supper home without going to see Mrs. Turner (age 37).

Pepy's Diary. 03 Feb 1660. Friday. Drank my morning draft at Harper's, and was told there that the soldiers were all quiet upon promise of pay. Thence to St James' Park [Map], and walked there to my place for my flageolet and then played a little, it being a most pleasant morning and sunshine. Back to Whitehall, where in the guard-chamber I saw about thirty or forty 'prentices of the City, who were taken at twelve o'clock last night and brought prisoners hither. Thence to my office, where I paid a little more money to some of the soldiers under Lieut.-Col. Miller (who held out the Tower against the Parliament after it was taken away from Fitch by the Committee of Safety, and yet he continued in his office). About noon Mrs. Turner (age 37) came to speak with me, and Joyce, and I took them and shewed them the manner of the Houses sitting, the doorkeeper very civilly opening the door for us. Thence with my cozen Roger Pepys (age 42), it being term time, we took him out of the Hall to Priors, the Rhenish wine-house, and there had a pint or two of wine and a dish of anchovies, and bespoke three or four dozen bottles of wine for him against his wedding. After this done he went away, and left me order to call and pay for all that Mrs. Turner (age 37) would have. So we called for nothing more there, but went and bespoke a shoulder of mutton at Wilkinson's to be roasted as well as it could be done, and sent a bottle of wine home to my house. In the meantime she and I and Joyce went walking all over White Hall, whither General Monk (age 51) was newly come, and we saw all his forces march by in very good plight and stout officers. Thence to my house where we dined, but with a great deal of patience, for the Mutton came in raw, and so we were fain to stay the stewing of it. In the meantime we sat studying a Posy for a ring for her which she is to have at Roger Pepys's (age 42) his wedding. After dinner I left them and went to hear news, but only found that the Parliament House was most of them with Monk (age 51) at White Hall, and that in his passing through the town he had many calls to him for a free Parliament, but little other welcome. I saw in the Palace Yard [Map] how unwilling some of the old soldiers were yet to go out of town without their money, and swore if they had it not in three days, as they were promised, they would do them more mischief in the country than if they had staid here; and that is very likely, the country being all discontented. The town and guards are already full of Monk's (age 51) soldiers. I returned, and it growing dark I and they went to take a turn in the park, where [her daughter] Theoph (age 8) (who was sent for to us to dinner) outran my wife and another poor woman, that laid a pot of ale with me that she would outrun her. After that I set them as far as Charing Cross [Map], and there left them and my wife, and I went to see Mrs. Ann, who began very high about a flock bed I sent her, but I took her down. Here I played at cards till 9 o'clock. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Feb 1660. Sunday. Lord's day. In the morning before church time Mr. Hawly, who had for this day or two looked something sadly, which methinks did speak something in his breast concerning me, came to me telling me that he was out £24 which he could not tell what was become of, and that he do remember that he had such a sum in a bag the other day, and could not tell what he did with it, at which I was very sorry but could not help him. In the morning to Mr. Gunning (age 46), where a stranger, an old man, preached a good honest sermon upon "What manner of love is this that we should be called the sons of God". After sermon I could not find my wife, who promised to be at the gate against my coming out, and waited there a great while; then went to my house and finding her gone I returned and called at the Chequers, thinking to dine at the ordinary with Mr. Chetwind and Mr. Thomas, but they not being there I went to my father (age 59) and found her there, and there I dined. To their church in the afternoon, and in Mrs. Turner's (age 37) pew my wife took up a good black hood and kept it. A stranger preached a poor sermon, and so read over the whole book of the story of Tobit.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Feb 1660. After sermon home with Mrs. Turner (age 37), staid with her a little while, then she went into the court to a christening and we to my father's (age 59), where I wrote some notes for my brother John (age 19) to give to the Mercers' to-morrow, it being the day of their apposition.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Feb 1660. Hence home and brought my wife to Mr. Mossum's to hear him, and indeed he made a very good sermon, but only too eloquent for a pulpit. Here Mr. L'Impertinent helped me to a seat. After sermon to my father's (age 59); and fell in discourse concerning our going to Cambridge the next week with my brother John (age 19). To Mrs. Turner (age 37) where her brother, [her brother] Mr. Edward Pepys (age 43), was there, and I sat a great while talking of public business of the times with him. So to supper to my father's (age 59), all supper talking of John's (age 19) going to Cambridge. So home, and it raining my wife got my mother's French mantle and my brother John's (age 19) hat, and so we went all along home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1660. This day it is two years since it pleased God that I was cut of the stone at Mrs. Turner's (age 37) in Salisbury Court, Fleet Street. And did resolve while I live to keep it a festival, as I did the last year at my house, and for ever to have Mrs. Turner (age 37) and her company with me. But now it pleases God that I am where I am and so prevented to do it openly; only within my soul I can and do rejoice, and bless God, being at this time blessed be his holy name, in as good health as ever I was in my life.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1660. Up early to do business in my study. This is my great day that three years ago I was cut of the stone, and, blessed be God, I do yet find myself very free from pain again. All this morning I staid at home looking after my workmen to my great content about my stairs, and at noon by coach to my father's, where Mrs. Turner (age 37), The. Joyce, Mr. Morrice, Mr. Armiger, Mr. Pierce, the surgeon, and his wife, my father and mother, and myself and my wife. Very merry at dinner; among other things, because Mrs. Turner (age 37) and her company eat no flesh at all this Lent, and I had a great deal of good flesh which made their mouths water. After dinner Mrs. Pierce and her husband and I and my wife to Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, where coming late he and she light of Col. Boone that made room for them, and I and my wife sat in the pit, and there met with Mr. Lewes and Tom Whitton, and saw "The Bondman" done to admiration. So home by coach, and after a view of what the workmen had done to-day I went to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jun 1660. Betimes to my Lord. Extremely much people and business. So with him to Whitehall to the Duke. Back with him by coach and left him in Covent Garden. I back to Will's and the Hall to see my father. Then to the Leg in King Street with Mr. Moore, and sent for. L'Impertinent to dinner with me. After that with Mr. Moore about Privy Seal business. To Mr. Watkins, so to Mr. Crew's (age 62). Then towards my father's (age 59) met my Lord and with him to Dorset House to the Chancellor. So to Mr. Crew's (age 62) and saw my Lord at supper, and then home, and went to see Mrs. Turner (age 37), and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jun 1660. To my Lord, where much business. With him to White Hall, where the Duke of York not being up, we walked a good while in the Shield Gallery. Mr. Hill (who for these two or three days hath constantly attended my Lord) told me of an offer of £500 for a Baronet's dignity, which I told my Lord of in the balcone in this gallery, and he said he would think of it. I to my Lord's and gave order for horses to be got to draw my Lord's great coach to Mr. Crew's (age 62). Mr. Morrice the upholsterer came himself to-day to take notice what furniture we lack for our lodgings at Whitehall. My dear friend Mr. Fuller (age 52) of Twickenham and I dined alone at the Sun Tavern, where he told me how he had the grant of being Dean of St. Patrick's, in Ireland; and I told him my condition, and both rejoiced one for another. Thence to my Lord's, and had the great coach to Brigham's, who went with me to the Half Moon [Map], and gave me a can of good julep, and told me how my Lady Monk (age 51) deals with him and others for their places, asking him £500, though he was formerly the King's (age 30) coach-maker, and sworn to it. My Lord abroad, and I to my house and set things in a little order there. So with Mr. Moore to my father's (age 59), I staying with Mrs. Turner (age 37) who stood at her door as I passed. Among other things she told me for certain how my old Lady Middlesex--herself the other day in the presence of the King, and people took notice of it. Thence called at my father's (age 59), and so to Mr. Crew's (age 62), where Mr. Hetley had sent a letter for me, and two pair of silk stockings, one for W. Howe, and the other for me. To Sir H. Wright's (age 23) to my Lord, where he, was, and took direction about business, and so by link home about 11 o'clock. To bed, the first time since my coming from sea, in my own house, for which God be praised.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jul 1660. This day I put on first my new silk suit, the first that ever I wore in my life. This morning came Nan Pepys' husband Mr. Hall to see me being lately come to town. I had never seen him before. I took him to the Swan [Map] tavern with Mr. Eglin and there drank our morning draft. Home, and called my wife, and took her to Dr. Clodius's to a great wedding of Nan Hartlib to Mynheer Roder, which was kept at Goring House [Map] with very great state, cost, and noble company. But, among all the beauties there, my wife was thought the greatest. After dinner I left the company, and carried my wife to Mrs. Turner's (age 37). I went to the Attorney-General's (age 62), and had my bill which cost me seven pieces. I called my wife, and set her home. And finding my Lord in White Hall garden, I got him to go to the Secretary's, which he did, and desired the dispatch of his and my bills to be signed by the King. His bill is to be Earl of Sandwich1, Viscount Hinchingbroke, and Baron of St. Neot's. Home, with my mind pretty quiet: not returning, as I said I would, to see the bride put to bed.

Note 1. The motive for Sir Edward Montagu's so suddenly altering his intended title is not explained; probably, the change was adopted as a compliment to the town of Sandwich, off which the Fleet was lying before it sailed to bring Charles from Scheveling. Montagu had also received marked attentions from Sir John Boys and other principal men at Sandwich; and it may be recollected, as an additional reason, that one or both of the seats for that borough have usually been placed at the disposal of the Admiralty. The title of Portsmouth was given, in 1673, for her life, to the celebrated Louise de Querouaille (age 10), and becoming extinct with her, was, in 1743, conferred upon John Wallop, Viscount Lymington, the ancestor of the present Earl of Portsmouth. B.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1660. Office Day. As Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I were walking in the garden, a messenger came to me from the Duke of York (age 26) to fetch me to the Lord Chancellor (age 51). So (Mrs. Turner (age 37) with her daughter The. being come to my house to speak with me about a friend of hers to send to sea) I went with her in her coach as far as Worcester House, but my Lord Chancellor (age 51) being gone to the House of Lords, I went thither, and (there being a law case before them this day) got in, and there staid all the morning, seeing their manner of sitting on woolpacks1, &c., which I never did before.

Note 1. It is said that these woolpacks were placed in the House of Lords for the judges to sit on, so that the fact that wool was a main source of our national wealth might be kept in the popular mind. The Lord Chancellor's (age 51) seat is now called the Woolsack.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1661. To church again, a good sermon of Mr. Mills, and after sermon Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I an hour in the garden talking, and he did answer me to many things, I asked Mr. Coventry's (age 33) opinion of me, and Sir W. Batten's (age 60) of my Lord Sandwich (age 35), which do both please me. Then to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where very merry, and here I met the Comptroller (age 50) and his lady and daughter (the first time I ever saw them) and Mrs. Turner (age 38), who and her husband supped with us here (I having fetched my wife thither), and after supper we fell to oysters, and then Mr. Turner went and fetched some strong waters, and so being very merry we parted, and home to bed. This day the parson read a proclamation at church, for the keeping of Wednesday next, the 30th of January, a fast for the murther of the late King.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Feb 1661. By coach to Whitehall with Colonel Slingsby (age 50) (carrying Mrs. Turner (age 38) with us) and there he and I up into the house, where we met with Sir G. Carteret (age 51): who afterwards, with the Duke of York (age 27), my Lord Sandwich (age 35), and others, went into a private room to consult: and we were a little troubled that we were not called in with the rest. But I do believe it was upon something very private. We staid walking in the gallery; where we met with Mr. Slingsby, that was formerly a great friend of Mons. Blondeau, who showed me the stamps of the King's new coyne; which is strange to see, how good they are in the stamp and bad in the money, for lack of skill to make them. But he says Blondeau will shortly come over, and then we shall have it better, and the best in the world1.

Note 1. Peter Blondeau, medallist, was invited to London from Paris in 1649, and appointed by the Council of State to coin their money; but the moneyers succeeded in driving him out of the country. Soon after the Restoration he returned, and was appointed engineer to the mint.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1661. Shrove Tuesday. I left my wife in bed, being indisposed... I to Mrs. Turner's (age 38), who I found busy with The. and Joyce making of things ready for fritters, so to Mr. Crew's (age 63) and there delivered Cotgrave's Dictionary' to my Lady Jemimah, and then with Mr. Moore to my coz Tom Pepys, but he being out of town I spoke with his lady, though not of the business I went about, which was to borrow £1000 for my Lord.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1661. Back to Mrs. Turner's (age 38), where several friends, all strangers to me but Mr. Armiger, dined. Very merry and the best fritters that ever I eat in my life.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Mar 1661. To my Lord's, where we found him lately come from Hinchingbroke, where he left my uncle very well, but my aunt not likely to live. I staid and dined with him. He took me aside, and asked me what the world spoke of the King's marriage. Which I answering as one that knew nothing, he enquired no further of me. But I do perceive by it that there is something in it that is ready to come out that the world knows not of yet. After dinner into London to Mrs. Turner's (age 38) and my father's, made visits and then home, where I sat late making of my journal for four days past, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1661. Early up in the morning to read "The Seaman's Grammar and Dictionary" I lately have got, which do please me exceeding well. At the office all the morning, dined at home, and Mrs. Turner (age 38), The. Joyce, and Mr. Armiger, and my father and mother with me, where they stand till I was weary of their company and so away. Then up to my chamber, and there set papers and things in order, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Mar 1661. To the office, and there all the morning, dined at home, and after dinner comes Mr. Salisbury to see me, and shewed me a face or two of his paynting, and indeed I perceive that he will be a great master. I took him to Whitehall with me by water, but he would not by any means be moved to go through bridge, and so we were fain to go round by the Old Swan [Map]. To my Lord's and there I shewed him the King's picture, which he intends to copy out in little. After that I and Captain Ferrers to Salisbury Court, Fleet Street by water, and saw part of the "Queene's (age 51) Maske". Then I to Mrs. Turner (age 38), and there staid talking late. [her daughter] The. Turner (age 9) being in a great chafe, about being disappointed of a room to stand in at the Coronacion.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Mar 1661. Sunday. At church, where a stranger preached like a fool. From thence home and dined with my wife, she staying at home, being unwilling to dress herself, the house being all dirty. To church again, and after sermon I walked to my father's, and to Mrs. Turner's (age 38), where I could not woo The. to give me a lesson upon the harpsicon and was angry at it. So home and finding Will abroad at Sir W. Batten's (age 60) talking with the people there (Sir W. and my Lady being in the country), I took occasion to be angry with him, and so to prayers and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1661. Up early, my Lady Batten knocking at her door that comes into one of my chambers. I did give directions to my people and workmen, and so about 8 o'clock we took barge at the Tower, Sir William Batten (age 60) and his lady, Mrs. Turner (age 38), Mr. Fowler and I A very pleasant passage and so to Gravesend, Kent [Map], where we dined, and from thence a coach took them and me, and Mr. Fowler with some others came from Rochester, Kent [Map] to meet us, on horseback. At Rochester, Kent [Map], where alight at Mr. Alcock's and there drank and had good sport, with his bringing out so many sorts of cheese. Then to the Hillhouse at Chatham, where I never was before, and I found a pretty pleasant house and am pleased with the arms that hang up there. Here we supped very merry, and late to bed; Sir William telling me that old Edgeborrow, his predecessor, did die and walk in my chamber, did make me some what afeard, but not so much as for mirth's sake I did seem. So to bed in the treasurer's chamber.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1661. After dinner, we went to fit books and things (Tom Hater being this morning come to us) for the sale, by an inch of candle, and very good sport we and the ladies that stood by had, to see the people bid. Among other things sold there was all the State's arms, which Sir W. Batten (age 60) bought; intending to set up some of the images in his garden, and the rest to burn on the Coronacion night. The sale being done, the ladies and I and Captain Pett and Mr. Castle (age 32) took barge and down we went to see the Sovereign, which we did, taking great pleasure therein, singing all the way, and, among other pleasures, I put my Lady, Mrs. Turner (age 38), Mrs. Hempson, and the two Mrs. Allens into the lanthorn and I went in and kissed them, demanding it as a fee due to a principall officer, with all which we were exceeding merry, and drunk some bottles of wine and neat's tongue, &c. Then back again home and so supped, and after much mirth to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Apr 1661. So to Captain Allen's (where we were last night, and heard him play on the harpsicon, and I find him to be a perfect good musician), and there, having no mind to leave Mrs. Rebecca, what with talk and singing (her father and I), Mrs. Turner (age 38) and I staid there till 2 o'clock in the morning and was most exceeding merry, and I had the opportunity of kissing Mrs. Rebecca very often. Among other things Captain Pett was saying that he thought that he had got his wife with child since I came thither. Which I took hold of and was merrily asking him what he would take to have it said for my honour that it was of my getting? He merrily answered that he would if I would promise to be godfather to it if it did come within the time just, and I said that I would. So that I must remember to compute it when the time comes.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Apr 1661. Lord's Day. In the morning to my father's, where I dined, and in the afternoon to their church, where come Mrs. Turner (age 38) and Mrs. Edward Pepys, and several other ladies, and so I went out of the pew into another. And after sermon home with them, and there staid a while and talked with them and was sent for to my father's, where my cozen Angier and his wife, of Cambridge, to whom I went, and was glad to see them, and sent for wine for them, and they supped with my father.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Apr 1661. And so home again, and gave order to my workmen what to do in my absence. At night to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), and by his and Sir W. Pen's (age 40) persuasion I sent for my wife from my father's, who came to us to Mrs. Turner's (age 38), where we were all at a collacion to-night till twelve o'clock, there being a gentlewoman there that did play well and sang well to the Harpsicon, and very merry we were. So home and to bed, where my wife had not lain a great while.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Nov 1661. Hence to the Temple [Map] to Mr. Turner about drawing up my bill in Chancery against T. Trice, and so to Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, where Mrs. Turner (age 38) is come to town to-night, but very ill still of an ague, which I was sorry to see. So to the Wardrobe and talked with my Lady, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Dec 1661. By and by came Sir W. Pen (age 40), and he and I staid while Sir W. Batten (age 60) went home to dinner, and then he came again, and Sir W. Pen (age 40) and I went and dined at my house, and had two mince pie sent thither by our order from the messenger Slater, that had dressed some victuals for us, and so we were very merry, and after dinner rode out in his coach, he to Whitehall, and my wife and I to the Opera, and saw "Hamlet" well performed. Thence to the Temple [Map] and Mrs. Turner's (age 38) (who continues still very ill), and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Dec 1661. At the office upon business extraordinary all the morning, then to my Lady Sandwich's (age 36) to dinner, whither my wife, who had been at the painter's (age 55), came to me, and there dined, and there I left her, and to the Temple [Map] my brother and I to see Mrs. Turner (age 38), who begins to be better, and so back to my Lady's, where much made of, and so home to my study till bed-time, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1661. So back again to Westminster, and from thence by water to the Treasury Office, where I found Sir W. Pen (age 40) paying off the Sophia and Griffen, and there I staid with him till noon, and having sent for some collar of beef and a mince pie, we eat and drank, and so I left him there and to my brother's by appointment to meet Prior, but he came not, so I went and saw Mrs. Turner (age 38) who continues weak, and by and by word was brought me that Prior's man was come to Tom's, and so I went and told out £128 which I am to receive of him, but Prior not coming I went away and left the money by his desire with my brother all night, and they to come to me to-morrow morning.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jan 1662. After dinner the Dean, my wife and I by Sir W. Pen's (age 40) coach left us, he to Whitehall, and my wife and I to visit Mrs. Pierce and thence Mrs. Turner (age 39), who continues very ill still, and The. is also fallen sick, which do trouble me for the poor mother. So home and to read, I being troubled to hear my wife rate though not without cause at her mayd Nell, who is a lazy slut. So to prayers and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jan 1662. Home to dinner, and then my wife and I on foot to see Mrs. Turner (age 39), who continues still sick, and thence into the Old Bayly by appointment to speak with Mrs. Norbury who lies at (it falls out) next door to my uncle Fenner's; but as God would have it, we having no desire to be seen by his people, he having lately married a midwife that is old and ugly, and that hath already brought home to him a daughter and three children, we were let in at a back door. And here she offered me the refusall of some lands of her's at Brampton, if I have a mind to buy, which I answered her I was not at present provided to do. She took occasion to talk of her sister Wight's making much of the Wights, who for namesake only my uncle do shew great kindness to, so I fear may do us that are nearer to him a great deal of wrong, if he should die without children, which I am sorry for.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Feb 1662. Lord's Day. To church this morning, and so home and to dinner. In the afternoon I walked to St. Bride's to church, to hear Dr. Jacomb preach upon the recovery, and at the request of Mrs. Turner (age 39), who came abroad this day, the first time since her long sickness. He preached upon David's words, "I shall not die, but live, and declare the works of the Lord", and made a pretty good sermon, though not extraordinary.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Feb 1662. After sermon I led her home, and sat with her, and there was the Dr. got before us; but strange what a command he hath got over Mrs. Turner (age 39), who was so carefull to get him what he would, after his preaching, to drink, and he, with a cunning gravity, knows how to command, and had it, and among other things told us that he heard more of the Common Prayer this afternoon (while he stood in the vestry, before he went up into the pulpitt) than he had heard this twenty years.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Mar 1662. At the office all the morning, and all the afternoon rummaging of papers in my chamber, and tearing some and sorting others till late at night, and so to bed, my wife being not well all this day. This afternoon Mrs. Turner (age 39) and The. came to see me, her mother not having been abroad many a day before, but now is pretty well again and has made me one of the first visits.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1662. So to the Exchange [Map], Mrs. Turner (age 39) (who I found sick in bed), and several other places about business, and so home. Supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 04 May 1662. Lord's Day. Lay long talking with my wife, then Mr. Holliard (age 53) came to me and let me blood, about sixteen ounces, I being exceedingly full of blood and very good. I begun to be sick; but lying upon my back I was presently well again, and did give him 5s. for his pains, and so we parted, and I, to my chamber to write down my journall from the beginning of my late journey to this house. Dined well, and after dinner, my arm tied up with a black ribbon, I walked with my wife to my brother Tom's (age 28); our boy waiting on us with his sword, which this day he begins to wear, to outdo Sir W. Pen's (age 41) boy, who this day, and Six W. Batten's too, begin to wear new livery; but I do take mine to be the neatest of them all. I led my wife to Mrs. Turner's (age 39) pew, and the church being full, it being to hear a Doctor who is to preach a probacon sermon, I went out to the Temple [Map] and there walked, and so when church was done went to Mrs. Turner's (age 39), and after a stay there, my wife and I walked to Grays Inn, to observe fashions of the ladies, because of my wife's making some clothes.

