Biography of William Batten 1601-1667

1661 Execution of the Fifth Monarchists

1661 Coronation of Charles II

1663 Battle of Ameixial

1663 Great Plague of London

1664 Comet

1665 Battle of Lowestoft

1665 Battle of Vågen

1666 St James' Day Battle

1666 Holme's Bonfire

1666 Great Fire of London

1667 Poll Bill

1667 Raid on the Medway

In 1601 William Batten was born.

In 1637 [his daughter] Martha Batten was born to William Batten (age 36).

In 1659 William Batten (age 58) and Elizabeth Turner were married.

Pepy's Diary. 25 May 1660. By the morning we were come close to the land, and every body made ready to get on shore. The King and the two Dukes did eat their breakfast before they went, and there being set some ship's diet before them, only to show them the manner of the ship's diet, they eat of nothing else but pease and pork, and boiled beef. I had Mr. Darcy in my cabin and Dr. Clerke, who eat with me, told me how the King had given £50 to Mr. Sheply for my Lord's servants, and £500 among the officers and common men of the ship. I spoke with the Duke of York about business, who called me Pepys by name, and upon my desire did promise me his future favour. Great expectation of the King's (age 29) making some Knights, but there was none. About noon (though the brigantine that Beale made was there ready to carry him) yet he would go in my Lord's barge with the two Dukes. Our Captain steered, and my Lord went along bare with him. I went, and Mr. Mansell, and one of the King's (age 29) footmen, with a dog that the King loved1, (which [dirted] the boat, which made us laugh, and me think that a King and all that belong to him are but just as others are), in a boat by ourselves, and so got on shore when the King did, who was received by General Monk (age 51) with all imaginable love and respect at his entrance upon the land of Dover. Infinite the crowd of people and the horsemen, citizens, and noblemen of all sorts. The Mayor of the town came and gave him his white staff, the badge of his place, which the King did give him again. The Mayor also presented him from the town a very rich Bible, which he took and said it was the thing that he loved above all things in the world. A canopy was provided for him to stand under, which he did, and talked awhile with General Monk (age 51) and others, and so into a stately coach there set for him, and so away through the town towards Canterbury, without making any stay at Dover. The shouting and joy expressed by all is past imagination. Seeing that my Lord did not stir out of his barge, I got into a boat, and so into his barge, whither Mr. John Crew stepped, and spoke a word or two to my Lord, and so returned, we back to the ship, and going did see a man almost drowned that fell out of his boat into the sea, but with much ado was got out. My Lord almost transported with joy that he had done all this without any the least blur or obstruction in the world, that could give an offence to any, and with the great honour he thought it would be to him. Being overtook by the brigantine, my Lord and we went out of our barge into it, and so went on board with Sir W. Batten (age 59)2, and the Vice and Rear-Admirals. At night my Lord supped and Mr. Thomas Crew with Captain Stoakes, I supped with the Captain, who told me what the King had given us. My Lord returned late, and at his coming did give me order to cause the marke to be gilded, and a Crown and C. R. to be made at the head of the coach table, where the King to-day with his own hand did mark his height, which accordingly I caused the painter to do, and is now done as is to be seen.

Note 1. Charles II's love of dogs is well known, but it is not so well known that his dogs were continually being stolen from him. In the "Mercurius Publicus", June 28-July 5, 1660, is the following advertisement, apparently drawn up by the King himself: "We must call upon you again for a Black Dog between a greyhound and a spaniel, no white about him, onely a streak on his brest, and his tayl a little bobbed. It is His Majesties own Dog, and doubtless was stoln, for the dog was not born nor bred in England, and would never forsake His master. Whoesoever findes him may acquaint any at Whitehal for the Dog was better known at Court, than those who stole him. Will they never leave robbing his Majesty! Must he not keep a Dog? This dog's place (though better than some imagine) is the only place which nobody offers to beg". (Quoted in "Notes and Queries", 7th S., vii. 26, where are printed two other advertisements of Charles's lost dogs.)

Note 2. Clarendon describes William Batten (age 59) as an obscure fellow, and, although unknown to the service, a good seaman, who was in 1642 made Surveyor to the Navy; in which employ he evinced great animosity against the King. The following year, while Vice-Admiral to the Earl of Warwick, he chased a Dutch man-of-war into Burlington Bay, knowing that Queen Henrietta Maria was on board; and then, learning that she had landed and was lodged on the quay, he fired above a hundred shot upon the house, some of which passing through her majesty's chamber, she was obliged, though indisposed, to retire for safety into the open fields. This act, brutal as it was, found favour with the Parliament. But Batten (age 59) became afterwards discontented; and, when a portion of the fleet revolted, he carried the "Constant Warwick", one of the best ships in the Parliament navy, over into Holland, with several seamen of note. For this act of treachery he was knighted and made a Rear-Admiral by Prince Charles. We hear no more of Batten (age 59) till the Restoration, when he became a Commissioner of the Navy, and was soon after M.P. for Rochester. See an account of his second wife, in note to November 24th, 1660, and of his illness and death, October 5th, 1667. He had a son, Benjamin, and a daughter, Martha, by his first wife. B.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jul 1660. Infinite of business that my heart and head and all were full. Met with purser Washington, with whom and a lady, a friend of his, I dined at the Bell Tavern in King Street, but the rogue had no more manners than to invite me and to let me pay my club. All the afternoon with my Lord, going up and down the town; at seven at night he went home, and there the principal Officers of the Navy1, among the rest myself was reckoned one. We had order to meet to-morrow, to draw up such an order of the Council as would put us into action before our patents were passed. At which my heart was glad. At night supped with my Lord, he and I together, in the great dining-room alone by ourselves, the first time I ever did it in London. Home to bed, my maid pretty well again.

Note 1. A list of the Officers of the Admiralty, May 31st, 1660. From a MS. in the Pepysian Library in Pepys's own handwriting. His Royal Highness James, Duke of York, Lord High Admiral, Sir George Carteret (age 50), Treasurer, Sir Robert Slingsby (age 49), (soon after) Comptroller. Sir William Batten (age 59), Surveyor. Samuel Pepys, Esq., Clerk of the Acts. John, Lord Berkeley (age 58) (of Stratton,) Sir William Pen (age 39), Commissioners. Peter Pett, Esq. B.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Jul 1660. We sat at the office this morning, Sir W. Batten (age 59) and Mr. Pett (age 49) being upon a survey to Chatham, Kent [Map]. This morning I sent my wife to my father's (age 59) and he is to give me £5 worth of pewter. After we rose at the office, I went to my father's (age 59), where my Uncle Fenner and all his crew and Captain Holland and his wife and my wife were at dinner at a venison pasty of the venison that I did give my mother the other day. I did this time show so much coldness to W. Joyce that I believe all the table took notice of it. After that to Westminster about my Lord's business and so home, my Lord having not been well these two or three days, and I hear that Mr. Barnwell at Hinchinbroke is fallen sick again. Home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jul 1660. The last night Sir W. Batten (age 59) and Sir W. Pen (age 39) came to their houses at the office. Met this morning and did business till noon. Dined at home and from thence to my Lord's where Will, my clerk, and I were all the afternoon making up my accounts, which we had done by night, and I find myself worth about £100 after all my expenses. At night I sent to W. Bowyer to bring me £100, being that he had in his hands of my Lord's. in keeping, out of which I paid Mr. Sheply all that remained due to my Lord upon my balance, and took the rest home with me late at night. We got a coach, but the horses were tired and could not carry us farther than St. Dunstan's [Map]. So we 'light and took a link and so home weary to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Aug 1660. To Westminster by water with Sir W. Batten (age 59) and Sir W. Pen (age 39) (our servants in another boat) to the Admiralty; and from thence I went to my Lord's to fetch him thither, where we stayed in the morning about ordering of money for the victuailers, and advising how to get a sum of money to carry on the business of the Navy. From thence dined with Mr. Blackburne at his house with his friends (his wife being in the country and just upon her return to London), where we were very well treated and merry. From thence W. Hewer (age 18) and I to the office of Privy Seal, where I stayed all the afternoon, and received about £40 for yesterday and to-day, at which my heart rejoiced for God's blessing to me, to give me this advantage by chance, there being of this £40 about £10 due to me for this day's work. So great is the present profit of this office, above what it was in the King's (age 30) time; there being the last month about 300 bills; whereas in the late King's (age 30) time it was much to have 40. With my money home by coach, it, being the first time that I could get home before our gates were shut since I came to the Navy office. When I came home I found my wife not very well of her old pain.... which she had when we were married first. I went and cast up the expense that I laid out upon my former house (because there are so many that are desirous of it, and I am, in my mind, loth to let it go out of my hands, for fear of a turn). I find my layings-out to come to about £20, which with my fine will come to about £22 to him that shall hire my house of me. [Pepys wished to let his house in Axe Yard [Map] now that he had apartments at the Navy Office.] To bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Aug 1660. Lord's Day. In the morning my wife tells me that the bitch has whelped four young ones and is very well after it, my wife having had a great fear that she would die thereof, the dog that got them being very big. This morning Sir W. Batten (age 59), Pen (age 39), and myself, went to church to the churchwardens, to demand a pew, which at present could not be given us, but we are resolved to have one built. So we staid and heard Mr. Mills;' a very, good minister. Home to dinner, where my wife had on her new petticoat that she bought yesterday, which indeed is a very fine cloth and a fine lace; but that being of a light colour, and the lace all silver, it makes no great show. Mr. Creed and my brother Tom (age 26) dined with me. After dinner my wife went and fetched the little puppies to us, which are very pretty ones. After they were gone, I went up to put my papers in order, and finding my wife's clothes lie carelessly laid up, I was angry with her, which I was troubled for. After that my wife and I went and walked in the garden, and so home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1660. This morning I went to White Hall with Sir W. Pen (age 39) by water, who in our passage told me how he was bred up under Sir W. Batten (age 59). We went to Mr. Coventry's (age 32) chamber, and consulted of drawing my papers of debts of the Navy against the afternoon for the Committee. So to the Admiralty, where W. Hewer (age 18) and I did them, and after that he went to his Aunt's Blackburn (who has a kinswoman dead at her house to-day, and was to be buried to-night, by which means he staid very late out). I to Westminster Hall [Map], where I met Mr. Crew (age 62) and dined with him, where there dined one Mr. Hickeman, an Oxford man, who spoke very much against the height of the now old clergy, for putting out many of the religious fellows of Colleges, and inveighing against them for their being drunk, which, if true, I am sorry to hear. After that towards Westminster, where I called on Mr. Pim, and there found my velvet coat (the first that ever I had) done, and a velvet mantle, which I took to the Privy Seal Office, and there locked them up, and went to the Queen's Court, and there, after much waiting, spoke with Colonel Birch (age 44), who read my papers, and desired some addition, which done I returned to the Privy Seal, where little to do, and with Mr. Moore towards London, and in our way meeting Monsieur Eschar (Mr. Montagu's man), about the Savoy, he took us to the Brazennose Tavern, and there drank and so parted, and I home by coach, and there, it being post-night, I wrote to my Lord to give him notice that all things are well; that General Monk (age 51) is made Lieutenant of Ireland, which my Lord Roberts (age 54) (made Deputy) do not like of, to be Deputy to any man but the King himself. After that to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Aug 1660. Office, and thence with Sir William Batten (age 59) and Sir William Pen (age 39) to the parish church to find out a place where to build a seat or a gallery to sit in, and did find one which is to be done speedily. Hence with them to dinner at a tavern in Thames Street, where they were invited to a roasted haunch of venison and other very good victuals and company. Hence to Whitehall to the Privy Seal, but nothing to do. At night by land to my father's (age 59), where I found my mother not very well. I did give her a pint of sack. My father came in, and Dr. T. Pepys (age 39), who talked with me in French about looking out for a place for him. But I found him a weak man, and speaks the worst French that ever I heard of one that had been so long beyond sea. Hence into St Pauls's Churchyard and bought Barkley's Argenis in Latin, and so home and to bed. I found at home that Captain Burr had sent me 4 dozen bottles of wine today. The King came back to Whitehall to-night.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Sep 1660. I did many things this morning at home before I went out, as looking over the joiners, who are flooring my diningroom, and doing business with Sir Williams1 both at the office, and so to Whitehall, and so to the Bullhead [Map], where we had the remains of our pasty, where I did give my verdict against Mr. Moore upon last Saturday's wager, where Dr. Fuller (age 52) coming in do confirm me in my verdict. From thence to my Lord's and despatched Mr. Cooke away with the things to my Lord. From thence to Axe Yard [Map] to my house, where standing at the door Mrs. Diana comes by, whom I took into my house upstairs, and there did dally with her a great while, and found that in Latin "Nulla puella negat2". So home by water, and there sat up late setting my papers in order, and my money also, and teaching my wife her music lesson, in which I take great pleasure. So to bed.

Note 1. "Both Sir Williams" is a favourite expression with Pepys, meaning Sir William Batten (age 59) and Sir William Pen (age 39).

Note 2. Nulla puella negat. She refused me nothing.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Sep 1660. To the office. From thence by coach upon the desire of the principal officers to a Master of Chancery to give Mr. Stowell his oath, whereby he do answer that he did hear Phineas Pett say very high words against the King a great while ago. Coming back our coach broke, and so Stowell and I to Mr. Rawlinson's (age 46), and after a glass of wine parted, and I to the office, home to dinner, where (having put away my boy in the morning) his father brought him again, but I did so clear up my boy's roguery to his father, that he could not speak against my putting him away, and so I did give him 10s. for the boy's clothes that I made him, and so parted and tore his indenture. All the afternoon with the principal officers at Sir W. Batten's (age 59) about Pett's business (where I first saw Col. Slingsby (age 49), who has now his appointment for Comptroller), but did bring it to no issue. This day I saw our Dedimus to be sworn in the peace by, which will be shortly. In the evening my wife being a little impatient I went along with her to buy her a necklace of pearl, which will cost £4 10s., which I am willing to comply with her in for her encouragement, and because I have lately got money, having now above £200 in cash beforehand in the world. Home, and having in our way bought a rabbit and two little lobsters, my wife and I did sup late, and so to bed. Great news now-a-day of the Duke d'Anjou's (age 19)1 desire to marry the Princesse Henrietta (age 16).

Note 1. Philip, Duke of Anjou (age 19), afterwards Duke of Orléans, brother of Louis XIV. (born 1640, died 1701), married the Princess Henrietta (age 16), youngest daughter of Charles I., who was born June 16th, 1644, at Exeter. She was known as "La belle Henriette". In May, 1670, she came to Dover on a political mission from Louis XIV. to her brother Charles II., but the visit was undertaken much against the wish of her husband. Her death occurred on her return to France, and was attributed to poison. It was the occasion of one of the finest of Bossuet's "Oraisons Funebres".

Pepy's Diary. 06 Sep 1660. To Whitehall by water with Sir W. Batten (age 59), and in our passage told me how Commissioner Pett (age 50) did pay himself for the entertainment that he did give the King at Chatham, Kent [Map] at his coming in, and 20s. a day all the time he was in Holland, which I wonder at, and so I see there is a great deal of envy between the two. At Whitehall I met with Commissioner Pett (age 50), who told me how Mr. Coventry (age 32) and Fairbank his solicitor are falling out, one complaining of the other for taking too great fees, which is too true. I find that Commissioner Pett (age 50) is under great discontent, and is loth to give too much money for his place, and so do greatly desire me to go along with him in what we shall agree to give Mr. Coventry (age 32), which I have promised him, but am unwilling to mix my fortune with him that is going down the wind. We all met this morning and afterwards at the Admiralty, where our business is to ask provision of victuals ready for the ships in the Downs, which we did, Mr. Gauden promising to go himself thither and see it done. Dined Will and I at my Lord's upon a joint of meat that I sent Mrs. Sarah for. Afterwards to my office and sent all my books to my Lord's, in order to send them to my house that I now dwell in. Home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Sep 1660. Office Day. News of the Duke's intention to go tomorrow to the fleet for a day or two to meet his sister. Col. Slingsby (age 49) and I to Whitehall, thinking to proffer our service to the Duke to wait upon him, but meeting with Sir G. Carteret (age 50) he sent us in all haste back again to hire two Catches for the present use of the Duke. So we returned and landed at the Bear [Map] at the Bridge foot, where we saw Southwark Fair (I having not at all seen Bartholomew Fair), and so to the Tower wharf, where we did hire two catches. So to the office and found Sir W. Batten (age 59) at dinner with some friends upon a good chine of beef, on which I ate heartily, I being very hungry. Home, where Mr. Snow (whom afterwards we called one another cozen) came to me to see me, and with him and one Shelston, a simple fellow that looks after an employment (that was with me just upon my going to sea last), to a tavern, where till late with them. So home, having drunk too much, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1660. At Sir W. Batten's (age 59) with Sir W. Pen (age 39) we drank our morning draft, and from thence for an hour in the office and dispatch a little business. Dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 59), and by this time I see that we are like to have a very good correspondence and neighbourhood, but chargeable. All the afternoon at home looking over my carpenters. At night I called Thos. Hater out of the office to my house to sit and talk with me. After he was gone I caused the girl to wash the wainscot of our parlour, which she did very well, which caused my wife and I good sport. Up to my chamber to read a little, and wrote my Diary for three or four days past. The Duke of York did go to-day by break of day to the Downs. The Duke of Gloucester (age 20) ill. The House of Parliament was to adjourn to-day. I know not yet whether it be done or no. To bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Sep 1660. At home all the morning looking over my workmen in my house. After dinner Sir W. Batten (age 59), Pen, and myself by coach to Westminster Hall [Map], where we met Mr. Wayte the lawyer to the Treasurer, and so we went up to the Committee of Parliament, which are to consider of the debts of the Army and Navy, and did give in our account of the twenty-five ships. Col. Birch (age 45) was very impertinent and troublesome. But at last we did agree to fit the accounts of our ships more perfectly for their view within a few days, that they might see what a trouble it is to do what they desire. From thence Sir Williams both going by water home, I took Mr. Wayte to the Rhenish Winehouse, and drank with him and so parted. Thence to Mr. Crew's (age 62) and spoke with Mr. Moore about the business of paying off Baron our share of the dividend. So on foot home, by the way buying a hat band and other things for my mourning to-morrow. So home and to bed. This day I heard that the Duke of York, upon the news of the death of his brother (deceased) yesterday, came hither by post last night.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1660. Lord's Day. my wife got up to put on her mourning to-day and to go to Church this morning. I up and set down my journall for these 5 days past. This morning came one from my father's (age 59) with a black cloth coat, made of my short cloak, to walk up and down in. To church my wife and I, with Sir W. Batten (age 59), where we heard of Mr. Mills a very good sermon upon these words, "So run that ye may obtain". After dinner all alone to Westminster. At Whitehall I met with Mr. Pierce and his wife (she newly come forth after childbirth) both in mourning for the Duke of Gloucester (deceased). She went with Mr. Child to Whitehall chapel and Mr. Pierce with me to the Abbey, where I expected to hear Mr. Baxter or Mr. Rowe preach their farewell sermon, and in Mr. Symons's pew I sat and heard Mr. Rowe. Before sermon I laughed at the reader, who in his prayer desires of God that He would imprint his word on the thumbs of our right hands and on the right great toes of our right feet. In the midst of the sermon some plaster fell from the top of the Abbey, that made me and all the rest in our pew afeard, and I wished myself out. After sermon with Mr. Pierce to Whitehall, and from thence to my Lord, but Diana did not come according to our agreement. So calling at my father's (age 59) (where my wife had been this afternoon but was gone home) I went home. This afternoon, the King having news of the Princess being come to Margate, Kent [Map], he and the Duke of York went down thither in barges to her.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Sep 1660. Office Day. From thence to dinner by coach with my wife to my Cozen Scott's, and the company not being come, I went over the way to the Barber's. So thither again to dinner, where was my uncle Fenner and my aunt, my father and mother, and others. Among the rest my Cozen Rich. Pepys1, their elder brother, whom I had not seen these fourteen years, ever since he came from New England. It was strange for us to go a gossiping to her, she having newly buried her child that she was brought to bed of. I rose from table and went to the Temple [Map] church, where I had appointed Sir W. Batten (age 59) to meet him; and there at Sir Heneage Finch Sollicitor General's chambers, before him and Sir W. Wilde2, Recorder of London (whom we sent for from his chamber) we were sworn justices of peace for Middlesex, Essex, Kent, and Southampton; with which honour I did find myself mightily pleased, though I am wholly ignorant in the duty of a justice of peace. From thence with Sir William to Whitehall by water (old Mr. Smith with us) intending to speak with Secretary Nicholas about the augmentation of our salaries, but being forth we went to the Three Tuns tavern, where we drank awhile, and then came in Col. Slingsby (age 49) and another gentleman and sat with us. From thence to my Lord's to enquire whether they have had any thing from my Lord or no.

Note 1. Richard Pepys, eldest son of Richard Pepys, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland. He went to Boston, Mass., in 1634, and returned to England about 1646.

Note 2. William Wilde, elected Recorder on November 3rd, 1659, and appointed one of the commissioners sent to Breda to desire Charles II to return to England immediately. He was knighted after the King's (age 30) return, called to the degree of Serjeant, and created a baronet, all in the same year. In 1668 he ceased to be Recorder, and was appointed judge of the Court of Common Pleas. In 1673 he was removed to the King's Bench [Map]. He was turned out of his office in 1679 on account of his action in connection with the Popish Plot, and died November 23rd of the same year.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1660. To the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 59), Colonel Slingsby (age 49), and I sat awhile, and Sir R. Ford (age 46)1 coming to us about some business, we talked together of the interest of this kingdom to have a peace with Spain and a war with France and Holland; where Sir R. Ford (age 46) talked like a man of great reason and experience. And afterwards I did send for a cup of tee2 (a China drink) of which I never had drank before, and went away. Then came Col. Birch (age 45) and Sir R. Browne by a former appointment, and with them from Tower wharf in the barge belonging to our office we went to Deptford, Kent [Map] to pay off the ship Success, which (Sir G. Carteret (age 50) and Sir W. Pen (age 39) coming afterwards to us) we did, Col. Birch (age 45) being a mighty busy man and one that is the most indefatigable and forward to make himself work of any man that ever I knew in my life. At the Globe we had a very good dinner, and after that to the pay again, which being finished we returned by water again, and I from our office with Col. Slingsby (age 49) by coach to Westminster (I setting him down at his lodgings by the way) to inquire for my Lord's coming thither (the King and the Princess3 coming up the river this afternoon as we were at our pay), and I found him gone to Mr. Crew's (age 62), where I found him well, only had got some corns upon his foot which was not well yet. My Lord told me how the ship that brought the Princess and him (The Tredagh) did knock six times upon the Kentish Knock4, which put them in great fear for the ship; but got off well. He told me also how the King had knighted Vice-Admiral Lawson (age 45) and Sir Richard Stayner (age 35). From him late and by coach home, where the plasterers being at work in all the rooms in my house, my wife was fain to make a bed upon the ground for her and me, and so there we lay all night.

Note 1. Sir Richard Ford was one of the commissioners sent to Breda to desire Charles II to return to England immediately.

Note 2. That excellent and by all Physicians, approved, China drink, called by the Chineans Tcha, by other nations Tay alias Tee, is sold at the Sultaness Head Coffee-House, in Sweetings Rents, by the "Royal Exchange, London". "Coffee, chocolate, and a kind of drink called tee, sold in almost every street in 1659".-Rugge's Diurnal. It is stated in "Boyne's Trade Tokens", ed. Williamson, vol. i., 1889, p. 593 that the word tea occurs on no other tokens than those issued from 'the Great Turk' (Morat ye Great) coffeehouse in Exchange Alley. The Dutch East India Company introduced tea into Europe in 1610, and it is said to have been first imported into England from Holland about 1650. The English "East India Company" purchased and presented 2 lbs. of tea to Charles II in 1660, and 23 lbs. in 1666. The first order for its importation by the company was in 1668, and the first consignment of it, amounting to 143 lbs., was received from Bantam in 1669 (see Sir George Birdwood's "Report on the Old Records at the India Office", 1890, p. 26). By act 12 Car. II., capp. 23, 24, a duty of 8d. per gallon was imposed upon the infusion of tea, as well as on chocolate and sherbet.

Note 3. "The Princess Royall came from Gravesend, Kent [Map] to Whitehall by water, attended by a noble retinue of about one hundred persons, gentry, and servants, and tradesmen, and tirewomen, and others, that took that opportunity to advance their fortunes, by coming in with so excellent a Princess as without question she is".-Rugge's Diurnal. A broadside, entitled "Ourania, the High and Mighty Lady the Princess Royal of Aurange, congratulated on her most happy arrival, September the 25th, 1660", was printed on the 29th.

Note 4. A shoal in the North Sea, off the Thames mouth, outside the Long Sand, fifteen miles N.N.E. of the North Foreland. It measures seven miles north-eastward, and about two miles in breadth. It is partly dry at low water. A revolving light was set up in 1840.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Sep 1660. Office Day. This morning Sir W. Batten (age 59) and Col. Slingsby (age 49) went with Col. Birch (age 45) and Sir Wm. Doyly to Chatham, Kent [Map] to pay off a ship there. So only Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I left here in town. All the afternoon among my workmen till 10 or 11 at night, and did give them drink and very merry with them, it being my luck to meet with a sort of drolling workmen on all occasions. To bed.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1660. With Sir W. Batten (age 59) and Pen (age 39) by water to White Hall, where a meeting of the Dukes of York and Albemarle, my Lord Sandwich (age 35) and all the principal officers, about the Winter Guard, but we determined of nothing. To my Lord's, who sent a great iron chest to White Hall; and I saw it carried, into the King's (age 30) closet, where I saw most incomparable pictures. Among the rest a book open upon a desk, which I durst have sworn was a reall book, and back again to my Lord, and dined all alone with him, who do treat me with a great deal of respect; and after dinner did discourse an hour with me, and advise about some way to get himself some money to make up for all his great expenses, saying that he believed that he might have any thing that he would ask of the King. This day Mr. Sheply and all my Lord's goods came from sea, some of them laid of the Wardrobe and some brought to my Lord's house. From thence to our office, where we met and did business, and so home and spent the evening looking upon the painters that are at work in my house. This day I heard the Duke speak of a great design that he and my Lord of Pembroke have, and a great many others, of sending a venture to some parts of Africa to dig for gold ore there. They intend to admit as many as will venture their money, and so make themselves a company. £250 is the lowest share for every man. But I do not find that my Lord do much like it. At night Dr. Fairbrother (for so he is lately made of the Civil Law) brought home my wife by coach, it being rainy weather, she having been abroad today to buy more furniture for her house.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Oct 1660. This morning Sir W. Batten (age 59) with Colonel Birch (age 45) to Deptford, to pay off two ships. Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I staid to do business, and afterwards together to White Hall, where I went to my Lord, and found him in bed not well, and saw in his chamber his picture1, very well done; and am with child2 till I get it copied out, which I hope to do when he is gone to sea.

Note 1. Peter Lely (age 42). Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich (age 35) in his Garter Robes and Garter Collar.