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1662. And so after the play done, she and [her daughter] The. Turner (age 10) and Mrs. Lucin and I, in her coach to the Park; and there found them out, and spoke to them; and observed many fine ladies, and staid till all were gone almost. And so to Mrs. Turner's (age 39), and there supped, and so walked home, and by and by comes my wife home, brought by my Baroness Carteret (age 60) to the gate, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1662. Thence to Paul's Church Yard [Map]; where seeing my Lady's Sandwich and Carteret, and my wife (who this day made a visit the first time to my Baroness Carteret (age 60)), come by coach, and going to Hide Park, I was resolved to follow them; and so went to Mrs. Turner's (age 39): and thence found her out at the Theatre [Map], where I saw the last act of the "Knight of the Burning Pestle", which pleased me not at all.

Pepy's Diary. 21 May 1662. Thence to my brother Tom's (age 28), in expectation to have met my father to-night come out of the country, but he is not yet come, but here we found my uncle Fenner and his old wife, whom I had not seen since the wedding dinner, nor care to see her. They being gone, my wife and I went and saw Mrs. Turner (age 39), whom we found not well, and her two boys Charles and Will come out of the country, grown very plain boys after three years being under their father's care in Yorkshire.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jun 1662. Thence by water to Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, and Mrs. Turner (age 39) not being at home, home by coach, and so after walking on the leads and supper to bed. This day my wife put on her slasht wastecoate, which is very pretty.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Aug 1662. So home with Mrs. Turner (age 39), and there hear that Mr. Calamy hath taken his farewell this day of his people, and that others will do so the next. Sunday. Mr. Turner, the draper, I hear, is knighted, made Alderman, and pricked for Sheriffe, with Sir Thomas Bluddel, for the next year, by the King (age 32), and so are called with great honour the King's Sheriffes.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Sep 1662. So to Deptford, and took my Lady Batten and her daughter and Mrs. Turner (age 39) along with me, they being going through the garden thither, they to Mr. Unthwayte's and I to the Pay, and then about 3 o'clock went to dinner (Sir W. Pen (age 41) and I), and after dinner to the Pay again, and at night by barge home all together, and so to my lodgings and to bed, my mind full of trouble about my house.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1662. Before I went to the office my wife's brother did come to us, and we did instruct him to go to Gosnell's and to see what the true matter is of her not coming, and whether she do intend to come or no, and so I to the office; and this morning come Sir G. Carteret (age 52) to us (being the first time we have seen him since his coming from France): he tells us, that the silver which he received for Dunkirk did weigh 120,000 weight. Here all the morning upon business, and at noon (not going home to dinner, though word was brought me that Will. Joyce was there, whom I had not seen at my house nor any where else these three or four months) with Mr. Coventry (age 34) by his coach as far as Fleet Street, and there stepped into Madam Turner's (age 39), where was told I should find my cozen Roger Pepys (age 45), and with him to the Temple [Map], but not having time to do anything I went towards my Lord Sandwich's (age 37). (In my way went into Captn. Cuttance's coach, and with him to my Lord's.) But the company not being ready I did slip down to Wilkinson's, and having not eat any thing to-day did eat a mutton pie and drank, and so to my Lord's, where my Lord and Mr. Coventry (age 34), Sir Wm. Darcy, one Mr. Parham (a very knowing and well-spoken man in this business), with several others, did meet about stating the business of the fishery, and the manner of the King's giving of this £200 to every man that shall set out a new-made English Busse by the middle of June next. In which business we had many fine pretty discourses; and I did here see the great pleasure to be had in discoursing of publique matters with men that are particularly acquainted with this or that business. Having come to some issue, wherein a motion of mine was well received, about sending these invitations from the King (age 32) to all the fishing-ports in general, with limiting so many Busses to this, and that port, before we know the readiness of Members, we parted, and I walked home all the way, and having wrote a letter full of business to my father, in my way calling upon my cozen Turner and Mr. Calthrop (age 38) at the Temple [Map], for their consent to be my arbitrators, which they are willing to. My wife and I to bed pretty pleasant, for that her brother brings word that Gosnell, which my wife and I in discourse do pleasantly call our Marmotte, will certainly come next week without fail, which God grant may be for the best.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1662. Thence home, and to visit Sir W. Pen (age 41), who continues still bed-rid. Here was Sir W. Batten (age 61) and his Lady, and Mrs. Turner (age 39), and I very merry, talking of the confidence of Sir R. Ford's (age 48) new-married daughter, though she married so strangely lately, yet appears at church as brisk as can be, and takes place of her elder sister, a maid.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1663. So home (there being here this night Mrs. Turner (age 40) and Mrs. Martha Batten of our office) to my Lord's lodgings again, and to a game at cards, we three and Sarah, and so to supper and some apples and ale, and to bed with great pleasure, blessed be God!

Pepy's Diary. 02 Feb 1663. Thence walking with Mr. Creed homewards we turned into a house and drank a cup of Cock ale and so parted, and I to the Temple [Map], where at my cozen Roger's (age 45) chamber I met Madam Turner (age 40), and after a little stay led her home and there left her, she and her daughter having been at the play to-day at the Temple [Map], it being a revelling time with them1.

Note 1. The revels were held in the Inner Temple [Map] Hall. The last revel in any of the Inns of Court was held in the Inner Temple [Map] in 1733.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Mar 1663. Thence by water home, and at noon, by promise, Mrs. Turner (age 40) and her daughter, and Mrs. Morrice, came along with Roger Pepys (age 45) to dinner. We were as merry as I could be, having but a bad dinner for them; but so much the better, because of the dinner which I must have at the end of this month. And here Mrs. The. shewed me my name upon her breast as her Valentine, which will cost me 20s.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Apr 1663. I find at Court that there is some bad news from Ireland of an insurrection of the Catholiques there, which puts them into an alarm. I hear also in the City that for certain there is an embargo upon all our ships in Spayne, upon this action of my Lord Windsor's (age 36) at Cuba, which signifies little or nothing, but only he hath a mind to say that he hath done something before he comes back again. Late tonight I sent to invite my uncle Wight and aunt with Mrs. Turner (age 40) to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Apr 1663. Up betimes and to my office. By and by to Lombard Street [Map] by appointment to meet Mr. Moore, but the business not being ready I returned to the office, where we sat a while, and, being sent for, I returned to him and there signed to some papers in the conveying of some lands mortgaged by Sir Rob. Parkhurst in my name to my Lord Sandwich (age 37), which I having done I returned home to dinner, whither by and by comes Roger Pepys (age 45), Mrs. Turner (age 40) her daughter, Joyce Norton, and a young lady, a daughter of Coll. Cockes, my uncle Wight, his wife and Mrs. Anne Wight. This being my feast, in lieu of what I should have had a few days ago for my cutting of the stone, for which the Lord make me truly thankful. Very merry at, before, and after dinner, and the more for that my dinner was great, and most neatly dressed by our own only maid. We had a fricasee of rabbits and chickens, a leg of mutton boiled, three carps in a dish, a great dish of a side of lamb, a dish of roasted pigeons, a dish of four lobsters, three tarts, a lamprey pie (a most rare pie), a dish of anchovies, good wine of several sorts, and all things mighty noble and to my great content.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Apr 1663. After dinner to Hide Park; my aunt, Mrs. Wight and I in one coach, and all the rest of the women in Mrs. Turner's (age 40); Roger being gone in haste to the Parliament about the carrying this business of the Papists, in which it seems there is great contest on both sides, and my uncle and father staying together behind. At the Park was the King (age 32), and in another coach my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22), they greeting one another at every tour1. Here about an hour, and so leaving all by the way we home and found the house as clean as if nothing had been done there to-day from top to bottom, which made us give the cook 12d. a piece, each of us.

Note 1. The company drove round and round the Ring in Hyde Park. The following two extracts illustrate this, and the second one shows how the circuit was called the Tour: "Here (1697) the people of fashion take the diversion of the Ring. In a pretty high place, which lies very open, they have surrounded a circumference of two or three hundred paces diameter with a sorry kind of balustrade, or rather with postes placed upon stakes but three feet from the ground; and the coaches drive round this. When they have turned for some time round one way they face about and turn t'other: so rowls the world!"-Wilson's Memoirs, 1719, p. 126.

Pepy's Diary. 01 May 1663. And so home to see Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who is well again, and after staying talking with him awhile, I took leave and went to hear Mrs. Turner's (age 40) daughter, at whose house Sir J. Minnes (age 64) lies, play on the harpsicon; but, Lord! it was enough to make any man sick to hear her; yet I was forced to commend her highly.

Pepy's Diary. 04 May 1663. He being gone to Chelsey by coach I to his lodgings, where my wife staid for me, and she from thence to see Mrs. Pierce and called me at Whitehall stairs (where I went before by land to know whether there was any play at Court to-night) and there being none she and I to Mr. Creed to the Exchange [Map], where she bought something, and from thence by water to White Fryars, and wife to see Mrs. Turner (age 40), and then came to me at my brother's, where I did give him order about my summer clothes, and so home by coach, and after supper to bed to my wife, with whom I have not lain since I used to lie with my father till to-night.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jun 1663. Mrs. Turner (age 40), who is often at Court, do tell me to-day that for certain the Queen (age 24) hath much changed her humour, and is become very pleasant and sociable as any; and they say is with child, or believed to be so.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jun 1663. This day I sent my cozen [her brother] Edward Pepys (age 46) his Lady, at my cozen Turner's, a piece of venison given me yesterday, and Madam Turner (age 40) I sent for a dozen bottles of her's, to fill with wine for her. This day I met with Pierce the surgeon, who tells me that the King (age 33) has made peace between Mr. Edward Montagu (age 28) and his father Lord Montagu, and that all is well again; at which; for the family's sake, I am very glad, but do not think it will hold long.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jul 1663. After dinner to church by coach, and there my Lady, Mrs. Turner (age 40), Mrs. Lemon, and I only, we, in spite to one another, kept one another awake; and sometimes I read in my book of Latin plays, which I took in my pocket, thinking to have walked it. An old doting parson preached.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jul 1663. So home to supper and musique, which is all the pleasure I have of late given myself, or is fit I should, others spending too much time and money. Going in I stepped to Sir W. Batten (age 62), and there staid and talked with him (my Lady being in the country), and sent for some lobsters, and Mrs. Turner (age 40) came in, and did bring us an umble pie hot out of her oven, extraordinary good, and afterwards some spirits of her making, in which she has great judgment, very good, and so home, merry with this night's refreshment.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jul 1663. By and by the King (age 33) and Queen (age 24), who looked in this dress (a white laced waistcoat and a crimson short pettycoat, and her hair dressed ci la negligence) mighty pretty; and the King (age 33) rode hand in hand with her. Here was also my Baroness Castlemaine (age 22) rode among the rest of the ladies; but the King (age 33) took, methought, no notice of her; nor when they 'light did any body press (as she seemed to expect, and staid for it) to take her down, but was taken down by her own gentleman. She looked mighty out of humour, and had a yellow plume in her hat (which all took notice of), and yet is very handsome, but very melancholy: nor did any body speak to her, or she so much as smile or speak to any body. I followed them up into White Hall, and into the Queen's (age 24) presence, where all the ladies walked, talking and fiddling with their hats and feathers, and changing and trying one another's by one another's heads, and laughing. But it was the finest sight to me, considering their great beautys and dress, that ever I did see in all my life. But, above all, Mrs. Stewart (age 16) in this dress, with her hat cocked and a red plume, with her sweet eye, little Roman nose, and excellent taille, is now the greatest beauty I ever saw, I think, in my life; and, if ever woman can, do exceed my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22), at least in this dress nor do I wonder if the King (age 33) changes, which I verily believe is the reason of his coldness to my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22). Here late, with much ado I left to look upon them, and went away, and by water, in a boat with other strange company, there being no other to be had, and out of him into a sculler half to the bridge, and so home and to Sir W. Batten (age 62), where I staid telling him and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Mrs. Turner (age 40), with great mirth, my being frighted at Chatham, Kent [Map] by young Edgeborough, and so home to supper and to bed, before I sleep fancying myself to sport with Mrs. Stewart (age 16) with great pleasure.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1663. So I landed them at Greenwich, Kent [Map], and there to a garden, and gave them fruit and wine, and so to boat again, and finally, in the cool of the evening, to Lyon Kee1, the tide against us, and so landed and walked to the Bridge [Map], and there took a coach by chance passing by, and so I saw them home, and there eat some cold venison with them, and drunk and bade them good night, having been mighty merry with them, and I think it is not amiss to preserve, though it cost me a little, such a friend as Mrs. Turner (age 40).

Note 1. Lion Key, Lower Thames Street, where the famous Duchess of Suffolk in the time of Bishop Gardiner's persecution took boat for the continent. James, Duke of York (age 29), also left the country from this same place on the night of April 20th, 1648, when he escaped from St. James's Palace.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1663. Upon the 'Change [Map] my brother, and Will bring me word that Madam Turner (age 40) would come and dine with me to-day, so I hasted home and found her and Mrs. Morrice there (The. Joyce being gone into the country), which is the reason of the mother rambling. I got a dinner for them, and after dinner my uncle Thomas and aunt Bell came and saw me, and I made them almost foxed with wine till they were very kind (but I did not carry them up to my ladies).

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1663. So they went away, and so my two ladies and I in Mrs. Turner's (age 40) coach to Mr. Povy's (age 49), who being not within, we went in and there shewed Mrs. Turner (age 40) his perspective and volary1, and the fine things that he is building of now, which is a most neat thing.

Note 1. A large birdcage, in which the birds can fly about; French 'voliere'. Ben Jonson uses the word volary.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Aug 1663. So home again, and having put up the bedstead and done other things in order to my wife's coming, I went out to several places and to Mrs. Turner's (age 40), she inviting me last night, and there dined; with her and Madam Morrice and a stranger we were very merry and had a fine dinner, and thence I took leave and to White Hall, where my Lords Sandwich, Peterborough (age 41), and others made a Tangier Committee; spent the afternoon in reading and ordering with a great deal of alteration, and yet methinks never a whit the better, of a letter drawn by Creed to my Lord Rutherford. The Lords being against anything that looked to be rough, though it was in matter of money and accounts, wherein their courtship may cost the King (age 33) dear. Only I do see by them, that speaking in matters distasteful to him that we write to, it is best to do it in the plainest way and without ambages or reasoning, but only say matters of fact, and leave the party to collect your meaning.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Aug 1663. Thence to fetch my wife from Mrs. Hunt's, where now he was come in, and we eat and drunk, and so away (their child being at home, a very lively, but not pretty at all), by water to Mrs. Turner's (age 40), and there made a short visit, and so home by coach, and after supper to prayers and to bed, and before going to bed Ashwell began to make her complaint, and by her I do perceive that she has received most base usage from my wife, which my wife sillily denies, but it is impossible the wench could invent words and matter so particularly, against which my wife has nothing to say but flatly to deny, which I am sorry to see, and blows to have past, and high words even at Hinchinbrooke House among my Lady's people, of which I am mightily ashamed. I said nothing to either of them, but let them talk till she was gone and left us abed, and then I told my wife my mind with great sobriety of grief, and so to sleep.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Aug 1663. So home, and I staid a while with Sir J. Minnes (age 64), at Mrs. Turner's (age 40), hearing his parrat talk, laugh, and crow, which it do to admiration.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1663. Before I was up, my brother's man came to tell me that my cozen, [her brother] Edward Pepys (age 46), was dead, died at Mrs. Turner's (age 40), for which my wife and I are very sorry, and the more for that his wife was the only handsome woman of our name.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Dec 1663. So I did go out to Mr. Smith's, where my brother tells me the scutcheons are made, but he not being within, I went to the Temple [Map], and there spent my time in a Bookseller's shop, reading in a book of some Embassages into Moscovia, &c., where was very good reading, and then to Mrs. Turner's (age 40), and thither came Smith to me, with whom I did agree for £4 to make a handsome one, ell square within the frame.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Dec 1663. At noon home to my poor wife and dined, and then by coach abroad to Mrs. Turner's (age 40) where I have not been for many a day, and there I found her and her sister Dike very sad for the death of their [her brother] brother (deceased). After a little common expression of sorrow, Mrs. Turner (age 40) told me that the trouble she would put me to was, to consult about getting an achievement prepared, scutcheons were done already, to set over the door.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1663. To Mrs. Turner's (age 40), whom I find busy with Sir W. Turner, about advising upon going down to Norfolke with the corps, and I find him in talke a sober, considering man.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Dec 1663. Up betimes, my wife having a mind to have gone abroad with me, but I had not because of troubling me, and so left her, though against my will, to go and see her father and mother by herself, and I straight to my Lord Sandwich's (age 38), and there I had a pretty kind salute from my Lord, and went on to the Duke's (age 30), where my fellow officers by and by came, and so in with him to his closet, and did our business, and so broke up, and I with Sir W. Batten (age 62) by coach to Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, and there spoke with Clerk our Solicitor about Field's business, and so parted, and I to Mrs. Turner's (age 40), and there saw the achievement pretty well set up, and it is well done.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1663. Up betimes and my wife; and being in as mourning a dress as we could, at present, without cost, put ourselves into, we by Sir W. Pen's (age 42) coach to Mrs. Turner's (age 40), at Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, where I find my Lord's coach and six horses. We staid till almost eleven o'clock, and much company came, and anon, the corps being put into the hearse, and the scutcheons set upon it, we all took coach, and I and my wife and Auditor Beale in my Lord Sandwich's (age 38) coach, and went next to Mrs. Turner's (age 40) mourning coach, and so through all the City and Shoreditch, I believe about twenty coaches, and four or five with six and four horses. Being come thither, I made up to the mourners, and bidding them a good journey, I took leave and back again, and setting my wife into a hackney out of Bishopsgate Street, I sent her home, and I to the 'Change [Map] and Auditor Beale about his business.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1664. Thence calling to see whether Mrs. Turner (age 41) was returned, which she is, and I spoke one word only to her, and away again by coach home and to my office, where late, and then home to supper and bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jan 1664. Lord's Day. Lay in bed with my wife till 10 or 11 o'clock, having been very sleepy all night. So up, and my brother Tom (age 30) being come to see me, we to dinner, he telling me how Mrs. Turner (age 41) found herself discontented with her late bad journey, and not well taken by them in the country, they not desiring her coming down, nor the burials of Mr. Edward Pepys's corps there.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1664. Thence back to Mrs. Turner's (age 41) and sat a while with them talking of plays and I know not what, and so called to see Tom, but not at home, though they say he is in a deep consumption, and Mrs. Turner (age 41) and Dike and they say he will not live two months to an end.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Feb 1664. Thence by water to Salsbury Court, and found my wife, by agreement, at Mrs. Turner's (age 41), and after a little stay and chat set her and young Armiger down in Cheapside, and so my wife and I home.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1664. By and by they bid me good night, but immediately as they were gone out of doors comes Mrs. Turner's (age 41) boy with a note to me to tell me that my brother Tom (age 30) was so ill as they feared he would not long live, and that it would be fit I should come and see him. So I sent for them back, and they came, and Will Joyce desiring to speak with me alone I took him up, and there he did plainly tell me to my great astonishment that my brother is deadly ill, and that their chief business of coming was to tell me so, and what is worst that his disease is the pox1, which he hath heretofore got, and hath not been cured, but is come to this, and that this is certain, though a secret told his father Fenner by the Doctor which he helped my brother to. This troubled me mightily, but however I thought fit to go see him for speech of people's sake, and so walked along with them, and in our way called on my uncle Fenner (where I have not been these 12 months and more) and advised with him, and then to my brother, who lies in bed talking idle. He could only say that he knew me, and then fell to other discourse, and his face like a dying man, which Mrs. Turner (age 41), who was here, and others conclude he is. The company being gone, I took the mayde, which seems a very grave and serious woman, and in W. Joyce's company' did inquire how things are with her master. She told me many things very discreetly, and said she had all his papers and books, and key of his cutting house, and showed me a bag which I and Wm. Joyce told, coming to £5 14s. 0d., which we left with her again, after giving her good counsel, and the boys, and seeing a nurse there of Mrs. Holden's choosing, I left them, and so walked home greatly troubled to think of my brother's condition, and the trouble that would arise to me by his death or continuing sick. So at home, my mind troubled, to bed.

Note 1. TT. Probably syphilis.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1664. So to the 'Change [Map], and thence home, where my wife and I fell out about my not being willing to have her have her gowne laced, but would lay out the same money and more on a plain new one. At this she flounced away in a manner I never saw her, nor which I could ever endure. So I away to the office, though she had dressed herself to go see my Lady Sandwich (age 39). She by and by in a rage follows me, and coming to me tells me in spitefull manner like a vixen and with a look full of rancour that she would go buy a new one and lace it and make me pay for it, and then let me burn it if I would after she had done it, and so went away in a fury. This vexed me cruelly, but being very busy I had, not hand to give myself up to consult what to do in it, but anon, I suppose after she saw that I did not follow her, she came again to the office, where I made her stay, being busy with another, half an houre, and her stomach coming down we were presently friends, and so after my business being over at the office we out and by coach to my Lady Sandwich's (age 39), with whom I left my wife, and I to White Hall, where I met Mr. Delsety, and after an hour's discourse with him met with nobody to do other business with, but back again to my Lady, and after half an hour's discourse with her to my brother's (age 30), who I find in the same or worse condition. The doctors give him over and so do all that see him. He talks no sense two, words together now; and I confess it made me weepe to see that he should not be able, when I asked him, to say who I was. I went to Mrs. Turner's (age 41), and by her discourse with my brother's Doctor, Mr. Powell, I find that she is full now of the disease which my brother (age 30) is troubled with, and talks of it mightily, which I am sorry for, there being other company, but methinks it should be for her honour to forbear talking of it, the shame of this very thing I confess troubles me as much as anything. Back to my brother's (age 30) and took my wife, and carried her to my uncle Fenner's and there had much private discourse with him. He tells me of the Doctor's thoughts of my brother's little hopes of recovery, and from that to tell me his thoughts long of my brother's bad husbandry, and from that to say that he believes he owes a great deal of money, as to my cozen Scott I know not how much, and Dr. Thos. Pepys £30, but that the Doctor confesses that he is paid £20 of it, and what with that and what he owes my father and me I doubt he is in a very sad condition, that if he lives he will not be able to show his head, which will be a very great shame to me.

15 Mar 1664. About 8 o'clock my brother (age 30) began to fetch his spittle with more pain, and to speak as much but not so distinctly, till at last the phlegm getting the mastery of him, and he beginning as we thought to rattle, I had no mind to see him die, as we thought he presently would, and so withdrew and led Mrs. Turner (age 41) home, but before I came back, which was in half a quarter of an hour, my brother was dead. I went up and found the nurse holding his eyes shut, and he poor wretch lying with his chops fallen, a most sad sight, and that which put me into a present very great transport of grief and cries, and indeed it was a most sad sight to see the poor wretch lie now still and dead, and pale like a stone. I staid till he was almost cold, while Mrs. Croxton, Holden, and the rest did strip and lay him out, they observing his corpse, as they told me afterwards, to be as clear as any they ever saw, and so this was the end of my poor brother (age 30), continuing talking idle and his lips working even to his last that his phlegm hindered his breathing, and at last his breath broke out bringing a flood of phlegm and stuff out with it, and so he died.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Mar 1664. This evening he talked among other talk a great deal of French very plain and good, as, among others: 'quand un homme boit quand il n'a poynt d'inclination a boire il ne luy fait jamais de bien1.' I once begun to tell him something of his condition, and asked him whither he thought he should go. He in distracted manner answered me-"Why, whither should I go? there are but two ways: If I go, to the bad way I must give God thanks for it, and if I go the other way I must give God the more thanks for it; and I hope I have not been so undutifull and unthankfull in my life but I hope I shall go that way". This was all the sense, good or bad, that I could get of him this day. I left my wife to see him laid out, and I by coach home carrying my brother's (age 30) papers, all I could find, with me, and having wrote a letter to, my father telling him what hath been said I returned by coach, it being very late, and dark, to my brother's (age 30), but all being gone, the corpse laid out, and my wife at Mrs. Turner's (age 41), I thither, and there after an hour's talk, we up to bed, my wife and I in the little blue chamber, and I lay close to my wife, being full of disorder and grief for my brother (age 30) that I could not sleep nor wake with satisfaction, at last I slept till 5 or 6 o'clock.

Note 1. "When a man drinks when he has no inclination to drink, it never does him any good."

Pepy's Diary. 15 Mar 1664. In the evening Dr. Wiverley came again, and I sent for Mr. Powell (the Doctor and I having first by ourselves searched my brother (age 30) again at his privities, where he was as clear as ever he was born, and in the Doctor's opinion had been ever so), and we three alone discoursed the business, where the coxcomb did give us his simple reasons for what he had said, which the Doctor fully confuted, and left the fellow only saying that he should cease to report any such thing, and that what he had said was the best of his judgment from my brother's (age 30) words and a ulcer, as he supposed, in his mouth. I threatened him that I would have satisfaction if I heard any more such discourse, and so good night to them two, giving the Doctor a piece for his fee, but the other nothing. I to my brother (age 30) again, where Madam Turner (age 41) and her company, and Mrs. Croxton, my wife, and Mrs. Holding.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Mar 1664. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon comes Madam Turner (age 41) and her daughter The., her chief errand to tell me that she had got Dr. Wiverly, her Doctor, to search my brother's (age 30) mouth, where Mr. Powell says there is an ulcer, from thence he concludes that he hath had the pox. But the Doctor swears that there is not, nor ever was any, and my brother being very sensible, which I was glad to hear, he did talk with him about it, and he did wholly disclaim that ever he had the disease, or that ever he said to Powell that he had it. All which did put me into great comfort as to the reproach which was spread against him.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1664. So home to supper, and after looking over some business in my chamber I to bed to my wife, who continues in bed in some pain still. This day I have a great barrel of oysters given me by Mr. Barrow, as big as 16 of others, and I took it in the coach with me to Mrs. Turner's (age 41), and give them to her.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1664. Then back again with my cozen Norton to Mrs. Turner's (age 41), and there staid a while talking with Dr. Pepys, the puppy, whom I had no patience to hear.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1664. At last weary of him I got him away, and I to Mrs. Turner's (age 41), and there, though my heart is still heavy to think of my poor brother (deceased), yet I could give way to my fancy to hear Mrs. The. play upon the Harpsicon, though the musique did not please me neither.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1664. Thence home and trimmed myself, and then to the 'Change [Map], and told my uncle Wight (age 62) of my brother's (deceased) death, and so by coach to my cozen Turner's and there dined very well, but my wife.... in great pain we were forced to rise in some disorder, and in Mrs. Turner's (age 41) coach carried her home and put her to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Mar 1664. After office I to my brother's (deceased) again, and thence to Madam Turner's (age 41), in both places preparing things against to-morrow; and this night I have altered my resolution of burying him in the church yarde among my young brothers and sisters, and bury him in the church, in the middle isle, as near as I can to my mother's pew. This costs me 20s. more. This being all, home by coach, bringing my brother's (deceased) silver tankard for safety along with me, and so to supper, after writing to my father, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Mar 1664. Up betimes, and walked to my brother's (deceased), where a great while putting things in order against anon; then to Madam Turner's (age 41) and eat a breakfast there, and so to Wotton, my shoemaker, and there got a pair of shoes blacked on the soles against anon for me; so to my brother's (deceased) and to church, and with the grave-maker chose a place for my brother (deceased) to lie in, just under my mother's pew. But to see how a man's tombes are at the mercy of such a fellow, that for sixpence he would, (as his owne words were,) "I will justle them together but I will make room for him"; speaking of the fulness of the middle isle, where he was to lie; and that he would, for my father's sake, do my brother (deceased) that is dead all the civility he can; which was to disturb other corps that are not quite rotten, to make room for him; and methought his manner of speaking it was very remarkable; as of a thing that now was in his power to do a man a courtesy or not.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Mar 1664. Anon to church, walking out into the streete to the Conduit, and so across the streete, and had a very good company along with the corps. And being come to the grave as above, Dr. Pierson, the minister of the parish, did read the service for buriall: and so I saw my poor brother (deceased) laid into the grave; and so all broke up; and I and my wife and Madam Turner (age 41) and her family to my brother's (deceased), and by and by fell to a barrell of oysters, cake, and cheese, of Mr. Honiwood's, with him, in his chamber and below, being too merry for so late a sad work.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1664. That being done Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and I sat all the morning, and then I to the 'Change [Map], and there got away by pretence of business with my uncle Wight (age 62) to put off Creed, whom I had invited to dinner, and so home, and there found Madam Turner (age 41), her daughter The., Joyce Norton, my father and Mr. Honywood, and by and by come my uncle Wight (age 62) and aunt. This being my solemn feast for my cutting of the stone, it being now, blessed be God! this day six years since the time; and I bless God I do in all respects find myself free from that disease or any signs of it, more than that upon the least cold I continue to have pain in making water, by gathering of wind and growing costive, till which be removed I am at no ease, but without that I am very well. One evil more I have, which is that upon the least squeeze almost my cods begin to swell and come to great pain, which is very strange and troublesome to me, though upon the speedy applying of a poultice it goes down again, and in two days I am well again. Dinner not being presently ready I spent some time myself and shewed them a map of Tangier left this morning at my house by Creed, cut by our order, the Commissioners, and drawn by Jonas Moore (age 47), which is very pleasant, and I purpose to have it finely set out and hung up. Mrs. Hunt coming to see my wife by chance dined here with us.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1664. So home and to bed. This day Mrs. Turner (age 41) did lend me, as a rarity, a manuscript of one Mr. Wells, writ long ago, teaching the method of building a ship, which pleases me mightily. I was at it to-night, but durst not stay long at it, I being come to have a great pain and water in my eyes after candle-light.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Apr 1664. Thence homewards, calling at Madam Turner's (age 41), and thence set my wife down at my aunt Wight's (age 45) and I to my office till late, and then at to at night fetched her home, and so again to my office a little, and then to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Apr 1664. I home, and immediately dressing myself, by coach with my wife to my Lord Sandwich's (age 38), but they having dined we would not 'light but went to Mrs. Turner's (age 41), and there got something to eat, and thence after reading part of a good play, Mrs. The., my wife and I, in their coach to Hide Parke, where great plenty of gallants, and pleasant it was, only for the dust. Here I saw Mrs. Bendy, my Lady Spillman's faire daughter that was, who continues yet very handsome. Many others I saw with great content, and so back again to Mrs. Turner's (age 41), and then took a coach and home. I did also carry them into St. James's Park and shewed them the garden.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1664. Up and in Sir J. Minnes' (age 65) coach (alone with Mrs. Turner (age 41) as far as Paternoster Row [Map], where I set her down) to St. James's, and there did our business, and I had the good lucke to speak what pleased the Duke (age 31) about our great contract in hand with Sir W. Warren against Sir W. Batten (age 63), wherein the Duke (age 31) is very earnest for our contracting.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Dec 1664. Thence vexed home, and there by appointment comes my cozen Roger Pepys (age 47) and Mrs. Turner (age 41), and dined with me, and very merry we were. They staid all the afternoon till night, and then after I had discoursed an hour with Sir W. Warren plainly declaring my resolution to desert him if he goes on to join with Castle, who and his family I, for great provocation, love not, which he takes with some trouble, but will concur in everything with me, he says. Now I am loth, I confess, to lose him, he having been the best friend I have had ever in this office. So he being gone, we all, it being night, in Madam Turner's (age 41) coach to her house, there to see, as she tells us, how fat Mrs. The. is grown, and so I find her, but not as I expected, but mightily pleased I am to hear the mother commend her daughter Betty that she is like to be a great beauty, and she sets much by her.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1664. Thence to my cozen Scott's, and there met my cozen Roger Pepys (age 47), and Mrs. Turner (age 41), and The. and Joyce, and prated all the while, and so with the "corps" to church and heard a very fine sermon of the Parson of the parish, and so homeward with them in their coach, but finding it too late to go home with me, I took another coach and so home, and after a while at my office, home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Dec 1664. Thence, very much vexed to find myself so much troubled about other men's matters, I to Mrs. Turner's (age 41), in Salsbury Court, and with her a little, and carried her, the porter staying for me, our eagle, which she desired the other day, and we were glad to be rid of her, she fouling our house of office mightily. They are much pleased with her.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1665. Thence by coach home (to see Sir J. Minnes (age 65) first), who is still sick, and I doubt worse than he seems to be. Mrs. Turner (age 42) here took me into her closet, and there did give me a glass of most pure water, and shewed me her Rocke, which indeed is a very noble thing but a very bawble. So away to my office, where late, busy, and then home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Feb 1665. Up, and walked with my boy (whom, because of my wife's making him idle, I dare not leave at home) walked first to Salsbury Court, there to excuse my not being at home at dinner to Mrs. Turner (age 42), who I perceive is vexed, because I do not serve her in something against the great feasting for her [her husband] husband's (age 52) Reading1 in helping her to some good penn'eths, but I care not. She was dressing herself by the fire in her chamber, and there took occasion to show me her leg, which indeed is the finest I ever saw, and she not a little proud of it.

Note 1. On his appointment as Reader in Law.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Mar 1665. Thence to see Mrs. Turner (age 42), who takes it mighty ill I did not come to dine with the Reader, her [her husband] husband (age 52), which, she says, was the greatest feast that ever was yet kept by a Reader, and I believe it was well. But I am glad I did not go, which confirms her in an opinion that I am growne proud.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1665. I sent yesterday an invitation to Mrs. Turner (age 42) and her family to come to keep this day with me, which she granted, but afterward sent me word that it being Sunday and Easter day she desired to choose another and put off this. Which I was willing enough to do; and so put it off as to this day, and will leave it to my own convenience when to choose another, and perhaps shall escape a feast by it.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jun 1665. Thence, with my heart full of joy; home, and to my office a little; then to my Lady Pen's (age 41), where they are all joyed and not a little puffed up at the good successe of their father (age 44)1 and good service indeed is said to have been done by him. Had a great bonefire at the gate; and I with my Lady Pen's (age 41) people and others to Mrs. Turner's (age 42) great room, and then down into the streete. I did give the boys 4s. among them, and mighty merry.

Note 1. In the royal charter granted by Charles II in 1680 to William Penn for the government of his American province, to be styled Pennsylvania, special reference is made to "the memory and merits of Sir William Pen (age 44) in divers services, and particularly his conduct, courage, and discretion under our dearest brother, James, Duke of York (age 31), in that signal battle and victory fought and obtained against the Dutch fleet commanded by Heer van Opdam in 1665" ("Penn's Memorials of Sir W. Penn (age 44)", vol. ii., p. 359).

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jun 1665. So to the Old Exchange [Map], and there at my pretty seamstresses bought a pair of stockings of her husband, and so home, where by and by comes Mr. Honiwood and Mrs. Wilde, and Roger Pepys (age 48) and, after long time spent, Mrs. Turner (age 42), The. and Joyce. We had a very good venison pasty, this being instead of my stone-feast the last March, and very merry we were, and the more I know the more I like Mr. Honiwood's conversation.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Nov 1665. Up, and fitted myself for my journey down to the fleete, and sending my money and boy down by water to Eriffe, [Erith, Kent] I borrowed a horse of Mr. Boreman's son, and after having sat an houre laughing with my Lady Batten and Mrs. Turner (age 42), and eat and drank with them, I took horse and rode to Eriffe, where, after making a little visit to Madam Williams, who did give me information of W. Howe's having bought eight bags of precious stones taken from about the Dutch Vice-Admirall's neck, of which there were eight dyamonds which cost him £60,000 sterling, in India, and hoped to have made £2000 here for them. And that this is told by one that sold him one of the bags, which hath nothing but rubys in it, which he had for 35s.; and that it will be proved he hath made £125 of one stone that he bought. This she desired, and I resolved I would give my Lord Sandwich (age 40) notice of.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1666. Up by candlelight again, and wrote the greatest part of my business fair, and then to the office, and so home to dinner, and after dinner up and made an end of my fair writing it, and that being done, set two entering while to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), and there find Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and all his company, and Mr. Boreman and Mrs. Turner (age 43), but, above all, my dear Mrs. Knipp, with whom I sang, and in perfect pleasure I was to hear her sing, and especially her little Scotch song of "Barbary Allen"1 and to make our mirthe the completer, Sir J. Minnes (age 66) was in the highest pitch of mirthe, and his mimicall tricks, that ever I saw, and most excellent pleasant company he is, and the best mimique that ever I saw, and certainly would have made an excellent actor, and now would be an excellent teacher of actors.