Note 2. A figurative expression for an eager longing desire, used by Udall and by Spenser. The latest authority given by Dr. Murray in the "New English Dictionary", is Bailey in 1725.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Oct 1660. Office day all the morning, and from thence with Sir W. Batten (age 59) and the rest of the officers to a venison pasty of his at the Dolphin, where dined withal Col. Washington, Sir Edward Brett, and Major Norwood, very noble company. After dinner I went home, where I found Mr. Cooke, who told me that my Lady Sandwich (age 35) is come to town to-day, whereupon I went to Westminster to see her, and found her at super, so she made me sit down all alone with her, and after supper staid and talked with her, she showing me most extraordinary love and kindness, and do give me good assurance of my uncle's resolution to make me his heir. From thence home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Oct 1660. I was forced to go to my Lord's to get him to meet the officers of the Navy this afternoon, and so could not go along with her, but I missed my Lord, who was this day upon the bench at the Sessions house. So I dined there, and went to White Hall, where I met with Sir W. Batten (age 59) and Pen (age 39), who with the Comptroller, Treasurer, and Mr. Coventry (age 32) (at his chamber) made up a list of such ships as are fit to be kept out for the winter guard, and the rest to be paid off by the Parliament when they can get money, which I doubt will not be a great while.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Oct 1660. This morning one came to me to advise with me where to make me a window into my cellar in lieu of one which Sir W. Batten (age 59) had stopped up, and going down into my cellar to look I stepped into a great heap of--by which I found that Mr. Turner's house of office is full and comes into my cellar, which do trouble me, but I shall have it helped.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Oct 1660. Office day. Much troubled all this morning in my mind about the business of my walk on the leads. I spoke of it to the Comptroller and the rest of the principal officers, who are all unwilling to meddle in anything that may anger my Lady Davis. And so I am fain to give over for the time that she do continue therein. Dined at home, and after dinner to Westminster Hall [Map], where I met with Billing (age 37) the quaker at Mrs. Michell's shop, who is still of the former opinion he was of against the clergymen of all sorts, and a cunning fellow I find him to be. Home, and there I had news that Sir W. Pen (age 39) is resolved to ride to Sir W. Batten's (age 59) country house to-morrow, and would have me go with him, so I sat up late, getting together my things to ride in, and was fain to cut an old pair of boots to make leathers for those I was to wear. This month I conclude with my mind very heavy for the loss of the leads, as also for the greatness of my late expenses, insomuch that I do not think that I have above £150 clear money in the world, but I have, I believe, got a great deal of good household stuff: I hear to-day that the Queen (age 50) is landed at Dover, and will be here on Friday next, November 2nd. my wife has been so ill of late of her old pain that I have not known her this fortnight almost, which is a pain to me.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Nov 1660. This morning Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I were mounted early, and had very merry discourse all the way, he being very good company. We came to Sir W. Batten's (age 59), where he lives like a prince, and we were made very welcome. Among other things he showed us my Lady's closet, where was great store of rarities; as also a chair, which he calls King Harry's chair, where he that sits down is catched with two irons, that come round about him, which makes good sport. Here dined with us two or three more country gentle men; among the rest Mr. Christmas, my old school-fellow, with whom I had much talk. He did remember that I was a great Roundhead when I was a boy, and I was much afraid that he would have remembered the words that I said the day the King was beheaded (that, were I to preach upon him, my text should be "The memory of the wicked shall rot"); but I found afterwards that he did go away from school before that time1. He did make us good sport in imitating Mr. Case, Ash, and Nye, the ministers, which he did very well, but a deadly drinker he is, and grown exceeding fat. From his house to an ale-house near the church, where we sat and drank and were merry, and so we mounted for London again, Sir W. Batten (age 59) with us. We called at Bow and drank there, and took leave of Mr. Johnson of Blackwall, who dined with us and rode with us thus far. So home by moonlight, it being about 9 o'clock before we got home.

Note 1. Pepys might well be anxious on this point, for in October of this year Phineas Pett, assistant master shipwright at Chatham, Kent [Map], was dismissed from his post for having when a Child spoken disrespectfully of the King. See ante, August 23rd.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Nov 1660. In the morning with Sir W. Batten (age 59) and Pen (age 39) by water to Westminster, where at my Lord's I met with Mr. Creed. With him to see my Lord's picture (now almost done), and thence to Westminster Hall [Map], where we found the Parliament met to-day, and thence meeting with Mr. Chetwind, I took them to the Sun, and did give them a barrel of oysters, and had good discourse; among other things Mr. Chetwind told me how he did fear that this late business of the Duke of York's (age 27) would prove fatal to my Lord Chancellor (age 51). From thence Mr. Creed and I to Wilkinson's, and dined together, and in great haste thence to our office, where we met all, for the sale of two ships by an inch of candle1 (the first time that ever I saw any of this kind), where I observed how they do invite one another, and at last how they all do cry, [To cry was to bid.] and we have much to do to tell who did cry last. The ships were the Indian, sold for £1,300, and the Half-moon, sold for £830. Home, and fell a-reading of the tryalls of the late men that were hanged for the King's death, and found good satisfaction in reading thereof.

Note 1. The old-fashioned custom of sale by auction by inch of candle was continued in sales by the Admiralty to a somewhat late date. See September 3rd, 1662.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1660. Up early. Sir Wm. Batten (age 59) and I to make up an account of the wages of the officers and mariners at sea, ready to present to the Committee of Parliament this afternoon. Afterwards came the Treasurer and Comptroller, and sat all the morning with us till the business was done. So we broke up, leaving the thing to be wrote over fair and carried to Trinity House for Sir Wm. Batten's (age 59) hand.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Nov 1660. Lord's Day. This morning I went to Sir W. Batten's (age 59) about going to Deptford, Kent [Map] to-morrow, and so eating some hog's pudding of my Lady's making, of the hog that I saw a fattening the other day at her house, he and I went to Church into our new gallery, the first time it was used, and it not being yet quite finished, there came after us Sir W. Pen (age 39), Mr. Davis, and his eldest son. There being no woman this day, we sat in the foremost pew, and behind us our servants, and I hope it will not always be so, it not being handsome for our servants to sit so equal with us. This day also did Mr. Mills begin to read all the Common Prayer, which I was glad of.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Nov 1660. Lay long in bed to-day. Sir Wm. Batten (age 59) went this morning to Deptford, Kent [Map] to pay off the Wolf. Mr. Comptroller and I sat a while at the office to do business, and thence I went with him to his house in Lime Street, a fine house, and where I never was before, and from thence by coach (setting down his sister at the new Exchange) to Westminster Hall [Map], where first I met with Jack Spicer and agreed with him to help me to tell money this afternoon. Hence to De Cretz, where I saw my Lord's picture finished, which do please me very well. So back to the Hall, where by appointment I met the Comptroller, and with him and three or four Parliament men I dined at Heaven, and after dinner called at Will's on Jack Spicer, and took him to Mr. Fox's (age 33), who saved me the labour of telling me the money by giving me; £3000 by consent (the other £1000 I am to have on Thursday next), which I carried by coach to the Exchequer, and put it up in a chest in Spicer's office. From thence walked to my father's (age 59), where I found my wife, who had been with my father to-day, buying of a tablecloth and a dozen of napkins of diaper the first that ever I bought in my life. My father and I took occasion to go forth, and went and drank at Mr. Standing's, and there discoursed seriously about my sister's coming to live with me, which I have much mind for her good to have, and yet I am much afeard of her ill-nature. Coming home again, he and I, and my wife, my mother and Pall, went all together into the little room, and there I told her plainly what my mind was, to have her come not as a sister in any respect, but as a servant, which she promised me that she would, and with many thanks did weep for joy, which did give me and my wife some content and satisfaction. So by coach home and to bed. The last night I should have mentioned how my wife and I were troubled all night with the sound of drums in our ears, which in the morning we found to be Mr. Davys's jack1, but not knowing the cause of its going all night, I understand to-day that they have had a great feast to-day.

Note 1. The date of the origin of smoke jacks does not appear to be known, but the first patent taken out for an improved smoke-jack by Peter Clare is dated December 24th, 1770. The smoke jack consists of a wind-wheel fixed in the chimney, which communicates motion by means of an endless band to a pulley, whence the motion is transmitted to the spit by gearing. In the valuable introduction to the volume of "Abridgments of Specifications relating to Cooking, 1634-1866" (Patent Office), mention is made of an Italian work by Bartolomeo Scappi, published first at Rome in 1572, and afterwards reprinted at Venice in 1622, which gives a complete account of the kitchens of the time and the utensils used in them. In the plates several roasting-jacks are represented, one worked by smoke or hot air and one by a spring.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Nov 1660. So home to dinner, and after that to the office till late at night, and so Sir W. Pen (age 39), the Comptroller, and I to the Dolphin, where we found Sir W. Batten (age 59), who is seldom a night from hence, and there we did drink a great quantity of sack and did tell many merry stories, and in good humours we were all. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Nov 1660. To Westminster, and it being very cold upon the water I went all alone to the Sun and drank a draft of mulled white wine, and so to Mr. De Cretz, whither I sent for J. Spicer (to appoint him to expect me this afternoon at the office, with the other £1000 from Whitehall), and here we staid and did see him give some finishing touches to my Lord's picture, so at last it is complete to my mind, and I leave mine with him to copy out another for himself, and took the original by a porter with me to my Lord's, where I found my Lord within, and staid hearing him and Mr. Child playing upon my Lord's new organ, the first time I ever heard it. My Lord did this day show me the King's (age 30) picture, which was done in Flanders, that the King did promise my Lord before he ever saw him, and that we did expect to have had at sea before the King came to us; but it came but to-day, and indeed it is the most pleasant and the most like him that ever I saw picture in my life. As dinner was coming on table, my wife came to my Lord's, and I got her carried in to my Lady, who took physic to-day, and was just now hiring of a French maid that was with her, and they could not understand one another till my wife came to interpret. Here I did leave my wife to dine with my Lord, the first time he ever did take notice of her as my wife, and did seem to have a just esteem for her. And did myself walk homewards (hearing that Sir W. Pen (age 39) was gone before in a coach) to overtake him and with much ado at last did in Fleet Street, and there I went in to him, and there was Sir Arnold Brames, and we all three to Sir W. Batten's (age 59) to dinner, he having a couple of Servants married to-day; and so there was a great number of merchants, and others of good quality on purpose after dinner to make an offering, which, when dinner was done, we did, and I did give ten shillings and no more, though I believe most of the rest did give more, and did believe that I did so too. From thence to Whitehall again by water to Mr. Fox (age 33) and by two porters carried away the other £1000. He was not within himself, but I had it of his kinsman, and did give him £4. and other servants something; but whereas I did intend to have given Mr. Fox (age 33) himself a piece of plate of £50 I was demanded £100, for the fee of the office at 6d. a pound, at which I was surprised, but, however, I did leave it there till I speak with my Lord. So I carried it to the Exchequer, where at Will's I found Mr. Spicer, and so lodged it at his office with the rest. From thence after a pot of ale at Will's I took boat in the dark and went for all that to the old Swan [Map], and so to Sir Wm. Batten's, and leaving some of the gallants at cards I went home, where I found my wife much satisfied with my Lord's discourse and respect to her, and so after prayers to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Nov 1660. Up early to my father's (age 59), where by appointment Mr. Moore came to me, and he and I to the Temple [Map], and thence to Westminster Hall [Map] to speak with Mr. Wm. Montagu about his looking upon the title of those lands which I do take as security for £3000 of my Lord's money. That being done Mr. Moore and I parted, and in the Hall I met with Mr. Fontleroy (my old acquaintance, whom I had not seen a long time), and he and I to the Swan [Map], and in discourse he seems to be wise and say little, though I know things are changed against his mind. Thence home by water, where my father, Mr. Snow, and Mr. Moore did dine with me. After dinner Mr. Snow and I went up together to discourse about the putting out of £80 to a man who lacks the money and would give me £15 per annum for 8 years for it, which I did not think profit enough, and so he seemed to be disappointed by my refusal of it, but I would not now part with my money easily. He seems to do it as a great favour to me to offer to come in upon a way of getting of money, which they call Bottomry1, which I do not yet understand, but do believe there may be something in it of great profit. After we were parted I went to the office, and there we sat all the afternoon, and at night we went to a barrel of oysters at Sir W. Batten's (age 59), and so home, and I to the setting of my papers in order, which did keep me up late. So to bed.

Note 1. "The contract of bottomry is a negotiable instrument, which may be put in suit by the person to whom it is transferred; it is in use in all countries of maritime commerce and interests. A contract in the nature of a mortgage of a ship, when the owner of it borrows money to enable him to carry on the voyage, and pledges the keel or bottom of the ship as a security for the repayment. If the ship be lost the lender loses his whole money; but if it returns in safety, then he shall receive back his principal, and also the premium stipulated to be paid, however it may exceed the usual or legal rate of interest".-Smyth's "Sailor's Word Book".

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1660. Lord's Day. In the morning to our own church, Where Mr. Powel (a crook legged man that went formerly with me to Paul's School), preached a good sermon. In the afternoon to our own church and my wife with me (the first time that she and my Lady Batten came to sit in our new pew), and after sermon my Lady took us home and there we supped with her and Sir W. Batten (age 59), and Pen, and were much made of. The first time that ever my wife was there. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Nov 1660. And so to see my Lord's picture at De Cretz, and he says it is very like him, and I say so too. After that to Westminster Hall [Map], and there hearing that Sir W. Batten (age 59) was at the Leg in the Palace, I went thither, and there dined with him and some of the Trinity House men who had obtained something to-day at the House of Lords concerning the Ballast Office. After dinner I went by water to London to the Globe in Cornhill [Map], and there did choose two pictures to hang up in my house, which my wife did not like when I came home, and so I sent the picture of Paris back again. To the office, where we sat all the afternoon till night. So home, and there came Mr. Beauchamp to me with the gilt tankard, and I did pay him for it £20. So to my musique and sat up late at it, and so to bed, leaving my wife to sit up till 2 o'clock that she may call the wench up to wash.

Note 1. Muscadine or muscadel, a rich sort of wine. 'Vinum muscatum quod moschi odorem referat.' "Quaffed off the muscadel, and threw the sops All in the sexton's face". Shakespeare, Taming of the Shrew, act iii. SC. 2.-M. B.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1660. In the morning seeing a great deal of foul water come into my parlour from under the partition between me and Mr. Davis, I did step thither to him and tell him of it, and he did seem very ready to have it stopt, and did also tell me how thieves did attempt to rob his house last night, which do make us all afraid. This noon I being troubled that the workmen that I have to do my door were called to Mr. Davis's away, I sent for them, when Mr. Davis sent to inquire a reason of, and I did give him a good one, that they were come on purpose to do some work with me that they had already begun, with which he was well pleased, and I glad, being unwilling to anger them. In the afternoon Sir W. Batten (age 59) and I met and did sell the ship Church for £440; and we asked £391, and that being done, I went home, and Dr. Petty came to me about Mr. Barlow's money, and I being a little troubled to be so importuned before I had received it, and that they would have it stopt in Mr. Fenn's hands, I did force the Doctor to go fetch the letter of attorney that he had to receive it only to make him same labour, which he did bring, and Mr. Hales came along with him from the Treasury with my money for the first quarter (Michaelmas last) that ever I received for this employment. So I paid the Dr. £25 and had £62 10s. for myself, and £7 10s. to myself also for Will's salary, which I do intend yet to keep for myself. With this my heart is much rejoiced, and do bless Almighty God that he is pleased to send so sudden and unexpected payment of my salary so soon after my great disbursements. So that now I am worth £200 again. In a great ease of mind and spirit I fell about the auditing of Mr. Shepley's last accounts with my Lord by my Lord's desire, and about that I sat till 12 o'clock at night, till I began to doze, and so to bed, with my heart praising God for his mercy to us.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Dec 1660. From thence I to my Lord's, and dined with him and told him what we had done to-day. Sir Tho. Crew (age 36) dined with my Lord to-day, and we were very merry with Mrs. Borfett, who dined there still as she has always done lately. After dinner Sir Tho. (age 36) and my Lady to the Playhouse [Map] to see "The Silent Woman". I home by water, and with Mr. Hater in my chamber all alone he and I did put this morning's design into order, which being done I did carry it to Sir W. Batten (age 59), where I found some gentlemen with him (Sir W. Pen (age 39) among the rest pretty merry with drink) playing at cards, and there I staid looking upon them till one o'clock in the morning, and so Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I went away, and I to bed. This day the Parliament voted that the bodies of Oliver, Ireton, Bradshaw, &c., should be taken up out of their graves in the Abbey, and drawn to the gallows, and there hanged and buried under it: which (methinks) do trouble me that a man of so great courage as he was, should have that dishonour, though otherwise he might deserve it enough.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Dec 1660. This morning some of the Commissioners of Parliament and Sir W. Batten (age 59) went to Sir G. Carteret's (age 50) office here in town, and paid off the Chesnut. I carried my wife to White Friars and landed her there, and myself to Whitehall to the Privy Seal, where abundance of pardons to seal, but I was much troubled for it because that there are no fees now coming for them to me. Thence Mr. Moore and I alone to the Leg in King Street, and dined together on a neat's tongue and udder. From thence by coach to Mr. Crew's (age 62) to my Lord, who told me of his going out of town to-morrow to settle the militia in Huntingdonshire, and did desire me to lay up a box of some rich jewels and things that there are in it, which I promised to do. After much free discourse with my Lord, who tells me his mind as to his enlarging his family, &c., and desiring me to look him out a Master of the Horse and other servants, we parted. From thence I walked to Greatorex (age 35) (he was not within), but there I met with Mr. Jonas Moore (age 43)1, and took him to the Five Bells,' and drank a glass of wine and left him. To the Temple [Map], when Sir R. Parkhurst (as was intended the last night) did seal the writings, and is to have the £2000 told to-morrow. From, thence by water to Parliament Stairs, and there at an alehouse to Doling (who is suddenly to go into Ireland to venture his fortune); Simonds D'Ewes 1st Baronet (who is at a great loss for £200 present money, which I was loth to let him have, though I could now do it, and do love him and think him honest and sufficient, yet lothness to part with money did dissuade me from it); Luellin (who was very drowsy from a dose that he had got the last night), Mr. Mount and several others, among the rest one Mr. Pierce, an army man, who did make us the best sport for songs and stories in a Scotch tone (which he do very well) that ever I heard in my life. I never knew so good a companion in all my observation. From thence to the bridge by water, it being a most pleasant moonshine night, with a waterman who did tell such a company of bawdy stories, how once he carried a lady from Putney in such a night as this, and she bade him lie down by her, which he did, and did give her content, and a great deal more roguery.

Note 1. Jonas Moore (age 43) was born at Whitley, Lancashire, February 8th, 1617, and was appointed by Charles I tutor to the Duke of York (age 27). Soon after the Restoration he was knighted and made Surveyor-General of the Ordnance. He was famous as a mathematician, and was one of the founders of the Royal Society. He died August 27th, 1679, and at his funeral sixty pieces of ordnance were discharged at the Tower.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Dec 1660. Lord's Day. Being called up early by Sir W. Batten (age 59) I rose and went to his house and he told me the ill news that he had this morning from Woolwich, Kent [Map], that the Assurance (formerly Captain Holland's ship, and now Captain Stoakes's, designed for Guiny and manned and victualled), was by a gust of wind sunk down to the bottom. Twenty men drowned. Sir Williams both went by barge thither to see how things are, and I am sent to the Duke of York (age 27) to tell him, and by boat with some other company going to Whitehall from the Old Swan [Map]. I went to the Duke. And first calling upon Mr. Coventry (age 32) at his chamber, I went to the Duke's bed-side, who had sat up late last night, and lay long this morning, who was much surprised, therewith. This being done I went to chappell, and sat in Mr. Blagrave's pew, and there did sing my part along with another before the King, and with much ease. From thence going to my Lady I met with a letter from my Lord (which Andrew had been at my house to bring me and missed me), commanding me to go to Mr. Denham, to get a man to go to him to-morrow to Hinchinbroke, to contrive with him about some alterations in his house, which I did and got Mr. Kennard. Dined with my Lady and staid all the afternoon with her, and had infinite of talk of all kind of things, especially of beauty of men and women, with which she seems to be much pleased to talk of. From thence at night to Mr. Kennard and took him to Mr. Denham, the Surveyor's. Where, while we could not speak with him, his chief man (Mr. Cooper) did give us a cup of good sack. From thence with Mr. Kennard to my Lady who is much pleased with him, and after a glass of sack there; we parted, having taken order for a horse or two for him and his servant to be gone to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Dec 1660. In the morning to Alderman Backwell's (age 42) for the candlesticks for Mr. Coventry (age 32), but they being not done I went away, and so by coach to Mr. Crew's (age 62), and there took some money of Mr. Moore's for my Lord, and so to my Lord's, where I found Sir Thomas Bond (whom I never saw before) with a message from the Queen (age 51) about vessells for the carrying over of her goods, and so with him to Mr. Coventry (age 32), and thence to the office (being soundly washed going through the bridge) to Sir Wm. Batten (age 59) and Pen (age 39) (the last of whom took physic to-day), and so I went up to his chamber, and there having made an end of the business I returned to White Hall by water, and dined with my Lady Sandwich (age 35), who at table did tell me how much fault was laid upon Dr. Frazer and the rest of the Doctors, for the death of the Princess!

Pepy's Diary. 27 Dec 1660. In the morning to Alderman Backwell's (age 42) again, where I found the candlesticks done, and went along with him in his coach to my Lord's and left the candlesticks with Mr. Shepley. I staid in the garden talking much with my Lord, who do show me much of his love and do communicate his mind in most things to me, which is my great content. Home and with my wife to Sir W. Batten's (age 59) to dinner, where much and good company. My wife not very well went home, I staid late there seeing them play at cards, and so home to bed. This afternoon there came in a strange lord to Sir William Batten's (age 59) by a mistake and enters discourse with him, so that we could not be rid of him till Sir Arn. Breames and Mr. Bens and Sir W. Pen (age 39) fell a-drinking to him till he was drunk, and so sent him away.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1661. This day I lent Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Captn. Rider my chine of beef for to serve at dinner tomorrow at Trinity House, Deptford [Map], the Duke of Albemarle (age 52) being to be there and all the rest of the Brethren, it being a great day for the reading over of their new Charter, which the King hath newly given them.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1661. This morning likewise, we had order to see guards set in all the King's yards; and so we do appoint who and who should go to them. Sir Wm. Batten (age 60) to Chatham, Kent [Map], Colonel Slingsby (age 50) and I to Deptford, Kent [Map] and Woolwich, Kent [Map]. Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] being a garrison, needs none.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jan 1661. The arms being come this morning from the Tower, we caused them to be distributed. I spent much time walking with Lieutenant Lambert, walking up and down the yards, who did give me much light into things there, and so went along with me and dined with us. After dinner Mrs. Pett, her husband being gone this morning with Sir W. Batten (age 60) to Chatham, Kent [Map], lent us her coach, and carried us to Woolwich, Kent [Map], where we did also dispose of the arms there and settle the guards. So to Mr. Pett's (age 50), the shipwright, and there supped, where he did treat us very handsomely (and strange it is to see what neat houses all the officers of the King's yards have), his wife a proper woman, and has been handsome, and yet has a very pretty hand.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jan 1661. So back again and went on shore at Chatham, Kent [Map], where I had ordered the coach to wait for us. Here I heard that Sir William Batten (age 60) and his lady (who I knew were here, and did endeavour to avoyd) were now gone this morning to London. So we took coach, and I went into the coach, and went through the town, without making stop at our inn, but left J. Goods to pay the reckoning. So I rode with my lady in the coach, and the page on the horse that I should have rid on-he desiring it. It begun to be dark before we could come to Dartford, and to rain hard, and the horses to fayle, which was our great care to prevent, for fear of my Lord's displeasure, so here we sat up for to-night, as also Captains Cuttance and Blake, who came along with us. We sat and talked till supper, and at supper my Lady and I entered into a great dispute concerning what were best for a man to do with his estate-whether to make his elder son heir, which my Lady is for, and I against, but rather to make all equall. This discourse took us much time, till it was time to go to bed; but we being merry, we bade my Lady goodnight, and intended to have gone to the Post-house to drink, and hear a pretty girl play of the cittern (and indeed we should have lain there, but by a mistake we did not), but it was late, and we could not hear her, and the guard came to examine what we were; so we returned to our Inn and to bed, the page and I in one bed, and the two captains in another, all in one chamber, where we had very good mirth with our most abominable lodging.

Execution of the Fifth Monarchists

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1661. This morning Sir W. Batten (age 60), the Comptroller (age 50) and I to Westminster, to the Commissioners for paying off the Army and Navy, where the Duke of Albemarle (age 52) was; and we sat with our hats on, and did discourse about paying off the ships and do find that they do intend to undertake it without our help; and we are glad of it, for it is a work that will much displease the poor seamen, and so we are glad to have no hand in it. From thence to the Exchequer, and took £200 and carried it home, and so to the office till night, and then to see Sir W. Pen (age 39), whither came my [his wife] Lady Batten and her daughter, and then I sent for my wife, and so we sat talking till it was late. So home to supper and then to bed, having eat no dinner to-day. It is strange what weather we have had all this winter; no cold at all; but the ways are dusty, and the flyes fly up and down, and the rose-bushes are full of leaves, such a time of the year as was never known in this world before here. This day many more of the Fifth Monarchy men were hanged.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jan 1661. At home all day. There dined with me Sir William Batten (age 60) and his lady and daughter, Sir W. Pen (age 39), Mr. Fox (age 33) (his lady being ill could not come), and Captain Cuttance; the first dinner I have made since I came hither. This cost me above £5, and merry we were-only my chimney smokes. In the afternoon Mr. Hater bringing me my last quarter's salary, which I received of him, and so I have now Mr. Barlow's money in my hands. The company all go away, and by and by Sir Wms. both and my [his wife] Lady Batten and his daughter come again and supped with me and talked till late, and so to bed, being glad that the trouble is over.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1661. To church again, a good sermon of Mr. Mills, and after sermon Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I an hour in the garden talking, and he did answer me to many things, I asked Mr. Coventry's (age 33) opinion of me, and Sir W. Batten's (age 60) of my Lord Sandwich (age 35), which do both please me. Then to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where very merry, and here I met the Comptroller (age 50) and his lady and daughter (the first time I ever saw them) and Mrs. Turner (age 38), who and her husband supped with us here (I having fetched my wife thither), and after supper we fell to oysters, and then Mr. Turner went and fetched some strong waters, and so being very merry we parted, and home to bed. This day the parson read a proclamation at church, for the keeping of Wednesday next, the 30th of January, a fast for the murther of the late King.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1661. Mr. Moore making up accounts with me all this morning till Lieut. Lambert (age 41) came, and so with them over the water to Southwark, and so over the fields to Lambeth, and there drank, it being a most glorious and warm day, even to amazement, for this time of the year. Thence to my Lord's, where we found my Lady gone with some company to see Hampton Court [Map], so we three went to BlackFryers (the first time I ever was there since plays begun), and there after great patience and little expectation, from so poor beginning, I saw three acts of "The Mayd in ye Mill" acted to my great content. But it being late, I left the play and them, and by water through bridge home, and so to Mr. Turner's house, where the Comptroller (age 50), Sir William Batten (age 60), and Mr. Davis and their ladies; and here we had a most neat little but costly and genteel supper, and after that a great deal of impertinent mirth by Mr. Davis, and some catches, and so broke up, and going away, Mr. Davis's eldest son took up my old Lady Slingsby in his arms, and carried her to the coach, and is said to be able to carry three of the biggest men that were in the company, which I wonder at. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jan 1661. Back to the Old James in Bishopsgate Street, where Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Sir Wm. Rider met him about business of the Trinity House, Deptford [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 04 Feb 1661. That being done, he and I back again home, where I met with my father and mother going to my cozen Snow's to Blackwall [Map], and had promised to bring me and my wife along with them, which we could not do because we are to go to the Dolphin to-day to a dinner of Capt. Tayler's. So at last I let my wife go with them, and I to the tavern, where Sir William Pen (age 39) and the Comptroller (age 50) and several others were, men and women; and we had a very great and merry dinner; and after dinner the Comptroller (age 50) begun some sports, among others the naming of people round and afterwards demanding questions of them that they are forced to answer their names to, which do make very good sport. And here I took pleasure to take the forfeits of the ladies who would not do their duty by kissing of them; among others a pretty lady, who I found afterwards to be wife to Sir W. Batten's (age 60) son.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Feb 1661. Home, and then with my wife to see Sir W. Batten (age 60), who could not be with us this day being ill, but we found him at cards, and here we sat late, talking with my Lady and others and Dr. Whistler1, who I found good company and a very ingenious man. So home and to bed.