Note 1. The Scottish ballad is entitled, "Sir John Grehme and Barbara Allan", and the English version, "Barbara Allen's Cruelty". Both are printed in Percy's "Reliques", Series III.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1666. He anon took leave and took Mrs. Barbary his niece home with him, and seems very thankful to me for the £10 I did give him for my wife's rent of his house, and I am sure I am beholding to him, for it was a great convenience to me, and then my wife home to London by water and I to the office till 8 at night, and so to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), thinking to have been merry, having appointed a meeting for Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and his company and Mrs. Knipp again, but whatever hindered I know not, but no company come, which vexed me because it disappointed me of the glut of mirthe I hoped for. However, good discourse with my Lord and merry, with Mrs. Williams's descants upon Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) and Mrs. Turner's (age 43) not coming. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Feb 1666. It being fast day I staid at home all day long to set things to rights in my chamber by taking out all my books, and putting my chamber in the same condition it was before the plague. But in the morning doing of it, and knocking up a nail I did bruise my left thumb so as broke a great deal of my flesh off, that it hung by a little. It was a sight frighted my wife, but I put some balsam of Mrs. Turner's (age 43) to it, and though in great pain, yet went on with my business, and did it to my full content, setting every thing in order, in hopes now that the worst of our fears are over as to the plague for the next year. Interrupted I was by two or three occasions this day to my great vexation, having this the only day I have been able to set apart for this work since my coming to town. At night to supper, weary, and to bed, having had the plasterers and joiners also to do some jobbs.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1666. Thence home with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) for discourse sake, and thence by Hackney coach home, and so my wife and I mighty pleasant discourse, supped and to bed. The great wound I had Wednesday last in my thumb having with once dressing by Mrs. Turner's (age 43) balsam been perfectly cured, whereas I did not hope to save my nail, whatever else ill it did give me. My wife and I are much thoughtfull now-a-days about Pall's coming up in order to a husband.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Feb 1666. Anon comes Mrs. Knipp to see my wife, who is gone out, so I fain to entertain her, and took her out by coach to look my wife at Mrs. Pierce's and Unthanke's, but find her not. So back again, and then my wife comes home, having been buying of things, and at home I spent all the night talking with this baggage, and teaching her my song of "Beauty retire", which she sings and makes go most rarely, and a very fine song it seems to be. She also entertained me with repeating many of her own and others' parts of the play-house, which she do most excellently; and tells me the whole practices of the play-house and players, and is in every respect most excellent company. So I supped, and was merry at home all the evening, and the rather it being my birthday, 33 years, for which God be praised that I am in so good a condition of healthe and estate, and every thing else as I am, beyond expectation, in all. So she to Mrs. Turner's (age 43) to lie, and we to bed. Mightily pleased to find myself in condition to have these people come about me and to be able to entertain them, and have the pleasure of their qualities, than which no man can have more in the world.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1666. In the evening being at Sir W. Batten's (age 65), stepped in (for I have not used to go thither a good while), I find my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Mrs. Williams, and they would of their own accord, though I had never obliged them (nor my wife neither) with one visit for many of theirs, go see my house and my wife; which I showed them and made them welcome with wine and China oranges (now a great rarity since the war, none to be had). There being also Captain Cocke (age 49) and Mrs. Turner (age 43), who had never been in my house since I come to the office before, and Mrs. Carcasse, wife of Mr. Carcasses. My house happened to be mighty clean, and did me great honour, and they mightily pleased with it.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Apr 1666. At noon dined alone, the girl Mercer taking physique can eat nothing, and W. Hewer (age 24) went forth to dinner. So up to my accounts again, and then comes Mrs. Mercer and fair Mrs. Turner (age 43), a neighbour of hers that my wife knows by their means, to visit me. I staid a great while with them, being taken with this pretty woman, though a mighty silly, affected citizen woman she is. Then I left them to come to me at supper anon, and myself out by coach to the old woman in Pannyer Alley for my ruled papers, and they are done, and I am much more taken with her black maid Nan.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Apr 1666. Thence called for my papers and so home, and there comes Mrs. Turner (age 43) and Mercer and supped with me, and well pleased I was with their company, but especially Mrs. Turner's (age 43), she being a very pretty woman of person and her face pretty good, the colour of her haire very fine and light. They staid with me talking till about eleven o'clock and so home, W. Hewer (age 24), who supped with me, leading them home. So I to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Apr 1666. Thence to Paul's Churchyarde, and there bespoke some new books, and so to my ruling woman's and there did see my work a doing, and so home and to my office a little, but was hindered of business I intended by being sent for to Mrs. Turner (age 43), who desired some discourse with me and lay her condition before me, which is bad and poor. Sir Thomas Harvey (age 40) intends again to have lodgings in her house, which she prays me to prevent if I can, which I promised.

Pepy's Diary. 09 May 1666. So I with them to Mrs. Turner's (age 43) and there sat with them a while, anon my wife sends for me, I come, and what was it but to scold at me and she would go abroad to take the ayre presently, that she would. So I left my company and went with her to Bow, but was vexed and spoke not one word to her all the way going nor coming, or being come home, but went up straight to bed. Half an hour after (she in the coach leaning on me as being desirous to be friends) she comes up mighty sicke with a fit of the cholique and in mighty pain and calls for me out of the bed; I rose and held her, she prays me to forgive her, and in mighty pain we put her to bed, where the pain ceased by and by, and so had some asparagus to our bed side for supper and very kindly afterward to sleepe and good friends in the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 10 May 1666. So up, and to the office, where all the morning. At noon home to dinner and there busy all the afternoon till past six o'clock, and then abroad with my wife by coach, who is now at great ease, her cheeke being broke inward. We took with us Mrs. Turner (age 43), who was come to visit my wife just as we were going out. A great deale of tittle tattle discourse to little purpose, I finding her, though in other things a very discreete woman, as very a gossip speaking of her neighbours as any body. Going out towards Hackney by coach for the ayre, the silly coachman carries us to Shoreditch [Map], which was so pleasant a piece of simplicity in him and us, that made us mighty merry.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jun 1666. By and by comes in our faire neighbour, Mrs. Turner (age 43), and two neighbour's daughters, Mrs. Tite, the elder of whom, a long red-nosed silly jade; the younger, a pretty black girle, and the merriest sprightly jade that ever I saw. With them idled away the whole night till twelve at night at the bonefire in the streets. Some of the people thereabouts going about with musquets, and did give me two or three vollies of their musquets, I giving them a crowne to drink; and so home. Mightily pleased with this happy day's newes, and the more, because confirmed by Sir Daniel Harvy (age 34), who was in the whole fight with the Generall, and tells me that there appear but thirty-six in all of the Dutch fleete left at the end of the voyage when they run home. The joy of the City was this night exceeding great.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1666. In the evening comes W. Batelier and his sister, and my wife, and fair Mrs. Turner (age 43) into the garden, and there we walked, and then with my Lady Pen (age 42) and Pegg (age 15) in a-doors, and eat and were merry, and so pretty late broke up, and to bed. The guns of the Tower [Map] going off, and there being bonefires also in the street for this late good successe.

Great Fire of London

Pepy's Diary. 04 Sep 1666. This afternoon, sitting melancholy with Sir W. Pen (age 45) in our garden, and thinking of the certain burning of this office, without extraordinary means, I did propose for the sending up of all our workmen from Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Deptford, Kent [Map] yards (none whereof yet appeared), and to write to Sir W. Coventry (age 38) to have the Duke of Yorke's (age 32) permission to pull down houses, rather than lose this office, which would, much hinder, the King's business. So Sir W. Pen (age 45) he went down this night, in order to the sending them up to-morrow morning; and I wrote to Sir W. Coventry (age 38) about the business, but received no answer. This night Mrs. Turner (age 43) (who, poor woman, was removing her goods all this day, good goods into the garden, and knows not how to dispose of them), and her husband supped with my wife and I at night, in the office; upon a shoulder of mutton from the cook's, without any napkin or any thing, in a sad manner, but were merry. Only now and then walking into the garden, and saw how horridly the sky looks, all on a fire in the night, was enough to put us out of our wits; and, indeed, it was extremely dreadful, for it looks just as if it was at us; and the whole heaven on fire. I after supper walked in the darke down to Tower-streete, and there saw it all on fire, at the Trinity House, Deptford [Map] on that side, and the Dolphin Taverne on this side, which was very near us; and the fire with extraordinary vehemence.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1666. Thence took my wife home to dinner, and then to the office, where Mr. Hater all the day putting in order and entering in a book all the measures that this account of the Navy hath been made up by, and late at night to Mrs. Turner's (age 43), where she had got my wife and Lady Pen (age 42) and Pegg (age 15), and supped, and after, supper and the rest of the company by design gone, Mrs. Turner (age 43) and her husband did lay their case to me about their lodgings, Sir J. Minnes (age 67) being now gone wholly to his owne, and now, they being empty, they doubt Sir T. Harvy or Lord Bruncker may look after the lodgings. I did give them the best advice, poor people, that I could, and would do them any kindnesse, though it is strange that now they should have ne'er a friend of Sir W. Batten (age 65) or Sir W. Pen (age 45) to trust to but me, that they have disobliged.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Nov 1666. I to dinner and thence to my chamber to read, and so to the office (it being a fast day and so a holiday), and then to Mrs. Turner's (age 43), at her request to speake and advise about Sir Thomas Harvy's (age 41) coming to lodge there, which I think must be submitted to, and better now than hereafter, when he gets more ground, for I perceive he intends to stay by it, and begins to crow mightily upon his late being at the payment of tickets; but a coxcombe he is and will never be better in the business of the Navy.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Nov 1666. Thence to the Swan [Map], having sent for some burnt claret, and there by and by comes Doll Lane, and she and I sat and drank and talked a great while, among other things about her sister's being brought to bed, and I to be godfather to the girle. I did tumble Doll, and do almost what I would with her, and so parted, and I took coach, and to the New Exchange, buying a neat's tongue by the way, thinking to eat it out of town, but there I find Burroughs in company of an old woman, an aunt of hers, whom she could not leave for half an hour. So after buying a few baubles to while away time, I down to Westminster, and there into the House of Parliament, where, at a great Committee, I did hear, as long as I would, the great case against my Lord Mordaunt (age 40), for some arbitrary proceedings of his against one Taylor, whom he imprisoned, and did all the violence to imaginable, only to get him to give way to his abusing his daughter. Here was Mr. Sawyer, my old chamber-fellow, a counsel against my Lord; and I am glad to see him in so good play. Here I met, before the committee sat, with my cozen Roger Pepys (age 49), the first time I have spoke with him this parliament. He hath promised to come, and bring Madam Turner (age 43) with him, who is come to towne to see the City, but hath lost all her goods of all kinds in Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, Sir William Turner (age 51) having not endeavoured, in her absence, to save one penny, to dine with me on Friday next, of which I am glad. Roger bids me to help him to some good rich widow; for he is resolved to go, and retire wholly, into the country; for, he says, he is confident we shall be all ruined very speedily, by what he sees in the State, and I am much in his mind.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Nov 1666. Thence home and there comes my Lady Pen (age 42), Pegg (age 15), and Mrs. Turner (age 43), and played at cards and supped with us, and were pretty merry, and Pegg (age 15) with me in my closet a good while, and did suffer me 'a la baiser mouche et toucher ses cosas' [Note. to kiss her mouth and touch the things] upon her breast, wherein I had great pleasure, and so spent the evening and then broke up, and I to bed, my mind mightily pleased with the day's entertainment.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1666. Thence to Westminster Hall [Map] and the Abbey, thinking as I had appointed to have met Mrs. Burroughs there, but not meeting her I home, and just overtook my cozen Roger Pepys (age 49), Mrs. Turner (age 43), Dicke, and Joyce Norton, coming by invitation to dine with me. These ladies I have not seen since before the plague. Mrs. Turner (age 43) is come to towne to look after her things in her house, but all is lost. She is quite weary of the country, but cannot get her husband to let her live here any more, which troubles her mightily. She was mighty angry with me, that in all this time I never writ to her, which I do think and take to myself as a fault, and which I have promised to mend.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Dec 1666. After dinner my wife and I by coach to St. Clement's Church [Map], to Mrs. Turner's (age 43) lodgings, hard by, to take our leaves of her. She is returning into the North to her children, where, I perceive, her [her husband] husband (age 53) hath clearly got the mastery of her, and she is likely to spend her days there, which for her sake I am a little sorry for, though for his it is but fit she should live where he hath a mind. Here were several people come to see and take leave of her, she going to-morrow: among others, my Lady Mordant (age 28), which was [her daughter] Betty Turner (age 13), a most homely widow, but young, and pretty rich, and good natured.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1667. Thence to the office a little while longer, and so home, where W. Hewer's (age 25) mother was, and Mrs. Turner (age 44), our neighbour, and supped with us. His mother a well-favoured old little woman, and a good woman, I believe. After we had supped, and merry, we parted late, Mrs. Turner (age 44) having staid behind to talk a little about her lodgings, which now my Lord Bruncker (age 47) upon Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) surrendering do claim, but I cannot think he will come to live in them so as to need to put them out.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1667. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) to White Hall, and there to the Duke of York (age 33), and did our usual business. Having done there, I to St. James's, to see the organ Mrs. Turner (age 44) told me of the other night, of my late Lord Aubigney's; and I took my Lord Bruncker (age 47) with me, he being acquainted with my present Lord Almoner, Mr. Howard (age 38), brother to the Duke of Norfolke (age 38); so he and I thither and did see the organ, but I do not like it, it being but a bauble, with a virginal! joining to it: so I shall not meddle with it.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jan 1667. Then to supper in the office, a cold, good supper, and wondrous merry. Here was Mrs. Turner (age 44) also, but the poor woman sad about her lodgings, and Mrs. Markham: after supper to dancing again and singing, and so continued till almost three in the morning, and then, with extraordinary pleasure, broke up only towards morning, Knipp fell a little ill, and so my wife home with her to put her to bed, and we continued dancing and singing; and, among other things, our Mercer unexpectedly did happen to sing an Italian song I know not, of which they two sung the other two parts to, that did almost ravish me, and made me in love with her more than ever with her singing.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jan 1667. At noon home to dinner, and after dinner to the office again, and there all the afternoon, and at night poor Mrs. Turner (age 44) come and walked in the garden for my advice about her [her husband] husband (age 54) and her relating to my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) late proceedings with them. I do give her the best I can, but yet can lay aside some ends of my own in what advice I do give her. So she being gone I to make an end of my letters, and so home to supper and to bed, Balty (age 27) lodging here with my brother, he being newly returned from mustering in the river.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1667. By and by comes Mrs. Turner (age 44) to me, to make her complaint of her sad usage she receives from my Lord Bruncker (age 47), that he thinks much she hath not already got another house, though he himself hath employed her night and day ever since his first mention of the matter, to make part of her house ready for him, as he ordered, and promised she should stay till she had fitted herself; by which and what discourse I do remember he had of the business before Sir W. Coventry (age 39) on Sunday last I perceive he is a rotten-hearted, false man as any else I know, even as Sir W. Pen (age 45) himself, and, therefore, I must beware of him accordingly, and I hope I shall. I did pity the woman with all my heart, and gave her the best council I could; and so, falling to other discourse, I made her laugh and merry, as sad as she came to me; so that I perceive no passion in a woman can be lasting long; and so parted and I home, and there teaching my girle Barker part of my song "It is decreed", which she will sing prettily, and so after supper to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Feb 1667. After something of that done, and dined, I to the office, where all the afternoon till night busy. At night, having done all my office matters, I home, and my brother and I to go on with my catalogue, and so to supper. Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to me this night again to condole her condition and the ill usage she receives from my Lord Bruncker (age 47), which I could never have expected from him, and shall be a good caution to me while I live.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Feb 1667. After dinner he went away, and awhile after them Michell and his wife, whom I love mightily, and then I to my chamber there to my Tangier accounts, which I had let run a little behind hand, but did settle them very well to my satisfaction, but it cost me sitting up till two in the morning, and the longer by reason that our neighbour, Mrs. Turner (age 44), poor woman, did come to take her leave of us, she being to quit her house to-morrow to my Lord Bruncker (age 47), who hath used her very unhandsomely. She is going to lodgings, and do tell me very odde stories how Mrs. Williams do receive the applications of people, and hath presents, and she is the hand that receives all, while my Lord Bruncker (age 47) do the business, which will shortly come to be loud talk if she continues here, I do foresee, and bring my Lord no great credit. So having done all my business, to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Feb 1667. So after dinner to the office, and there busy and did much business, and late at it. Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to me to hear how matters went; I told her of our getting rent for a house for her. She did give me account of this wedding to-day, its being private being imputed to its being just before Lent, and so in vain to make new clothes till Easter, that they might see the fashions as they are like to be this summer; which is reason good enough. Mrs. Turner (age 44) tells me she hears [Sir W. Pen (age 45)] gives £4500 or 4000 with her. They are gone to bed, so I wish them much sport, and home to supper and to bed. They own the treaty for a peace publickly at Court, and the Commissioners providing themselves to go over as soon as a passe comes for them.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Feb 1667. So home and to the office a while, and then home to supper, where Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to us, and sat and talked. Poor woman, I pity her, but she is very cunning. She concurs with me in the falseness of Sir W. Pen's (age 45) friendship, and she tells pretty storms of my Lord Bruncker (age 47) since he come to our end of the town, of people's applications to Mrs. Williams.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1667. So home and to the office, where late, and then home to supper and bed. This evening Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to my office, and did walk an hour with me in the garden, telling me stories how Sir Edward Spragge (age 47) hath lately made love to our neighbour, a widow, Mrs. Hollworthy, who is a woman of estate, and wit and spirit, and do contemn him the most, and sent him away with the greatest scorn in the world; she tells me also odd stories how the parish talks of Sir W. Pen's (age 45) family, how poorly they clothe their daughter (age 16) so soon after marriage, and do say that Mr. Lowther (age 26) was married once before, and some such thing there hath been, whatever the bottom of it is. But to think of the clatter they make with his coach, and his owne fine cloathes, and yet how meanly they live within doors, and nastily, and borrowing everything of neighbours is a most shitten thing.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Apr 1667. Up, and troubled with Mr. Carcasse's coming to speak with me, which made me give him occasion to fall into a heat, and he began to be ill-mannered to me, which made me angry. He gone, I to Sir W. Pen (age 45) about the business of Mrs. Turner's (age 44) son to keep his ship in employment, but so false a fellow as Sir W. Pen (age 45) is I never did nor hope shall ever know again.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Apr 1667. So home and to my chamber about sending an express to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] about Balty's (age 27) money, and then comes Mrs. Turner (age 44) to enquire after her son's business, which goes but bad, which led me to show her how false Sir W. Pen (age 45) is to her, whereupon she told me his obligations to her, and promises to her, and how a while since he did show himself dissatisfied in her son's coming to the table and applying himself to me, which is a good nut, and a nut I will make use of. She gone I to other business in my chamber, and then to supper and to bed. The Swede's Embassadors and our Commissioners are making all the haste they can over to the treaty for peace, and I find at Court, and particularly Lord Bellasses (age 52), says there will be a peace, and it is worth remembering what Sir W. Coventry (age 39) did tell me (as a secret though) that whereas we are afeard Harman's (age 42) fleete to the West Indys will not be got out before the Dutch come and block us up, we shall have a happy pretext to get out our ships under pretence of attending the Embassadors and Commissioners, which is a very good, but yet a poor shift.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1667. So home and to the office a little, and then to Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where he tells me how he hath found his lady's jewels again, which have been so long lost, and a servant imprisoned and arraigned, and they were in her closet under a china cup, where he hath servants will swear they did look in searching the house; but Mrs. Turner (age 44) and I, and others, do believe that they were only disposed of by my Lady, in case she had died, to some friends of hers, and now laid there again.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Apr 1667. Set us down, so my wife and I into the garden, a fine moonshine evening, and there talking, and among other things she tells me that she finds by W. Hewer (age 25) that my people do observe my minding my pleasure more than usual, which I confess, and am ashamed of, and so from this day take upon me to leave it till Whit-Sunday. While we were sitting in the garden comes Mrs. Turner (age 44) to advise about her son, the Captain, when I did give her the best advice I could, to look out for some land employment for him, a peace being at hand, when few ships will be employed and very many, and these old Captains, to be provided for. Then to other talk, and among the rest about Sir W. Pen's (age 45) being to buy Wansted House of Sir Robert Brookes (age 30), but has put him off again, and left him the other day to pay for a dinner at a tavern, which she says our parishioner, Mrs. Hollworthy, talks of; and I dare be hanged if ever he could mean to buy that great house, that knows not how to furnish one that is not the tenth part so big.

Pepy's Diary. 21 May 1667. Mrs. Turner (age 44) says she do believe their coming here is only out of a belief of getting purchase by it, and that their servants (which was wittily said of her touching his clerks) do act only as privateers, no purchase, no pay. And in my conscience she is in the right. Then we fell to talk of Sir W. Pen (age 46), and his family and rise. She [Mrs. Turner (age 44)] says that he was a pityfull [fellow] when she first knew them; that his lady (age 43) was one of the sourest, dirty women, that ever she saw; that they took two chambers, one over another, for themselves and child, in Tower Hill [Map]; that for many years together they eat more meals at her house than at their own; did call brothers and sisters the husbands and wives; that her husband was godfather to one, and she godmother to another (this Margaret) of their children, by the same token that she was fain to write with her own hand a letter to Captain Twiddy, to stand for a godfather for her; that she brought my Lady, who then was a dirty slattern, with her stockings hanging about her heels, so that afterwards the people of the whole Hill did say that Mrs. Turner (age 44) had made Mrs. Pen (age 43) a gentlewoman, first to the knowledge of my Lady Vane (age 50), Sir Henry's lady, and him to the knowledge of most of the great people that then he sought to, and that in short his rise hath been his giving of large bribes, wherein, and she agrees with my opinion and knowledge before therein, he is very profuse. This made him General; this got him out of the Tower when he was in; and hath brought him into what he is now, since the King's coming in: that long ago, indeed, he would drink the King's health privately with Mr. Turner; but that when he saw it fit to turn Roundhead, and was offered by Mr. Turner to drink the King's health, he answered "No"; he was changed, and now, he that would make him drink the King's health, or any health but the Protector's and the State's, or to that purpose, he would be the first man should sheath his sword in his guts. That at the King's coming in, he did send for her husband, and told him what a great man Sir W. Coventry (age 39) was like to be, and that he having all the records in his hands of the Navy, if he would transcribe what was of most present use of the practice of the Navy, and give them him to give Sir W. Coventry (age 39) from him, it would undoubtedly do his business of getting him a principal officer's place; that her husband was at £5 charge to get these presently writ; that Sir W. Pen (age 46) did give them Sir W. Coventry (age 39) as from himself, which did set him up with W. Coventry (age 39), and made him what he is, and never owned any thing of Mr. Turner in them; by which he left him in the lurch, though he did promise the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) to do all that was possible, and made no question of Mr. Turner's being what he desired; and when afterwards, too, did propose to him the getting of the Purveyor's place for him, he did tell Mr. Turner it was necessary to present Sir W. Coventry (age 39) 100 pieces, which he did, and W. Coventry took 80 of them: so that he was W. Coventry's mere broker, as Sir W. Batten (age 66) and my Lady did once tell my Lady Duchess of Albemarle (age 48), in the case of Mr. Falconer, whom W. Pen (age 46) made to give W. Coventry £200 for his place of Clerk of the Rope Yard of Woolwich, Kent [Map], and to settle £80 a year upon his daughter Pegg (age 16), after the death of his wife, and a gold watch presently to his wife.

Pepy's Diary. 21 May 1667. This morning the Captain come from Holland did tell us at the board what I have said he reported yesterday. This evening after I come from the office Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to see my wife and me, and sit and talk with us, and so, my wife not being well and going to bed, Mrs. Turner (age 44) and I sat up till 12 at night talking alone in my chamber, and most of our discourse was of our neighbours. As to my Lord Bruncker (age 47), she says how Mrs. Griffin, our housekeeper's wife, hath it from his maid, that comes to her house often, that they are very poor; that the other day Mrs. Williams was fain to send a jewell to pawn; that their maid hath said herself that she hath got £50 since she come thither, and £17 by the payment of one bill; that they have a most lewd and nasty family here in the office, but Mrs. Turner (age 44) do tell me that my Lord hath put the King (age 36) to infinite charge since his coming thither in alterations, and particularly that Mr. Harper at Deptford, Kent [Map] did himself tell her that my Lord hath had of Foly, the ironmonger, £50 worth in locks and keys for his house, and that it is from the fineness of them, having some of £4 and £5 a lock, such as is in the Duke's closet; that he hath several of these; that he do keep many of her things from her of her own goods, and would have her bring a bill into the office for them; that Mrs. Griffin do say that he do not keep Mrs. Williams now for love, but need, he having another whore that he keeps in Covent Garden [Map]; that they do owe money everywhere almost for every thing, even Mrs. Shipman for her butter and cheese about £3, and after many demands cannot get it.

Pepy's Diary. 21 May 1667. Mrs. Turner (age 44) do tell me that my Lady and Pegg (age 16) have themselves owned to her that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) and Sir W. Pen (age 46) had private marks to write to one another by, that when they in appearance writ a fair letter in behalf of anybody, that they had a little mark to show they meant it only in shew: this, these silly people did confess themselves of him. She says that their son, Mr. William Pen (age 22), did tell her that his father did observe the commanders did make their addresses to me and applications, but they should know that his father should be the chief of the office, and that she hath observed that Sir W. Pen (age 46) never had a kindness to her son, since W. Pen told her son that he had applied himself to me. That his rise hath been by her and her husband's means, and that it is a most inconceivable thing how this man can have the face to use her and her family with the neglect that he do them. That he was in the late war a most devilish plunderer, and that got him his estate, which he hath in Ireland, and nothing else, and that he hath always been a very liberal man in his bribes, that upon his coming into this part of the Controller's business wherein he is, he did send for T. Willson and told him how against his knowledge he was put in, and had so little wit as to say to him, "This will make the pot boyle, will it not, Mr. Willson? will it not make the pot boyle?" and do offer him to come in and do his business for him, and he would reward him. This Mr. Willson did come and tell her presently, he having been their servant, and to this day is very faithful to them. That her husband's not being forward to make him a bill for Rere Admirall's pay and Generall's pay both at the same time after he was first made Generall did first give him occasion of keeping a distance from him, since which they have never been great friends, Pen having by degrees been continually growing higher% and Higher, till now that he do wholly slight them and use them only as servants. Upon the whole, she told me stories enough to confirm me that he is the most false fellow that ever was born of woman, and that so she thinks and knows him to be.

Pepy's Diary. 28 May 1667. After dinner my wife away down with Jane and W. Hewer (age 25) to Woolwich, Kent [Map], in order to a little ayre and to lie there to-night, and so to gather May-dew to-morrow morning1, which Mrs. Turner (age 44) hath taught her as the only thing in the world to wash her face with; and I am contented with it. Presently comes Creed, and he and I by water to Fox-Hall, and there walked in Spring Garden. A great deal of company, and the weather and garden pleasant: that it is very pleasant and cheap going thither, for a man may go to spend what he will, or nothing, all is one. But to hear the nightingale and other birds, and here fiddles, and there a harp, and here a Jew's trump, and here laughing, and there fine people walking, is mighty divertising. Among others, there were two pretty women alone, that walked a great while, which being discovered by some idle gentlemen, they would needs take them up; but to see the poor ladies how they were put to it to run from them, and they after them, and sometimes the ladies put themselves along with other company, then the other drew back; at last, the last did get off out of the house, and took boat and away. I was troubled to see them abused so; and could have found in my heart, as little desire of fighting as I have, to have protected the ladies.

Note 1. If we are to credit the following paragraph, extracted from the "Morning Post" of May 2nd, 1791, the virtues of May dew were then still held in some estimation; for it records that "on the day preceding, according to annual and superstitious custom, a number of persons went into the fields, and bathed their faces with the dew on the grass, under the idea that it would render them beautiful" (Hone's "Every Day Book", vol. ii., p. 611). Aubrey speaks of May dew as "a great dissolvent" ("Miscellanies", p. 183). B.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jun 1667. In the evening sent for home, and there I find my Lady Pen (age 43) and Mrs. Lowther, and Mrs. Turner (age 44) and my wife eating some victuals, and there I sat and laughed with them a little, and so to the office again, and in the evening walked with my wife in the garden, and did give Sir W. Pen (age 46) at his lodgings (being just come from Deptford, Kent [Map] from attending the dispatch of the fire-ships there) an account of what passed the other day at Council touching Commissioner Pett (age 56), and so home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jul 1667. At noon home to dinner, and after dinner my wife and Jane (mighty fine the girle) to go to see Jane's old mistress, who was to see her, and did see my wife the other day, and it is pleasant to hear with what kindness her old mistress speaks of this girle, and how she would still have her, and how the wench cried when she told her that she must come to her old mistress my wife. They gone, I to my chamber, and there dallied a little with my maid Nell.... [Missing text 'to touch her thing, but nothing more'] and so to the office where busy till night, and then comes Mrs. Turner (age 44), and walks with me in the garden to talk with me about her husband's business, and to tell me how she hears at the other end of the town how bad our office is spoken of by the King (age 37) and Prince (age 47) and Duke of Albemarle (age 58), and that there is not a good word said of any of us but of me; and me they all do speak mightily of, which, whether true or no, I am mighty glad to hear, but from all put together that I hear from other people, I am likely to pass as well as anybody. So, she gone, comes my wife and to walk in the garden, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) being still ill and so keeping us from singing, and by and by Sir W. Pen (age 46) come and walked with us and gave us a bottle of Syder, and so we home to supper and to bed. This day I am told that poor Tooker is dead, a very painfull poor man as ever I knew.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jul 1667. So home, and resolved upon going to Epsum tomorrow, only for ayre, and got Mrs. Turner (age 44) to go with us, and so home and to supper (after having been at the office) and to bed. It is an odd and sad thing to say, that though this be a peace worse than we had before, yet every body's fear almost is, that the Dutch will not stand by their promise, now the King (age 37) hath consented to all they would have. And yet no wise man that I meet with, when he comes to think of it, but wishes, with all his heart, a war; but that the King (age 37) is not a man to be trusted with the management of it. It was pleasantly said by a man in this City, a stranger, to one that told him that the peace was concluded, "Well", says he, "and have you a peace?"-"Yes", says the other.-"Why, then", says he, "hold your peace!" partly reproaching us with the disgracefulness of it, that it is not fit to be mentioned; and next, that we are not able to make the Dutch keep it, when they have a mind to break it. Sir Thomas Crew (age 43) yesterday, speaking of the King of France (age 28), how great a man he is, why, says he, all the world thought that when the last Pope died, there would have been such bandying between the Crowns of France and Spain, whereas, when he was asked what he would have his ministers at Rome do, why, says he, let them choose who they will; if the Pope will do what is fit, the Pope and I will be friends. If he will not, I will take a course with him: therefore, I will not trouble myself; and thereupon the election was despatched in a little time-I think in a day, and all ended1.

Note 1. Of Clement IX., Giulio Rispogliosi, elected June 20th, 1667, N.S. He was succeeded by Clement X. in 1670.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1667. Anon it grew dark, and as it grew dark we had the pleasure to see several glow-wormes, which was mighty pretty, but my foot begins more and more to pain me, which Mrs. Turner (age 44), by keeping her warm hand upon it, did much ease; but so that when we come home, which was just at eleven at night, I was not able to walk from the lane's end to my house without being helped, which did trouble me, and therefore to bed presently, but, thanks be to God, found that I had not been missed, nor any business happened in my absence.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1667. So to our coach, and through Mr. Minnes's wood, and looked upon Mr. Evelyn's (age 50) house; and so over the common, and through Epsum towne to our inne, in the way stopping a poor woman with her milk-pail, and in one of my gilt tumblers did drink our bellyfulls of milk, better than any creame; and so to our inne, and there had a dish of creame, but it was sour, and so had no pleasure in it; and so paid our reckoning, and took coach, it being about seven at night, and passed and saw the people walking with their wives and children to take the ayre, and we set out for home, the sun by and by going down, and we in the cool of the evening all the way with much pleasure home, talking and pleasing ourselves with the pleasure of this day's work, Mrs. Turner (age 44) mightily pleased with my resolution, which, I tell her, is never to keep a country-house, but to keep a coach, and with my wife on the Saturday to go sometimes for a day to this place, and then quit to another place; and there is more variety and as little charge, and no trouble, as there is in a country-house.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1667. Lord's Day. Up, and my wife, a little before four, and to make us ready; and by and by Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to us, by agreement, and she and I staid talking below, while my wife dressed herself, which vexed me that she was so long about it keeping us till past five o'clock before she was ready. She ready; and, taking some bottles of wine, and beer, and some cold fowle with us into the coach, we took coach and four horses, which I had provided last night, and so away.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1667. Here W. Hewer's (age 25) horse broke loose, and we had the sport to see him taken again. Then I carried them to see my cozen [her father] Pepys's house, and 'light, and walked round about it, and they like it, as indeed it deserves, very well, and is a pretty place; and then I walked them to the wood hard by, and there got them in the thickets till they had lost themselves, and I could not find the way into any of the walks in the wood, which indeed are very pleasant, if I could have found them. At last got out of the wood again; and I, by leaping down the little bank, coming out of the wood, did sprain my right foot, which brought me great present pain, but presently, with walking, it went away for the present, and so the women and W. Hewer (age 25) and I walked upon the Downes, where a flock of sheep was; and the most pleasant and innocent sight that ever I saw in my life-we find a shepherd and his little boy reading, far from any houses or sight of people, the Bible to him; so I made the boy read to me, which he did, with the forced tone that children do usually read, that was mighty pretty, and then I did give him something, and went to the father, and talked with him; and I find he had been a servant in my cozen Pepys's house, and told me what was become of their old servants. He did content himself mightily in my liking his boy's reading, and did bless God for him, the most like one of the old patriarchs that ever I saw in my life, and it brought those thoughts of the old age of the world in my mind for two or three days after. We took notice of his woolen knit stockings of two colours mixed, and of his shoes shod with iron shoes, both at the toe and heels, and with great nails in the soles of his feet, which was mighty pretty: and, taking notice of them, "Why", says the poor man, "the downes, you see, are full of stones, and we are faine to shoe ourselves thus; and these", says he, "will make the stones fly till they sing before me". I did give the poor man something, for which he was mighty thankful, and I tried to cast stones with his horne crooke. He values his dog mightily, that would turn a sheep any way which he would have him, when he goes to fold them: told me there was about eighteen scoare sheep in his flock, and that he hath four shillings a week the year round for keeping of them: so we posted thence with mighty pleasure in the discourse we had with this poor man, and Mrs. Turner (age 44), in the common fields here, did gather one of the prettiest nosegays that ever I saw in my life.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jul 1667. So as I was not able to go to-day to wait on the Duke of York (age 33) with my fellows, but was forced in bed to write the particulars for their discourse there, and kept my bed all day, and anon comes Mrs. Turner (age 44), and new-dressed my foot, and did it so, that I was at much ease presently, and so continued all day, so as I slept much and well in the daytime, and in the evening rose and eat something, where our poor Jane very sad for the death of her poor brother, who hath left a wife and two small children. I did give her 20s. in money, and what wine she needed, for the burying him. This evening come to see me Pelling, and we did sing together, and he sings well indeed, and after supper I was willing to go to bed to ease my foot again, which I did, and slept well all night.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Aug 1667. At noon my wife and I dined at Sir W. Pen's (age 46), only with Mrs. Turner (age 44) and her [her husband] husband (age 54), on a damned venison pasty, that stunk like a devil. However, I did not know it till dinner was done. We had nothing but only this, and a leg of mutton, and a pullet or two. Mrs. Markham was here, with her great belly. I was very merry, and after dinner, upon a motion of the women, I was got to go to the play with them-the first I have seen since before the Dutch coming upon our coast, and so to the King's house, to see "The Custome of the Country". The house mighty empty-more than ever I saw it-and an ill play. After the play, we into the house, and spoke with Knipp, who went abroad with us by coach to the Neat Houses in the way to Chelsy; and there, in a box in a tree, we sat and sang, and talked and eat; my wife out of humour, as she always is, when this woman is by. So, after it was dark, we home. Set Knepp down at home, who told us the story how Nell is gone from the King's house, and is kept by my Lord Buckhurst (age 24).

Pepy's Diary. 01 Aug 1667. Then we home, the gates of the City shut, it being so late: and at Newgate we find them in trouble, some thieves having this night broke open prison [Map]. So we through, and home; and our coachman was fain to drive hard from two or three fellows, which he said were rogues, that he met at the end of Blow-bladder Street, next Cheapside. So set Mrs. Turner (age 44) home, and then we home, and I to the Office a little; and so home and to bed, my wife in an ill humour still.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Aug 1667. After dinner my wife abroad with Mrs. Turner (age 44), and I to the office, where busy all the afternoon, and in the evening by coach to St. James's, and there met Sir W. Coventry (age 39); and he and I walked in the Park an hour. And then to his chamber, where he read to me the heads of the late great dispute between him and the rest of the Commissioners of the Treasury, and our new Treasurer of the Navy where they have overthrown him the last Wednesday, in the great dispute touching his having the payment of the Victualler, which is now settled by Council that he is not to have it and, indeed, they have been most just, as well as most severe and bold, in the doing this against a man of his quality; but I perceive he do really make no difference between any man. He tells me this day it is supposed the peace is ratified at Bredah, and all that matter over. We did talk of many retrenchments of charge of the Navy which he will put in practice, and every where else; though, he tells me, he despairs of being able to do what ought to be done for the saving of the Kingdom, which I tell him, as indeed all the world is almost in hopes of, upon the proceeding of these gentlemen for the regulating of the Treasury, it being so late, and our poverty grown so great, that they want where to set their feet, to begin to do any thing.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1667. Lord's Day. Up by four o'clock, and ready with Mrs. Turner (age 44) to take coach before five; which we did, and set on our journey, and got to the Wells at Barnett [Map] by seven o'clock, and there found many people a-drinking; but the morning is a very cold morning, so as we were very cold all the way in the coach. Here we met Joseph Batelier, and I talked with him, and here was W. Hewer (age 25) also, and his uncle Steventon: so, after drinking three glasses and the women nothing, we back by coach to Barnett, where to the Red Lyon, where we 'light, and went up into the great Room, and there drank, and eat some of the best cheese-cakes that ever I eat in my life, and so took coach again, and W. Hewer (age 25) on horseback with us, and so to Hatfield, Hertfordshire, to the inn, next my Lord Salisbury's house, and there rested ourselves, and drank, and bespoke dinner; and so to church, it being just church-time, and there we find my Lord and my Lady Sands and several fine ladies of the family, and a great many handsome faces and genteel persons more in the church, and did hear a most excellent good sermon, which pleased me mightily, and very devout; it being upon, the signs of saving grace, where it is in a man, and one sign, which held him all this day, was, that where that grace was, there is also the grace of prayer, which he did handle very finely. In this church lies the former Lord of Salisbury, Cecil, buried in a noble tomb.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Aug 1667. Walk back home and to our own church, where a dull sermon and our church empty of the best sort of people, they being at their country houses, and so home, and there dined with me Mr. Turner and his daughter [her daughter] Betty (age 14)1. Her mother should, but they were invited to Sir J. Minnes (age 68), where she dined and the others here with me. Betty is grown a fine lady as to carriage and discourse. I and my wife are mightily pleased with her. We had a good haunch of venison, powdered and boiled, and a good dinner and merry.

Note 1. Betty Turner (age 14), who is frequently mentioned after this date, appears to have been a daughter of [her husband] Serjeant John Turner (age 54) and his wife Jane (age 44), and younger sister of [her daughter] Theophila Turner (age 15) (see January 4th, 6th, 1668-69).