Note 1. Daniel Whistler, M.D., Fellow of Merton College, whose inaugural dissertation on rickets in 1645 contains the earliest printed account of that disease. He was Gresham Professor of Geometry, 1648-57, and held several offices at the College of Physicians, being elected President in 1683. He was one of the original Fellows of the Royal Society. Dr. Munk, in his "Roll of the Royal College of Physicians", speaks very unfavourably of Whistler, and says that he defrauded the college. He died May 11th, 1684.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Feb 1661. Called up by my Cozen Snow, who sat by me while I was trimmed, and then I drank with him, he desiring a courtesy for a friend, which I have done for him. Then to the office, and there sat long, then to dinner, Captain Murford with me. I had a dish of fish and a good hare, which was sent me the other day by Goodenough the plasterer. So to the office again, where Sir W. Pen (age 39) and I sat all alone, answering of petitions and nothing else, and so to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where comes Mr. Jessop (one whom I could not formerly have looked upon, and now he comes cap in hand to us from the Commissioners of the Navy, though indeed he is a man of a great estate and of good report), about some business from them to us, which we answered by letter. Here I sat long with Sir W., who is not well, and then home and to my chamber, and some little, music, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Feb 1661. I dined with my Lord, and then with Mr. Shepley and Creed (who talked very high of France for a fine country) to the tavern, and then I home. To the office, where the two Sir Williams had staid for me, and then we drew up a letter to the Commissioners of Parliament again, and so to Sir W. Batten (age 60), where I staid late in talk, and so home, and after writing the letter fair then I went to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Feb 1661. With Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Pen (age 39) to Whitehall to Mr. Coventry's (age 33) chamber, to debate upon the business we were upon the other day morning, and thence to Westminster Hall [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 13 Feb 1661. At the office all the morning; dined at home, and poor Mr. Wood with me, who after dinner would have borrowed money of me, but I would lend none. Then to Whitehall by coach with Sir W. Pen (age 39), where we did very little business, and so back to Mr. Rawlinson's (age 47), where I took him and gave him a cup of wine, he having formerly known Mr. Rawlinson (age 47), and here I met my uncle Wight, and he drank with us, and with him to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), whither I sent for my wife, and we chose Valentines' against to-morrow1, my wife chose me, which did much please me; my [his wife] Lady Batten Sir W. Pen (age 39), &c. Here we sat late, and so home to bed, having got my Lady Batten to give me a spoonful of honey for my cold.

Note 1. The observation of St. Valentine's day is very ancient in this country. Shakespeare makes Ophelia sing "To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day, All in the morning betime, And I a maid at your window To be your Valentine". Hamlet, act iv. sc. 5.-M. B.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Feb 1661. About 10 o'clock we, with a great deal of company, went down by our barge to Deptford, and there only went to see how forward Mr. Pett's (age 50) yacht is; and so all into the barge again, and so to Woolwich, Kent [Map], on board the Rose-bush, Captain Brown's' ship, that is brother-in-law to Sir W. Batten (age 60), where we had a very fine dinner, dressed on shore, and great mirth and all things successfull; the first time I ever carried my wife a-ship-board, as also my boy Wayneman, who hath all this day been called young Pepys, as Sir W. Pen's (age 39) boy young Pen.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Feb 1661. Valentine's Day. Up early and to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), but would not go in till I asked whether they that opened the door was a man or a woman, and Mingo, who was there, answered a woman, which, with his tone, made me laugh; so up I went and took Mrs. Martha for my Valentine (which I do only for complacency), and Sir W. Batten (age 60) he go in the same manner to my wife, and so we were very merry.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Feb 1661. Lord's Day. A most tedious, unreasonable, and impertinent sermon, by an Irish Doctor. His text was "Scatter them, O Lord, that delight in war". Sir Wm. Batten (age 60) and I very much angry with the parson. And so I to Westminster as soon as I came home to my Lord's, where I dined with Mr. Shepley and Howe. After dinner (without speaking to my Lord), Mr. Shepley and I into the city, and so I home and took my wife to my uncle Wight's, and there did sup with them, and so home again and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Feb 1661. In the evening Mrs. The. and Joyce took us all into the coach home, calling in Bishopsgate Street, thinking to have seen a new Harpsicon1 that she had a making there, but it was not done, and so we did not see it. Then to my home, where I made very much of her, and then she went home. Then my wife to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), and there sat a while; he having yesterday sent my wife half-a-dozen pairs of gloves, and a pair of silk stockings and garters, for her Valentine's gift. Then home and to bed.

Note 1. The harpsichord is an instrument larger than a spinet, with two or three strings to a note.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Feb 1661. This my birthday, 28 years. This morning Sir W. Batten (age 60), Pen, and I did some business, and then I by water to Whitehall, having met Mr. Hartlibb (age 61) by the way at Alderman Backwell's (age 43). So he did give me a glass of Rhenish wine at the Steeleyard, and so to Whitehall by water. He continues of the same bold impertinent humour that he was always of and will ever be. He told me how my Lord Chancellor (age 52) had lately got the Duke of York (age 27) and Duchess, and her woman, my Lord Ossory's and a Doctor, to make oath before most of the judges of the kingdom, concerning all the circumstances of their marriage. And in fine, it is confessed that they were not fully married till about a month or two before she was brought to bed; but that they were contracted long before, and time enough for the child to be legitimate1. But I do not hear that it was put to the judges to determine whether it was so or no.

Note 1. The Duke of York's (age 27) marriage took place September 3rd, 1660. Anne Hyde was contracted to the Duke at Breda, November 24th, 1659.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Feb 1661. Sunday. Mr. Mills made as excellent a sermon in the morning against drunkenness as ever I heard in my life. I dined at home; another good one of his in the afternoon. My Valentine had her fine gloves on at church to-day that I did give her. After sermon my wife and I unto Sir Wm. Batten (age 60) and sat awhile. Then home, I to read, then to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1661. So all by coach to my house, where I found my Valentine with my wife, and here they drank, and then went away. Then I sat and talked with my Valentine and my wife a good while, and then saw her home, and went to Sir W. Batten (age 60) to the Dolphin, where Mr. Newborne, &c., were, and there after a quart or two of wine, we home, and I to bed....

Pepy's Diary. 04 Mar 1661. My Lord went this morning on his journey to Hinchingbroke, Mr. Parker with him; the chief business being to look over and determine how, and in what manner, his great work of building shall be done. Before his going he did give me some jewells to keep for him, viz., that that the King of Sweden did give him, with the King's own picture in it, most excellently done; and a brave George, all of diamonds, and this with the greatest expressions of love and confidence that I could imagine or hope for, which is a very great joy to me. To the office all the forenoon. Then to dinner and so to Whitehall to Mr. Coventry (age 33) about several businesses, and then with Mr. Moore, who went with me to drink a cup of ale, and after some good discourse then home and sat late talking with Sir W. Batten (age 60). So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1661. At the office all the morning. At dinner Sir W. Batten (age 60) came and took me and my wife to his house to dinner, my Lady being in the country, where we had a good Lenten dinner. Then to Whitehall with Captn. Cuttle, and there I did some business with Mr. Coventry (age 33), and after that home, thinking to have had Sir W. Batten (age 60), &c., to have eat a wigg1 at my house at night. But my Lady being come home out of the country ill by reason of much rain that has fallen lately, and the waters being very high, we could not, and so I home and to bed.

Note 1. Wigg, a kind of north country bun or tea-cake, still so called, to my knowledge, in Staffordshire.-M. B.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Mar 1661. All the morning at the office. At noon Sir W. Batten (age 60), Col. Slingsby (age 50) and I by coach to the Tower, to Sir John Robinson's, to dinner; where great good cheer. High company; among others the Duchess of Albemarle (age 41), who is ever a plain homely dowdy. After dinner, to drink all the afternoon. Towards night the Duchess and ladies went away. Then we set to it again till it was very late. And at last came in Sir William Wale, almost fuddled; and because I was set between him and another, only to keep them from talking and spoiling the company (as we did to others), he fell out with the Lieutenant of the Tower; but with much ado we made him under stand his error, and then all quiet. And so he carried Sir William Batten (age 60) and I home again in his coach, and so I almost overcome with drink went to bed. I was much contented to ride in such state into the Tower, and be received among such high company, while Mr. Mount, my Lady Duchess's gentleman usher, stood waiting at table, whom I ever thought a man so much above me in all respects; also to hear the discourse of so many high Cavaliers of things past. It was a great content and joy to me.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Mar 1661. At the office about business all the morning, so to the Exchange [Map], and there met with Nick Osborne lately married, and with him to the Fleece, where we drank a glass of wine. So home, where I found Mrs. Hunt in great trouble about her husband's losing of his place in the Excise. From thence to Guildhall [Map], and there set my hand to the book before Colonel King for my sea pay, and blessed be God! they have cast me at midshipman's pay, which do make my heart very glad. So, home, and there had Sir W. Batten (age 60) and my Lady and all their company and Capt. Browne and his wife to a collation at my house till it was late, and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1661. With Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Pen (age 39) to Mr. Coventry's (age 33), and there had a dispute about my claim to the place of Purveyor of Petty-provisions, and at last to my content did conclude to have my hand to all the bills for these provisions and Mr. Turner to purvey them, because I would not have him to lose the place. Then to my Lord's, and so with Mr. Creed to an alehouse, where he told me a long story of his amours at Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to one of Mrs. Boat's daughters, which was very pleasant. Dined with my Lord and Lady, and so with Mr. Creed to the Theatre [Map], and there saw "King and no King", well acted. Thence with him to the Cock alehouse at Temple Bar, where he did ask my advice about his amours, and I did give him it, which was to enquire into the condition of his competitor, who is a son of Mr. Gauden's, and that I promised to do for him, and he to make (what) use he can of it to his advantage. Home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Mar 1661. Lord's Day. At church in the morning, a stranger preached a good honest and painfull sermon. My wife and I dined upon a chine of beef at Sir W. Batten's (age 60), so to church again. Then home, and put some papers in order. Then to supper at Sir W. Batten's (age 60) again, where my wife by chance fell down and hurt her knees exceedingly. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Mar 1661. This morning early Sir W. Batten (age 60) went to Rochester, Kent [Map], where he expects to be chosen Parliament man. At the office all the morning, dined at home and with my wife to Westminster, where I had business with the Commissioner for paying the seamen about my Lord's pay, and my wife at Mrs. Hunt's. I called her home, and made inquiry at Mr. Greatorex's (age 36) and in other places to hear of Mr. Barlow (thinking to hear that he is dead), but I cannot find it so, but the contrary.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Mar 1661. This day I saw the Florence Ambassador go to his audience, the weather very foul, and yet he and his company very gallant. After I was a-bed Sir W. Pen (age 39) sent to desire me to go with him to-morrow morning to meet Sir W. Batten (age 60) coming from Rochester, Kent [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 22 Mar 1661. This morning I rose early, and my [his wife] Lady Batten knocked at her door that comes into one of my chambers, and called me to know whether I and my wife were ready to go. So my wife got her ready, and about eight o'clock I got a horseback, and my Lady and her two daughters, and Sir W. Pen (age 39) into coach, and so over London Bridge, and thence to Dartford. The day very pleasant, though the way bad. Here we met with Sir W. Batten (age 60), and some company along with him, who had assisted him in his election at Rochester, Kent [Map]; and so we dined and were very merry.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Mar 1661. At 5 o'clock we set out again in a coach home, and were very merry all the way. At Deptford, Kent [Map] we met with Mr. Newborne, and some other friends and their wives in a coach to meet us, and so they went home with us, and at Sir W. Batten's (age 60) we supped, and thence to bed, my head akeing mightily through the wine that I drank to-day.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Mar 1661. Lord's Day. My wife and I to church, and then home with Sir W. Batten (age 60) and my Lady to dinner, where very merry, and then to church again, where Mr. Mills made a good sermon. Home again, and after a walk in the garden Sir W. Batten's (age 60) two daughters came and sat with us a while, and I then up to my chamber to read.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Mar 1661. At last we made Mingo, Sir W. Batten's (age 60) black, and Jack, Sir W. Pen's (age 39), dance, and it was strange how the first did dance with a great deal of seeming skill. Home, where I found my wife all day in her chamber. So to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Mar 1661. Up among my workmen with great pleasure. Then to the office, where I found Sir W. Pen (age 39) sent down yesterday to Chatham, Kent [Map] to get two great ships in readiness presently to go to the East Indies upon some design against the Dutch, we think, at Goa but it is a great secret yet. Dined at home, came Mr. Shepley and Moore, and did business with both of them. After that to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where great store of company at dinner. Among others my schoolfellow, Mr. Christmas, where very merry, and hither came letters from above for the fitting of two other ships for the East Indies in all haste, and so we got orders presently for the Hampshire and Nonsuch. Then home and there put some papers in order, and not knowing what to do, the house being so dirty, I went to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Mar 1661. Sunday. At church, where a stranger preached like a fool. From thence home and dined with my wife, she staying at home, being unwilling to dress herself, the house being all dirty. To church again, and after sermon I walked to my father's, and to Mrs. Turner's (age 38), where I could not woo The. to give me a lesson upon the harpsicon and was angry at it. So home and finding Will abroad at Sir W. Batten's (age 60) talking with the people there (Sir W. and my Lady being in the country), I took occasion to be angry with him, and so to prayers and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1661. This day my waiting at the Privy Seal comes in again. Up early among my workmen. So to the once, and went home to dinner with Sir W. Batten (age 60), and after that to the Goat Tavern by Charing Cross to meet Dr. Castle, where he and I drank a pint of wine and talked about Privy Seal business.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1661. Then to the Privy Seal, and signed some things, and so to White-fryars and saw "The Little Thiefe", which is a very merry and pretty play, and the little boy do very well. Then to my Father's, where I found my mother and my wife in a very good mood, and so left them and went home. Then to the Dolphin to Sir W. Batten (age 60), and Pen (age 39), and other company; among others Mr. Delabar; where strange how these men, who at other times are all wise men, do now, in their drink, betwitt and reproach one another with their former conditions, and their actions as in public concernments, till I was ashamed to see it. But parted all friends at 12 at night after drinking a great deal of wine. So home and alone to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Apr 1661. Up among my workmen, my head akeing all day from last night's debauch. To the office all the morning, and at noon dined with Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Pen (age 39), who would needs have me drink two drafts of sack to-day to cure me of last night's disease, which I thought strange but I think find it true1.

Note 1. The proverb, "A hair of the dog that bit you", which probably had originally a literal meaning, has long been used to inculcate the advice of the two Sir Williams.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Apr 1661. Up among my workmen and so to the office, and then to Sir W. Pen's (age 39) with the other Sir William and Sir John Lawson (age 46) to dinner, and after that, with them to Mr. Lucy's, a merchant, where much good company, and there drank a great deal of wine, and in discourse fell to talk of the weight of people, which did occasion some wagers, and where, among others, I won half a piece to be spent. Then home, and at night to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), and there very merry with a good barrell of oysters, and this is the present life I lead. Home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Apr 1661. After dinner, my Lord and I and Mr. Shepley did look over our accounts and settle matters of money between us; and my Lord did tell me much of his mind about getting money and other things of his family, &c. Then to my father's, where I found Mr. Hunt and his wife at supper with my father and mother and my wife, where after supper I left them and so home, and then I went to Sir W. Batten's (age 60) and resolved of a journey tomorrow to Chatham, Kent [Map], and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1661. Up early, my [his wife] Lady Batten knocking at her door that comes into one of my chambers. I did give directions to my people and workmen, and so about 8 o'clock we took barge at the Tower, Sir William Batten (age 60) and his lady, Mrs. Turner (age 38), Mr. Fowler and I A very pleasant passage and so to Gravesend, Kent [Map], where we dined, and from thence a coach took them and me, and Mr. Fowler with some others came from Rochester, Kent [Map] to meet us, on horseback. At Rochester, Kent [Map], where alight at Mr. Alcock's and there drank and had good sport, with his bringing out so many sorts of cheese. Then to the Hillhouse at Chatham, where I never was before, and I found a pretty pleasant house and am pleased with the arms that hang up there. Here we supped very merry, and late to bed; Sir William telling me that old Edgeborrow, his predecessor, did die and walk in my chamber, did make me some what afeard, but not so much as for mirth's sake I did seem. So to bed in the treasurer's chamber.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1661. After dinner, we went to fit books and things (Tom Hater being this morning come to us) for the sale, by an inch of candle, and very good sport we and the ladies that stood by had, to see the people bid. Among other things sold there was all the State's arms, which Sir W. Batten (age 60) bought; intending to set up some of the images in his garden, and the rest to burn on the Coronacion night. The sale being done, the ladies and I and Captain Pett and [his future son-in-law] Mr. Castle (age 32) took barge and down we went to see the Sovereign, which we did, taking great pleasure therein, singing all the way, and, among other pleasures, I put my Lady, Mrs. Turner (age 38), Mrs. Hempson, and the two Mrs. Allens into the lanthorn and I went in and kissed them, demanding it as a fee due to a principall officer, with all which we were exceeding merry, and drunk some bottles of wine and neat's tongue, &c. Then back again home and so supped, and after much mirth to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Apr 1661. At 2 o'clock, with very great mirth, we went to our lodging and to bed, and lay till 7, and then called up by Sir W. Batten (age 60), so I arose and we did some business, and then came Captn. Allen, and he and I withdrew and sang a song or two, and among others took pleasure in "Goe and bee hanged, that's good-bye". The young ladies come too, and so I did again please myself with Mrs. Rebecca, and about 9 o'clock, after we had breakfasted, we sett forth for London, and indeed I was a little troubled to part with Mrs. Rebecca, for which God forgive me. Thus we went away through Rochester, Kent [Map], calling and taking leave of Mr. Alcock at the door, Capt. Cuttance going with us. We baited at Dartford, and thence to London, but of all the journeys that ever I made this was the merriest, and I was in a strange mood for mirth.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Apr 1661. In several places, I asked women whether they would sell me their children, but they denied me all, but said they would give me one to keep for them, if I would. Mrs. Anne and I rode under the man that hangs upon Shooter's Hill, Greenwich [Map]1, and a filthy sight it was to see how his flesh is shrunk to his bones. So home and I found all well, and a deal of work done since I went. I sent to see how my wife do, who is well, and my brother John (age 20) come from Cambridge. To Sir W. Batten's (age 60) and there supped, and very merry with the young ladles. So to bed very sleepy for last night's work, concluding that it is the pleasantest journey in all respects that ever I had in my life.

Note 1. Shooter's Hill, Greenwich [Map], Kent, between the eighth and ninth milestones on the Dover road. It was long a notorious haunt of highwaymen. The custom was to leave the bodies of criminals hanging until the bones fell to the ground.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Apr 1661. Up among my workmen, and about 7 o'clock comes my wife to see me and my brother John (age 20) with her, who I am glad to see, but I sent them away because of going to the office, and there dined with Sir W. Batten (age 60), all fish dinner, it being Good Friday. Then home and looking over my workmen, and then into the City and saw in what forwardness all things are for the Coronacion, which will be very magnificent.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Apr 1661. That done to my Lord's and dined there, and so by water with parson Turner towards London, and upon my telling of him of Mr. Moore to be a fit man to do his business with Bishop Wren (age 75), about which he was going, he went back out of my boat into another to Whitehall, and so I forwards home and there by and by took coach with Sir W. Pen (age 39) and Captain Terne and went to the buriall of Captain Robert Blake, at Wapping, and there had each of us a ring, but it being dirty, we would not go to church with them, but with our coach we returned home, and there staid a little, and then he and I alone to the Dolphin (Sir W. Batten (age 60) being this day gone with his wife to Walthamstow [Map] to keep Easter), and there had a supper by ourselves, we both being very hungry, and staying there late drinking I became very sleepy, and so we went home and I to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Apr 1661. That done we went to the Globe and there had a good dinner, and by and by took barge again and so home. By the way they would have me sing, which I did to Mr. Coventry (age 33), who went up to Sir William Batten's (age 60), and there we staid and talked a good while, and then broke up and I home, and then to my father's and there lay with my wife.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Apr 1661. By land and saw the arches, which are now almost done and are very fine, and I saw the picture of the ships and other things this morning, set up before the East Indy House, which are well done. So to the office, and that being done I went to dinner with Sir W. Batten (age 60), and then home to my workmen, and saw them go on with great content to me. Then comes Mr. Allen of Chatham, Kent [Map], and I took him to the Mitre [Map] and there did drink with him, and did get of him the song that pleased me so well there the other day, "Of Shitten come Shites the beginning of love". His daughters are to come to town to-morrow, but I know not whether I shall see them or no.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Apr 1661. Then, it raining hard, we left Sir W. Batten (age 60), and we two returned and called at Mr.--and drank some brave wine there, and then homewards again and in our way met with two country fellows upon one horse, which I did, without much ado, give the way to, but Sir W. Pen (age 39) would not, but struck them and they him, and so passed away, but they giving him some high words, he went back again and struck them off their horse, in a simple fury, and without much honour, in my mind, and so came away. Home, and I sat with him a good while talking, and then home and to bed.

Coronation of Charles II

Pepy's Diary. 19 Apr 1661. Among my workmen and then to the office, and after that dined with Sir W. Batten (age 60), and then home, where Sir W. Warren came, and I took him and Mr. Shepley and Moore with me to the Mitre [Map], and there I cleared with Warren for the deals I bought lately for my Lord of him, and he went away, and we staid afterwards a good while and talked, and so parted, it being so foul that I could not go to Whitehall to see the Knights of the Bath made to-day, which do trouble me mightily. So home, and having staid awhile till Will came in (with whom I was vexed for staying abroad), he comes and then I went by water to my father's, and then after supper to bed with my wife.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Apr 1661. KING'S GOING FROM YE TOWER TO WHITE HALL1. Up early and made myself as fine as I could, and put on my velvet coat, the first day that I put it on, though made half a year ago. And being ready, Sir W. Batten (age 60), my Lady, and his two daughters and his son and wife, and Sir W. Pen (age 39) and his son and I, went to Mr. Young's, the flag-maker, in Corne-hill2; and there we had a good room to ourselves, with wine and good cake, and saw the show very well.

Note 1. The king in the early morning of the 22nd went from Whitehall to the Tower by water, so that he might proceed from thence through the City to Westminster Abbey, there to be crowned.

Note 2. The members of the Navy Office appear to have chosen Mr. Young's house on account of its nearness to the second triumphal arch, situated near the Royal Exchange [Map], which was dedicated to the Navy.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Apr 1661. Both the King (age 30) and the Duke of York (age 27) took notice of us, as he saw us at the window. The show being ended, Mr. Young did give us a dinner, at which we were very merry, and pleased above imagination at what we have seen. Sir W. Batten (age 60) going home, he and I called and drunk some mum1 and laid our wager about my Lady Faulconbridge's name3, which he says not to be Mary, and so I won above 20s. So home, where Will and the boy staid and saw the show upon Towre Hill, and Jane at T. Pepys's, The. Turner (age 9), and my wife at Charles Glassecocke's, in Fleet Street. In the evening by water to White Hall to my Lord's, and there I spoke with my Lord. He talked with me about his suit, which was made in France, and cost him £200, and very rich it is with embroidery. I lay with Mr. Shepley, and CORONACION DAY.

Note 1. Mum. Ale brewed with wheat at Brunswick. "Sedulous and stout With bowls of fattening mum". J. Phillips, Cyder, Vol. ii. p. 231.

Note 2. Mary (age 24), third daughter of Oliver Cromwell, and second wife of Thomas Bellasis (age 62), second Viscount Fauconberg, created Earl of Fauconberg, April 9th, 1689.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Apr 1661. Waked in the morning with my head in a sad taking through the last night's drink, which I am very sorry for; so rose and went out with Mr. Creed to drink our morning draft, which he did give me in chocolate1 to settle my stomach. And after that I to my wife, who lay with Mrs. Frankelyn at the next door to Mrs. Hunt's, and they were ready, and so I took them up in a coach, and carried the ladies to Paul's, and there set her down, and so my wife and I home, and I to the office. That being done my wife and I went to dinner to Sir W. Batten (age 60), and all our talk about the happy conclusion of these last solemnities.

Note 1. Chocolate was introduced into England about the year 1652. In the "Publick Advertiser" of Tuesday, June 16-22, 1657, we find the following; "In Bishopsgate Street in Queen's Head Alley, at a Frenchman's house, is an excellent West India drink called chocolate, to be sold, where you may have it ready at any time, and also unmade at reasonable rates".-M. B.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Apr 1661. In the morning to my Lord's, and there dined with my Lady, and after dinner with Mr. Creed and Captain Ferrers to the Theatre [Map] to see "The Chances", and after that to the Cock alehouse, where we had a harp and viallin played to us, and so home by coach to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), who seems so inquisitive when my house will be made an end of that I am troubled to go thither. So home with some trouble in my mind about it.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Apr 1661. And so home again, and gave order to my workmen what to do in my absence. At night to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), and by his and Sir W. Pen's (age 40) persuasion I sent for my wife from my father's, who came to us to Mrs. Turner's (age 38), where we were all at a collacion to-night till twelve o'clock, there being a gentlewoman there that did play well and sang well to the Harpsicon, and very merry we were. So home and to bed, where my wife had not lain a great while.

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1661. In the morning to Mr. Coventry (age 33), Sir G. Carteret (age 51), and my Lord's to give them an account of my return. My Lady, I find, is, since my going, gone to the Wardrobe. Then with Mr. Creed into London, to several places about his and my business, being much stopped in our way by the City traynebands, who go in much solemnity and pomp this day to muster before the King and the Duke (age 27), and shops in the City are shut up every where all this day. He carried me to an ordinary by the Old Exchange [Map], where we come a little too late, but we had very good cheer for our 18d a-piece, and an excellent droll too, my host, and his wife so fine a woman; and sung and played so well that I staid a great while and drunk a great deal of wine. Then home and staid among my workmen all day, and took order for things for the finishing of their work, and so at night to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), and there supped and so home and to bed, having sent my Lord a letter to-night to excuse myself for not going with him to-morrow to the Hope, whither he is to go to see in what condition the fleet is in.

Pepy's Diary. 10 May 1661. At the office all the morning, and the afternoon among my workmen with great pleasure, because being near an end of their work. This afternoon came Mr. Blackburn and Creed to see me, and I took them to the Dolphin, and there drank a great deal of Rhenish wine with them and so home, having some talk with Mr. Blackburn about his kinsman my Will, and he did give me good satisfaction in that it is his desire that his kinsman should do me all service, and that he would give him the best counsel he could to make him good. Which I begin of late to fear that he will not because of the bad company that I find that he do begin to take. This afternoon Mr. Hater received for me the £225 due upon Mr. Creed's bill in which I am concerned so much, which do make me very glad. At night to Sir W. Batten (age 60) and sat a while. So to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 May 1661. After church home, and so to the Mitre [Map], where I found Dr. Burnett, the first time that ever I met him to drink with him, and my uncle Wight and there we sat and drank a great deal, and so I to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where I have on purpose made myself a great stranger, only to get a high opinion a little more of myself in them. Here I heard how Mrs. Browne, Sir W. Batten's (age 60) sister, is brought to bed, and I to be one of the godfathers, which I could not nor did deny. Which, however, did trouble me very much to be at charge to no purpose, so that I could not sleep hardly all night, but in the morning I bethought myself, and I think it is very well I should do it. Sir W. Batten (age 60) told me how Mr. Prin (age 61) (among the two or three that did refuse to-day to receive the sacrament upon their knees) was offered by a mistake the drink afterwards, which he did receive, being denied the drink by Dr. Gunning (age 47), unless he would take it on his knees; and after that by another the bread was brought him, and he did take it sitting, which is thought very preposterous. Home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 29 May 1661. Back to dinner to Sir William Batten's (age 60); and then, after a walk in the fine gardens, we went to Mrs. Browne's, where Sir W. Pen (age 40) and I were godfathers, and Mrs. Jordan and Shipman godmothers to her boy. And there, before and after the christening; we were with the woman above in her chamber; but whether we carried ourselves well or ill, I know not; but I was directed by young [his wife] Mrs. Batten. One passage of a lady that eat wafers with her dog did a little displease me. I did give the midwife 10s. and the nurse 5s. and the maid of the house 2s. But for as much I expected to give the name to the child, but did not (it being called John), I forbore then to give my plate till another time after a little more advice.