Pepy's Diary. 19 Aug 1667. Soon as the play done I home, and there busy till night, and then comes Mr. Moore to me only to discourse with me about some general things touching the badness of the times, how ill they look, and he do agree with most people that I meet with, that we shall fall into a commonwealth in a few years, whether we will or no; for the charge of a monarchy is such as the Kingdom cannot be brought to bear willingly, nor are things managed so well nowadays under it, as heretofore. He says every body do think that there is something extraordinary that keeps us so long from the news of the peace being ratified, which the King (age 37) and the Duke of York (age 33) have expected these six days. He gone, my wife and I and Mrs. Turner (age 44) walked in the garden a good while till 9 at night, and then parted, and I home to supper and to read a little (which I cannot refrain, though I have all the reason in the world to favour my eyes, which every day grow worse and worse by over-using them), and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1667. Home and to the office a little, and then home and to my chamber to read, and anon, late, comes home my wife, with Mr. Turner and Mrs. Turner (age 44), with whom she supped, having been with Mrs. Turner (age 44) to-day at her daughter's school, to see her daughters dancing, and the rest, which she says is fine. They gone, I to supper and to bed. My wife very fine to-day, in her new suit of laced cuffs and perquisites. This evening Pelling comes to me, and tells me that this night the Dutch letters are come, and that the peace was proclaimed there the 19th inst., and that all is finished; which, for my life, I know not whether to be glad or sorry for, a peace being so necessary, and yet the peace is so bad in its terms.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Aug 1667. By and by the Lords come; and I perceive Sir W. Coventry (age 39) is the man, and nothing done till he comes. Among other things, I hear him observe, looking over a paper, that Sir John Shaw is a miracle of a man, for he thinks he executes more places than any man in England; for there he finds him a Surveyor of some of the King's woods, and so reckoned up many other places, the most inconsistent in the world. Their business with me was to consider how to assigne such of our commanders as will take assignements upon the Act for their wages; and the consideration thereof was referred to me to give them an answer the next sitting: which is a horrid poor thing: but they scruple at nothing of honour in the case. So away hence, and called my wife, and to the King's house, and saw "The Mayden Queene", which pleases us mightily; and then away, and took up Mrs. Turner (age 44) at her door, and so to Mile End [Map], and there drank, and so back to her house, it being a fine evening, and there supped. The first time I ever was there since they lived there; and she hath all things so neat and well done, that I am mightily pleased with her, and all she do. So here very merry, and then home and to bed, my eyes being very bad. I find most people pleased with their being at ease, and safe of a peace, that they may know no more charge or hazard of an ill-managed war: but nobody speaking of the peace with any content or pleasure, but are silent in it, as of a thing they are ashamed of; no, not at Court, much less in the City.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1667. Then to the office, where we sat upon a particular business all the morning: and my Lord Anglesey (age 53) with us: who, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47), do bring us news how my Chancellor's (age 58) seal is to be taken away from him to-day. The thing is so great and sudden to me, that it put me into a very great admiration what should be the meaning of it; and they do not own that they know what it should be: but this is certain, that the King (age 37) did resolve it on Saturday, and did yesterday send the Duke of Albemarle (age 58), the only man fit for those works, to him for his purse: to which the Chancellor (age 58) answered, that he received it from the King (age 37), and would deliver it to the King's own hand, and so civilly returned the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) without it; and this morning my Chancellor (age 58) is to be with the King (age 37), to come to an end in the business. After sitting, we rose, and my wife being gone abroad with Mrs. Turner (age 44) to her washing at the whitster's, I dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where Mr. Boreman was, who come from White Hall; who tells us that he saw my Chancellor (age 58) come in his coach with some of his men, without his Seal, to White Hall to his chamber; and thither the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 33) come and staid together alone, an hour or more: and it is said that the King (age 37) do say that he will have the Parliament meet, and that it will prevent much trouble by having of him out of their enmity, by his place being taken away; for that all their enmity will be at him. It is said also that my Chancellor (age 58) answers, that he desires he may be brought to his trial, if he have done any thing to lose his office; and that he will be willing, and is most desirous, to lose that, and his head both together. Upon what terms they parted nobody knows but the Chancellor (age 58) looked sad, he says. Then in comes Sir Richard Ford (age 53), and says he hears that there is nobody more presses to reconcile the King (age 37) and Chancellor (age 58) than the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) and Duke of Buckingham (age 39): the latter of which is very strange, not only that he who was so lately his enemy should do it, but that this man, that but the other day was in danger of losing his own head, should so soon come to be a mediator for others: it shows a wise Government. They all say that he [Clarendon] is but a poor man, not worth above £3000 a-year in land; but this I cannot believe: and all do blame him for having built so great a house, till he had got a better estate. Having dined, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and I to White Hall, where we could be informed in no more than we were told before, nobody knowing the result of the meeting, but that the matter is suspended. So I walked to the King's playhouse, there to meet Sir W. Pen (age 46), and saw "The Surprizall", a very mean play, I thought: or else it was because I was out of humour, and but very little company in the house. But there Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I had a great deal of discourse with Moll; who tells us that Nell (age 17) is already left by my Lord Buckhurst (age 24), and that he makes sport of her, and swears she hath had all she could get of him; and Hart1, her great admirer, now hates her; and that she is very poor, and hath lost my Baroness Castlemayne (age 26), who was her great friend also but she is come to the House, but is neglected by them all2. Thence with Sir W. Pen (age 46) home, and I to the office, where late about business, and then home to supper, and so to bed.

Note 1. Charles Hart, great-nephew of Shakespeare, a favourite actor. He is credited with being Nell Gwyn's (age 17) first lover (or Charles I, as the wits put it), and with having brought her on the stage. He died of stone, and was buried at Stanmore Magna, Middlesex, where he had a country house.

Note 2. Lord Buckhurst's (age 24) liaison with Nell Gwyn probably came to an end about this time. We learn from Pepys that in January, 1667-68, the King (age 37) sent several times for Nelly (age 17) (see January 11th, 1667-68). Nell's eldest son by Charles II, Charles Beauclerc, was not born till May 8th, 1670. He was created Earl of Burford in 1676 and Duke of St. Albans in 1684.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Sep 1667. Up, and to Westminster to the Exchequer, and then into the Hall, and there bought "Guillim's Heraldry" for my wife, and so to the Swan [Map], and thither come Doll Lane, and je did toucher her, and drank, and so away, I took coach and home, where I find my wife gone to Walthamstow [Map] by invitation with Sir W. Batten (age 66), and so I followed, taking up Mrs. Turner (age 44), and she and I much discourse all the way touching the baseness of Sir W. Pen (age 46) and sluttishness of his family, and how the world do suspect that his son Lowther (age 26), who is sick of a sore mouth, has got the pox. So we come to Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where Sir W. Pen (age 46) and his Lady (age 43), and we and Mrs. Shipman, and here we walked and had an indifferent good dinner, the victuals very good and cleanly dressed and good linen, but no fine meat at all.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1667. Up, and with Mr. Gawden to the Exchequer. By the way, he tells me this day he is to be answered whether he must hold Sheriffe or no; for he would not hold unless he may keep it at his office, which is out of the city (and so my Lord Mayor must come with his sword down, whenever he comes thither), which he do, because he cannot get a house fit for him in the city, or else he will fine for it. Among others that they have in nomination for Sheriffe, one is little Chaplin (age 40), who was his servant, and a very young man to undergo that place; but as the city is now, there is no great honour nor joy to be had, in being a public officer. At the Exchequer I looked after my business, and when done went home to the 'Change [Map], and there bought a case of knives for dinner, and a dish of fruit for 5s., and bespoke other things, and then home, and here I find all things in good order, and a good dinner towards. Anon comes Sir W. Batten (age 66) and his lady, and Mr. Griffith, their ward, and Sir W. Pen (age 46) and his lady (age 43), and Mrs. Lowther, who is grown, either through pride or want of manners, a fool, having not a word to say almost all dinner; and, as a further mark of a beggarly, proud fool, hath a bracelet of diamonds and rubies about her wrist, and a sixpenny necklace about her neck, and not one good rag of clothes upon her back; and Sir John Chichly (age 27) in their company, and Mrs. Turner (age 44). Here I had an extraordinary good and handsome dinner for them, better than any of them deserve or understand, saving Sir John Chichly (age 27) and Mrs. Turner (age 44), and not much mirth, only what I by discourse made, and that against my genius.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1667. After dinner I took occasion to break up the company soon as I could, and all parted, Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I by water to White Hall, there to speak with the Commissioners of the Treasury, who are mighty earnest for our hastening all that may be the paying off of the Seamen, now there is money, and are considering many other thins for easing of charge, which I am glad of, but vexed to see that J. Duncomb (age 45) should be so pressing in it as if none of us had like care with him. Having done there, I by coach to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw part of "The Ungratefull Lovers"; and sat by Beck Marshall, who is very handsome near hand. Here I met Mrs. Turner (age 44) and my wife as we agreed, and together home, and there my wife and I part of the night at the flageolet, which she plays now any thing upon almost at first sight and in good time.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Sep 1667. To the office, and there despatched business till ten o'clock, and then with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and my wife and Mrs. Turner (age 44) by Hackney-coach to Walthamstow [Map], to Mr. Shipman's to dinner, where Sir W. Pen (age 46) and my Lady and Mrs. Lowther (the latter of which hath got a sore nose, given her, I believe, from her husband, which made me I could not look upon her with any pleasure), and here a very good and plentifull wholesome dinner, and, above all thing, such plenty of milk meats, she keeping a great dairy, and so good as I never met with. The afternoon proved very foul weather, the morning fair. We staid talking till evening, and then home, and there to my flageolet with my wife, and so to bed without any supper, my belly being full and dinner not digested. It vexed me to hear how Sir W. Pen (age 46), who come alone from London, being to send his coachman for his wife and daughter, and bidding his coachman in much anger to go for them (he being vexed, like a rogue, to do anything to please his wife), his coachman Tom was heard to say a pox, or God rot her, can she walk hither? These words do so mad me that I could find in my heart to give him or my Lady notice of them.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Sep 1667. And by and by away by coach and met with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35), and with him to the Temple [Map], and there in Playford's (age 44) shop did give him some of my Exchequer orders and took his receipts, and so parted and home, and there to my business hard at the office, and then home, my wife being at Mrs. Turner's (age 44), who and her husband come home with her, and here staid and talked and staid late, and then went away and we to bed. But that which vexed me much this evening is that Captain Cocke (age 50) and Sir W. Batten (age 66) did come to me, and sat, and drank a bottle of wine, and told me how Sir W. Pen (age 46) hath got an order for the "Flying Greyhound" for himself, which is so false a thing, and the part of a knave, as nothing almost can be more. This vexed me; but I resolve to bring it before the Duke, and try a pull for it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1667. By and by my Lord come, and we did look over Yeabsly's business a little; and I find how prettily this cunning Lord can be partial and dissemble it in this case, being privy to the bribe he is to receive. This done; we away, and with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) to Westminster; who by the way told me how merry the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 33) and Court were the other day, when they were abroad a-hunting. They come to Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) house at Cranbourne, and there were entertained, and all made drunk; and that all being drunk, Armerer did come to the King (age 37), and swore to him, "By God, Sir", says he, "you are not so kind to the Duke of York (age 33) of late as you used to be".-"Not I?" says the King (age 37). "Why so?"-"Why", says he, "if you are, let us drink his health".-"Why, let us", says the King (age 37). Then he fell on his knees, and drank it; and having done, the King (age 37) began to drink it. "Nay, Sir", says Armerer, "by God you must do it on your knees!" So he did, and then all the company: and having done it, all fell a-crying for joy, being all maudlin and kissing one another, the King (age 37) the Duke of York (age 33), and the Duke of York (age 33) the King (age 37): and in such a maudlin pickle as never people were: and so passed the day. But Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) tells me, that the King (age 37) hath this good luck, that the next day he hates to have any body mention what he had done the day before, nor will suffer any body to gain upon him that way; which is a good quality. Parted with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) at White Hall, and there I took coach and took up my wife at Unthanke's, and so out for ayre, it being a mighty pleasant day, as far as Bow, and so drank by the way, and home, and there to my chamber till by and by comes Captain Cocke (age 50) about business; who tells me that Mr. Bruncker is lost for ever, notwithstanding my Lord Bruncker (age 47) hath advised with him, Cocke (age 50), how he might make a peace with the Duke of York (age 33) and Chancellor (age 58), upon promise of serving him in the Parliament but Cocke (age 50) says that is base to offer, and will have no success neither. He says that Mr. Wren hath refused a present of Tom Wilson's for his place of Store-keeper of Chatham, Kent [Map], and is resolved never to take any thing; which is both wise in him, and good to the King's service. He stayed with me very late, here being Mrs. Turner (age 44) and W. Batelier drinking and laughing, and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Oct 1667. So I alone to church, and then home, and there Deane (age 33) comes and dines with me by invitation, and both at and after dinner he and I spent all the day till it was dark in discourse of business of the Navy and the ground of the many miscarriages, wherein he do inform me in many more than I knew, and I had desired him to put them in writing, and many indeed they are and good ones; and also we discoursed of the business of shipping, and he hath promised me a draught of the ship he is now building, wherein I am mightily pleased. This afternoon comes to me Captain O'Bryan, about a ship that the King (age 37) hath given him; and he and I to talk of the Parliament; and he tells me that the business of the Duke of York's (age 34) slackening sail in the first fight, at the beginning of the war, is brought into question, and Sir W. Pen (age 46) and Captain Cox are to appear to-morrow about it; and it is thought will at last be laid upon Mr. Bruncker's giving orders from the Duke of York (age 34) (which the Duke of York (age 34) do not own) to Captain Cox to do it; but it seems they do resent this very highly, and are mad in going through all business, where they can lay any fault. I am glad to hear, that in the world I am as kindly spoke of as any body; for, for aught I see, there is bloody work like to be, Sir W. Coventry (age 39) having been forced to produce a letter in Parliament wherein the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) did from Sheernesse [Map] write in what good posture all things were at Chatham, Kent [Map], and that the chain was so well placed that he feared no attempt of the enemy: so that, among other things, I see every body is upon his own defence, and spares not to blame another to defend himself, and the same course I shall take. But God knows where it will end! He gone, and Deane (age 33), I to my chamber for a while, and then comes Pelling the apothecary to see us, and sat and supped with me (my wife being gone to bed sick of the cholique), and then I to bed, after supper. Pelting tells me that my Lady Duchesse Albemarle (age 48) was at Mrs. Turner's (age 44) this afternoon, she being ill, and did there publickly talk of business, and of our Office; and that she believed that I was safe, and had done well; and so, I thank God! I hear every body speaks of me; and indeed, I think, without vanity, I may expect to be profited rather than injured by this inquiry, which the Parliament makes into business.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1667. In the evening comes Mrs. Turner (age 44) to visit us, who hath been long sick, and she sat and supped with us, and after supper, her son Francke being there, now upon the point of his going to the East Indys, I did give him "Lex Mercatoria", and my wife my old pair of tweezers, which are pretty, and my book an excellent one for him. Most of our talk was of the great discourse the world hath against my Lady Batten, for getting her husband to give her all, and disinherit his eldest son; though the truth is, the son, as they say, did play the knave with his father when time was, and the father no great matter better with him, nor with other people also. So she gone, we to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Dec 1667. Up, and to the office, where very busy all the morning, and then in the afternoon I with Sir W. Pen (age 46) and Sir T. Harvy (age 42) to White Hall to attend the Duke of York (age 34), who is now as well as ever, and there we did our usual business with him, and so away home with Sir W. Pen (age 46), and there to the office, where pretty late doing business, my wife having been abroad all day with Mrs. Turner (age 44) buying of one thing or other. This day I do hear at White Hall that the Duke of Monmouth (age 18) is sick, and in danger of the smallpox.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Dec 1667. At night comes Mrs. Turner (age 44) to see us; and there, among other talk, she tells me that Mr. William Pen (age 23), who is lately come over from Ireland, is a Quaker again, or some very melancholy thing; that he cares for no company, nor comes into any which is a pleasant thing, after his being abroad so long, and his father (age 46) such a hypocritical rogue, and at this time an Atheist. She gone, I to my very great content do find my accounts to come very even and naturally, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jan 1668. By and by to my house, to a very good supper, and mighty merry, and good musick playing; and after supper to dancing and singing till about twelve at night; and then we had a good sack-posset for them, and an excellent cake, cost me near 20s., of our Jane's making, which was cut into twenty pieces, there being by this time so many of our company, by the coming in of young Goodyer and some others of our neighbours, young men that could dance, hearing of our dancing; and anon comes in Mrs. Turner (age 45), the mother, and brings with her Mrs. Hollworthy, which pleased me mightily. And so to dancing again, and singing, with extraordinary great pleasure, till about two in the morning, and then broke up; and Mrs. Pierce and her family, and Harris (age 34) and Knepp by coach home, as late as it was. And they gone, I took Mrs. Turner (age 45) and Hollworthy home to my house, and there gave wine and sweetmeats; but I find Mrs. Hollworthy but a mean woman, I think, for understanding, only a little conceited, and proud, and talking, but nothing extraordinary in person, or discourse, or understanding. However, I was mightily pleased with her being there, I having long longed for to know her, and they being gone, I paid the fiddlers £3 among the four, and so away to bed, weary and mightily pleased, and have the happiness to reflect upon it as I do sometimes on other things, as going to a play or the like, to be the greatest real comfort that I am to expect in the world, and that it is that that we do really labour in the hopes of; and so I do really enjoy myself, and understand that if I do not do it now I shall not hereafter, it may be, be able to pay for it, or have health to take pleasure in it, and so fill myself with vain expectation of pleasure and go without it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1668. At the Office all the morning; and at noon find the Bishop of Lincolne (age 60) come to dine with us; and after him comes Mr. Brisband; and there mighty good company. But the Bishop a very extraordinary good-natured man, and one that is mightily pleased, as well as I am, that I live so near Bugden, the seat of his bishopricke, where he is like to reside: and, indeed, I am glad of it. In discourse, we think ourselves safe for this year, by this league with Holland, which pleases every body, and, they say, vexes France; insomuch that D'Estrades; the French Embassador in Holland, when he heard it, told the States that he would have them not forget that his master is at the head of 100,000 men, and is but 28 years old; which was a great speech. The Bishop tells me he thinks that the great business of Toleration will not, notwithstanding this talk, be carried this Parliament; nor for the King's taking away the Deans' and Chapters' lands to supply his wants, they signifying little to him, if he had them, for his present service. He gone, I mightily pleased with his kindness, I to the office, where busy till night, and then to Mrs. Turner's (age 45), where my wife, and Deb., and I, and Batelier spent the night, and supped, and played at cards, and very merry, and so I home to bed. She is either a very prodigal woman, or richer than she would be thought, by her buying of the best things, and laying out much money in new-fashioned pewter; and, among other things, a new-fashioned case for a pair of snuffers, which is very pretty; but I could never have guessed what it was for, had I not seen the snuffers in it.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1668. Thence to my Lady Peterborough's (age 46), she desiring to speak with me. She loves to be taken dressing herself, as I always find her; and there, after a little talk, to please her, about her husband's (age 46) pension, which I do not think he will ever get again, I away thence home, and all the afternoon mighty busy at the office, and late, preparing a letter to the Commissioners of Accounts, our first letter to them, and so home to supper, where [her daughter] Betty Turner (age 15) was (whose brother Frank did set out toward the East Indies this day, his [her husband] father (age 55) and mother (age 45) gone down with him to Gravesend, Kent [Map]), and there was her little brother Moses, whom I examined, and he is a pretty good scholar for a child, and so after supper to talk and laugh, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jan 1668. Thence to talk of other things, and the want of money and he told me of the general want of money in the country; that land sold for nothing, and the many pennyworths he knows of lands and houses upon them, with good titles in his country, at 16 years' purchase: "and", says he, "though I am in debt, yet I have a mind to one thing, and that is a Bishop's lease"; but said, "I will yet choose such a lease before any other, yes", says he, plainly, "because I know they cannot stand, and then it will fall into the King's hands, and I in possession shall have an advantage by it". "And", says he, "I know they must fall, and they are now near it, taking all the ways they can to undo themselves, and showing us the way"; and thereupon told the a story of the present quarrel between the Bishop (age 75) and Deane of Coventry and Lichfield (age 61); the former of which did excommunicate the latter, and caused his excommunication to be read in the Church while he was there; and, after it was read, the Deane (age 61) made the service be gone through with, though himself, an excommunicate, was present, which is contrary to the Canon, and said he would justify the quire therein against the Bishop (age 75); and so they are at law in the Arches about it; which is a very pretty story. He tells me that the King (age 37) is for Toleration, though the Bishops be against it: and that he do not doubt but it will be carried in Parliament; but that he fears some will stand for the tolerating of Papists with the rest; and that he knows not what to say, but rather thinks that the sober party will be without it, rather than have it upon those terms; and I do believe so. Here we broke off, and I home to dinner, and after dinner set down my wife and Deb. at the 'Change [Map], and I to make a visit to Mr. Godolphin (age 32)1 at his lodgings, who is lately come from Spain from my Lord Sandwich (age 42), and did, the other day, meeting me in White Hall, compliment me mightily, and so I did offer him this visit, but missed him, and so back and took up my wife and set her at Mrs. Turner's (age 45), and I to my bookbinder's, and there, till late at night, binding up my second part of my Tangier accounts, and I all the while observing his working, and his manner of gilding of books with great pleasure, and so home, and there busy late, and then to bed. This day Griffin did, in discourse in the coach, put me in the head of the little house by our garden, where old goodman Taylor puts his brooms and dirt, to make me a stable of, which I shall improve, so as, I think, to be able to get me a stable without much charge, which do please me mightily. He did also in discourse tell me that it is observed, and is true, in the late fire of London, that the fire burned just as many Parish-Churches as there were hours from the beginning to the end of the fire; and, next, that there were just as many Churches left standing as there were taverns left standing in the rest of the City that was not burned, being, I think he told me, thirteen in all of each: which is pretty to observe.

Note 1. William Godolphin (age 32), descended from a younger branch of that family, which was afterwards ennobled in the person of Sidney, Earl Godolphin, Lord Treasurer (age 22). William Godolphin was of Christ Church, Oxford, and graduated M.A., January 14th, 1660-61. He was afterwards secretary to Sir H. Bennet (age 50) (Lord Arlington), and M.P. for Camelford. He was a great favourite at Court, and was knighted on August 28th, 1668. In the spring of 1669 he returned to Spain as Envoy Extraordinary, and in 1671 he became Ambassador. On July 11th, 1696, he died at Madrid, having been for some years a Roman Catholic.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1668. Thence I to Mrs. Turner (age 45), and did get her to go along with me to the French pewterer's, and there did buy some new pewter against to-morrow; and thence to White Hall, to have got a cook of her acquaintance, the best in England, as she says. But after we had with much ado found him, he could not come, nor was Mr. Gentleman in town, whom next I would have had, nor would Mrs. Stone let her man Lewis come, whom this man recommended to me; so that I was at a mighty loss what in the world to do for a cooke, Philips being out of town. Therefore, after staying here at Westminster a great while, we back to London, and there to Philips's, and his man directed us to Mr. Levett's, who could not come, and he sent to two more, and they could not; so that, at last, Levett as a great kindness did resolve he would leave his business and come himself, which set me in great ease in my mind, and so home, and there with my wife setting all things in order against to-morrow, having seen Mrs. Turner (age 45) at home, and so late to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Mar 1668. Up betimes and to the office, where all the morning busy, and then at noon home to dinner, and so again to the office awhile, and then abroad to the Excize-Office, where I met Mr. Ball, and did receive the paper I went for; and there fell in talk with him, who, being an old cavalier, do swear and curse at the present state of things, that we should be brought to this, that we must be undone and cannot be saved; that the Parliament is sitting now, and will till midnight, to find how to raise this £300,000, and he doubts they will not do it so as to be seasonable for the King (age 37): but do cry out against our great men at Court; how it is a fine thing for a Secretary of State to dance a jigg, and that it was not so heretofore; and, above all, do curse my Lord of Bristol (age 55), saying the worst news that ever he heard in his life, or that the Devil could ever bring us, was this Lord's coming to prayers the other day in the House of Lords, by which he is coming about again from being a Papist, which will undo this nation; and he says he ever did say, at the King's first coming in, that this nation could not be safe while that man was alive. Having done there, I away towards Westminster, but seeing by the coaches the House to be up, I stopped at the 'Change [Map] (where, I met Mrs. Turner (age 45), and did give her a pair of gloves), and there bought several things for my wife, and so to my bookseller's, and there looked for Montaigne's Essays1, which I heard by my Lord Arlington (age 50) and Lord Blaney so much commended, and intend to buy it, but did not now, but home, where at the office did some business, as much as my eyes would give leave, and so home to supper, Mercer with us talking and singing, and so to bed. The House, I hear, have this day concluded upon raising £100,000 of the £300,000 by wine, and the rest by a poll-[tax], and have resolved to excuse the Church, in expectation that they will do the more of themselves at this juncture; and I do hear that Sir W. Coventry (age 40) did make a speech in behalf of the Clergy.

Note 1. This must have been Florio's translation, as Cotton's was not published until 1685.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Mar 1668. Thence home, and there, in favour to my eyes, stayed at home, reading the ridiculous History of my Lord Newcastle, wrote by his wife, which shews her to be a mad, conceited, ridiculous woman, and he an asse to suffer her to write what she writes to him, and of him1. [her daughter] Betty Turner (age 15) sent my wife the book to read, and it being a fair print, to ease my eyes, which would be reading, I read that. Anon comes Mrs. Turner (age 45) and sat and talked with us, and most about the business of Ackworth2, which comes before us to-morrow, that I would favour it, but I do not think, notwithstanding all the friendship I can shew him, that he can escape, and therefore it had been better that he had followed the advice I sent him the other day by Mrs. Turner (age 45), to make up the business. So parted, and I to bed, my eyes being very bad; and I know not how in the world to abstain from reading.

Note 1. "The Life of the thrice noble, high, and puissant Prince, William Cavendish, Duke... of Newcastle", by his duchess, of which the first edition, in folio, was published in 1667.

Note 2. William Acworth, storekeeper at Woolwich, Kent [Map], was accused of converting stores to his own use (see Calendar of State Papers, 1667-68, p. 279).

Pepy's Diary. 29 Mar 1668. Lord's Day. Up, and I to Church, where I have not been these many weeks before, and there did first find a strange Reader, who could not find in the Service-book the place for churching women, but was fain to change books with the clerke: and then a stranger preached, a seeming able man; but said in his pulpit that God did a greater work in raising of an oake-tree from an akehorne, than a man's body raising it, at the last day, from his dust (shewing the possibility of the Resurrection): which was, methought, a strange saying. At home to dinner, whither comes and dines with me W. Howe, and by invitation Mr. Harris (age 34) and Mr. Banister (age 38), most extraordinary company both, the latter for musique of all sorts, the former for everything: here we sang, and Banister (age 38) played on the theorbo, and afterwards Banister (age 38) played on his flageolet, and I had very good discourse with him about musique, so confirming some of my new notions about musique that it puts me upon a resolution to go on and make a scheme and theory of musique not yet ever made in the world. Harris (age 34) do so commend my wife's picture of Mr. Hales's (age 68), that I shall have him draw Harris's (age 34) head; and he hath also persuaded me to have Cooper draw my wife's, which, though it cost £30, yet I will have done. Thus spent the afternoon most deliciously, and then broke up and walked with them as far as the Temple [Map], and there parted, and I took coach to Westminster, but there did nothing, meeting nobody that I had a mind to speak with, and so home, and there find Mr. Pelling, and then also comes Mrs. Turner (age 45), and supped and talked with us, and so to bed. I do hear by several that Sir W. Pen's (age 46) going to sea do dislike the Parliament mightily, and that they have revived the Committee of Miscarriages to find something to prevent it; and that he being the other day with the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) to ask his opinion touching his going to sea, the Duchess overheard and come in to him, and asks W. Pen (age 46) how he durst have the confidence to offer to go to sea again, to the endangering the nation, when he knew himself such a coward as he was, which, if true, is very severe.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1668. Thence home, and to visit Mrs. Turner (age 45), where among other talk, Mr. Foly and her husband being there, she did tell me of young Captain Holmes's (age 46) marrying of Pegg Lowther last Saturday by stealth, which I was sorry for, he being an idle rascal, and proud, and worth little, I doubt; and she a mighty pretty, well-disposed lady, and good fortune. Her mother and friends take on mightily; but the sport is, Sir Robert Holmes do seem to be mad too with his brother, and will disinherit him, saying that he hath ruined himself, marrying below himself, and to his disadvantage; whereas, I said, in this company, that I had married a sister (age 27) lately, with little above half that portion, that he should have kissed her breech before he should have had her, which, if R. Holmes should hear, would make a great quarrel; but it is true I am heartily sorry for the poor girl that is undone by it.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Apr 1668. Up, and at the office all the morning, at noon dined at home, and thence took Mrs. Turner (age 45) out and carried her to the King's house, and saw "The Indian Emperour"; and after that done, took Knepp out, and to Kensington; and there walked in the garden, and then supped, and mighty merry, there being also in the house Sir Philip Howard (age 37), and some company, and had a dear reckoning, but merry, and away, it being quite night, home, and dark, about 9 o'clock or more, and in my coming had the opportunity the first time in my life to be bold with Knepp.., and so left her at home, and so Mrs. Turner (age 45) and I home to my letters and to bed. Here hear how Sir W. Pen's (age 46) impeachment was read, and agreed to, in the House this day, and ordered to be engrossed; and he suspended the House1 Harman (age 43) set at liberty; and Brouncker (age 41) put out of the House, and a writ for a new election, and an impeachment ordered to be brought in against him, he being fled!2

Note 1. From sitting as a member pending the impeachment.-B.

Note 2. Sir Charles Berkeley, jun (age 68). was chosen in his room. In the sea-fight off Southwold Bay on June 3rd, 1665, the English triumphed over the Dutch, but the very considerable victory was not followed up. During the night, while the Duke of York (age 34) slept, Henry Brouncker (age 41), his groom of the bedchamber, ordered the lieutenant to shorten sail, by which means the progress of the whole fleet was retarded, the Duke of York's (age 34) being the leading ship. The duke affirmed that he first heard of Brouncker's (age 41) unjustifiable action in July, and yet he kept the culprit in his service for nearly two years after the offence had come to his knowledge. After Brouncker (age 41) had been dismissed from the duke's service, the House of Commons ejected him. The whole matter is one of the unsolved difficulties of history. See Lister's "Life of Clarendon", ii., 334 335.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Apr 1668. So home, and there took up Mrs. Turner (age 45) and carried her to Mile End [Map] and drank, and so back talking, and so home and to bed, I being mighty cold, this being a mighty cold day, and I had left off my waistcoat three or four days. This evening, coming home in the dusk, I saw and spoke to our Nell, Pain's daughter, and had I not been very cold I should have taken her to Tower Hill [Map] para together et toker her. Thus ends this month; my wife in the country, myself full of pleasure and expence; and some trouble for my friends, my Lord Sandwich (age 42), by the Parliament, and more for my eyes, which are daily worse and worse, that I dare not write or read almost any thing. The Parliament going in a few days to rise; myself so long without accounting now, for seven or eight months, I think, or more, that I know not what condition almost I am in, as to getting or spending for all that time, which troubles me, but I will soon do it. The Kingdom in an ill state through poverty; a fleete going out, and no money to maintain it, or set it out; seamen yet unpaid, and mutinous when pressed to go out again; our Office able to do little, nobody trusting us, nor we desiring any to trust us, and yet have not money for any thing, but only what particularly belongs to this fleete going out, and that but lamely too. The Parliament several months upon an Act for £300,000, but cannot or will not agree upon it, but do keep it back, in spite of the King's desires to hasten it, till they can obtain what they have a mind, in revenge upon some men for the late ill managements; and he is forced to submit to what they please, knowing that, without it, he shall have no money, and they as well, that, if they give the money, the King (age 37) will suffer them to do little more; and then the business of religion do disquiet every body, the Parliament being vehement against the Nonconformists, while the King (age 37) seems to be willing to countenance them. So we are all poor, and in pieces-God help us! while the peace is like to go on between Spain and France; and then the French may be apprehended able to attack us. So God help us!

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1668. Up, and to the office, where all the morning. At noon home to dinner, and thither I sent for Mercer to dine with me, and after dinner she and I called Mrs. Turner (age 45), and I carried them to the Duke of York's (age 34) house, and there saw "The Man's the Master", which proves, upon my seeing it again, a very good play.

Pepy's Diary. 13 May 1668. Thence, at noon, to Hercules Pillars, and there dined all alone, and so to White Hall, some of us attended the Duke of York (age 34) as usual, and so to attend the Council about the business of Hemskirke's project of building a ship that sails two feet for one of any other ship, which the Council did agree to be put in practice, the King (age 37) to give him, if it proves good, £5000 in hand, and £15,000 more in seven years, which, for my part, I think a piece of folly for them to meddle with, because the secret cannot be long kept. So thence, after Council, having drunk some of the King's wine and water with Mr. Chevins (age 66), my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and some others, I by water to the Old Swan [Map], and there to Michell's, and did see her and drink there, but he being there je ne baiser la; and so back again by water to Spring Garden all alone, and walked a little, and so back again home, and there a little to my viall, and so to bed, Mrs. Turner (age 45) having sat and supped with me. This morning I hear that last night Sir Thomas Teddiman, poor man! did die by a thrush in his mouth: a good man, and stout and able, and much lamented; though people do make a little mirth, and say, as I believe it did in good part, that the business of the Parliament did break his heart, or, at least, put him into this fever and disorder, that caused his death.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1668. By and by the corpse went; and I, with my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and Dr. Clerke, and Mr. Pierce, as far as the foot of London-bridge; and there we struck off into Thames Street, the rest going to Redriffe [Map], where he is to be buried. And we 'light at the Temple [Map], and there parted; and I to the King's house, and there saw the last act of "The Committee", thinking to have seen Knepp there, but she did not act. And so to my bookseller's, and there carried home some books-among others, "Dr. Wilkins's Reall Character", and thence to Mrs. Turner's (age 45), and there went and sat, and she showed me her house from top to bottom, which I had not seen before, very handsome, and here supped, and so home, and got Mercer, and she and I in the garden singing till ten at night, and so home to a little supper, and then parted, with great content, and to bed. The Duchesse of Monmouth's hip is, I hear, now set again, after much pain. I am told also that the Countess of Shrewsbury is brought home by the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) to his house, where his Duchess saying that it was not for her and the other to live together in a house, he answered, Why, Madam, I did think so, and, therefore, have ordered your coach to be ready, to carry you to your father's, which was a devilish speech, but, they say, true; and my Lady Shrewsbury is there, it seems.

Pepy's Diary. 21 May 1668. Up, and busy to send some things into the country, and then to the Office, where meets me Sir Richard Ford (age 54), who among other things congratulates me, as one or two did yesterday, [on] my great purchase; and he advises me rather to forbear, if it be not done, as a thing that the world will envy me in: and what is it but my cozen Tom Pepys's buying of Martin Abbey, in Surry! which is a mistake I am sorry for, and yet do fear that it may spread in the world to my prejudice. All the morning at the office, and at noon my clerks dined with me, and there do hear from them how all the town is full of the talk of a meteor, or some fire, that did on Saturday last fly over the City at night, which do put me in mind that, being then walking in the dark an hour or more myself in the garden, after I had done writing, I did see a light before me come from behind me, which made me turn back my head; and I did see a sudden fire or light running in the sky, as it were towards Cheapside ward, and it vanished very quick, which did make me bethink myself what holyday it was, and took it for some rocket, though it was much brighter than any rocket, and so thought no more of it, but it seems Mr. Hater and Gibson going home that night did meet with many clusters of people talking of it, and many people of the towns about the city did see it, and the world do make much discourse of it, their apprehensions being mighty full of the rest of the City to be burned, and the Papists to cut our throats. Which God prevent! Thence after dinner I by coach to the Temple [Map], and there bought a new book of songs set to musique by one Smith of Oxford, some songs of Mr. Cowley's, and so to Westminster, and there to walk a little in the Hall, and so to Mrs. Martin's, and there did hazer cet que je voudrai mit her, and drank and sat most of the afternoon with her and her sister, and here she promises me her fine starling, which was the King's, and speaks finely, which I shall be glad of, and so walked to the Temple [Map], meeting in the street with my cozen Alcocke, the young man, that is a good sober youth, I have not seen these four or five years, newly come to town to look for employment: but I cannot serve him, though I think he deserves well, and so I took coach and home to my business, and in the evening took Mrs. Turner (age 45) and Mercer out to Mile End [Map] and drank, and then home, and sang; and eat a dish of greene pease, the first I have seen this year, given me by Mr. Gibson, extraordinary young and pretty, and so saw them at home, and so home to bed. Sir W. Pen (age 47) continues ill of the gout.

Pepy's Diary. 26 May 1668. So home, where we find all well, and brother Balty (age 28) and his wife looking to the house, she mighty fine, in a new gold-laced 'just a cour'. I shifted myself, and so to see Mrs. Turner (age 45), and Mercer appearing over the way, called her in, and sat and talked, and then home to my house by and by, and there supped and talked mighty merry, and then broke up and to bed, being a little vexed at what W. Hewer (age 26) tells me Sir John Shaw did this day in my absence say at the Board, complaining of my doing of him injury and the board permitting it, whereas they had more reason to except against his attributing that to me alone which I could not do but with their condent and direction, it being to very good service to the King (age 37), and which I shall be proud to have imputed to me alone. The King (age 37) I hear come to town last night.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jun 1668. So to dinner, and then with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) to White Hall, and there attended the Lords of the Treasury and also a committee of Council with the Duke of York (age 34) about the charge of this year's fleete, and thence I to Westminster and to Mrs. Martin's, and did hazer what je would con her, and did once toker la thigh de su landlady, and thence all alone to Fox Hall, and walked and saw young Newport (age 23), and two more rogues of the town, seize on two ladies, who walked with them an hour with their masks on; perhaps civil ladies; and there I left them, and so home, and thence to Mr. Mills's, where I never was before, and here find, whom I indeed saw go in, and that did make me go thither, Mrs. Hallworthy and Mrs. Andrews, and here supped, and, extraordinary merry till one in the morning, Mr. Andrews (age 36) coming to us: and mightily pleased with this night's company and mirth I home to bed. Mrs. Turner (age 45), too, was with us.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jun 1668. So to the lodge, and drank a cup of new milk, and so home, and there to Mrs. Turner's (age 45), and sat and talked with her, and then home to bed, having laid my business with W. Hewer (age 26) to go out of town Friday next, with hopes of a great deal of pleasure.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jun 1668. So homeward, and stopped at Mr. Mills's, where he and she at the door, and Mrs. Turner (age 45), and Betty, and Mrs. Hollworthy, and there I stayed and talked, and up to the church leads, and saw the fire, which spent itself, till all fear over. I home, and there we to bed again, and slept pretty well, and about nine rose, and then my wife fell into her blubbering again, and at length had a request to make to me, which was, that she might go into France, and live there, out of trouble; and then all come out, that I loved pleasure and denied her any, and a deal of do; and I find that there have been great fallings out between my father and her, whom, for ever hereafter, I must keep asunder, for they cannot possibly agree. And I said nothing, but, with very mild words and few, suffered her humour to spend, till we begun to be very quiet, and I think all will be over, and friends, and so I to the office, where all the morning doing business. Yesterday I heard how my Lord Ashly (age 46) is like to die, having some imposthume in his breast, that he hath been fain to be cut into the body1.

Note 1. "Such an operation was performed in this year, after a consultation of medical men, and chiefly by Locke's advice, and the wound was afterwards always kept open, a silver pipe being inserted. This saved Lord Ashley's (age 46) life, and gave him health"-Christie's Life of the first Earl of Shaftesbury, vol. ii., p. 34. 'Tapski' was a name given to Shaftesbury in derision, and vile defamers described the abscess, which had originated in a carriage accident in Holland, as the result of extreme dissipation. Lines by Duke, a friend and imitator of Dryden (age 36): "The working ferment of his active mind, In his weak body's cask with pain confined, Would burst the rotten vessel where 'tis pent, But that 'tis tapt to give the treason vent"..