Pepy's Diary. 29 May 1661. All being done, we went to Mrs. Shipman's, who is a great butter-woman, and I did see there the most of milk and cream, and the cleanest that ever I saw in my life. After we had filled our bellies with cream, we took our leaves and away. In our way, we had great sport to try who should drive fastest, Sir W. Batten's (age 60) coach, or Sir W. Pen's (age 40) chariott, they having four, and we two horses, and we beat them. But it cost me the spoiling of my clothes and velvet coat with dirt. Being come home I to bed, and give my breeches to be dried by the fire against to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jun 1661. Having taken our leaves of Sir W. Batten (age 60) and my Lady, who are gone this morning to keep their Whitsuntide, Sir W. Pen (age 40) and I and Mr. Gauden by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and there went from ship to ship to give order for and take notice of their forwardness to go forth, and then to Deptford, Kent [Map] and did the like, having dined at Woolwich, Kent [Map] with Captain Poole at the tavern there.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jun 1661. To my Lord's at Whitehall, but not finding him I went to the Wardrobe and there dined with my Lady, and was very kindly treated by her. After dinner to the office, and there till late at night. So home, and to Sir William Batten's (age 60), who is come this day from Chatham, Kent [Map] with my Lady, who is and has been much troubled with the toothache. Here I staid till late, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jun 1661. Lord's Day. In the morning to church, and my wife not being well, I went with Sir W. Batten (age 60) home to dinner, my Lady being out of town, where there was Sir W. Pen (age 40), Captain Allen and his daughter Rebecca, and Mr. Hempson and his wife. After dinner to church all of us and had a very good sermon of a stranger, and so I and the young company to walk first to Graye's Inn Walks, where great store of gallants, but above all the ladies that I there saw, or ever did see, Mrs. Frances Butler (Monsieur L'Impertinent's sister) is the greatest beauty. Then we went to Islington [Map], where at the great house I entertained them as well as I could, and so home with them, and so to my own home and to bed. Pall, who went this day to a child's christening of Kate Joyce's, staid out all night at my father's, she not being well.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1661. Midsummer-Day. We kept this a holiday, and so went not to the office at all. All the morning at home. At noon my father came to see my house now it is done, which is now very neat. He and I and Dr. Williams (who is come to see my wife, whose soare belly is now grown dangerous as she thinks) to the ordinary over against the Exchange [Map], where we dined and had great wrangling with the master of the house when the reckoning was brought to us, he setting down exceeding high every thing. I home again and to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), and there sat a good while. So home.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jun 1661. To my father's, and with him to Mr. Starling's to drink our morning draft, and there I told him how I would have him speak to my uncle Robert, when he comes thither, concerning my buying of land, that I could pay ready money £600 and the rest by £150 per annum, to make up as much as will buy £50 per annum, which I do, though I not worth above £500 ready money, that he may think me to be a greater saver than I am. Here I took my leave of my father, who is going this morning to my uncle upon my aunt's letter this week that he is not well and so needs my father's help. At noon home, and then with my [his wife] Lady Batten, Mrs. Rebecca Allen, Mrs. Thompson, &c., two coaches of us, we went and saw "Bartholomew Fayre" acted very well, and so home again and staid at Sir W. Batten's (age 60) late, and so home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jul 1661. So to the office, and that being done to Sir W. Batten's (age 60) with the Comptroller (age 50), where we sat late talking and disputing with Mr. Mills the parson of our parish. This day my [his wife] Lady Batten and my wife were at the burial of a daughter of Sir John Lawson's (age 46), and had rings for themselves and their husbands. Home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jul 1661. At home, and in the afternoon to the office, and that being done all went to Sir W. Batten's (age 60) and there had a venison pasty, and were very merry. At night home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1661. And then home, and prepared to go to Walthamstow [Map] to-morrow. This night I was forced to borrow £40 of Sir W. Batten (age 60).

Pepy's Diary. 14 Aug 1661. So I went to my Lady's and dined with her, and found my Lord Hinchingbroke somewhat better. After dinner Captain Ferrers and I to the Theatre [Map], and there saw "The Alchymist" and there I saw Sir W. Pen (age 40), who took us when the play was done and carried the Captain to Paul's and set him down, and me home with him, and he and I to the Dolphin, but not finding Sir W. Batten (age 60) there, we went and carried a bottle of wine to his house, and there sat a while and talked, and so home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Aug 1661. This morning Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Sir W. Pen (age 40) and I, waited upon the Duke of York (age 27) in his chamber, to give him an account of the condition of the Navy for lack of money, and how our own very bills are offered upon the Exchange [Map], to be sold at 20 in the 100 loss. He is much troubled at it, and will speak to the King and Council of it this morning.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1661. So I followed him to the Dolphin, where Sir W. Batten (age 60) was, and there we sat awhile, and so home after we had made shift to fuddle Mr. Falconer of Woolwich, Kent [Map]. So home.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Aug 1661. At the office all the morning and did business; by and by we are called to Sir W. Batten's (age 60) to see the strange creature that Captain Holmes hath brought with him from Guiny; it is a great baboon, but so much like a man in most things, that though they say there is a species of them, yet I cannot believe but that it is a monster got of a man and she-baboon. I do believe that it already understands much English, and I am of the mind it might be taught to speak or make signs.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Sep 1661. After dinner to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where I found Sir W. Pen (age 40) and Captain Holmes. Here we were very merry with Sir W. Pen (age 40) about the loss of his tankard, though all be but a cheat, and he do not yet understand it; but the tankard was stole by Sir W. Batten (age 60), and the letter, as from the thief, wrote by me, which makes: very good sport. Here I staid all the afternoon, and then Captain Holmes and I by coach to White Hall; in our way, I found him by discourse, to be a great friend of my Lord's, and he told me there was many did seek to remove him; but they were old seamen, such as Sir J. Minnes (age 62) (but he would name no more, though I do believe Sir W. Batten (age 60) is one of them that do envy him), but he says he knows that the King do so love him, and the Duke of York (age 27) too, that there is no fear of him. He seems to be very well acquainted with the King's mind, and with all the several factions at Court, and spoke all with so much frankness, that I do take him to be my Lord's good friend, and one able to do him great service, being a cunning fellow, and one (by his own confession to me) that can put on two several faces, and look his enemies in the face with as much love as his friends.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Sep 1661. From thence to Dr. Williams (at the little blind alehouse in Shoe Lane, Fleet Street, at the Gridiron, a place I am ashamed to be seen to go into), and there with some bland counsel of his we discuss our matters, but I find men of so different minds that by my troth I know not what to trust to. It being late I took leave, and by link home and called at Sir W. Batten's (age 60), and there hear that Sir W. Pen (age 40) do take our jest of the tankard very ill, which Pam sorry for.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1661. At the office all the morning; dined at home, and in the afternoon Mr. Moore came to me, and he and I went to Tower Hill to meet with a man, and so back all three to my house, and there I signed a bond to Mr. Battersby, a friend of Mr. Moore's, who lends me £50, the first money that ever I borrowed upon bond for my own occasion, and so I took them to the Mitre and a Portugal millon with me; there sat and discoursed in matters of religion till night with great pleasure, and so parted, and I home, calling at Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where his son and his wife were, who had yesterday been at the play where we were, and it was good sport to hear how she talked of it with admiration like a fool. So home, and my head was not well with the wine that I drank to-day.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Oct 1661. At the office all the morning. After office done, went and eat some Colchester oysters with Sir W. Batten (age 60) at his house, and there, with some company; dined and staid there talking all the afternoon; and late after dinner took Mrs. Martha out by coach, and carried her to the Theatre [Map] in a frolique, to my great expense, and there shewed her part of the "Beggar's Bush", without much pleasure, but only for a frolique, and so home again.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Oct 1661. Lord's Day. Did not stir out all day, but rose and dined below, and this day left off half skirts and put on a wastecoate, and my false taby wastecoate with gold lace; and in the evening there came Sir W. Batten (age 60) to see me, and sat and supped very kindly with me, and so to prayers and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Oct 1661. To church in the afternoon, where a sleepy Presbyter preached, and then to Sir W. Batten (age 60) who is to go to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to-morrow to wait upon the Duke of York (age 28), who goes to take possession and to set in order the garrison there. Supped at home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Oct 1661. All the morning at the office. At noon played on my Theorbo, and much pleased therewith; it is now altered with a new neck. In the afternoon Captain Lambert called me out by appointment, and we walked together to Deptford, and there in his ship, the Norwich, I got him to shew me every hole and corner of the ship, much to my information, and the purpose of my going. So home again, and at Sir W. Batten's (age 60) heard how he had been already at Sir R. Slingsby's (deceased), as we were all invited, and I intended this night to go, and there he finds all things out of order, and no such thing done to-night, but pretending that the corps stinks, they will bury it to-night privately, and so will unbespeak all their guests, and there shall be no funerall, which I am sorry for, that there should be nothing done for the honour of Sir Robert, but I fear he hath left his family in great distraction.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Nov 1661. I went this morning with Sir W. Pen (age 40) by coach to Westminster, and having done my business at Mr. Montagu's, I went back to him at Whitehall, and from thence with him to the 3 Tun Tavern, at Charing Cross, and there sent for up the maister of the house's dinner, and dined very well upon it, and afterwards had him and his fayre sister (who is very great with Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Sir W. Pen (age 40) in mirth) up to us, and looked over some medals that they shewed us of theirs; and so went away to the Theatre [Map], to "The Joviall Crew", and from hence home, and at my house we were very merry till late, having sent for his son, Mr. William Pen (age 17)1, lately come from Oxford. And after supper parted, and to bed.

Note 1. The celebrated Quaker, and founder of Pennsylvania.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Nov 1661. This morning up early, and to my Lord Chancellor's (age 52) with a letter to him from my Lord, and did speak with him; and he did ask me whether I was son to Mr. Talbot Pepys or no (with whom he was once acquainted in the Court of Requests), and spoke to me with great respect. Thence to Westminster Hall [Map] (it being Term time) and there met with Commissioner Pett (age 51), and so at noon he and I by appointment to the Sun [Map] in New Fish Street, where Sir J. Minnes (age 62), Sir W. Batten (age 60), and we all were to dine, at an invitation of Captain Stoaks and Captain Clerk, and were very merry, and by discourse I found Sir J. Minnes (age 62) a fine gentleman and a very good scholler.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1661. Thence home to my wife, and took her to my Aunt Wight's, and there sat a while with her (my uncle being at Katharine hill), and so home, and I to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where Captain Cock was, and we sent for two bottles of Canary to the Rose, which did do me a great deal of hurt, and did trouble me all night, and, indeed, came home so out of order that I was loth to say prayers to-night as I am used ever to do on Sundays, which my wife took notice of and people of the house, which I was sorry for.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Nov 1661. In the morning again at looking over my last night's papers, and by and by comes Mr. Moore, who finds that my papers may do me much good. He staid and dined with me, and we had a good surloyne of rost beefe, the first that ever I had of my own buying since I kept house; and after dinner he and I to the Temple [Map], and there showed Mr. Smallwood my papers, who likes them well, and so I left them with him, and went with Mr. Moore to Gray's Inn to his chamber, and there he shewed me his old Camden's "Britannica", which I intend to buy of him, and so took it away with me, and left it at St. Paul's Churchyard to be bound, and so home and to the office all the afternoon; it being the first afternoon that we have sat, which we are now to do always, so long as the Parliament sits, who this day have voted the King (age 31) L120,0001 to be raised to pay his debts. And after the office with Sir W. Batten (age 60) to the Dolphin, and drank and left him there, and I again to the Temple [Map] about my business, and so on foot home again and to bed.

Note 1. A mistake. According to the journals, £1,200,000. And see Diary, February 29th, 1663-64.-M. B.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Nov 1661. Within all the morning, and at noon with my wife, by appointment to dinner at the Dolphin, where Sir W. Batten (age 60), and his lady and daughter Matt, and Captain Cocke and his lady, a German lady, but a very great beauty, and we dined together, at the spending of some wagers won and lost between him and I; and there we had the best musique and very good songs, and were very merry and danced, but I was most of all taken with Madam Cocke and her little boy, which in mirth his father had given to me. But after all our mirth comes a reckoning of £4, besides 40s. to the musicians, which did trouble us, but it must be paid, and so I took leave and left them there about eight at night.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Nov 1661. By and by Sir W. Batten (age 60) and Cock, after drinking a good deal of wine, went away, and Sir W. Pen (age 40) staid with my wife and I to supper, very pleasant, and so good night. This day I have a chine of beef sent home, which I bespoke to send, and did send it as a present to my uncle Wight.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Nov 1661. Thence homewards, and meeting Mr. Yong, the upholster, he and I to the Mitre [Map], and with Mr. Rawlinson (age 47) sat and drank a quart of sack, and so I to Sir W. Batten's (age 60) and there staid and supped, and so home, where I found an invitation sent my wife and I to my uncle Wight's on Tuesday next to the chine of beef which I presented them with yesterday. So to prayers and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1661. In the morning to the Temple [Map], Mr. Philips and Dr. Williams about my several law matters, and so to the Wardrobe to dinner, and after dinner stole away, my Lady not dining out of her chamber, and so home and then to the office all the afternoon, and that being done Sir W. Batten (age 60) and I and Captain Cock got a bottle of sack into the office, and there we sat late and drank and talked, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Dec 1661. Thence to the Treasury Office, where I found Sir W. Batten (age 60) come before me, and there we sat to pay off the St. George.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Dec 1661. By and by came Sir W. Pen (age 40), and he and I staid while Sir W. Batten (age 60) went home to dinner, and then he came again, and Sir W. Pen (age 40) and I went and dined at my house, and had two mince pie sent thither by our order from the messenger Slater, that had dressed some victuals for us, and so we were very merry, and after dinner rode out in his coach, he to Whitehall, and my wife and I to the Opera, and saw "Hamlet" well performed. Thence to the Temple [Map] and Mrs. Turner's (age 38) (who continues still very ill), and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Dec 1661. So back to Sir G. Carteret's (age 51) and ended our business, and so away homewards, but Sir W. Batten (age 60) offering to go to the 3 Tuns at Charing Cross, where the pretty maid the daughter of the house is; I was saying that, that tickled Sir W. Pen (age 40), he seemed to take these words very captiously and angrily, which I saw, and seemed indifferent to go home in his coach with them, and so took leave to go to the Council Chamber to speak with my Lord Privy Seal, which I did, but they did stay for me, which I was pleased at, but no words passed between him and me in all our way home. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Dec 1661. So I went to see Sir W. Pen (age 40), who for this two or three days has not been well, and he and I after some talk took a coach and went to Moorfields [Map], and there walked, though it was very cold, an hour or two, and went into an alehouse, and there I drank some ale and eat some bread and cheese, but he would not eat a bit, and so being very merry we went home again. He to his lodgings and I by promise to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where he and my lady have gone out of town, and so Mrs. Martha was at home alone, and Mrs. Moore and there I supped upon some good things left of yesterday's dinner there, where dined a great deal of company-Sir R. Browne and others-and by and by comes in Captain Cox who promised to be here with me, but he staid very late, and had been drinking somewhere and was very drunk, and so very capricious, which I was troubled to see in a man that I took for a very wise and wary man. So I home and left him there, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1662. After church to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where on purpose I have not been this fortnight, and I am resolved to keep myself more reserved to avoyd the contempt which otherwise I must fall into, and so home and six and talked and supped with my wife, and so up to prayers and to bed, having wrote a letter this night to Sir J. Mennes (age 62) in the Downs for his opinion in the business of striking of flags.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jan 1662. Thence to dinner to Sir W. Pen's (age 40), it being a solemn feast day with him, his wedding day, and we had, besides a good chine of beef and other good cheer, eighteen mince pies in a dish, the number of the years that he hath been married, where Sir W. Batten (age 61) and his Lady, and daughter was, and Colonel Treswell and Major Holmes, who I perceive would fain get to be free and friends with my wife, but I shall prevent it, and she herself hath also a defyance against him.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jan 1662. To dinner with my Lady, and after dinner talked long with her, and so home, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), and sat and talked with him, and so home troubled in mind, and so up to my study and read the two treaties before Mr. Selden's "Mare Clausum", and so to bed. This night come about £100 from Brampton by carrier to me, in holsters from my father, which made me laugh.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jan 1662. At the office all the morning private with Sir G. Carteret (age 52) (who I expected something from about yesterday's business, but he said nothing), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and Sir W. Pen (age 40), about drawing; up an answer to several demands of my Lord Treasurer, and late at it till 2 o'clock.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1662. So home to dinner, and in the afternoon to the office, and so to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where in discourse I heard the custom of the election of the Dukes of Genoa, who for two years are every day attended in the greatest state; and four or five hundred men always waiting upon him as a king; and when the two years are out, and another is chose, a messenger is, sent to him, who stands at the bottom of the stairs, and he at the top, and says, "Va. Illustrissima Serenita sta finita, et puede andar en casa".-"Your serenity is now ended; and now you may be going home", and so claps on his hat. And the old Duke (having by custom sent his goods home before), walks away, it may be but with one man at his heels; and the new one brought immediately in his room, in the greatest state in the world. Another account was told us, how in the Dukedom of Ragusa, in the Adriatique (a State that is little, but more ancient, they say, than Venice, and is called the mother of Venice, and the Turks lie round about it), that they change all the officers of their guard, for fear of conspiracy, every twenty-four hours, so that nobody knows who shall be captain of the guard to-night; but two men come to a man, and lay hold of him as a prisoner, and carry him to the place; and there he hath the keys of the garrison given him, and he presently issues his orders for that night's watch: and so always from night to night. Sir Wm. Rider told the first of his own knowledge; and both he and Sir W. Batten (age 61) confirm the last. Hence home and to read, and so to bed, but very late again.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jan 1662. In the afternoon at the office, and at night to Sir W. Batten (age 61), and there saw him and Captain Cock and Stokes play at cards, and afterwards supped with them. Stokes told us, that notwithstanding the country of Gambo is so unhealthy, yet the people of the place live very long, so as the present king there is 150 years old, which they count by rains: because every year it rains continually four months together. He also told us, that the Kings (age 31) there have above 100 wives a-piece, and offered him the choice of any of his wives to lie with, and so he did Captain Holmes. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jan 1662. So home, and I put in at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where Major Holmes was, and in our discourse and drinking I did give Sir J. Mennes' (age 62) health, which he swore he would not pledge, and called him knave and coward (upon the business of Holmes with the Swedish ship lately), which we all and I particularly did desire him to forbear, he being of our fraternity, which he took in great dudgeon, and I was vexed to hear him persist in calling him so, though I believe it to be true, but however he is to blame and I am troubled at it. So home and to prayers, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Jan 1662. This morning Sir Win. Batten (age 61) and Pen (age 40) and I did begin the examining the Treasurer's accounts, the first time ever he had passed in the office, which is very long, and we were all at it till noon, and then to dinner, he providing a fine dinner for us, and we eat it at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where we were very merry, there being at table the Treasurer and we three, Mr. Wayth, Ferrer, Smith, Turner, and Mr. Morrice, the wine cooper, who this day did divide the two butts, which we four did send for, of sherry from Cales, and mine was put into a hogshead, and the vessel filled up with four gallons of Malaga wine, but what it will stand us in I know not: but it is the first great quantity of wine that I ever bought.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Feb 1662. Before we had dined came Sir G. Carteret (age 52), and we went all three to the office and did business there till night, and then to Sir W. Batten (age 61) again, and I went along with my lady and the rest of the gentlewomen to Major Holmes's, and there we had a fine supper, among others, excellent lobsters, which I never eat at this time of the year before. The Major hath good lodgings at the Trinity House, Deptford [Map]. Here we staid, and at last home, and, being in my chamber, we do hear great noise of mirth at Sir William Batten's (age 61), tearing the ribbands from my Lady and him1. So I to bed.

Note 1. As if they were a newly-married couple.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Feb 1662. After musique practice I went to the office, and there with the two Sir Williams all the morning about business, and at noon I dined with Sir W. Batten (age 61) with many friends more, it being his wedding-day, and among other froliques, it being their third year, they had three pyes, whereof the middlemost was made of an ovall form, in an ovall hole within the other two, which made much mirth, and was called the middle piece; and above all the rest, we had great striving to steal a spooneful out of it; and I remember Mrs. Mills, the minister's wife, did steal one for me and did give it me; and to end all, Mrs. Shippman did fill the pye full of white wine, it holding at least a pint and a half, and did drink it off for a health to Sir William and my Lady, it being the greatest draft that ever I did see a woman drink in my life.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Feb 1662. After dinner the barber trimmed me, and so to the office, where I do begin to be exact in my duty there and exacting my privileges, and shall continue to do so. None but Sir W. Batten (age 61) and me here to-night, and so we broke up early, and I home and to my chamber to put things in order, and so to bed. My swelling I think do begin to go away again.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Feb 1662. Valentine's Day. I did this day purposely shun to be seen at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), because I would not have his daughter to be my Valentine, as she was the last year, there being no great friendship between us now, as formerly.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Feb 1662. Going and coming we played at gleeke, and I won 9s. 6d. clear, the most that ever I won in my life. I pray God it may not tempt me to play again. Being come home again we went to the Dolphin, where Mr. Alcock and my Lady and Mrs. Martha Batten came to us, and after them many others (as it always is where Sir W. Batten (age 61) goes), and there we had some pullets to supper. I eat though I was not very well, and after that left them, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Mar 1662. This morning I paid Sir W. Batten (age 61) £40, which I have owed him this half year, having borrowed it of him.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1662. So after a little being at Sir W. Batten's (age 61) with Sir G. Carteret (age 52) talking, I went home, and so to my chamber, and then to bed, my mind somewhat troubled about Brampton affairs.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Mar 1662. About one o'clock with both Sir Williams and another, one Sir Rich. Branes, to the Trinity House, Deptford [Map], but came after they had dined, so we had something got ready for us. Here Sir W. Batten (age 61) was taken with a fit of coughing that lasted a great while and made him very ill, and so he went home sick upon it.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Mar 1662. Lord's Day. Church in the morning: dined at home, then to Church again and heard Mr. Naylor, whom I knew formerly of Keye's College, make a most eloquent sermon. Thence to Sir W. Batten's (age 61) to see how he did, then to walk an hour with Sir W. Pen (age 40) in the garden: then he in to supper with me at my house, and so to prayers and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Mar 1662. At the office doing business all the morning, and my wife being gone to buy some things in the city I dined with Sir W. Batten (age 61), and in the afternoon met Sir W. Pen (age 40) at the Treasury Office, and there paid off the Guift, where late at night, and so called in and eat a bit at Sir W. Batten's (age 61) again, and so home and to bed, to-morrow being washing day.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Mar 1662. With Sir W. Batten (age 61) by water to Whitehall, and he to Westminster. I went to see Sarah and my Lord's lodgings, which are now all in dirt, to be repaired against my Lord's coming from sea with the Queen (age 23).

Pepy's Diary. 23 Mar 1662. Lord's Day. This morning was brought me my boy's fine livery, which is very handsome, and I do think to keep to black and gold lace upon gray, being the colour of my arms, for ever. To church in the morning, and so home with Sir W. Batten (age 61), and there eat some boiled great oysters, and so home, and while I was at dinner with my wife I was sick, and was forced to vomit up my oysters again, and then I was well.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Mar 1662. So back again and took my wife, calling at my brother Tom's (age 28), whom I found full of work, which I am glad of, and thence at the New Exchange [Map] and so home, and I to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), and supped there out of pure hunger and to save getting anything ready at home, which is a thing I do not nor shall not use to do. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Apr 1662. By barge Sir George, Sir Williams both and I to Deptford, and there fell to pay off the Drake and Hampshire, then to dinner, Sir George to his lady at his house, and Sir Wm. Pen (age 40) to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and Sir W. Batten (age 61) and I to the tavern, where much company came to us and our dinner, and somewhat short by reason of their taking part away with them.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Apr 1662. After dinner my wife and the two ladies to see my aunt Wight, and thence met me at home. From thence (after Sir W. Batten (age 61) and I had viewed our houses with a workman in order to the raising of our roofs higher to enlarge our houses) I went with them by coach first to Moorfields [Map] and there walked, and thence to Islington [Map] and had a fine walk in the fields there, and so, after eating and drinking, home with them, and so by water with my wife home, and after supper to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Apr 1662. At the office till almost noon, and then broke up. Then came Sir G. Carteret (age 52), and he and I walked together alone in the garden, taking notice of some faults in the office, particularly of Sir W. Batten's (age 61), and he seemed to be much pleased with me, and I hope will be the ground of a future interest of mine in him, which I shall be glad of.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Apr 1662. At the office all the morning, where, among other things, being provoked by some impertinence of Sir W. Batten's (age 61), I called him unreasonable man, at which he was very angry and so was I, but I think we shall not much fall out about it.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Apr 1662. So to White Hall, thinking to have had a Seal at Privy Seal, but my Lord did not come, and so I walked back home and staid within all the afternoon, there being no office kept to-day, but in the evening Sir W. Batten (age 61) sent for me to tell me that he had this day spoke to the Duke about raising our houses, and he hath given us leave to do it, at which, being glad, I went home merry, and after supper to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Apr 1662. This morning Sir G. Carteret (age 52), Sir W. Batten (age 61) and I met at the office, and did conclude of our going to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] next week, in which my mind is at a great loss what to do with my wife, for I cannot persuade her to go to Brampton, and I am loth to leave her at, home. All the afternoon in several places to put things in order for my going. At night home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Apr 1662. So to the office and then home to dinner, and Captain David Lambert came to take his leave of me, he being to go back to Tangier there to lie. Then abroad about business, and in the evening did get a bever, an old one, but a very good one, of Sir W. Batten (age 61), for which I must give him something; but I am very well pleased with it. So after writing by the post to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Apr 1662. This morning I attempted to persuade my wife in bed to go to Brampton this week, but she would not, which troubles me, and seeing that I could keep it no longer from her, I told her that I was resolved to go to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to-morrow. Sir W. Batten (age 61) goes to Chatham, Kent [Map] to-day, and will be back again to come for Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] after us on Thursday next. I went to Westminster and several places about business. Then at noon dined with my Lord Crew; and after dinner went up to Sir Thos. Crew's chamber, who is still ill. He tells me how my Lady Duchess of Richmond and Castlemaine had a falling out the other day; and she calls the latter Jane Shore, and did hope to see her come to the same end that she did. Coming down again to my Lord, he told me that news was come that the Queen (age 23) is landed; at which I took leave, and by coach hurried to White Hall, the bells ringing in several places; but I found there no such matter, nor anything like it. So I went by appointment to Anthony Joyce's, where I sat with his wife and Matt. Joyce an hour or two, and so her husband not being at home, away I went and in Cheapside spied him and took him into the coach.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Apr 1662. Up early, and to Petersfield, Hampshire, and there dined well; and thence got a countryman to guide us by Havant, to avoid going through the Forest; but he carried us much out of the way, and upon our coming we sent away an express to Sir W. Batten (age 61) to stop his coming, which I did project to make good my oath, that my wife should come if any of our wives came, which my [his wife] Lady Batten did intend to do with her husband. The Doctor and I lay together at Wiard's, the chyrurgeon's, in Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], his wife a very pretty woman. We lay very well and merrily; in the morning, concluding him to be of the eldest blood and house of the Clerkes, because that all the fleas came to him and not to me.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Apr 1662. After dinner Sir W. Batten (age 61) and I, the Doctor, and Ned Pickering (age 44) by coach to the Yard, and there on board the Swallow in the dock hear our navy chaplain preach a sad sermon, full of nonsense and false Latin; but prayed for the Right Honourable the principal officers1.

Note 1. Principal officers of the navy, of which body Pepys was one as Clerk of the Acts.

Pepy's Diary. 08 May 1662. So home and to dinner, and by and by to the office, and after the rest gone (my Lady Albemarle (age 43) being this day at dinner at Sir W. Batten's (age 61)) Sir G. Carteret (age 52) comes, and he and I walked in the garden, and, among other discourse, tells me that it is Mr. Coventry (age 34) that is to come to us as a Commissioner of the Navy; at which he is much vexed, and cries out upon Sir W. Pen (age 41), and threatens him highly.

Pepy's Diary. 22 May 1662. So home, and supped with Sir W. Pen (age 41), where Sir W. Batten (age 61) and Captn. Cocke came to us, to whom I have lately been a great stranger. This night we had each of us a letter from Teddiman from the Streights, of a peace made upon good terms, by Sir J. Lawson (age 47), with the Argier men, which is most excellent news? He hath also sent each of us some anchovies, olives, and muscatt; but I know not yet what that is, and am ashamed to ask. After supper home, and to bed, resolving to make up this week in seeing plays and pleasure, and so fall to business next week again for a great while.

Pepy's Diary. 26 May 1662. Thence home, and to the Trinity House, Deptford [Map]; where the Brethren (who have been at Deptford, Kent [Map] choosing a new Maister; which is Sir J. Minnes (age 63), notwithstanding Sir W. Batten (age 61) did contend highly for it: at which I am not a little pleased, because of his proud lady) about three o'clock came hither, and so to dinner. I seated myself close by Mr. Prin (age 62), who, in discourse with me, fell upon what records he hath of the lust and wicked lives of the nuns heretofore in England, and showed me out of his pocket one wherein thirty nuns for their lust were ejected of their house, being not fit to live there, and by the Pope's command to be put, however, into other nunnerys. I could not stay to end dinner with them, but rose, and privately went out, and by water to my brother's, and thence to take my wife to the Redd Bull, where we saw "Doctor Faustus", but so wretchedly and poorly done, that we were sick of it, and the worse because by a former resolution it is to be the last play we are to see till Michaelmas.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jun 1662. Home and to the office, where about 8 at night comes Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and Sir W. Batten (age 61), and so we did some business, and then home and to bed, my mind troubled about Sir W. Pen (age 41), his playing the rogue with me to-day, as also about the charge of money that is in my house, which I had forgot; but I made the maids to rise and light a candle, and set it in the dining-room, to scare away thieves, and so to sleep.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1662. By and by Sir W. Batten (age 61) and I by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map]; and there saw an experiment made of Sir R. Ford's (age 48) Holland's yarn (about which we have lately had so much stir; and I have much concerned myself for our ropemaker, Mr. Hughes, who has represented it as bad), and we found it to be very bad, and broke sooner than, upon a fair triall, five threads of that against four of Riga yarn; and also that some of it had old stuff that had been tarred, covered over with new hemp, which is such a cheat as hath not been heard of. I was glad of this discovery, because I would not have the King's workmen discouraged (as Sir W. Batten (age 61) do most basely do) from representing the faults of merchants' goods, where there is any.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jun 1662. At noon with him and Sir W. Batten (age 61) to dinner at Trinity House, Deptford [Map]; where, among others, Sir J. Robinson (age 47), Lieutenant of the Tower, was, who says that yesterday Sir H. Vane (age 49) had a full hearing at the King's Bench, and is found guilty; and that he did never hear any man argue more simply than he in all his life, and so others say. My mind in great trouble whether I should go as I intended to Hampton Court [Map] to-morrow or no. At last resolved the contrary, because of the charge thereof, and I am afraid now to bring in any accounts for journeys, and so will others I suppose be, because of Mr. Coventry's (age 34) prying into them.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jun 1662. At the office all the morning, Sir W. Batten (age 61), Sir W. Pen (age 41), and I about the Victualler's accounts.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jun 1662. This morning I tried on my riding cloth suit with close knees, the first that ever I had; and I think they will be very convenient, if not too hot to wear any other open knees after them. At the office all the morning, where we had a full Board, viz., Sir G. Carteret (age 52), Sir John Mennes, Sir W. Batten (age 61), Mr. Coventry (age 34), Sir W. Pen (age 41), Mr. Pett (age 51), and myself. Among many other businesses, I did get a vote signed by all, concerning my issuing of warrants, which they did not smell the use I intend to make of it; but it is to plead for my clerks to have their right of giving out all warrants, at which I am not a little pleased. But a great difference happened between Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and Mr. Coventry (age 34), about passing the Victualler's account, and whether Sir George (age 52) is to pay the Victualler his money, or the Exchequer; Sir George (age 52) claiming it to be his place to save his threepences. It ended in anger, and I believe will come to be a question before the King (age 32) and Council. I did what I could to keep myself unconcerned in it, having some things of my own to do before I would appear high in anything.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jun 1662. Up before four o'clock, and after some business took Will forth, and he and I walked over the Tower Hill [Map], but the gate not being open we walked through St. Catharine's and Ratcliffe (I think it is) by the waterside above a mile before we could get a boat, and so over the water in a scull (which I have not done a great while), and walked finally to Deptford, where I saw in what forwardness the work is for Sir W. Batten's (age 61) house and mine, and it is almost ready. I also, with Mr. Davis, did view my cozen Joyce's tallow, and compared it with the Irish tallow we bought lately, and found ours much more white, but as soft as it; now what is the fault, or whether it be or no a fault, I know not.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jun 1662. So to the office, and at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where we all met by chance and talked, and they drank wine; but I forebore all their healths. Sir John Minnes (age 63), I perceive, is most excellent company. So home and to bed betimes by daylight.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jun 1662. Up early, this morning, and my people are taking down the hangings and things in my house because of the great dust that is already made by the pulling down of Sir W. Batten's (age 61) house, and will be by my own when I come to it. To my office, and there hard at work all the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jun 1662. At last we concluded upon dispatching all his accounts as soon as possible, and so I parted, and to my office, where I met Sir W. Pen (age 41), and he desired a turn with me in the garden, where he told me the day now was fixed for his going into Ireland; [Penn was Governor of Kinsale.-B.] and that whereas I had mentioned some service he could do a friend of mine there, Saml. Pepys1, he told me he would most readily do what I would command him, and then told me we must needs eat a dish of meat together before he went, and so invited me and my wife on Sunday next. To all which I did give a cold consent, for my heart cannot love or have a good opinion of him since his last playing the knave with me, but he took no notice of our difference at all, nor I to him, and so parted, and I by water to Deptford, where I found Sir W. Batten (age 61) alone paying off the yard three quarters pay.

Note 1. Mentioned elsewhere as "My cousin in Ireland". He was son of Lord Chief Justice Richard Pepys.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1662. This I take to be as bad a juncture as ever I observed. The King (age 32) and his new Queen (age 23) minding their pleasures at Hampton Court [Map]. All people discontented; some that the King (age 32) do not gratify them enough; and the others, Fanatiques of all sorts, that the King (age 32) do take away their liberty of conscience; and the height of the Bishops, who I fear will ruin all again. They do much cry up the manner of Sir H. Vane's (deceased) death, and he deserves it. They clamour against the chimney-money, and say they will not pay it without force. And in the mean time, like to have war abroad; and Portugall to assist, when we have not money to pay for any ordinary layings-out at home. Myself all in dirt about building of my house and Sir W. Batten's (age 61) a story higher. Into a good way, fallen on minding my business and saving money, which God encrease; and I do take great delight in it, and see the benefit of it. In a longing mind of going to see Brampton, but cannot get three days time, do what I can. In very good health, my wife and myself.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1662. To the office, and there we sat till past noon, and then Captain Cuttance and I by water to Deptford, where The Royal James (in which my Lord went out the last voyage, though (he) came back in the Charles) was paying off by Sir W. Batten (age 61) and Sir W. Pen (age 41).

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jul 1662. And so to my business at my office again till noon, about which time Sir W. Warren did come to me about business, and did begin to instruct me in the nature of fine timber and deals, telling me the nature of every sort; and from that we fell to discourse of Sir W. Batten's (age 61) corruption and the people that he employs, and from one discourse to another of the kind. I was much pleased with his company, and so staid talking with him all alone at my office till 4 in the afternoon, without eating or drinking all day, and then parted, and I home to eat a bit, and so back again to my office; and toward the evening came Mr. Sheply, who is to go out of town to-morrow, and so he and I with much ado settled his accounts with my Lord, which, though they be true and honest, yet so obscure, that it vexes me to see in what manner they are kept.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jul 1662. Dined at home, and so to the office again, my wife with me, and while I was for an hour making a hole behind my seat in my closet to look into the office, she was talking to me about her going to Brampton, which I would willingly have her to do but for the cost of it, and to stay here will be very inconvenient because of the dirt that I must have when my house is pulled down. Then to my business till night, then Mr. Cooper and I to our business, and then came Mr. Mills, the minister, to see me, which he hath but rarely done to me, though every day almost to others of us; but he is a cunning fellow, and knows where the good victuals is, and the good drink, at Sir W. Batten's (age 61). However, I used him civilly, though I love him as I do the rest of his coat. So to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jul 1662. Dined at home with my wife, then to the office again, and being called by Sir W. Batten (age 61), walked to the Victualler's office, there to view all the several offices and houses to see that they were employed in order to give the Council an account thereof. So after having taken an oath or two of Mr. Lewes and Captain Brown and others I returned to the office, and there sat despatching several businesses alone till night, and so home and by daylight to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jul 1662. Up early this morning sending the things to the carrier's, and my boy, who goes to-day, though his mistress do not till next Monday. All the morning at the office, Sir W. Batten (age 61) being come to town last night. I hear, to my great content, that my Lord Sandwich (age 36) is safe landed in France.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jul 1662. This morning Sir W. Batten (age 61) came in to the office and desired to speak with me; he began by telling me that he observed a strangeness between him and me of late, and would know the reason of it, telling me he heard that I was offended with merchants coming to his house and making contracts there. I did tell him that as a friend I had spoke of it to Sir W. Pen (age 41) and desired him to take a time to tell him of it, and not as a backbiter, with which he was satisfied, but I find that Sir W. Pen (age 41) has played the knave with me, and not told it from me as a friend, but in a bad sense.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jul 1662. Sir W. Batten (age 61), Mr. Pett (age 51), and I at the office sitting all the morning. So dined at home, and then to my office again, causing the model hanging in my chamber to be taken down and hung up in my office, for fear of being spoilt by the workmen, and for my own convenience of studying it.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jul 1662. This morning among other things I broached the business of our being abused about flags, which I know doth trouble Sir W. Batten (age 61), but I care not.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jul 1662. At noon being invited I went with Sir George (age 52) and Mr. Coventry (age 34) to Sir W. Batten's (age 61) to dinner, and there merry, and very friendly to Sir Wm. and he to me, and complies much with me, but I know he envies me, and I do not value him.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jul 1662. Thence with Captain Fletcher, of the Gage, in his ship's boat with 8 oars (but every ordinary oars outrowed us) to Woolwich, Kent [Map], expecting to find Sir W. Batten (age 61) there upon his survey, but he is not come, and so we got a dish of steaks at the White Hart, while his clarkes and others were feasting of it in the best room of the house, and after dinner playing at shuffleboard1, and when at last they heard I was there, they went about their survey. But God help the King (age 32)! what surveys, shall be taken after this manner! I after dinner about my business to the Rope-yard [Map], and there staid till night, repeating several trialls of the strength, wayte, waste, and other things of hemp, by which I have furnished myself enough to finish my intended business of stating the goodness of all sorts of hemp.

Note 1. The game of shovelboard was played by two players (each provided with five coins) on a smooth heavy table. On the table were marked with chalk a series of lines, and the play was to strike the coin on the edge of the table with the hand so that it rested between these lines. Shakespeare uses the expression "shove-groat shilling", as does Ben Jonson. These shillings were usually smooth and worn for the convenience of playing. Strutt says ("Sports and Pastimes"), "I have seen a shovel-board table at a low public house in Benjamin Street, near Clerkenwell Green, which is about three feet in breadth and thirty-nine feet two inches in length, and said to be the longest at this time in London"..

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1662. At noon Mr. Coventry (age 34) and I by his coach to the Exchange [Map] together; and in Lumbard-street [Map] met Captain Browne of the Rosebush: at which he was cruel angry: and did threaten to go to-day to the Duke at Hampton Court [Map], and get him turned out because he was not sailed. But at the Exchange [Map] we resolved of eating a bit together, which we did at the Ship behind the Exchange [Map], and so took boat to Billingsgate, and went down on board the Rosebush at Woolwich, Kent [Map], and found all things out of order, but after frightening the officers there, we left them to make more haste, and so on shore to the yard, and did the same to the officers of the yard, that the ship was not dispatched. Here we found Sir W. Batten (age 61) going about his survey, but so poorly and unlike a survey of the Navy, that I am ashamed of it, and so is Mr. Coventry (age 34). We found fault with many things, and among others the measure of some timber now serving in which Mr. Day the assistant told us of, and so by water home again, all the way talking of the office business and other very pleasant discourse, and much proud I am of getting thus far into his books, which I think I am very much in.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Aug 1662. So to all the storehouses and viewed the stores of all sorts and the hemp, where we found Captain Cocke's (age 45) (which he came down to see along with me) very bad, and some others, and with much content (God forgive me) I did hear by the Clerk of the Ropeyard [Map] how it was by Sir W. Batten's (age 61) private letter that one parcel of Alderman Barker's' was received.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Aug 1662. This afternoon Mr. Waith was with me, and did tell me much concerning the Chest, which I am resolved to look into; and I perceive he is sensible of Sir W. Batten's (age 61) carriage; and is pleased to see any thing work against him. Who, poor man, is, I perceive, much troubled, and did yesterday morning walk in the garden with me, did tell me he did see there was a design of bringing another man in his room, and took notice of my sorting myself with others, and that we did business by ourselves without him. Part of which is true, but I denied, and truly, any design of doing him any such wrong as that. He told me he did not say it particularly of me, but he was confident there was somebody intended to be brought in, nay, that the trayne was laid before Sir W. Pen (age 41) went, which I was glad to hear him say. Upon the whole I see he perceives himself tottering, and that he is suspected, and would be kind to me, but I do my business in the office and neglect him. At night writing in my study a mouse ran over my table, which I shut up fast under my shelf's upon my table till to-morrow, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Aug 1662. Up early, and, going to my office, met Sir G. Carteret (age 52) in coming through the yard, and so walked a good while talking with him about Sir W. Batten (age 61), and find that he is going down the wind in every body's esteem, and in that of his honesty by this letter that he wrote to Captn. Allen concerning Alderman Barker's hemp.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Aug 1662. By and by we sat, and among other things Sir W. Batten (age 61) and I had a difference about his clerk's making a warrant for a Maister, which I would not suffer, but got another signed, which he desires may be referred to a full board, and I am willing to it. But though I did get another signed of my own clerk's, yet I will give it to his clerk, because I would not be judged unkind, and though I will stand upon my privilege.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Aug 1662. At noon home and to dinner alone, and so to the office again, where busy all the afternoon till to o'clock at night, and so to supper and to bed, my mind being a little disquieted about Sir W. Batten's (age 61) dispute to-day, though this afternoon I did speak with his man Norman at last, and told him the reason of my claim.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Aug 1662. By and by comes one Mr. Marshall, of whom the King has many carriages for his timber, and they staid and drank with me, and while I am here, Sir W. Batten (age 61) passed by in his coach, homewards from Colchester, where he had been seeing his son-in-law, Lemon, that lies a-dying, but I would take no notice of him, but let him go.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Aug 1662. After sitting, Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and I walked a good while in the garden, who told me that Sir W. Batten (age 61) had made his complaint to him that some of us had a mind to do him a bad turn, but I do not see that Sir George (age 52) is concerned for him at all, but rather against him. He professes all love to me, and did tell me how he had spoke of me to my Lord Chancellor (age 53), and that if my Lord Sandwich (age 37) would ask my Lord Chancellor (age 53), he should know what he had said of me to him to my advantage, of which I am very glad, and do not doubt that all things will grow better and better every day for me.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1662. In the evening Mr. Hayward came to me to advise with me about the business of the Chest, which I have now a mind to put in practice, though I know it will vex Sir W. Batten (age 61), which is one of the ends (God forgive me) that I have in it. So home, and eat a bit, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Aug 1662. Up early, and about my works in my house, to see what is done and design more. Then to my office, and by and by we sat till noon at the office. After sitting, Mr. Coventry (age 34) and I did walk together a great while in the Garden, where he did tell me his mind about Sir G. Carteret's (age 52) having so much the command of the money, which must be removed. And indeed it is the bane of all our business. He observed to me also how Sir W. Batten (age 61) begins to struggle and to look after his business, which he do indeed a little, but it will come to nothing. I also put him upon getting an order from the Duke for our inquiries into the Chest, which he will see done.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Aug 1662. Then to Mr. Pett's (age 52), and there eat some fruit and drank, and so to boat again, and to Deptford, calling there about the business of my house only, and so home, where by appointment I found Mr. Coventry (age 34), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and Mr. Waith met at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), and thither I met, and so agreed upon a way of answering my Lord Treasurer's letter. Here I found Mr. Coventry (age 34) had got a letter from the Duke, sent us for looking into the business of the Chest, of which I am glad.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1662. Up betimes and among my works and workmen, and with great pleasure seeing them go on merrily, and a good many hands, which I perceive makes good riddance, and so to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon dined alone with Sir W. Batten (age 61), which I have not done a great while, but his lady being out of the way I was the willinger to do it, and after dinner he and I by water to Deptford, and there found Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and my Lady at dinner, and so we sat down and eat another dinner of venison with them, and so we went to the payhouse, and there staid till to o'clock at night paying off the Martin and Kinsale, being small but troublesome ships to pay, and so in the dark by water home to the Custom House and so got a lanthorn to light us home, there being Mr. Morrice the wine cooper with us, he having been at Deptford, Kent [Map] to view some of the King's casks we have to sell. So to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Aug 1662. Among my workmen again, pleasing myself all the afternoon there, and so to the office doing business till past 9 at night, and so home and to bed. This afternoon Mrs. Hunt came to see me, and I did give her a Muske Millon. To-day my hogshead of sherry I have sold to Sir W. Batten (age 61), and am glad of my money instead of wine.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Aug 1662. Up and among my workmen, my work going on still very well. So to my office all the morning, and dined again with Sir W. Batten (age 61), his Lady being in the country. Among other stories, he told us of the Mayor of Bristoll's reading a pass with the bottom upwards; and a barber that could not read, that flung a letter in the kennel when one came to desire him to read the superscription, saying, "Do you think I stand here to read letters?"

Pepy's Diary. 28 Aug 1662. I observe that Will, whom I used to call two or three times in a morning, would now wake of himself and rise without calling. Which though angry I was glad to see. So I rose and among my workmen, in my gown, without a doublet, an hour or two or more, till I was afraid of getting an ague, and so to the office, and there we sat all the morning, and at noon Mr. Coventry (age 34) and I dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where I have now dined three days together, and so in the afternoon again we sat, which we intend to do two afternoons in a week besides our other sitting.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Sep 1662. Up betimes at my lodging and to my office and among my workmen, and then with Sir W. Batten (age 61) and Sir W. Pen (age 41) by coach to St. James's, this being the first day of our meeting there by the Duke's (age 28) order; but when we come, we found him going out by coach with his Duchess (age 25), and he told us he was to go abroad with the Queen (age 23) to-day (to Durdans, it seems, to dine with my Lord Barkeley (age 34), where I have been very merry when I was a little boy); so we went and staid a little at Mr. Coventry's (age 34) chamber, and I to my Lord Sandwich's (age 37), who is gone to wait upon the King (age 32) and Queen (age 23) today.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Sep 1662. Up betimes and got myself ready alone, and so to my office, my mind much troubled for my key that I lost yesterday, and so to my workmen and put them in order, and so to my office, and we met all the morning, and then dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 61) with Sir W. Pen (age 41), and so to my office again all the afternoon, and in the evening wrote a letter to Mr. Cooke, in the country, in behalf of my brother Tom (age 28), to his mistress, it being the first of my appearing in it, and if she be as Tom sets her out, it may be very well for him. So home and eat a bit, and so to my lodging to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Sep 1662. After dinner I came home and found Sir John Minnes (age 63) come this day, and I went to him to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where it pleased me to see how jealous Sir Williams both are of my going down to Woolwich, Kent [Map], &c., and doing my duty as I nowadays do, and of my dining with the Commission of the Customs.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Sep 1662. At my office betimes, and by and by we sat, and at noon Mr. Coventry (age 34), Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Mr. Pett (age 52), and myself by water to Deptford, where we met Sir G. C. (age 52), Sir W. B. (age 61), and Sir W. P. (age 41) at the pay of a ship, and we dined together on a haunch of good venison boiled, and after dinner returned again to the office, and there met several tradesmen by our appointment to know of them their lowest rates that they will take for their several provisions that they sell to us, for I do resolve to know that, and to buy no dearer, that so when we know the lowest rate, it shall be the Treasurer's fault, and not ours, that we pay dearer.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Sep 1662. So to supper with them at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), and do counterfeit myself well pleased, but my heart is troubled and offended at the whole company.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Sep 1662. So by water with Sir Wm. Pen (age 41) to White Hall; and, with much ado, was fain to walk over the piles through the bridge, while Sir W. Batten (age 61) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) were aground against the bridge, and could not in a great while get through.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1662. We met and sat all the morning, dined at home alone, and with my workmen all the afternoon, and in the evening by water and land to Deptford, Kent [Map] to give order for things about my house, and came back again by coach with Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and Sir W. Batten (age 61) (who has been at a Pay to-day), and to my office and did some business, and so to supper and to my lodgings, and so to bed. In our coming home Sir G. Carteret (age 52) told me how in most cabaretts in France they have writ upon the walls in fair letters to be read, "Dieu te regarde", as a good lesson to be in every man's mind, and have also, as in Holland, their poor's box; in both which places at the making all contracts and bargains they give so much, which they call God's penny.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1662. Up betimes and to my workmen, and then to the office, where we sat all the morning. So home to dinner alone and then to my workmen till night, and so to my office till bedtime, and so after supper to my lodgings and to bed. This evening I sat awhile at Sir W. Batten's (age 61) with Sir J. Minnes (age 63), &c., where he told us among many other things how in Portugal they scorn to make a seat for a house of office, but they do .... all in pots and so empty them in the river. I did also hear how the woman, formerly nurse to Mrs. Lemon (Sir W. Batten's (age 61) daughter), her child was torn to pieces by two doggs at Walthamstow [Map] this week, and is dead, which is very strange.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Sep 1662. Up betimes and among my workmen. By and by to Sir W. Batten (age 61), who with Sir J. M. are going to Chatham, Kent [Map] this morning, and I was in great pain till they were gone that I might see whether Sir John do speak any thing of my chamber that I am afraid of losing or no. But he did not, and so my mind is a little at more ease.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Oct 1662. Up and in Sir J. Minnes's (age 63) coach with him and Sir W. Batten (age 61) to White Hall, where now the Duke is come again to lodge: and to Mr. Coventry's (age 34) little new chamber there.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Oct 1662. Up and among my workmen, and so to the office, and there sitting all the morning we stept all out to visit Sir W. Batten (age 61), who it seems has not been well all yesterday, but being let blood is now pretty well, and Sir W. Pen (age 41) after office I went to see, but he continues in great pain of the gout and in bed, cannot stir hand nor foot but with great pain.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1662. So home and dined there with my wife upon a most excellent dish of tripes of my own directing, covered with, mustard, as I have heretofore seen them done at my Lord Crew's, of which I made a very great meal, and sent for a glass of wine for myself, and so to see Sir W. Pen (age 41), who continues bed-rid in great pain, and hence to the Treasury to Sir J. Minnes (age 63) paying off of tickets, and at night home, and in my study (after seeing Sir W. Batten (age 61), who also continues ill) I fell to draw out my conceptions about books for the clerk that cheques in the yard to keep according to the distinct works there, which pleases me very well, and I am confident it will be of great use.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Oct 1662. So home, and to see Sir W. Batten (age 61), who is pretty well again, and then to my uncle Wight's to show my fine band and to see Mrs. Margaret Wight, but she was not there. All this day soldiers going up and down the town, there being an alarm and many Quakers and others clapped up; but I believe without any reason: only they say in Dorsetshire there hath been some rising discovered. So after supper home, and then to my study, and making up my monthly account to myself. I find myself, by my expense in bands and clothes this month, abated a little of my last, and that I am worth £679 still; for which God be praised.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Oct 1662. At Sir W. Batten's (age 61) I met with Mr. Mills, who tells me that he could get nothing out of the maid hard by (that did poyson herself) before she died, but that she did it because she did not like herself, nor had not liked herself, nor anything she did a great while. It seems she was well-favoured enough, but crooked, and this was all she could be got to say, which is very strange.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Oct 1662. Lord Mayor's Day. Intended to have made me fine, and by invitation to have dined with the Lord Mayor to-day, but going to see Sir W. Batten (age 61) this morning, I found Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) going with Sir W. Batten (age 61) and myself to examine Sir G. Carteret's (age 52) accounts for the last year, whereupon I settled to it with them all the day long, only dinner time (which Sir G. Carteret (age 52) gave us), and by night did as good as finish them, and so parted, and thence to my office, and there set papers in order and business against to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Nov 1662. So home with Mr. Moore to his chamber, and after a little talk I walked home to my house and staid at Sir W. Batten's (age 61). Till late at night with him and Sir J. Minnes (age 63), with whom we did abundance of most excellent discourse of former passages of sea commanders and officers of the navy, and so home and to bed, with my mind well at ease but only as to my chamber, which I fear to lose.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1662. Up betimes and to set my workmen to work, and then a little to the office, and so with Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and myself by coach to White Hall, to the Duke (age 29), who, after he was ready, did take us into his closett. Thither come my Lord General Monk (age 53), and did privately talk with the Duke (age 29) about having the life-guards pass through the City today only for show and to fright people, for I perceive there are great fears abroad; for all which I am troubled and full of doubt that things will not go well. He being gone, we fell to business of the Navy. Among other things, how to pay off this fleet that is now come from Portugall; the King (age 32) of Portugall sending them home, he having no more use for them, which we wonder at, that his condition should be so soon altered. And our landmen also are coming back, being almost starved in that poor country. Having done here I went by my Lord Sandwich's (age 37), who was not at home, and so to Westminster Hall [Map], where full of term, and here met with many about business, among others my cozen Roger Pepys (age 45), who is all for a composition with my uncle Thomas, which upon any fair terms I am for also and desire it.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1662. Up and to the office, where Mr. Phillip the lawyer came to me, but I put him off to the afternoon. At noon I dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), Sir John Minnes (age 63) being here, and he and I very kind, but I every day expect to pull a crow with him about our lodgings. My mind troubled about Gosnell and my law businesses. So after dinner to Mr. Phillips his chamber, where he demands an abatement for Piggott's money, which vexes me also, but I will not give it him without my father's consent, which I will write to him to-night about, and have done it. Here meeting my uncle Thomas, he and I to my cozen Roger's (age 45) chamber, and there I did give my uncle him and Mr. Philips to be my two arbiters against Mr. Cole and Punt, but I expect no great good of the matter.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Nov 1662. Thence to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), and there staid awhile and heard how Sir R. Ford's (age 48) daughter is married to a fellow without friends' consent, and the match carried on and made up at Will Griffin's, our doorkeeper's.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Nov 1662. Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and I, going forth toward White Hall, we hear that the King (age 32) and Duke (age 29) are come this morning to the Tower to see the Dunkirk money! So we by coach to them, and there went up and down all the magazines with them; but methought it was but poor discourse and frothy that the King's companions (young Killigrew (age 25) among the rest) about the codpieces of some of the men in armour there to be seen, had with him. We saw none of the money, but Mr. Slingsby did show the King (age 32), and I did see, the stamps of the new money that is now to be made by Blondeau's fashion1, which are very neat, and like the King (age 32).

Note 1. Peter Blondeau was employed by the Commonwealth to coin their money. After the Restoration, November 3rd, 1662, he received letters of denization, and a grant for being engineer of the Mint in the Tower of London, and for using his new invention for coining gold and silver with the mill and press, with the fee of £100 per annum (Walpole's "Anecdotes of Painting").