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1668. Then to the office again, all the afternoon: we met about the Victualler's new contract. And so up, and to walk all the evening with my wife and Mrs. Turner (age 45) in the garden, till supper, about eleven at night; and so, after supper, parted, and to bed, my eyes bad, but not worse, only weary with working. But, however, I very melancholy under the fear of my eyes being spoiled, and not to be recovered; for I am come that I am not able to readout a small letter, and yet my sight good for the little while I can read, as ever they were, I think.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jul 1668. Up, and to the office, where Kate Joyce come to me about some tickets of hers, but took no notice to me of her being married, but seemed mighty pale, and doubtful what to say or do, expecting, I believe, that I should begin; and not finding me beginning, said nothing, but, with trouble in her face, went away. At the office all the morning, and after dinner also all the afternoon, and in the evening with my wife and Deb. and [her daughter] Betty Turner (age 15) to Unthanke's, where we are fain to go round by Newgate, because of Fleet Bridge being under rebuilding. They stayed there, and I about some business, and then presently back and brought them home and supped and Mrs. Turner (age 45), the mother, comes to us, and there late, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1668. At noon home to dinner, and thence all the afternoon hard at the office, we meeting about the Victualler's new contract; and so into the garden, my Lady Pen (age 44), Mrs. Turner (age 45) and her daughter, my wife and I, and there supped in the dark and were merry, and so to bed. This day Bossc finished his copy of my picture, which I confess I do not admire, though my wife prefers him to Browne; nor do I think it like. He do it for W. Hewer (age 26), who hath my wife's also, which I like less. This afternoon my Lady Pickering (age 42) come to see us: I busy, saw her not. But how natural it is for us to slight people out of power, and for people out of power to stoop to see those that while in power they contemned!

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jul 1668. Lord's Day. Up, and to my chamber, and there I up and down in the house spent the morning getting things ready against noon, when come Mr. Cooper (age 59), Hales (age 68), Harris (age 34), Mr. Butler, that wrote Hudibras, and Mr. Cooper's (age 59) cozen Jacke; and by and by comes Mr. Reeves and his wife, whom I never saw before: and there we dined: a good dinner, and company that pleased me mightily, being all eminent men in their way. Spent all the afternoon in talk and mirth, and in the evening parted, and then my wife and I to walk in the garden, and so home to supper, Mrs. Turner (age 45) and husband and daughter with us, and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Aug 1668. So home; and, after dinner, I took my wife and Deb. round by Hackney, and up and down to take the ayre; and then home, and made visits to Mrs. Turner (age 45), and Mrs. Mercer, and Sir W. Pen (age 47), who is come from Epsom not well, and Sir J. Minnes (age 69), who is not well neither. And so home to supper, and to set my books a little right, and then to bed. This day Betty Michell come and dined with us, the first day after her lying in, whom I was glad to see.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1668. So to visit W. Pen (age 47), who is yet ill, and then home, where W. Batelier and Mrs. Turner (age 45) come and sat and supped with us, and so they gone we to bed. This afternoon my wife, and Mercer, and Deb., went with Pelting to see the gypsies at Lambeth, and have their fortunes told; but what they did, I did not enquire.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Aug 1668. Home to dinner, where Pelting dines with us, and brings some partridges, which is very good meat; and, after dinner, I, and wife, and Mercer, and Deb., to the Duke of York's house, and saw "Mackbeth", to our great content, and then home, where the women went to the making of my tubes, and I to the office, and then come Mrs. Turner (age 45) and her husband to advise about their son, the Chaplain, who is turned out of his ship, a sorrow to them, which I am troubled for, and do give them the best advice I can, and so they gone we to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Sep 1668. Thence by water home, and so all the afternoon and evening late busy at the office, and then home to supper, and Mrs. Turner (age 45) comes to see my wife before her journey to-morrow, but she is in bed, and so sat talking to little purpose with me a great while, and, she gone, I to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1668. Thence to St. Margaret's Church [Map], thinking to have seen Betty Michell, but she was not there. So back, and walked to Gray's Inn walks a while, but little company; and so over the fields to Clerkenwell, to see whether I could find that the fair Botelers do live there still, I seeing Frances the other day in a coach with Cary Dillon (age 41), her old servant, but know not where she lives. So walked home, and there walked in the garden an hour, it being mighty pleasant weather, and so took my Lady Pen (age 44) and Mrs. Markham home with me and sent for Mrs. Turner (age 45), and by and by comes Sir W. Pen (age 47) and supped with me, a good supper, part of my dinner to-day. They gone, Mrs. Turner (age 45) staid an hour talking with me.... [Note. Missing text "and yo did now the first time tocar her cosa with my hand and did make her do the like con su hand to my thing, whereto neither did she show any aversion really, but a merry kind of opposition, but yo did both and yo do believe I might have hecho la cosa too mit her. ] So parted, and I to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Sep 1668. So to supper, and the boy to read to me, and so to bed. This day I met Mr. Moore in the New Exchange, and had much talk of my Lord's concernments. This day also come out first the new five-pieces in gold, coined by the Guiny Company; and I did get two pieces of Mr. Holder1. 22nd. Up, and to the Office, where sitting all the morning at noon, home to dinner, with my people, and so to the Office again, where busy all the afternoon, and in the evening spent my time walking in the dark, in the garden, to favour my eyes, which I find nothing but ease to help. In the garden there comes to me my Lady Pen (age 44) and Mrs. Turner (age 45) and Markham, and we sat and talked together, and I carried them home, and there eat a bit of something, and by and by comes Sir W. Pen (age 47), and eat with us, and mighty merry-in appearance, at least, he being on all occasions glad to be at friendship with me, though we hate one another, and know it on both sides. They gone, Mrs. Turner (age 45) and I to walk in the garden.... So led her home, and I back to bed. This day Mr. Wren (age 39) did give me, at the Board, Commissioner Middleton's answer to the Duke of York's (age 34) great letter; so that now I have all of them.

Note 1. Guineas took their name from the gold brought from Guinea by the African Company in 1663, who, as an encouragement to bring over gold to be coined, were permitted by their charter from Charles II to have their stamp of an elephant upon the coin. When first coined they were valued at 20s., but were worth 30s. in 1695. There were likewise fivepound pieces, like the guinea, with the inscription upon the rim.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Oct 1668. Thence sent them home, and I to Arundel House [Map], where the first time we have met since the vacation, and not much company: but here much good discourse, and afterwards my Lord and others and I to the Devil tavern, and there eat and drank, and so late, with Mr. Colwell, home by coach; and at home took him with me, and there found my uncle Wight (age 66) and aunt, and Woolly and his wife, and there supped, and mighty merry. And anon they gone, and Mrs. Turner (age 45) staid, who was there also to talk of her husband's business; and the truth is, I was the less pleased to talk with her, for that she hath not yet owned, in any fit manner of thanks, my late and principal service to her husband about his place, which I alone ought to have the thanks for, if they know as much as I do; but let it go: if they do not own it, I shall have it in my hand to teach them to do it.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1668. Home at night, and there comes Mrs. Turner (age 45) and Betty to see us, and supped with us, and I shewed them a cold civility for fear of troubling my wife, and after supper, they being gone, we to bed. Thus ended this month, with very good content, that hath been the most sad to my heart and the most expenseful to my purse on things of pleasure, having furnished my wife's closet and the best chamber, and a coach and horses, that ever I yet knew in the world: and do put me into the greatest condition of outward state that ever I was in, or hoped ever to be, or desired: and this at a time when we do daily expect great changes in this Office: and by all reports we must, all of us, turn out. But my eyes are come to that condition that I am not able to work: and therefore that, and my wife's desire, make me have no manner of trouble in my thoughts about it. So God do his will in it!

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1669. Lay long, talking with my wife, and did of my own accord come to an allowance of her of £30 a-year for all expences, clothes and everything, which she was mightily pleased with, it being more than ever she asked or expected, and so rose, with much content, and up with W. Hewer (age 27) to White Hall, there to speak with Mr. Wren (age 40), which I did about several things of the office entered in my memorandum books, and so about noon, going homeward with W. Hewer (age 27), he and I went in and saw the great tall woman that is to be seen, who is but twenty-one years old, and I do easily stand under her arms. Then, going further, [her daughter] The. Turner (age 17) called me, out of her coach where her mother, &c., was, and invited me by all means to dine with them, at my cozen Roger's (age 51) mistress's, the widow Dickenson! So, I went to them afterwards, and dined with them, and mighty handsomely treated, and she a wonderful merry, good-humoured, fat, but plain woman, but I believe a very good woman, and mighty civil to me. Mrs. Turner (age 46), the mother, and Mrs. Dyke, and The. (age 17), and Betty was the company, and a gentleman of their acquaintance. Betty I did long to see, and she is indifferent pretty, but not what the world did speak of her; but I am mighty glad to have one so pretty of our kindred.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jan 1669. At noon comes Mrs. Turner (age 46) and Dyke, and Mrs. Dickenson, and then comes [her daughter] The. (age 17) and [her daughter] Betty Turner (age 16), the latter of which is a very pretty girl; and then Creed and his wife, whom I sent for, by my coach. These were my guests, and Mrs. Turner's (age 46) friend, whom I saw the other day, Mr. Wicken, and very merry we were at dinner, and so all the afternoon, talking, and looking up and down my house; and in the evening I did bring out my cake-a noble cake, and there cut it into pieces, with wine and good drink: and after a new fashion, to prevent spoiling the cake, did put so many titles into a hat, and so drew cuts; and I was the Queene (age 59); and The. Turner (age 17), King-Creed, Sir Martin Marr-all; and Betty, Mrs. Millicent: and so we were mighty merry till it was night; and then, being moonshine and fine frost, they went home, I lending some of them my coach to help to carry them, and so my wife and I spent the rest of the evening in talk and reading, and so with great pleasure to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jan 1669. Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon eat a mouthful, and so with my wife to Madam Turner's (age 46), and find her gone, but [her daughter] The. (age 17) staid for us; and so to the King's house, to see "Horace"; this the third day of its acting-a silly tragedy; but Lacy (age 54) hath made a farce of several dances-between each act, one: but his words are but silly, and invention not extraordinary, as to the dances; only some Dutchmen come out of the mouth and tail of a Hamburgh sow.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1669. Thence in my own coach home, where I find Madam Turner (age 46), Dyke, and [her daughter] The. (age 17), and had a good dinner for them, and merry; and so carried them to the Duke of York's (age 35) house, all but Dyke, who went away on other business; and there saw "The Tempest"; but it is but ill done by Gosnell, in lieu of Moll Davis (age 21).

Pepy's Diary. 02 Mar 1669. Up, and at the office till noon, when home, and there I find my company come, namely, Madam Turner (age 46), Dyke, [her daughter] The. (age 17), and [her daughter] Betty Turner (age 16), and Mr. Bellwood, formerly their father's clerk, but now set up for himself-a conceited, silly fellow, but one they make mightily of-my cozen Roger Pepys (age 51), and his wife, and two daughters [Barbara Pepys and Elizabeth Pepys]. I had a noble dinner for them, as I almost ever had, and mighty merry, and particularly myself pleased with looking on Betty Turner (age 16), who is mighty pretty.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Apr 1669. Up, and by coach to my cozen Turner's, and invited them to dine at the Cocke (age 52) to-day, with my wife and me; and so to the Lords of the Treasury, where all the morning, and settled matters to their liking about the assignments on the Customes, between the Navy Office and Victualler, and to that end spent most of the morning there with Prince, and thence took him to the Cocke (age 52), and there left him and my clerk Gibson together evening their reckonings, while I to the New Exchange to talk with Betty, my little sempstress; and so to Mrs. Turner's (age 46), to call them to dinner, but my wife not come, I back again, and was overtaken by a porter, with a message from my wife that she was ill, and could not come to us: so I back again to Mrs. Turner's (age 46), and find them gone; and so back again to the Cocke (age 52), and there find Mr. Turner, Betty, and Talbot Pepys, and they dined with myself Sir Prince and Gibson, and mighty merry, this house being famous for good meat, and particularly pease-porridge and after dinner broke up, and they away; and I to the Council-Chamber, and there heard the great complaint of the City, tried against the gentlemen of the Temple [Map], for the late riot, as they would have it, when my Lord Mayor was there. But, upon hearing the whole business, the City was certainly to blame to charge them in this manner as with a riot: but the King (age 38) and Council did forbear to determine any thing it, till the other business of the title and privilege be decided which is now under dispute at law between them, whether Temple [Map] be within the liberty of the City or no. But I, sorry to see the City so ill advised as to complain in a thing where their proofs were so weak.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Apr 1669. Thence took occasion to go back to this milliner's [in Fenchurch Street [Map]], whose name I now understand to be Clerke; and there, her husband inviting me up to the balcony, to see the sight go by to dine at Clothworker's-Hall, I did go up and there saw it go by: and then; there being a good piece of cold roast beef upon the tables and one Margetts, a young merchant that lodges there, and is likely to marry a sister of hers, I staid and eat, and had much good conversation with her, who hath the vanity to talk of her great friends and father, one Wingate, near Welling;, that hath been a Parliament-man. Here also was Stapely: the rope-merchant, and dined with us; and, after spending most of the afternoon also, I away home, and there sent for W. Hewer (age 27), and he and I by water to White Hall to loop among other things, for Mr. May, to unbespeak his dining with me to-morrow. But here being in the court-yard, God would have it, I spied Deb., which made my heart and head to work, and I presently could not refrain, but sent W. Hewer (age 27) away to look for Mr. Wren (age 40) (W. Hewer (age 27), I perceive, did see her, but whether he did see me see her I know not, or suspect my sending him away I know not, but my heart could not hinder me), and I run after her and two women and a man, more ordinary people, and she in her old clothes, and after hunting a little, find them in the lobby of the chapel below stairs, and there I observed she endeavoured to avoid me, but I did speak to her and she to me, and did get her pour dire me ou she demeurs now, and did charge her para say nothing of me that I had vu elle, which she did promise, and so with my heart full of surprize and disorder I away, and meeting with Sir H. Cholmley walked into the Park with him and back again, looking to see if I could spy her again in the Park, but I could not. And so back to White Hall, and then back to the Park with Mr. May, but could see her, no more, and so with W. Hewer (age 27), who I doubt by my countenance might see some disorder in me, we home by water, and there I find Talbot Pepys, and Mrs. Turner (age 46), and Betty, come to invite us to dinner on Thursday; and, after drinking, I saw them to the water-side, and so back home through Crutched Friars [Map], and there saw Mary Mercer, and put off my hat to her, on the other side of the way, but it being a little darkish she did not, I think, know me well, and so to my office to put my papers in order, they having been removed for my closet to be made clean, and so home to my wife, who is come home from Deptford, Kent [Map]. But, God forgive me, I hardly know how to put on confidence enough to speak as innocent, having had this passage to-day with Deb., though only, God knows, by accident. But my great pain is lest God Almighty shall suffer me to find out this girl, whom indeed I love, and with a bad amour, but I will pray to God to give me grace to forbear it.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Apr 1669. Thence I away, and through Jewen Street, my mind, God knows, running that way, but stopped not, but going down Holborne hill, by the Conduit, I did see Deb. on foot going up the hill. I saw her, and she me, but she made no stop, but seemed unwilling to speak to me; so I away on, but then stopped and 'light, and after her and overtook her at the end of Hosier lane in Smithfield [Map], and without standing in the street desired her to follow me, and I led her into a little blind alehouse within the walls, and there she and I alone fell to talk and baiser la and toker su mammailles, but she mighty coy, and I hope modest.... [Missing text "but however, though with great force, did hazer ella par su hand para tocar mi thing, nut ella was in great pain para be brought para it."] I did give her in a paper 20s., and we did agree para meet again in the Hall at Westminster on Monday next; and so giving me great hopes by her carriage that she continues modest and honest, we did there part, she going home and I to Mrs. Turner's (age 46), but when I come back to the place where I left my coach it was gone, I having staid too long, which did trouble me to abuse the poor fellow, so that taking another coach I did direct him to find out the fellow and send him to me. At my cozen Turner's I find they are gone all to dinner to Povy's (age 55), and thither I, and there they were all, and W. Batelier and his sister, and had dined; but I had good things brought me, and then all up and down the house, and mightily pleased to see the fine rooms: but, the truth is, there are so many bad pictures, that to me make the good ones lose much of the pleasure in seeing them. [her daughter] The. (age 17) and [her daughter] Betty Turner (age 16) in new flowered tabby gowns, and so we were pretty merry, only my fear upon me for what I had newly done, do keep my content in. So, about five or six o'clock, away, and I took my wife and the two Bateliers, and carried them homeward, and W. Batelier 'lighting, I carried the women round by Islington [Map], and so down Bishopsgate Street home, and there to talk and sup, and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Apr 1669. Thence the Duke of York (age 35) being gone, I did there stay walking with Sir H. Cholmly (age 36) in the Court, talking of news; where he told me, that now the great design of the Duke of Buckingham (age 41) is to prevent the meeting, since he cannot bring about with the King (age 38) the dissolving, of this Parliament, that the King (age 38) may not need it; and therefore my Lord St. Albans (age 64) is hourly expected with great offers of a million of money1, to buy our breach with the Dutch: and this, they do think, may tempt the King (age 38) to take the money, and thereby be out of a necessity of calling the Parliament again, which these people dare not suffer to meet again: but this he doubts, and so do I, that it will be to the ruin of the nation if we fall out with Holland. This we were discoursing when my boy comes to tell me that his mistress was at the Gate with the coach, whither I went, and there find my wife and the whole company. So she, and Mrs. Turner (age 46), and [her daughter] The. (age 17), and Talbot, in mine: and Joyce, W. Batelier, and I, in a Hackney, to Hyde Park, where I was ashamed to be seen; but mightily pleased, though troubled, with a drunken coachman that did not remember when we come to 'light, where it was that he took us up; but said at Hammersmith, and thither he was carrying of us when we come first out of the Park. So I carried them all to Hercules-Pillars, and there did treat them: and so, about ten at night, parted, and my wife, and I, and W. Batelier, home; and he gone, we to bed.

Note 1. From Louis XIV. See April 28th.

In 1686 Jane Pepys (age 63) died.

In 1689 [her former husband] John Turner (age 76) died.

Pepy's Diary. 29th Feb 1660. To my office, and drank at Will's with Mr. Moore, who told me how my Lord is chosen General at Sea by the Council, and that it is thought that Monk will be joined with him therein. Home and dined, after dinner my wife and I by water to London, and thence to Herring's, the merchant in Coleman Street, about £50 which he promises I shall have on Saturday next. So to my mother's, and then to Mrs. Turner's, of whom I took leave, and her company, because she was to go out of town to-morrow with Mr. Pepys into Norfolk. Here my cosen Norton gave me a brave cup of metheglin [Note. A liquor made of honey and water, boiled and fermenting. By 12 Charles II, a grant of certain impositions upon beer, ale, and other liquors, a duty of 1d. per gallon was laid upon "all metheglin or mead".] the first I ever drank. To my mother's and supped there.

Royal Ancestors of Jane Pepys 1623-1686

Kings Wessex: Great x 19 Grand Daughter of King Edmund "Ironside" I of England

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 16 Grand Daughter of Owain "Great" King Gwynedd

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 22 Grand Daughter of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg King Deheubarth

Kings Powys: Great x 17 Grand Daughter of Maredudd ap Bleddyn King Powys

Kings England: Great x 9 Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Kings Scotland: Great x 15 Grand Daughter of William "Lion" I King Scotland

Kings Franks: Great x 15 Grand Daughter of Louis VII King Franks

Kings France: Great x 11 Grand Daughter of Philip "The Fair" IV King France

Ancestors of Jane Pepys 1623-1686

Great x 1 Grandfather: Thomas Pepys

GrandFather: Fermor aka Jerome Pepys

Father: John Pepys of Ashtead 8 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 1 Grandfather: John Drury

GrandMother: Frances Drury 7 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 1 Grandmother: Eleanor Sydney 6 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Jane Pepys 9 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England