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1662. Thence home, and to visit Sir W. Pen (age 41), who continues still bed-rid. Here was Sir W. Batten (age 61) and his Lady, and Mrs. Turner (age 39), and I very merry, talking of the confidence of Sir R. Ford's (age 48) new-married daughter, though she married so strangely lately, yet appears at church as brisk as can be, and takes place of her elder sister, a maid.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Dec 1662. Up and by coach with Sir John Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 61) to White Hall to the Duke's chamber, where, as is usual, my Lord Sandwich (age 37) and all of us, after his being ready, to his closett, and there discoursed of matters of the Navy, and here Mr. Coventry (age 34) did do me the great kindness to take notice to the Duke (age 29) of my pains in making a collection of all contracts about masts, which have been of great use to us.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Dec 1662. So back to the office with Sir J. Minnes (age 63), in his coach, but so great a snow that we could hardly pass the streets. So we and Sir W. Batten (age 61) to the office, and there did discourse of Mr. Creed's accounts, and I fear it will be a good while before we shall go through them, and many things we meet with, all of difficulty.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Dec 1662. Then to the Dolphin, where Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and I, did treat the Auditors of the Exchequer, Auditors Wood and Beale, and hither come Sir G. Carteret (age 52) to us. We had a good dinner, cost us £5 and 6s., whereof my share 26s., and after dinner did discourse of our salarys and other matters, which I think now they will allow.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Dec 1662. At noon broke up and dined with my wife, and then to the office again, and there made an end of last night's examination, and got my study there made very clean and put in order, and then to write by the post, among other letters one to Sir W. Batten (age 61) about this day's work with Field, desiring his promise also. The letter I have caused to be entered in our public book of letters. So home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Dec 1662. By and by we sat, Mr. Coventry (age 34) and I (Sir G. Carteret (age 52) being gone), and among other things, Field and Stint did come, and received the £41 given him by the judgement against me and Harry Kem1; and we did also sign bonds in £500 to stand to the award of Mr. Porter (age 31) and Smith for the rest: which, however, I did not sign to till I got Mr. Coventry (age 34) to go up with me to Sir W. Pen (age 41); and he did promise me before him to bear his share in what should be awarded, and both concluded that Sir W. Batten (age 61) would do no less.

Note 1. Fine for the imprisonment of Field (see February 4th, 1661-62, and October 21st, 1662).

Pepy's Diary. 13 Dec 1662. Slept long to-day till Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 61) were set out towards Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] before I rose, and Sir G. Carteret (age 52) came to the office to speak with me before I was up. So I started up and down to him.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1662. Up and to the office, and thither came Mr. Coventry (age 34) and Sir G. Carteret (age 52), and among other business was Strutt's the purser, against Captn. Browne, Sir W. Batten's (age 61) brother-in-law, but, Lord! though I believe the Captain has played the knave, though I seem to have a good opinion of him and to mean him well, what a most troublesome fellow that Strutt is, such as I never did meet with his fellow in my life. His talking and ours to make him hold his peace set my head off akeing all the afternoon with great pain.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1662. And slept hard till 8 o'clock this morning, and so up and to the office, where I found Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 61) come unexpectedly home last night from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], having done the Pay there before we could have, thought it. Sat all the morning, and at noon home to dinner with my wife alone, and after dinner sat by the fire, and then up to make up my accounts with her, and find that my ordinary housekeeping comes to £7 a month, which is a great deal.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Dec 1662. Lay pleasantly, talking to my wife, till 8 o'clock, then up and to Sir W. Batten's (age 61) to see him and Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) take coach towards the Pay at Chatham, Kent [Map], which they did and I home, and took money in my pocket to pay many reckonings to-day in the town, as my bookseller's, and paid at another shop £4 10s. for "Stephens's Thesaurus Graecae Linguae", given to Paul's School.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1663. Lay long in bed, and so up and to the office, where all the morning alone doing something or another. So dined at home with my wife, and in the afternoon to the Treasury office, where Sir W. Batten (age 62) was paying off tickets, but so simply and arbitrarily, upon a dull pretence of doing right to the King (age 32), though to the wrong of poor people (when I know there is no man that means the King (age 32) less right than he, or would trouble himself less about it, but only that he sees me stir, and so he would appear doing something, though to little purpose), that I was weary of it. At last we broke up, and walk home together, and I to see Sir W. Pen (age 41), who is fallen sick again. I staid a while talking with him, and so to my office, practising some arithmetique, and so home to supper and bed, having sat up late talking to my poor wife with great content.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1663. And I took Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Captain Allen into the wine cellar to my tenant (as I call him, Serjeant Dalton), and there drank a great deal of variety of wines, more than I have drunk at one time, or shall again a great while, when I come to return to my oaths, which I intend in a day or two.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1663. Up and to the Duke (age 29), who himself told me that Sir J. Lawson (age 48) was come home to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] from the Streights, who is now come with great renown among all men, and, I perceive, mightily esteemed at Court by all. The Duke (age 29) did not stay long in his chamber; but to the King's chamber, whither by and by the Russia Embassadors (age 18) come; who, it seems, have a custom that they will not come to have any treaty with our or any King's Commissioners, but they will themselves see at the time the face of the King (age 32) himself, be it forty days one after another; and so they did to-day only go in and see the King (age 32); and so out again to the Council-chamber. The Duke (age 29) returned to his chamber, and so to his closett, where Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 62), Mr. Coventry (age 35), and myself attended him about the business of the Navy; and after much discourse and pleasant talk he went away.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1663. Up pretty early, that is by seven o'clock, it being not yet light before or then. So to my office all the morning, signing the Treasurer's ledger, part of it where I have not put my hand, and then eat a mouthful of pye at home to stay my stomach, and so with Mr. Waith by water to Deptford, and there among other things viewed old pay-books, and found that the Commanders did never heretofore receive any pay for the rigging time, but only for seatime, contrary to what Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) told the Duke the other day. I also searched all the ships in the Wett Dock for fire, and found all in good order, it being very dangerous for the King that so many of his ships lie together there. I was among the canvass in stores also, with Mr. Harris, the saylemaker, and learnt the difference between one sort and another, to my great content, and so by water home again, where my wife tells me stories how she hears that by Sarah's going to live at Sir W. Pen's (age 41), all our affairs of my family are made known and discoursed of there and theirs by my people, which do trouble me much, and I shall take a time to let Sir W. Pen (age 41) know how he has dealt in taking her without our full consent. So to my office, and by and by home to supper, and so to prayers and bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jan 1663. So to the office, and sat till noon, then rose and to dinner, and then to the office again, where Mr. Creed sat with me till late talking very good discourse, as he is full of it, though a cunning knave in his heart, at least not to be too much trusted, till Sir J. Minnes (age 63) came in, which at last he did, and so beyond my expectation he was willing to sign his accounts, notwithstanding all his objections, which really were very material, and yet how like a doting coxcomb he signs the accounts without the least satisfaction, for which we both sufficiently laughed at him and Sir W. Batten (age 62) after they had signed them and were gone, and so sat talking together till 11 o'clock at night, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1663. Lord's Day. Lay long talking pleasant with my wife, then up and to church, the pew being quite full with strangers come along with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63), so after a pitifull sermon of the young Scott, home to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1663. In the evening to Sir W. Pen's (age 41), where Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and afterwards came Sir G. Carteret (age 53). There talked about business, and afterwards to Sir W. Batten's (age 62), where we staid talking and drinking Syder, and so I went away to my office a little, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jan 1663. Up, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) to bid him and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) adieu, they going this day towards Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], and then to Sir W. Pen's (age 41) to see Sir J. Lawson (age 48), who I heard was there, where I found him the same plain man that he was, after all his success in the Straights, with which he is come loaded home.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jan 1663. So to my [his wife] Lady Batten's, and sat with her awhile, Sir W. Batten (age 62) being gone out of town; but I did it out of design to get some oranges for my feast to-morrow of her, which I did.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jan 1663. That done, I singled out Mr. Coventry (age 35) into the Matted Gallery, and there I told him the complaints I meet every day about our Treasurer's or his people's paying no money, but at the goldsmith's shops, where they are forced to pay fifteen or twenty sometimes per cent. for their money, which is a most horrid shame, and that which must not be suffered. Nor is it likely that the Treasurer (at least his people) will suffer Maynell the Goldsmith to go away with £10,000 per annum, as he do now get, by making people pay after this manner for their money. We were interrupted by the Duke (age 29), who called Mr. Coventry (age 35) aside for half an hour, walking with him in the gallery, and then in the garden, and then going away I ended my discourse with Mr. Coventry (age 35). But by the way Mr. Coventry (age 35) was saying that there remained nothing now in our office to be amended but what would do of itself every day better and better, for as much as he that was slowest, Sir W. Batten (age 62), do now begin to look about him and to mind business. At which, God forgive me! I was a little moved with envy, but yet I am glad, and ought to be, though it do lessen a little my care to see that the King's service is like to be better attended than it was heretofore.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1663. To the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) are come from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map]. We sat till dinner time. Then home, and Mr. Dixon by agreement came to dine, to give me an account of his success with Mr. Wheatly for his daughter for my brother; and in short it is, that his daughter cannot fancy my brother because of his imperfection in his speech, which I am sorry for, but there the business must die, and we must look out for another. There came in also Mrs. Lodum, with an answer from her brother Ashwell's daughter, who is likely to come to me, and with her my wife's brother, and I carried Commissioner Pett (age 52) in with me, so I feared want of victuals, but I had a good dinner, and mirth, and so rose and broke up, and with the rest of the officers to Mr. Russell's buriall, where we had wine and rings, and a great and good company of aldermen and the livery of the Skinners' Company.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1663. Thence homewards, and meeting Sir W. Batten (age 62), turned back again to a coffee-house, and there drunk more till I was almost sick, and here much discourse, but little to be learned, but of a design in the north of a rising, which is discovered, among some men of condition, and they sent for up.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1663. Thence to the 'Change [Map], and so home with him by coach, and I to see how my wife do, who is pretty well again, and so to dinner to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) to a cod's head, and so to my office, and after stopping to see Sir W. Pen (age 41), where was Sir J. Lawson (age 48) and his lady and daughter, which is pretty enough, I came back to my office, and there set to business pretty late, finishing the margenting my Navy-Manuscript. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jan 1663. Up and by water with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to White Hall, drinking a glass of wormewood wine at the Stillyard [Map], and so up to the Duke, and with the rest of the officers did our common service; thence to my Lord Sandwich's (age 37), but he was in bed, and had a bad fit last night, and so I went to, Westminster Hall [Map], it being Term time, it troubling me to think that I should have any business there to trouble myself and thoughts with. Here I met with Monsieur Raby, who is lately come from France. (he) tells me that my Lord Hinchingbroke (age 15) and his brother do little improve there, and are much neglected in their habits and other things; but I do believe he hath a mind to go over as their tutour, and so I am not apt to believe what he says therein. But I had a great deal of very good discourse with him, concerning the difference between the French and the Pope, and the occasion, which he told me very particularly, and to my great content; and of most of the chief affairs of France, which I did enquire: and that the King (age 32) is a most excellent Prince, doing all business himself; and that it is true he hath a mistress, Mademoiselle La Valiere (age 18), one of the Princess Henriette's women, that he courts for his pleasure every other day, but not so as to make him neglect his publique affairs. He tells me how the King (age 32) do carry himself nobly to the relations of the dead Cardinall1, and will not suffer one pasquill to come forth against him; and that he acts by what directions he received from him before his death.

Note 1. Cardinal Mazarin died March 9th, 1661.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jan 1663. So by coach home, being melancholy, overcharged with business, and methinks I fear that I have some ill offices done to Mr. Coventry (age 35), or else he observes that of late I have not despatched business so as I did use to do, which I confess I do acknowledge. But it may be it is but my fear only, he is not so fond as he used to be of me. But I do believe that Sir W. Batten (age 62) has made him believe that I do too much crow upon having his kindness, and so he may on purpose to countenance him seem a little more strange to me, but I will study hard to bring him back again to the same degree of kindness.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Feb 1663. By coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) to the Duke (age 29); and after discourse as usual with him in his closett, I went to my Lord's: the King (age 32) and Duke (age 29) being gone to chappell, it being collar-day1, it being Candlemas-day; where I staid with him a while until towards noon, there being Jonas Moore (age 45) talking about some mathematical businesses, and thence I walked at noon to Mr. Povey's, where Mr. Gawden met me, and after a neat and plenteous dinner as is usual, we fell to our victualling business, till Mr. Gawden and I did almost fall out, he defending himself in the readiness of his provision, when I know that the ships everywhere stay for them.

Note 1. TT. Collar-day. A designated days on which the collar forming part of the insignia of certain members of British orders of knighthood may be worn. Collars are special large and elaborate ceremonial metal chains worn over the shoulders, hanging equally over the front and back, often tied with a bow at the shoulders, with a distinctive pendant attached to the front.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Feb 1663. In the evening came Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) to see me, and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) advises me to the same thing, but would not have me take anything from the apothecary, but from him, his Venice treacle1 being better than the others, which I did consent to and did anon take and fell into a great sweat, and about 10 or 11 o'clock came out of it and shifted myself, and slept pretty well alone, my wife lying in the red chamber above.

Note 1. TT. A ancient medicine containing numerous ingredients such as viper flesh, opium, cinnamon, agarics and gum arabic. The ingredients were pulverized and reduced to an electuary with honey

Pepy's Diary. 16 Feb 1663. Up and by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) to White Hall, and, after we had done our usual business with the Duke (age 29), to my Lord Sandwich (age 37) and by his desire to Sir W. Wheeler (age 52), who was brought down in a sedan chair from his chamber, being lame of the gout, to borrow £1000 of him for my Lord's occasions, but he gave me a very kind denial that he could not, but if any body else would, he would be bond with my Lord for it.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. Here I staid vexing, and yet pleased to see every body, man and woman, my Lady and Mr. Turner especially, for me, till 10 at night; and so home, where my people are mightily surprized to see this business, but it troubles me not very much, it being nothing touching my particular person or estate. Being in talk to-day with Sir W. Batten (age 62) he tells me that little is done yet in the Parliament-house, but only this day it was moved and ordered that all the members of the House do subscribe to the renouncing of the Covenant, which is thought will try some of them. There is also a bill brought in for the wearing of nothing but cloth or stuffs of our own manufacture, and is likely to be passed. Among other talk this evening, my lady did speak concerning Commissioner Pett's (age 52) calling the present King bastard, and other high words heretofore; and Sir W. Batten (age 62) did tell us, that he did give the Duke or Mr. Coventry (age 35) an account of that and other like matters in writing under oath, of which I was ashamed, and for which I was sorry, but I see there is an absolute hatred never to be altered there, and Sir J. Minnes (age 63), the old coxcomb, has got it by the end, which troubles me for the sake of the King's service, though I do truly hate the expressions laid to him. To my office and set down this day's journall, and so home with my mind out of order, though not very sad with it, but ashamed for myself something, and for the honour of the office much more. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. Well, at last they went away, and I by advice took occasion to go abroad, and walked through the street to show myself among the neighbours, that they might not think worse than the business is. Being met by Captn. Taylor and Bowry, whose ship we have hired for Tangier, they walked along with me to Cornhill [Map] talking about their business, and after some difference about their prices we agreed, and so they would have me to a tavern, and there I drank one glass of wine and discoursed of something about freight of a ship that may bring me a little money, and so broke up, and I home to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) again, where Sir J. Lawson (age 48), Captain Allen, Spragg, and several others, and all our discourse about the disgrace done to our office to be liable to this trouble, which we must get removed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. By and by comes Mr. Clerke (age 40), our solicitor, who brings us a release from our adverse atturney, we paying the fees of the commission, which comes to five marks, and pay the charges of these fellows, which are called the commissioners, but are the most rake-shamed rogues that ever I saw in my life; so he showed them this release, and they seemed satisfied, and went away with him to their atturney to be paid by him. But before they went, Sir W. Batten (age 62) and my lady did begin to taunt them, but the rogues answered them as high as themselves, and swore they would come again, and called me rogue and rebel, and they would bring the sheriff and untile his house, before he should harbour a rebel in his house, and that they would be here again shortly.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. By and by at my parler-window comes Sir W. Batten's Mungo, to tell me that his master and lady would have me come to their house through Sir J. Minnes's (age 63) lodgings, which I could not do; but, however, by ladders, did get over the pale between our yards, and so to their house, where I found them (as they have reason) to be much concerned for me, my lady especially. The fellows staid in the yard swearing with one or two constables, and some time we locked them into the yard, and by and by let them out again, and so kept them all the afternoon, not letting them see me, or know where I was. One time I went up to the top of Sir W. Batten's (age 62) house, and out of one of their windows spoke to my wife out of one of ours; which methought, though I did it in mirth, yet I was sad to think what a sad thing it would be for me to be really in that condition.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Feb 1663. Lord's Day. Lay long in bed and went not out all day; but after dinner to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) and Sir W. Pen's (age 41), where discoursing much of yesterday's trouble and scandal; but that which troubled me most was Sir J. Minnes (age 63) coming from Court at night, and instead of bringing great comfort from thence (but I expected no better from him), he tells me that the Duke and Mr. Coventry (age 35) make no great matter of it. So at night discontented to prayers, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1663. Up and drinking a draft of wormewood wine with Sir W. Batten (age 62) at the Steelyard [Map], he and I by water to the Parliament-house: he went in, and I walked up and down the Hall. All the news is the great odds yesterday in the votes between them that are for the Indulgence to the Papists and Presbyters, and those that are against it, which did carry it by 200 against 30. And pretty it is to consider how the King (age 32) would appear to be a stiff Protestant and son of the Church; and yet would appear willing to give a liberty to these people, because of his promise at Breda. And yet all the world do believe that the King (age 32) would not have this liberty given them at all.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Feb 1663. Thence with great satisfaction to me back to the Company, where I heard good discourse, and so to the afternoon Lecture upon the heart and lungs, &c., and that being done we broke up, took leave, and back to the office, we two, Sir W. Batten (age 62), who dined here also, being gone before. Here late, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) to speak upon some business, where I found Sir J. Minnes (age 63) pretty well fuddled I thought: he took me aside to tell me how being at my Chancellor's (age 54) to-day, my Lord told him that there was a Great Seal passing for Sir W. Pen (age 41), through the impossibility of the Comptroller's duty to be performed by one man; to be as it were joynt-comptroller with him, at which he is stark mad; and swears he will give up his place, and do rail at Sir W. Pen (age 41) the cruellest; he I made shift to encourage as much as I could, but it pleased me heartily to hear him rail against him, so that I do see thoroughly that they are not like to be great friends, for he cries out against him for his house and yard and God knows what. For my part, I do hope, when all is done, that my following my business will keep me secure against all their envys. But to see how the old man do strut, and swear that he understands all his duty as easily as crack a nut, and easier, he told my Chancellor (age 54), for his teeth are gone; and that he understands it as well as any man in England; and that he will never leave to record that he should be said to be unable to do his duty alone; though, God knows, he cannot do it more than a child. All this I am glad to see fall out between them and myself safe, and yet I hope the King's service well done for all this, for I would not that should be hindered by any of our private differences. So to my office, and then home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Feb 1663. Waked with great pain in my right ear (which I find myself much subject to) having taken cold. Up and to my office, where we sat all the morning, and I dined with Sir W. Batten (age 62) by chance, being in business together about a bargain of New England masts.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Mar 1663. Rose this morning early, only to try with intention to begin my last summer's course in rising betimes. So to my office a little, and then to Westminster by coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), in our way talking of Sir W. Pen's (age 41) business of his patent, which I think I have put a stop to wholly, for Sir J. Minnes (age 64) swears he will never consent to it.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1663. To my office, and thence to Sir W. Batten's (age 62), where Major Holmes (age 41) was lately come from the Streights, but do tell me strange stories of the faults of Cooper his master, put in by me, which I do not believe, but am sorry to hear and must take some course to have him removed, though I believe that the Captain is proud, and the fellow is not supple enough to him.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1663. Up betimes, and about eight o'clock by coach with four horses, with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), to Woolwich, Kent [Map], a pleasant day. There at the yard we consulted and ordered several matters, and thence to the rope yard and did the like, and so into Mr. Falconer's, where we had some fish, which we brought with us, dressed; and there dined with us his new wife, which had been his mayde, but seems to be a genteel woman, well enough bred and discreet.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Mar 1663. Up betimes, and to my office, walked a little in the garden with Sir W. Batten (age 62), talking about the difference between his Lady and my wife yesterday, and I doubt my wife is to blame. About noon had news by Mr. Wood that Butler, our chief witness against Field, was sent by him to New England contrary to our desire, which made me mad almost; and so Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Pen (age 41), and I dined together at Trinity House, Deptford [Map], and thither sent for him to us and told him our minds, which he seemed not to value much, but went away. I wrote and sent an express to Walthamstow [Map] to Sir W. Pen (age 41), who is gone thither this morning, to tell him of it. However, in the afternoon Wood sends us word that he has appointed another to go, who shall overtake the ship in the Downes. So I was late at the office, among other things writing to the Downes, to the Commander-in-Chief, and putting things into the surest course I could to help the business. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1663. Up very betimes and to my office, where, with several Masters of the King's ships, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I advising upon the business of Slopps, wherein the seaman is so much abused by the Pursers, and that being done, then I home to dinner, and so carried my wife to her mother's, set her down and Ashwell to my Lord's lodging, there left her, and I to the Duke (age 29), where we met of course, and talked of our Navy matters. Then to the Commission of Tangier, and there, among other things, had my Lord Peterborough's (age 41) Commission read over; and Mr. Secretary Bennet (age 45) did make his querys upon it, in order to the drawing one for my Lord Rutherford more regularly, that being a very extravagant thing. Here long discoursing upon my Lord Rutherford's despatch, and so broke up, and so going out of the Court I met with Mr. Coventry (age 35), and so he and I walked half an hour in the long Stone Gallery, where we discoursed of many things, among others how the Treasurer doth intend to come to pay in course, which is the thing of the world that will do the King (age 32) the greatest service in the Navy, and which joys my heart to hear of. He tells me of the business of Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Pen (age 41), which I knew before, but took no notice or little that I did know it. But he told me it was chiefly to make Mr. Pett's (age 52) being joyned with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to go down the better, and do tell me how he well sees that neither one nor the other can do their duties without help. But however will let it fall at present without doing more in it to see whether they will do their duties themselves, which he will see, and saith they do not. We discoursed of many other things to my great content and so parted, and I to my wife at my Lord's lodgings, where I heard Ashwell play first upon the harpsicon, and I find she do play pretty well, which pleaseth me very well.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Mar 1663. So home with my mind at very great ease, over the water to the Tower, and thence, there being nobody at the office, we being absent, and so no office could be kept. Sir W. Batten (age 62) and I to my Lord Mayor's, where we found my Lord with Colonel Strangways and Sir Richard Floyd, Parliament-men, in the cellar drinking, where we sat with them, and then up; and by and by comes in Sir Richard Ford. In our drinking, which was always going, we had many discourses, but from all of them I do find Sir R. Ford (age 49) a very able man of his brains and tongue, and a scholler. But my Lord Mayor (age 48) I find to be a talking, bragging Bufflehead, a fellow that would be thought to have led all the City in the great business of bringing in the King (age 32), and that nobody understood his plots, and the dark lanthorn he walked by; but led them and plowed with them as oxen and asses (his own words) to do what he had a mind when in every discourse I observe him to be as very a coxcomb as I could have thought had been in the City. But he is resolved to do great matters in pulling down the shops quite through the City, as he hath done in many places, and will make a thorough passage quite through the City, through Canning-street, which indeed will be very fine. And then his precept, which he, in vain-glory, said he had drawn up himself, and hath printed it, against coachmen and carrmen affronting of the gentry in the street; it is drawn so like a fool, and some faults were openly found in it, that I believe he will have so much wit as not to proceed upon it though it be printed.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Mar 1663. Up betimes and to my office a while, and then home and to Sir W. Batten (age 62), with whom by coach to St. Margaret's Hill in Southwark, Surrey [Map], where the judge of the Admiralty came, and the rest of the Doctors of the Civill law, and some other Commissioners, whose Commission of oyer and terminer was read, and then the charge, given by Dr. Exton, which methought was somewhat dull, though he would seem to intend it to be very rhetoricall, saying that justice had two wings, one of which spread itself over the land, and the other over the water, which was this Admiralty Court.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Mar 1663. This discourse done, and things put in a way of doing, they went away, and Captain Holmes (age 41) being called in he began his high complaint against his Master Cooper, and would have him forthwith discharged. Which I opposed, not in his defence but for the justice of proceeding not to condemn a man unheard, upon [which] we fell from one word to another that we came to very high terms, such as troubled me, though all and the worst that I ever said was that that was insolently or ill mannerdly spoken. When he told me that it was well it was here that I said it. But all the officers, Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir W. Pen (age 41) cried shame of it.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Mar 1663. And to that purpose I lay long talking with my wife about my father's coming, which I expect to-day, coming up with the horses brought up for my Lord. Up and to my office, where doing business all the morning, and at Sir W. Batten's (age 62), whither Mr. Gauden and many others came to us about business.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1663. So to my office all the afternoon till night, and then home, calling at Sir W. Batten's (age 62), where was Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Pen (age 41), I telling them how by my letter this day from Commissioner Pett (age 52) I hear that his Stempeese1 he undertook for the new ship at Woolwich, Kent [Map], which we have been so long, to our shame, in looking for, do prove knotty and not fit for service. Lord! how Sir J. Minnes (age 64), like a mad coxcomb, did swear and stamp, swearing that Commissioner Pett (age 52) hath still the old heart against the King (age 32) that ever he had, and that this was his envy against his brother that was to build the ship, and all the damnable reproaches in the world, at which I was ashamed, but said little; but, upon the whole, I find him still a fool, led by the nose with stories told by Sir W. Batten (age 62), whether with or without reason. So, vexed in my mind to see things ordered so unlike gentlemen, or men of reason, I went home and to bed.

Note 1. Stemples, cross pieces which are put into a frame of woodwork to cure and strengthen a shaft.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Apr 1663. By and by, much against my will, being twice sent for, to Sir G. Carteret's (age 53) to pass his accounts there, upon which Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir W. Pen (age 41), and myself all the morning, and again after dinner to it, being vexed at my heart to see a thing of that importance done so slightly and with that neglect for which God pardon us, and I would I could mend it.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1663. Up betimes and to my office, and by and by, about 8 o'clock, to the Temple [Map] to Commissioner Pett (age 52) lately come to town and discoursed about the affairs of our office, how ill they go through the corruption and folly of Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64).

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1663. To bed vexed also to think of Sir J. Minnes (age 64) finding fault with Mr. Hater for what he had done the other day, though there be no hurt in the thing at all but only the old fool's jealousy, made worse by Sir W. Batten (age 62).

Pepy's Diary. 13 Apr 1663. Up by five o'clock and to my office, where hard at work till towards noon, and home and eat a bit, and so going out met with Mr. Mount my old acquaintance, and took him in and drank a glass or two of wine to him and so parted, having not time to talk together, and I with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to the Stillyard [Map], and there eat a lobster together, and Wyse the King's fishmonger coming in we were very merry half an hour, and so by water to Whitehall, and by and by being all met we went in to the Duke and there did our business and so away, and anon to the Tangier Committee, where we had very fine discourse from Dr. Walker and Wiseman, civilians, against our erecting a court-merchant at Tangier, and well answered in many things by my Lord Sandwich (age 37) (whose speaking I never till now observed so much to be very good) and Sir R. Ford (age 49).

Pepy's Diary. 14 Apr 1663. Up betimes to my office, where busy till 8 o'clock that Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Pen (age 41) and I down by barge to Woolwich, Kent [Map], to see "The Royal James" launched, where she has been under repair a great while. We staid in the yard till almost noon, and then to Mr. Falconer's to a dinner of fish of our own sending, and when it was just ready to come upon the table, word is brought that the King (age 32) and Duke (age 29) are come, so they all went away to shew themselves, while I staid and had a little dish or two by myself, resolving to go home, and by the time I had dined they came again, having gone to little purpose, the King (age 32), I believe, taking little notice of them. So they to dinner, and I staid a little with them, and so good bye. I walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map], studying the Slide Rule for measuring of timber, which is very fine.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Apr 1663. So to dinner, and after dinner to the office, where some of us met and did a little business, and so to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) to see a little picture drawing of his by a Dutchman which is very well done.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Apr 1663. At noon we rose, Sir W. Batten (age 62) ashamed and vexed, and so home to dinner, and after dinner walked to the old Exchange [Map] and so all along to Westminster Hall [Map], White Hall, my Lord Sandwich's (age 37) lodgings, and going by water back to the Temple [Map] did pay my debts in several places in order to my examining my accounts tomorrow to my great content. So in the evening home, and after supper (my father at my brother's) and merrily practising to dance, which my wife hath begun to learn this day of Mr. Pembleton1, but I fear will hardly do any great good at it, because she is conceited that she do well already, though I think no such thing.

Note 1. Pembleton, the dancing-master, made Pepys very jealous, and there are many allusions to him in the following pages. His lessons ceased on May 27th.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Apr 1663. Up betimes and to my vyall and song book a pretty while, and so to my office, and there we sat all the morning. Among other things Sir W. Batten (age 62) had a mind to cause Butler (our chief witness in the business of Field, whom we did force back from an employment going to sea to come back to attend our law sute) to be borne as a mate on the Rainbow in the Downes in compensation for his loss for our sakes. This he orders an order to be drawn by Mr. Turner for, and after Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir W. Pen (age 42) had signed it, it came to me and I was going to put it up into my book, thinking to consider of it and give them my opinion upon it before I parted with it, but Sir W. Pen (age 42) told me I must sign it or give it him again, for it should not go without my hand. I told him what I meant to do, whereupon Sir W. Batten (age 62) was very angry, and in a great heat (which will bring out any thing which he has in his mind, and I am glad of it, though it is base in him to have a thing so long in his mind without speaking of it, though I am glad this is the worst, for if he had worse it would out as well as this some time or other) told me that I should not think as I have heretofore done, make them sign orders and not sign them myself. Which what ignorance or worse it implies is easy to judge, when he shall sign to things (and the rest of the board too as appears in this business) for company and not out of their judgment for. After some discourse I did convince them that it was not fit to have it go, and Sir W. Batten (age 62) first, and then the rest, did willingly cancel all their hands and tear the order, for I told them, Butler being such a rogue as I know him, and we have all signed him to be to the Duke, it will be in his power to publish this to our great reproach, that we should take such a course as this to serve ourselves in wronging the King (age 32) by putting him into a place he is no wise capable of, and that in an Admiral ship.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Apr 1663. Up betimes and to my office, where doing business alone a good while till people came about business to me. Will Griffin tells me this morning that Captain Browne, Sir W. Batten's (age 62) brother-in-law, is dead of a blow given him two days ago by a seaman, a servant of his, being drunk, with a stone striking him on the forehead, for which I am sorry, he having a good woman and several small children. At the office all the morning, at noon dined at home with my wife, merry, and after dinner by water to White Hall; but found the Duke of York (age 29) gone to St. James's for this summer; and thence with Mr. Coventry (age 35), to whose chamber I went, and Sir W. Pen (age 42) up to the Duke's closett. And a good while with him about our Navy business; and so I to White Hall, and there alone a while with my Lord Sandwich (age 37) discoursing about his debt to the Navy, wherein he hath given me some things to resolve him in.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Apr 1663. Up, and after drinking my morning draft with my father and W. Stankes, I went forth to Sir W. Batten (age 62), who is going (to no purpose as he uses to do) to Chatham, Kent [Map] upon a survey.

Pepy's Diary. 09 May 1663. Up betimes and to my office, whither sooner than ordinary comes Mr. Hater desiring to speak a word to me alone, which I was from the disorder of his countenance amused at, and so the poor man began telling me that by Providence being the last Lord's day at a meeting of some Friends upon doing of their duties, they were surprised, and he carried to the Counter, but afterwards released; however, hearing that Sir W. Batten (age 62) do hear of [it,] he thought it good to give me an account of it, lest it might tend to any prejudice to me. I was extraordinary surprised with it, and troubled for him, knowing that now it is out it is impossible for me to conceal it, or keep him in employment under me without danger to myself. I cast about all I could, and did give him the best advice I could, desiring to know if I should promise that he would not for the time to come commit the same, he told me he desired that I would rather forbear to promise that, for he durst not do it, whatever God in His providence shall do with him, and that for my part he did bless God and thank me for all the love and kindness I have shewed him hitherto. I could not without tears in my eyes discourse with him further, but at last did pitch upon telling the truth of the whole to Mr. Coventry (age 35) as soon as I could, and to that end did use means to prevent Sir W. Batten (age 62) (who came to town last night) from going to that end to-day, lest he might doe it to Sir G. Carteret (age 53) or Mr. Coventry (age 35) before me; which I did prevail and kept him at the office all the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 13 May 1663. Then came Mr. Barrow, storekeeper of Chatham, Kent [Map], who tells me many things, how basely Sir W. Batten (age 62) has carried himself to him, and in all things else like a passionate dotard, to the King's great wrong. God mend all, for I am sure we are but in an ill condition in the Navy, however the King (age 32) is served in other places. Home to supper, to cards, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 May 1663. Up and after taking leave of Sir W. Batten (age 62), who is gone this day towards Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] (to little purpose, God knows) upon his survey, I home and spent the morning at dancing; at noon Creed dined with us and Deane (age 29) of Woolwich, and so after dinner came Mr. Howe, who however had enough for his dinner, and so, having done, by coach to Westminster, she to Mrs. Clerke and I to St. James's, where the Duke being gone down by water to-day with the King (age 32) I went thence to my Lord Sandwich's (age 37) lodgings, where Mr. Howe and I walked a while, and going towards Whitehall through the garden Dr. Clerk and Creed called me across the bowling green, and so I went thither and after a stay went up to Mrs. Clerke who was dressing herself to go abroad with my wife.

Pepy's Diary. 21 May 1663. Up, but cannot get up so early as I was wont, nor my mind to business as it should be and used to be before this dancing. However, to my office, where most of the morning talking of Captain Cox of Chatham, Kent [Map] about his and the whole yard's difference against Mr. Barrow the storekeeper, wherein I told him my mind clearly, that he would be upheld against the design of any to ruin him, he being we all believed, but Sir W. Batten (age 62) his mortal enemy, as good a servant as any the King (age 32) has in the yard.

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1663. Thence home by water, and after a dance with Pembleton to my office and wrote by the post to Sir W. Batten (age 62) at Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to send for him up against next Wednesday, being our triall day against Field at Guildhall [Map], in which God give us good end. So home: to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 25 May 1663. Thence by coach home, where I found Pembleton, and so I up to dance with them till the evening, when there came Mr. Alsopp, the King's brewer, and Lanyon of Plymouth to see me. Mr. Alsopp tells me of a horse of his that lately, after four days' pain, voided at his fundament four stones, bigger than that I was cut of, very heavy, and in the middle of each of them either a piece of iron or wood. The King (age 32) has two of them in his closett, and a third the College of Physicians to keep for rarity, and by the King's command he causes the turd of the horse to be every day searched to find more. At night to see Sir W. Batten (age 62) come home this day from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map]. I met with some that say that the King of France (age 24) is poisoned, but how true that is is not known. So home to supper and to bed pleasant.

Pepy's Diary. 27 May 1663. So to my office, to put things in order there, and by and by comes Pembleton, and word is brought me from my wife thereof that I might come home. So I sent word that I would have her go dance, and I would come presently. So being at a great loss whether I should appear to Pembleton or no, and what would most proclaim my jealousy to him, I at last resolved to go home, and took Tom Hater with me, and staid a good while in my chamber, and there took occasion to tell him how I hear that Parliament is putting an act out against all sorts of conventicles1, and did give him good counsel, not only in his own behalf, but my own, that if he did hear or know anything that could be said to my prejudice, that he would tell me, for in this wicked age (specially Sir W. Batten (age 62) being so open to my reproaches, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), for the neglect of their duty, and so will think themselves obliged to scandalize me all they can to right themselves if there shall be any inquiry into the matters of the Navy, as I doubt there will) a man ought to be prepared to answer for himself in all things that can be inquired concerning him. After much discourse of this nature to him I sent him away, and then went up, and there we danced country dances, and single, my wife and I; and my wife paid him off for this month also, and so he is cleared.

Note 1. 16 Car. II, cap. 4, "An Act to prevent and suppresse seditious Conventicles". It was enacted that anyone of the age of sixteen or upwards present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle was to incur fine or imprisonment. A conventicle was defined as an assembly of more than five persons besides the members of a family met together for holding worship not according to the rites of the Church of England. The act was amended 22 Car. II, cap. i (1670), and practically repealed by the Toleration Act of 1689, but the act 22 Car. II, cap. i, was specially repealed 52 Geo. III, cap. 155, s. 1.

Pepy's Diary. 31 May 1663. To church again after dinner (my wife finding herself ill.... did not go), and there the Scot preaching I slept most of the sermon. This day Sir W. Batten's (age 62) son's child is christened in the country, whither Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and Sir W, Batten, and Sir W. Pen (age 42) are all gone. I wonder, and take it highly ill that I am not invited by the father, though I know his father and mother, with whom I am never likely to have much kindness, but rather I study the contrary, are the cause of it, and in that respect I am glad of it.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jun 1663. Thence up and down about business in several places, as to speak with Mr. Phillips, but missed him, and so to Mr. Beacham, the goldsmith, he being one of the jury to-morrow in Sir W. Batten's (age 62) case against Field. I have been telling him our case, and I believe he will do us good service there.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jun 1663. So home, and seeing my wife had dined I went, being invited, and dined with Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and others, at Sir W. Batten's (age 62), Captain Allen (age 51) giving them a Foy' dinner, he being to go down to lie Admiral in the Downs this summer. I cannot but think it a little strange that having been so civil to him as I have been he should not invite me to dinner, but I believe it was but a sudden motion, and so I heard not of it.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jun 1663. Up betimes, and studying of my double horizontal diall against Dean Honiwood comes to me, who dotes mightily upon it, and I think I must give it him. So after talking with Sir W. Batten (age 62), who is this morning gone to Guildhall [Map] to his trial with Field, I to my office, and there read all the morning in my statute-book, consulting among others the statute against selling of offices, wherein Mr. Coventry (age 35) is so much concerned; and though he tells me that the statute do not reach him, yet I much fear that it will.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jun 1663. At noon, hearing that the trial is done, and Sir W. Batten (age 62) come to the Sun behind the Exchange [Map] I went thither, where he tells me that he had much ado to carry it on his side, but that at last he did, but the jury, by the judge's favour, did give us but; £10 damages and the charges of the suit, which troubles me; but it is well it went not against us, which would have been much worse.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jun 1663. Thence, taking the little History of England with me, I went by water to Deptford, where Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) attending the Pay; I dined with them, and there Dr. Britton, parson of the town, a fine man and good company, dined with us, and good discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jun 1663. Thence home, and dined with my wife and Ashwell and after dinner discoursed very pleasantly, and so I to church again in the afternoon, and, the Scot preaching, again slept all the afternoon, and so home, and by and by to Sir W. Batten's (age 62), to talk about business, where my [his wife] Lady Batten inveighed mightily against the German Princess, and I as high in the defence of her wit and spirit, and glad that she is cleared at the sessions.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jun 1663. Up and betimes to Thames Street among the tarr men, to look the price of tarr and so by water to Whitehall thinking to speak with Sir G. Carteret (age 53), but he lying in the city all night, and meeting with Mr. Cutler the merchant, I with him in his coach into the city to Sir G. Carteret (age 53), but missing him there, he and I walked to find him at Sir Tho. Allen's in Bread Street, where not finding him he and I walked towards our office, he discoursing well of the business of the Navy, and particularly of the victualling, in which he was once I perceive concerned, and he and I parted and I to the office and there had a difference with Sir W. Batten (age 62) about Mr. Bowyer's tarr, which I am resolved to cross, though he sent me last night, as a bribe, a barrel of sturgeon, which, it may be, I shall send back, for I will not have the King (age 33) abused so abominably in the price of what we buy, by Sir W. Batten's (age 62) corruption and underhand dealing.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jun 1663. So from the office, Mr. Wayth with me, to the Parliament House, and there I spoke and told Sir G. Carteret (age 53) all, with which he is well pleased, and do recall his willingness yesterday, it seems, to Sir W. Batten (age 62), that we should buy a great quantity of tarr, being abused by him.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jun 1663. By and by in comes Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and so we sat talking. Among other things, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) brought many fine expressions of Chaucer, which he doats on mightily, and without doubt he is a very fine poet1. Sir W. Pen (age 42) continues lame of the gout, that he cannot rise from his chair. So after staying an hour with him, we went home and to supper, and so to prayers and bed.

Note 1. Pepys continued through life an admirer of Chaucer, and we have the authority of Dryden (age 31) himself for saying that we owe his character of the Good Parson to Pepys's recommendation.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jun 1663. So home by coach, and thence by water to Deptford to the Trinity House, Deptford [Map], where I came a little late; but I found them reading their charter, which they did like fools, only reading here and there a bit, whereas they ought to do it all, every word, and then proceeded to the election of a maister, which was Sir W. Batten (age 62), without any control, who made a heavy, short speech to them, moving them to give thanks to the late Maister for his pains, which he said was very great, and giving them thanks for their choice of him, wherein he would serve them to the best of his power. Then to the choice of their assistants and wardens, and so rose. I might have received 2s. 6d. as a younger Brother, but I directed one of the servants of the House to receive it and keep it.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jun 1663. After dinner with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to see some pictures at Brewer's, said to be of good hands, but I do not like them. So I to the office and thence to Stacy's, his Tar merchant, whose servant with whom I agreed yesterday for some tar do by combination with Bowyer and Hill fall from our agreement, which vexes us all at the office, even Sir W. Batten (age 62), who was so earnest for it.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jun 1663. At noon by desire I dined with Sir W. Batten (age 62), who tells me that the House have voted the supply, intended for the King (age 33), shall be by subsidy.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jun 1663. After dinner half an hour at my viallin, and then all the afternoon sitting at the office late, and so home and to bed. This morning Mr. Cutler came and sat in my closet half an hour with me, his discourse very excellent, being a wise man, and I do perceive by him as well as many others that my diligence is taken notice of in the world, for which I bless God and hope to continue doing so. Before I went into my house this night I called at Sir W. Batten's (age 62), where finding some great ladies at table at supper with him and his lady, I retreated and went home, though they called to me again and again, and afterwards sent for me. So I went, and who should it be but Sir Fr. Clerke and his lady and another proper lady at supper there, and great cheer, where I staid till 11 o'clock at night, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jun 1663. By and by with Sir W. Batten (age 62) by coach to Westminster, where all along I find the shops evening with the sides of the houses, even in the broadest streets; which will make the City very much better than it was. I walked in the Hall from one man to another. Hear that the House is still divided about the manner of levying the subsidys which they intend to give the King (age 33), both as to the manner, the time, and the number. It seems the House do consent to send to the King (age 33) to desire that he would be graciously pleased to let them know who it was that did inform him of what words Sir Richard Temple (age 29) should say, which were to this purpose: "That if the King (age 33) would side with him, or be guided by him and his party, that he should not lack money:" but without knowing who told it, they do not think fit to call him to any account for it.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jun 1663. So to White Hall, and by water to the Temple [Map], and calling at my brother's and several places, but to no purpose, I came home, and meeting Strutt, the purser, he tells me for a secret that he was told by Field that he had a judgment against me in the Exchequer for £400. So I went to Sir W. Batten (age 62), and taking Mr. Batten, his son the counsellor, with me, by coach, I went to Clerke, our Solicitor, who tells me there can be no such thing, and after conferring with them two together, who are resolved to look well after the business, I returned home and to my office, setting down this day's passages, and having a letter that all is well in the country I went home to supper, and then a Latin chapter of Will and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jun 1663. So I by and by to the office, and there had a great fray with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who, like an old dotard, is led by the nose by him. It was in Captain Cocke's (age 46) business of hemp, wherein the King (age 33) is absolutely abused; but I was for peace sake contented to be quiet and to sign to his bill, but in my manner so as to justify myself, and so all was well; but to see what a knave Sir W. Batten (age 62) is makes my heart ake. So late at my office, and then home to supper and to bed, my man Will not being well.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1663. Up before 4 o'clock, and so to my lute an hour or more, and then by water, drinking my morning draft alone at an alehouse in Thames Street, to the Temple [Map], and thence after a little discourse with my cozen Roger (age 46) about some business, away by water to St. James's, and there an hour's private discourse with Mr. Coventry (age 35), where he told me one thing to my great joy, that in the business of Captain Cocke's (age 46) hemp, disputed before him the other day, Mr. Coventry (age 35) absent, the Duke (age 29) did himself tell him since, that Mr. Pepys and he did stand up and carry it against the rest that were there, Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), which do please me much to see that the Duke do take notice of me.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1663. He tells me, too, that he hath lately been observed to tack about at Court, and to endeavour to strike in with the persons that are against the Chancellor (age 54); but this he says of him, that he do not say nor do anything to the prejudice of the Chancellor (age 54). But he told me that the Chancellor (age 54) was rising again, and that of late Sir G. Carteret's (age 53) business and employment hath not been so full as it used to be while the Chancellor (age 54) stood up. From that we discoursed of the evil of putting out men of experience in business as the Chancellor (age 54), and from that to speak of the condition of the King's party at present, who, as the Papists, though otherwise fine persons, yet being by law kept for these fourscore years out of employment, they are now wholly uncapable of business; and so the Cavaliers for twenty years, who, says he, for the most part have either given themselves over to look after country and family business, and those the best of them, and the rest to debauchery, &c.; and that was it that hath made him high against the late Bill brought into the House for the making all men incapable of employment that had served against the King (age 33). Why, says he, in the sea-service, it is impossible to do any thing without them, there being not more than three men of the whole King's side that are fit to command almost; and these were Captain Allen (age 51), Smith, and Beech; and it may be Holmes, and Utber, and Batts might do something. I desired him to tell me if he thought that I did speak anything that I do against Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) out of ill will or design. He told me quite the contrary, and that there was reason enough. After a good deal of good and fine discourse, I took leave, and so to my Lord Sandwich's (age 37) house, where I met my Lord, and there did discourse of our office businesses, and how the Duke do show me kindness, though I have endeavoured to displease more or less of my fellow officers, all but Mr. Coventry (age 35) and Pett; but it matters not. Yes, says my Lord, Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who is great with the Chancellor (age 54); I told him the Chancellor (age 54) I have thought was declining, and however that the esteem he has among them is nothing but for a jester or a ballad maker; at which my Lord laughs, and asks me whether I believe he ever could do that well.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1663. We did talk highly of Sir W. Batten's (age 62) corruption, which Mr. Coventry (age 35) did very kindly say that it might be only his heaviness and unaptness for business, that he do things without advice and rashly, and to gratify people that do eat and drink and play with him, and that now and then he observes that he signs bills only in anger and fury to be rid of men. Speaking of Sir G. Carteret (age 53), of whom I perceive he speaks but slightly, and diminishing of him in his services for the King (age 33) in Jersey; that he was well rewarded, and had good lands and rents, and other profits from the King (age 33), all the time he was there; and that it was always his humour to have things done his way. He brought an example how he would not let the Castle there be victualled for more than a month, that so he might keep it at his beck, though the people of the town did offer to supply it more often themselves, which, when one did propose to the King (age 33), Sir George Carteret (age 53) being by, says Sir George (age 53), "Let me know who they are that would do it, I would with all my heart pay them". "Ah, by God", says the Commander that spoke of it, "that is it that they are afeard of, that you would hug them", meaning that he would not endure them. Another thing he told me, how the Duke of York (age 29) did give Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and the Island his profits as Admirall, and other things, toward the building of a pier there. But it was never laid out, nor like to be. So it falling out that a lady being brought to bed, the Duke (age 29) was to be desired to be one of the godfathers; and it being objected that that would not be proper, there being no peer of the land to be joyned with him, the lady replied, "Why, let him choose; and if he will not be a godfather without a peer, then let him even stay till he hath made a pier of his own1".

Note 1. In the same spirit, long after this, some question arising as to the best material to be used in building Westminster Bridge, Lord Chesterfield (age 29) remarked, that there were too many wooden piers (peers) at Westminster already. B.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jun 1663. So by water home, and after a little while getting me ready, Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), my [his wife] Lady Batten, and I by coach to Bednall Green, to Sir W. Rider's to dinner, where a fine place, good lady mother, and their daughter, Mrs. Middleton, a fine woman. A noble dinner, and a fine merry walk with the ladies alone after dinner in the garden, which is very pleasant; the greatest quantity of strawberrys I ever saw, and good, and a collation of great mirth, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) reading a book of scolding very prettily. This very house1 was built by the Blind Beggar of Bednall Green, so much talked of and sang in ballads; but they say it was only some of the outhouses of it. We drank great store of wine, and a beer glass at last which made me almost sick. At table, discoursing of thunder and lightning, they told many stories of their own knowledge at table of their masts being shivered from top to bottom, and sometimes only within and the outside whole, but among the rest Sir W. Rider did tell a story of his own knowledge, that a Genoese gally in Leghorn Roads was struck by thunder, so as the mast was broke a-pieces, and the shackle upon one of the slaves was melted clear off of his leg without hurting his leg. Sir William went on board the vessel, and would have contributed towards the release of the slave whom Heaven had thus set free, but he could not compass it, and so he was brought to his fetters again.

Note 1. Sir William Rider's house was known as Kirby Castle, and was supposed to have been built in 1570 by John Thorpe for John Kirby. It was associated in rhyme with other follies of the time in bricks and mortar, as recorded by Stow "Kirkebyes Castell, and Fisher's Follie, Spinila's pleasure, and Megse's glorie". The place was known in Strype's time as the "Blind Beggar's House", but he knew nothing of the ballad, "The Beggar's Daughter of Bednall Green", for he remarks, "perhaps Kirby beggared himself by it". Sr. William Rider died at this house in 1669.

Note 2. From www.spitalfieldmusic.org.uk. The story starts with the sad story of the Blind Beggar, a man who didn't have a penny to his name but his pride and joy was his daughter Bessy - "a fair daughter, most pleasant and bright". Many men, including a gentleman of fortune, a London merchant and an innkeeper's son, could not help to fall in love with Bessy due to her great beauty and her sweet countenance. However, most would soon turn their backs on her once they found out about her lowly status and her poor blind father, who spent his days begging for charity accompanied by his faithful dog. There was one man who was different! He was described as a Knight and he was determined to marry young Bessy and wanted to meet her father to ask for her hand in marriage as he believed that you "weigh true love not by the weight of the purse". A wedding soon followed that featured the most skillful musicians, the most scrumptious foods and attended by many of the noblest families - a wedding of "joy and delight". This was when the secret was finally revealed! The Blind Beggar was in fact the son of Simon de Montford who had been an influential baron during reign of King John. Despite being blinded at the Battle of Evesham (other sources say he died at the battle), he was indeed a man of substantial means; he lived the life of a Blind Beggar to ensure that whoever would win the heart and love of young Bessy was not after her money!

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jun 1663. Then to his yard and house, where I staid two hours or more discoursing of the expense of the navy and the corruption of Sir W. Batten (age 62) and his man Wood that he brings or would bring to sell all that is to be sold by the Navy.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jun 1663. Thence home and at my office all the morning, and then by water to St. James's, but no meeting to-day being holy day, but met Mr. Creed in the Park, and after a walk or two, discoursing his business, took leave of him in Westminster Hall [Map], whither we walked, and then came again to the Hall and fell to talk with Mrs. Lane, and after great talk that she never went abroad with any man as she used heretofore to do, I with one word got her to go with me and to meet me at the further Rhenish wine-house, where I did give her a lobster and do so touse her and feel her all over, making her believe how fair and good a skin she has, and indeed she has a very white thigh and leg, but monstrous fat. When weary I did give over and somebody, having seen some of our dalliance, called aloud in the street, "Sir! why do you kiss the gentlewoman so?" and flung a stone at the window, which vexed me, but I believe they could not see my touzing her, and so we broke up and I went out the back way, without being observed I think, and so she towards the Hall and I to White Hall, where taking water I to the Temple [Map] with my cozen Roger (age 46) and Mr. Goldsborough to Gray's Inn to his counsel, one Mr. Rawworth, a very fine man, where it being the question whether I as executor should give a warrant to Goldsborough in my reconveying her estate back again, the mortgage being performed against all acts of the testator, but only my own, my cozen said he never heard it asked before; and the other that it was always asked, and he never heard it denied, or scrupled before, so great a distance was there in their opinions, enough to make a man forswear ever having to do with the law; so they agreed to refer it to Serjeant Maynard. So we broke up, and I by water home from the Temple [Map], and there to Sir W. Batten (age 62) and eat with him, he and his lady and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) having been below to-day upon the East India men that are come in, but never tell me so, but that they have been at Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Deptford, and done great deal of business. God help them.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1663. Thence by water home and to dinner, and afterwards to the office, and there sat till evening, and then I by water to Deptford, Kent [Map] to see Sir W. Pen (age 42), who lies ill at Captain Rooth's, but in a way to be well again this weather, this day being the only fair day we have had these two or three months. Among other discourse I did tell him plainly some of my thoughts concerning Sir W. Batten (age 62). and the office in general, upon design for him to understand that I do mind things and will not balk to take notice of them, that when he comes to be well again he may know how to look upon me.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1663. Thus, by God's blessing, ends this book of two years; I being in all points in good health and a good way to thrive and do well. Some money I do and can lay up, but not much, being worth now above £700, besides goods of all sorts. My wife in the country with Ashwell, her woman, with my father; myself at home with W. Hewer (age 21) and my cooke-maid Hannah, my boy Wayneman being lately run away from me. In my office, my repute and understanding good, especially with the Duke (age 29) and Mr. Coventry (age 35); only the rest of the officers do rather envy than love me, I standing in most of their lights, specially Sir W. Batten (age 62), whose cheats I do daily oppose to his great trouble, though he appears mighty kind and willing to keep friendship with me, while Sir J. Minnes (age 64), like a dotard, is led by the nose by him. My wife and I, by my late jealousy, for which I am truly to be blamed, have not the kindness between us which we used and ought to have, and I fear will be lost hereafter if I do not take course to oblige her and yet preserve my authority. Publique matters are in an ill condition; Parliament sitting and raising four subsidys for the King (age 33), which is but a little, considering his wants; and yet that parted withal with great hardness. They being offended to see so much money go, and no debts of the publique's paid, but all swallowed by a luxurious Court: which the King (age 33) it is believed and hoped will retrench in a little time, when he comes to see the utmost of the revenue which shall be settled on him: he expecting to have his £1,200,000 made good to him, which is not yet done by above £150,000, as he himself reports to the House. My differences with my uncle Thomas at a good quiett, blessed be God! and other matters. The town full of the great overthrow lately given to the Spaniards by the Portugalls, they being advanced into the very middle of Portugall. The weather wet for two or three months together beyond belief, almost not one fair day coming between till this day, which has been a very pleasant day and the first pleasant day this summer. The charge of the Navy intended to be limited to £200,000 per annum, the ordinary charge of it, and that to be settled upon the Customs. The King (age 33) yet greatly taken up with Madam Castlemaine (age 22) and Mrs. Stewart (age 15), which God of Heaven put an end to! Myself very studious to learn what I can of all things necessary for my place as an officer of the Navy, reading lately what concerns measuring of timber and knowledge of the tides. I have of late spent much time with Creed, being led to it by his business of his accounts, but I find him a fellow of those designs and tricks, that there is no degree of true friendship to be made with him, and therefore I must cast him off, though he be a very understanding man, and one that much may be learned of as to cunning and judging of other men. Besides, too, I do perceive more and more that my time of pleasure and idleness of any sort must be flung off to attend to getting of some money and the keeping of my family in order, which I fear by my wife's liberty may be otherwise lost.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1663. Thence by water with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to Trinity House, Deptford [Map], there to dine with him, which we did; and after dinner we fell talking, Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Mr. Batten and I; Mr. Batten telling us of a late triall of Sir Charles Sydly (age 24) the other day, before my Lord Chief Justice Foster and the whole bench, for his debauchery a little while since at Oxford Kate's1, coming in open day into the Balcone and showed his nakedness,.... and abusing of scripture and as it were from thence preaching a mountebank sermon from the pulpit, saying that there he had to sell such a powder as should make all the (women) in town run after him, 1000 people standing underneath to see and hear him, and that being done he took a glass of wine.... and then drank it off, and then took another and drank the King's health. It seems my Lord and the rest of the judges did all of them round give him a most high reproof; my Lord Chief justice saying, that it was for him, and such wicked wretches as he was, that God's anger and judgments hung over us, calling him sirrah many times. It's said they have bound him to his good behaviour (there being no law against him for it) in £5000. It being told that my Lord Buckhurst (age 20) was there, my Lord asked whether it was that Buckhurst that was lately tried for robbery; and when answered Yes, he asked whether he had so soon forgot his deliverance at that time, and that it would have more become him to have been at his prayers begging God's forgiveness, than now running into such courses again...

Note 1. The details in the original are very gross. Dr. Johnson relates the story in the "Lives of the Poets", in his life of Sackville, Lord Dorset "Sackville (age 20), who was then Lord Buckhurst, with Sir Charles Sedley (age 24) and Sir Thomas Ogle, got drunk at the Cock, in Bow Street, by Covent Garden [Map], and going into the balcony exposed themselves to the populace in very indecent postures. At last, as they grew warmer, Sedley stood forth naked, and harangued the populace in such profane language, that the publick indignation was awakened; the crowd attempted to force the door, and being repulsed, drove in the performers with stones, and broke the windows of the house. For this misdemeanour they were indicted, and Sedley was fined five hundred pounds; what was the sentence of the others is not known. Sedley employed Henry Killigrew and another to procure a remission from the King (age 33), but (mark the friendship of the dissolute!) they begged the fine for themselves, and exacted it to the last groat". (The woman known as Oxford Kate appears to have kept the notorious Cock Tavern in Bow Street at this date.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1663. I to St. James's, and there discoursed a while with Mr. Coventry (age 35), between whom and myself there is very good understanding and friendship, and so to Westminster Hall [Map], and being in the Parliament lobby, I there saw my Lord of Bristol (age 50) come to the Commons House to give his answer to their question, about some words he should tell the King (age 33) that were spoke by Sir Richard Temple (age 29), a member of their House. A chair was set at the bar of the House for him, which he used but little, but made an harangue of half an hour bareheaded, the House covered. His speech being done, he came out and withdrew into a little room till the House had concluded of an answer to his speech; which they staying long upon, I went away. And by and by out comes Sir W. Batten (age 62); and he told me that his Lordship had made a long and a comedian-like speech, and delivered with such action as was not becoming his Lordship. He confesses he did tell the King (age 33) such a thing of Sir Richard Temple (age 29), but that upon his honour they were not spoke by Sir Richard, he having taken a liberty of enlarging to the King (age 33) upon the discourse which had been between Sir Richard and himself lately; and so took upon himself the whole blame, and desired their pardon, it being not to do any wrong to their fellow-member, but out of zeal to the King (age 33). He told them, among many other things, that as to his religion he was a Roman Catholique, but such a one as thought no man to have right to the Crown of England but the Prince that hath it; and such a one as, if the King (age 33) should desire his counsel as to his own, he would not advise him to another religion than the old true reformed religion of this country, it being the properest of this kingdom as it now stands; and concluded with a submission to what the House shall do with him, saying, that whatever they shall do, says he, "thanks be to God, this head, this heart, and this sword (pointing to them all), will find me a being in any place in Europe". The House hath hereupon voted clearly Sir Richard Temple (age 29) to be free from the imputation of saying those words; but when Sir William Batten (age 62) came out, had not concluded what to say to my Lord, it being argued that to own any satisfaction as to my Lord from his speech, would be to lay some fault upon the King (age 33) for the message he should upon no better accounts send to the impeaching of one of their members.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jul 1663. Up and he home, and I with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) by coach to Westminster, to St. James's, thinking to meet Sir G. Carteret (age 53), and to attend the Duke (age 29), but he not coming we broke up, and so to Westminster Hall [Map], and there meeting with Mr. Moore he tells me great news that my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22) is fallen from Court, and this morning retired. He gives me no account of the reason of it, but that it is so: for which I am sorry: and yet if the King (age 33) do it to leave off not only her but all other mistresses, I should be heartily glad of it, that he may fall to look after business. I hear my Lord Digby (age 50) is condemned at Court for his speech, and that my Chancellor (age 54) grows great again.

1663 Battle of Ameixial

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jul 1663. So to St. James's by water with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), I giving occasion to a wager about the tide, that it did flow through bridge, by which Sir W. Batten (age 62) won 5s. of Sir J. Minnes (age 64). At St. James's we staid while the Duke (age 29) made himself ready. Among other things Sir Allen Apsley (age 47) showed the Duke (age 29) the Lisbon Gazette in Spanish, where the late victory is set down particularly, and to the great honour of the English beyond measure. They have since taken back Evora, which was lost to the Spaniards, the English making the assault, and lost not more than three men. Here I learnt that the English foot are highly esteemed all over the world, but the horse not so much, which yet we count among ourselves the best; but they abroad have had no great knowledge of our horse, it seems.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jul 1663. The Duke (age 29) being ready, we retired with him, and there fell upon Mr. Creed's business, where the Treasurer (age 56) did, like a mad coxcomb, without reason or method run over a great many things against the account, and so did Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), which the Duke himself and Mr. Coventry (age 35) and my Lord Barkely (age 61) and myself did remove, and Creed being called in did answer all with great method and excellently to the purpose (myself I am a little conscious did not speak so well as I purposed and do think I used to do, that is, not so intelligibly and persuasively, as I well hoped I should), not that what I said was not well taken, and did carry the business with what was urged and answered by Creed and Mr. Coventry (age 35), till the Duke himself did declare that he was satisfied, and my Lord Barkely (age 61) offered to lay £100 that the King (age 33) would receive no wrong in the account, and the two last knights held their tongues, or at least by not understanding it did say what made for Mr. Creed, and so Sir G. Carteret (age 53) was left alone, but yet persisted to say that the account was not good, but full of corruption and foul dealing. And so we broke up to his shame, but I do fear to the loss of his friendship to me a good while, which I am heartily troubled for.

On 05 Jul 1663 Jun 1663 [his son-in-law] William Castle of Rotherhithe (age 34) and [his daughter] Martha Batten (age 26) were married.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jul 1663. So home to supper and musique, which is all the pleasure I have of late given myself, or is fit I should, others spending too much time and money. Going in I stepped to Sir W. Batten (age 62), and there staid and talked with him (my Lady being in the country), and sent for some lobsters, and Mrs. Turner (age 40) came in, and did bring us an umble pie hot out of her oven, extraordinary good, and afterwards some spirits of her making, in which she has great judgment, very good, and so home, merry with this night's refreshment.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jul 1663. Dined at home, and Mr. Moore in the afternoon comes to me and concluded not to go. Sir W. Batten (age 62) and I sat a little this afternoon at the office, and thence I by water to Deptford, and there mustered the Yard, purposely, God forgive me, to find out Bagwell (age 26), a carpenter, whose wife is a pretty woman, that I might have some occasion of knowing him and forcing her to come to the office again, which I did so luckily that going thence he and his wife did of themselves meet me in the way to thank me for my old kindness, but I spoke little to her, but shall give occasion for her coming to me. Her husband went along with me to show me Sir W. Pen's (age 42) lodging, which I knew before, but only to have a time of speaking to him and sounding him. So left and I went in to Sir W. Pen (age 42), who continues ill, and worse, I think, than before. He tells me my Baroness Castlemaine (age 22) was at Court, for all this talk this week, which I am glad to hear; but it seems the King (age 33) is stranger than ordinary to her.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jul 1663. Up to the Lobby, and there sent out for Mr. Coventry (age 35) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and told them if they thought convenient I would go to Chatham, Kent [Map] today, Sir John Minnes (age 64) being already there at a Pay, and I would do such and such business there, which they thought well of, and so I went home and prepared myself to go after, dinner with Sir W. Batten (age 62). Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Mr. Coventry (age 35) tell me that my Lord Bristoll (age 50) hath this day impeached my Chancellor (age 54) in the House of Lords of High Treason. The chief of the articles are these:

Note 1st. That he should be the occasion of the peace made with Holland lately upon such disadvantageous terms, and that he was bribed to it.

Note 2d. That Dunkirke was also sold by his advice chiefly, so much to the damage of England.

Note 3d. That he had £6000 given him for the drawing-up or promoting of the Irish declaration lately, concerning the division of the lands there.

Note 4th. He did carry on the design of the Portugall match, so much to the prejudice of the Crown of England, notwithstanding that he knew the Queen (age 24) is not capable of bearing children.

Note 5th. That the Duke's (age 29) marrying of his daughter (age 26) was a practice of his, thereby to raise his family; and that it was done by indirect courses.

Note 6th. That the breaking-off of the match with Parma, in which he was employed at the very time when the match with Portugall was made up here, which he took as a great slur to him, and so it was; and that, indeed, is the chief occasion of all this fewde.

Note 7th. That he hath endeavoured to bring in Popery, and wrote to the Pope for a cap for a subject of the King (age 33) of England's (my Lord Aubigny (age 43) ); and some say that he lays it to the Chancellor (age 54), that a good Protestant Secretary (Sir Edward Nicholas) was laid aside, and a Papist, Sir H. Bennet (age 45), put in his room: which is very strange, when the last of these two is his own creature, and such an enemy accounted to the Chancellor (age 54), that they never did nor do agree; and all the world did judge the Chancellor (age 54) to be falling from the time that Sir H. Bennet (age 45) was brought in. Besides my Lord Bristoll (age 50) being a Catholique himself, all this is very strange.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jul 1663. Thence, it raining as hard as it could pour down, home to the Hillhouse, and anon to supper, and after supper, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I had great discourse with Captain Cox and Mr. Hempson about business of the yard, and particularly of pursers' accounts with Hempson, who is a cunning knave in that point. So late to bed and, Mr. Wayth being gone, I lay above in the Treasurer's (age 56) bed and slept well. About one or two in the morning the curtains of my bed being drawn waked me, and I saw a man stand there by the inside of my bed calling me French dogg 20 times, one after another, and I starting, as if I would get out of the bed, he fell a-laughing as hard as he could drive, still calling me French dogg, and laid his hand on my shoulder. At last, whether I said anything or no I cannot tell, but I perceived the man, after he had looked wistly upon me, and found that I did not answer him to the names that he called me by, which was Salmon, Sir Carteret's clerk, and Robt. Maddox, another of the clerks, he put off his hat on a suddaine, and forebore laughing, and asked who I was, saying, "Are you Mr. Pepys?" I told him yes, and now being come a little better to myself, I found him to be Tom Willson, Sir W. Batten's (age 62) clerk, and fearing he might be in some melancholy fit, I was at a loss what to do or say. At last I asked him what he meant. He desired my pardon for that he was mistaken, for he thought verily, not knowing of my coming to lie there, that it had been Salmon, the Frenchman, with whom he intended to have made some sport. So I made nothing of it, but bade him good night, and I, after a little pause, to sleep again, being well pleased that it ended no worse, and being a little the better pleased with it, because it was the Surveyor's clerk, which will make sport when I come to tell Sir W. Batten (age 62) of it, it being a report that old Edgeborough, the former Surveyor, who died here, do now and then walk.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jul 1663. By and by the King (age 33) and Queen (age 24), who looked in this dress (a white laced waistcoat and a crimson short pettycoat, and her hair dressed ci la negligence) mighty pretty; and the King (age 33) rode hand in hand with her. Here was also my Baroness Castlemaine (age 22) rode among the rest of the ladies; but the King (age 33) took, methought, no notice of her; nor when they 'light did any body press (as she seemed to expect, and staid for it) to take her down, but was taken down by her own gentleman. She looked mighty out of humour, and had a yellow plume in her hat (which all took notice of), and yet is very handsome, but very melancholy: nor did any body speak to her, or she so much as smile or speak to any body. I followed them up into White Hall, and into the Queen's (age 24) presence, where all the ladies walked, talking and fiddling with their hats and feathers, and changing and trying one another's by one another's heads, and laughing. But it was the finest sight to me, considering their great beautys and dress, that ever I did see in all my life. But, above all, Mrs. Stewart (age 16) in this dress, with her hat cocked and a red plume, with her sweet eye, little Roman nose, and excellent taille, is now the greatest beauty I ever saw, I think, in my life; and, if ever woman can, do exceed my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22), at least in this dress nor do I wonder if the King (age 33) changes, which I verily believe is the reason of his coldness to my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22). Here late, with much ado I left to look upon them, and went away, and by water, in a boat with other strange company, there being no other to be had, and out of him into a sculler half to the bridge, and so home and to Sir W. Batten (age 62), where I staid telling him and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Mrs. Turner (age 40), with great mirth, my being frighted at Chatham, Kent [Map] by young Edgeborough, and so home to supper and to bed, before I sleep fancying myself to sport with Mrs. Stewart (age 16) with great pleasure.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jul 1663. At night, after office done, I went to Sir W. Batten's (age 62), where my Lady and I [had] some high words about emptying our house of office, where I did tell her my mind, and at last agreed that it should be done through my office, and so all well. So home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jul 1663. At noon, by my [his wife] Lady Batten's desire, I went over the water to [his son-in-law] Mr. Castle's (age 34), who brings his wife home to his own house to-day, where I found a great many good old women, and my Lady, Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir J. Minnes (age 64). A good, handsome, plain dinner, and then walked in the garden; which is pleasant enough, more than I expected there, and so Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and I by water to the office, and there sat, and then I by water to the Temple [Map] about my law business, and back again home and wrote letters to my father and wife about my desire that they should observe the feast at Brampton, and have my Lady and the family, and so home to supper and bed, my head aching all the day from my last night's bad rest, and yesterday's distempering myself with over walking, and to-day knocking my head against a low door in Mr. Castle's (age 34) house. This day the Parliament kept a fast for the present unseasonable weather.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jul 1663. So up and to supper with Sir W. Batten (age 62) upon a soused mullet, very good meat, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jul 1663. So to the yard, and there mustered the yard, and found many faults, and discharged several fellows that were absent from their business. I staid also at Mr. Ackworth's desire at dinner with him and his wife, and there was a simple fellow, a gentleman I believe of the Court, their kinsmen, that threatened me I could have little discourse or begin, acquaintance with Ackworth's wife, and so after dinner away, with all haste home, and there found Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) at the office, and by Sir W. Batten's (age 62) testimony and Sir G. Carteret's (age 53) concurrence was forced to consent to a business of Captain Cocke's (age 46) timber, as bad as anything we have lately disputed about, and all through Mr. Coventry's (age 35) not being with us.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jul 1663. Up and to my office setting papers in order for these two or three days, in which I have been hindered a little, and then having intended this day to go to Banstead Downs, Surrey to see a famous race, I sent Will to get himself ready to go with me, and I also by and by home and put on my riding suit, and being ready came to the office to Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and did a little of course at the office this morning, and so by boat to White Hall, where I hear that the race is put off, because the Lords do sit in Parliament to-day. However, having appointed Mr. Creed to come to me to Fox Hall, I went over thither, and after some debate, Creed and I resolved to go to Clapham, Surrey, to Mr. Gauden's, who had sent his coach to their place for me because I was to have my horse of him to go to the race. So I went thither by coach and my Will by horse with me; Mr. Creed he went over back again to Westminster to fetch his horse. When I came to Mr. Gauden's one first thing was to show me his house, which is almost built, wherein he and his family live. I find it very regular and finely contrived, and the gardens and offices about it as convenient and as full of good variety as ever I saw in my life. It is true he hath been censured for laying out so much money; but he tells me that he built it for his brother, who is since dead (the Bishop), who when he should come to be Bishop of Winchester, which he was promised (to which bishoprick at present there is no house), he did intend to dwell here. Besides, with the good husbandry in making his bricks and other things I do not think it costs him so much money as people think and discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jul 1663. So I to my office, and having given some order to Tom Hater, to whom I gave leave for his recreation to go down to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] this Pay, I went down to Wapping to Sir W. Warren, and there staid an hour or two discoursing of some of his goods and then things in general relating to this office, &c., and so home, and there going to Sir William Batten (age 62) (having no stomach to dine at home, it being yet hardly clean of last night's [mess])and there I dined with my Lady and her daughter and son Castle, and mighty kind she is and I kind to her, but, Lord! how freely and plainly she rails against Commissioner Pett (age 52), calling him rogue, and wondering that the King (age 33) keeps such a fellow in the Navy.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jul 1663. By and by Mr. Coventry (age 35) only came (Sir John Minnes (age 64) and Sir William Batten (age 62) being gone this morning to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to pay some ships and the yard there), and after doing a little business he and I down to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and there up and down the yard, and by and by came Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and we all looked into matters, and then by water back to Deptford, where we dined with him at his house, a very good dinner and mightily tempted with wines of all sorts and brave French Syder, but I drunk none. But that which is a great wonder I find his little daughter Betty, that was in hanging sleeves but a month or two ago, and is a very little young child; married, and to whom, but to young Scott, son to Madam Catharine Scott, that was so long in law, and at whose triall I was with her husband; he pleading that it was unlawfully got and would not own it, she, it seems, being brought to bed of it, if not got by somebody else at Oxford, but it seems a little before his death he did own the child, and hath left him his estate, not long since. So Sir G. Carteret (age 53) hath struck up of a sudden a match with him for his little daughter. He hath about £2000 per annum; and it seems Sir G. Carteret (age 53) hath by this means over-reached Sir H. Bennet (age 45), who did endeavour to get this gentleman for a sister of his, but Sir G. Carteret (age 53) I say has over-reached him. By this means Sir G. Carteret (age 53) hath married two daughters this year both very well.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Aug 1663. This night Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) returned [from] Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], but I did not go see them.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Aug 1663. So home and at my office reading my vowes, and so to Sir W. Batten (age 62) to dinner, being invited and sent for, and being willing to hear how they left things at Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], which I found but ill enough, and are mightily for a Commissioner to be at seat there to keep the yard in order.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Aug 1663. And leaving my wife and her talking highly, I went away by coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) to St. James's, and there attended of course the Duke (age 29).

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1663. So to other places by the way about small businesses, and so home, and after looking over all my workmen, I went by water and land to Deptford, and there found by appointment Sir W. Batten (age 62), but he was got to Mr. Waith's to dinner, where I dined with him, a good dinner and good discourse, and his wife, I believe, a good woman. We fell in discourse of Captain Cocke (age 46), and how his lady has lost all her fine linen almost, but besides that they say she gives out she had £3000 worth of linen, which we all laugh at, and Sir W. Batten (age 62) (who I perceive is not so fond of the Captain as he used to be, and less of her, from her slight receiving of him and his lady it seems once) told me how he should say that he see he must spend £700 per ann. get it how he could, which was a high speech, and by all men's discover, his estate not good enough to spend so much.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1663. Up by four o'clock to go with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), which we did, though not before 6 or 7 by their laying a-bed. Our business was to survey the new wharf building there, in order to the giving more to him that do it (Mr. Randall) than contracted for, but I see no reason for it, though it be well done, yet no better than contracted to be. Here we eat and drank at the Clerke of the Cheques, and in taking water at the Tower gate, we drank a cup of strong water, which I did out of pure conscience to my health, and I think is not excepted by my oaths, but it is a thing I shall not do again, hoping to have no such occasion.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1663. After dinner to my office, getting my closet made clean and setting some papers in order, and so in the evening home and to bed. This day Sir W. Batten (age 62) tells me that Mr. Newburne (of whom the nickname came up among us forarse Tom Newburne) is dead of eating cowcumbers, of which, the other day, I heard another, I think Sir Nicholas Crisp's (age 64) son.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Aug 1663. Thence down to see some good plank in the river with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and back again, it being a very cold day and a cold wind.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Aug 1663. Up and to my office all the morning, where Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did pay the short allowance money to the East India companies, and by the assistance of the City Marshall and his men, did lay hold of two or three of the chief of the companies that were in the mutiny the other day, and sent them to prison.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Sep 1663. Up betimes and to my office, and thence with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) by coach to White Hall, where met us Sir W. Batten (age 62), and there staid by the Council Chamber till the Lords called us in, being appointed four days ago to attend them with an account of the riott among the seamen the other day, when Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did as like a coxcomb as ever I saw any man speak in my life, and so we were dismissed, they making nothing almost of the matter.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Sep 1663. Then up and to the office a while, and then to Sir W. Batten (age 62), who is going this day for pleasure down to the Downes. I eat a breakfast with them, and at my Lady's desire with them by coach to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where I went aboard with them on the Charlotte yacht. The wind very fresh, and I believe they will be all sicke enough, besides that she is mighty troublesome on the water. Methinks she makes over much of her husband's ward, young Mr. Griffin, as if she expected some service from him when he comes to it, being a pretty young boy. I left them under sayle, and I to Deptford, and, after a word or two with Sir J. Minnes (age 64), walked to Redriffe [Map] and so home. In my way, it coming into my head, overtaking of a beggar or two on the way that looked like Gypsys, what the Gypsys 8 or 9 days ago had foretold, that somebody that day se'nnight should be with me to borrow money, but I should lend none; and looking, when I came to my office, upon my journall, that my brother John (age 22) had brought a letter that day from my brother Tom (age 29) to borrow £20 more of me, which had vexed me so that I had sent the letter to my father into the country, to acquaint him of it, and how little he is beforehand that he is still forced to borrow. But it pleased me mightily to see how, contrary to my expectations, having so lately lent him £20, and belief that he had money by him to spare, and that after some days not thinking of it, I should look back and find what the Gypsy had told me to be so true.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Sep 1663. I hear this day that Sir W. Batten (age 62) was fain to put ashore at Queenborough [Map] with my Lady, who has been so sick she swears never to go to sea again. But it happens well that Holmes is come home into the Downes, where he will meet my Lady, and it may be do her more good than she looked for. He brings news of the peace between Tangier and the Moors, but the particulars I know not. He is come but yesterday.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Sep 1663. Up very betimes by break of day, and got my wife up, whom the thought of this day's long journey do discourage; and after eating something, and changing of a piece of gold to pay the reckoning, we mounted, and through Baldwicke, where a fayre is kept to-day, and a great one for cheese and other such commodities, and so to Hatfield, Hertfordshire, it being most curious weather from the time we set out to our getting home, and here we dined, and my wife being very weary, and believing that it would be hard to get her home to-night, and a great charge to keep her longer abroad, I took the opportunity of an empty coach that was to go to London, and left her to come in it to London, for half-a-crown, and so I and the boy home as fast as we could drive, and it was even night before we got home. So that I account it very good fortune that we took this course, being myself very weary, much more would my wife have been. At home found all very well and my house in good order. To see Sir W. Pen (age 42), who is pretty well, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who is a little lame on one foot, and the rest gone to Chatham, Kent [Map], viz.: Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), who has in my absence inveighed against my contract the other day for Warren's masts, in which he is a knave, and I shall find matter of tryumph, but it vexes me a little.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1663. Lay pretty long in bed, and so to my office all the morning till by and by called out by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), with them by water to Deptford, where it of a sudden did lighten, thunder, and rain so as we could do nothing but stay in Davis's house, and by and by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I home again by water, and I home to dinner, and after dinner to the office, and there till night all alone, even of my clerks being there, doing of business, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Sep 1663. Home and eat one bit of meat, and then by water with him and Sir W. Batten (age 62) to a sale of old provisions at Deptford, which we did at Captain Boddily's house, to the value of £600 or £700, but I am not satisfied with the method used in this thing.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Oct 1663. Up and betimes to my office, and then to sit, where Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir W. Pen (age 42), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Mr. Coventry (age 35) and myself, a fuller board than by the King's progresse and the late pays and my absence has been a great while. Sat late, and then home to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Oct 1663. So I to the office till night, about several businesses, and then went and sat an hour or two with Sir W. Pen (age 42), talking very largely of Sir J. Minnes's (age 64) simplicity and unsteadiness, and of Sir W. Batten's (age 62) suspicious dealings, wherein I was open, and he sufficiently, so that I do not care for his telling of tales, for he said as much, but whether that were so or no I said nothing but what is my certain knowledge and belief concerning him. Thence home to bed in great pain.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Oct 1663. Thence we fell to talk of Warren's other goods, which Pett (age 43) had said were generally bad, and falling to this contract again, I did say it was the most cautious and as good a contract as had been made here, and the only [one] that had been in such terms. Sir J. Minnes (age 64) told me angrily that Winter's timber, bought for 33s. per load, was as good and in the same terms. I told him that it was not so, but that he and Sir W. Batten (age 62) were both abused, and I would prove it was as dear a bargain as had been made this half year, which occasioned high words between them and me, but I am able to prove it and will. That also was so ended, and so to other business.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Oct 1663. Slept pretty well, and my wife waked to ring the bell to call up our mayds to the washing about 4 o'clock, and I was and she angry that our bell did not wake them sooner, but I will get a bigger bell. So we to sleep again till 8 o'clock, and then I up in some ease to the office, where we had a full board, where we examined Cocke's (age 46) second account, when Mr. Turner had drawn a bill directly to be paid the balance thereof, as Mr. Cocke (age 46) demanded, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did boldly assert the truth of it, and that he had examined it, when there is no such thing, but many vouchers, upon examination, missing, and we saw reason to strike off several of his demands, and to bring down his 5 per cent. commission to 3 per cent. So we shall save the King (age 33) some money, which both the Comptroller (age 64) and his clerke had absolutely given away. There was also two occasions more of difference at the table; the one being to make out a bill to Captain Smith for his salary abroad as commander-in-chief in the Streights. Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did demand an increase of salary for his being Vice-Admiral in the Downes, he having received but 40s. without an increase, when Sir J. Lawson (age 48), in the same voyage, had £3, and others have also had increase, only he, because he was an officer of the board, was worse used than any body else, and particularly told Sir W. Batten (age 62) that he was the opposer formerly of his having an increase, which I did wonder to hear him so boldly lay it to him. So we hushed up the dispute, and offered, if he would, to examine precedents, and report them, if there was any thing to his advantage to be found, to the Duke (age 29). The next was, Mr. Chr. Pett (age 43) and Deane (age 29) were summoned to give an account of some knees1 which Pett reported bad, that were to be served in by Sir W. Warren, we having contracted that none should be served but such as were to be approved of by our officers. So that if they were bad they were to be blamed for receiving them.

Note 1. "Naturally grown timber or bars of iron bent to a right angle or to fit the surfaces and to secure bodies firmly together as hanging knees secure the deck beams to the sides".-Smyth's Sailor's Word- Book. There are several kinds of knees.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Oct 1663. Up, and not in any good ease yet, but had pain in making water, and some course. I see I must take besides keeping myself warm to make myself break wind and go freely to stool before I can be well, neither of which I can do yet, though I have drank the other bottle of Mr. Hollyard's (age 54) against my stomach this morning. I did, however, make shift to go to the office, where we sat, and there Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) did advise me to take some juniper water, and Sir W. Batten (age 62) sent to his Lady for some for me, strong water made of juniper. Whether that or anything else of my draught this morning did it I cannot tell, but I had a couple of stools forced after it.... but whether I shall grow better upon it I cannot tell.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Oct 1663. Up (though slept well) and made some water in the morning [as] I used to do, and a little pain returned to me, and some fears, but being forced to go to the Duke (age 29) at St. James's, I took coach and in my way called upon Mr. Hollyard (age 54) and had his advice to take a glyster. At St. James's we attended the Duke all of us. And there, after my discourse, Mr. Coventry (age 35) of his own accord begun to tell the Duke how he found that discourse abroad did run to his prejudice about the fees that he took, and how he sold places and other things; wherein he desired to appeal to his Highness, whether he did any thing more than what his predecessors did, and appealed to us all. So Sir G. Carteret (age 53) did answer that some fees were heretofore taken, but what he knows not; only that selling of places never was nor ought to be countenanced. So Mr. Coventry (age 35) very hotly answered to Sir G. Carteret (age 53), and appealed to himself whether he was not one of the first that put him upon looking after this taking of fees, and that he told him that Mr. Smith should say that he made £5000 the first year, and he believed he made £7000. This Sir G. Carteret (age 53) denied, and said, that if he did say so he told a lie, for he could not, nor did know, that ever he did make that profit of his place; but that he believes he might say £2500 the first year. Mr. Coventry (age 35) instanced in another thing, particularly wherein Sir G. Carteret (age 53) did advise with him about the selling of the Auditor's place of the stores, when in the beginning there was an intention of creating such an office. This he confessed, but with some lessening of the tale Mr. Coventry (age 35) told, it being only for a respect to my Lord Fitz-Harding (age 33). In fine, Mr. Coventry (age 35) did put into the Duke's hand a list of above 250 places that he did give without receiving one farthing, so much as his ordinary fees for them, upon his life and oath; and that since the Duke's establishment of fees he had never received one token more of any man; and that in his whole life he never conditioned or discoursed of any consideration from any commanders since he came to the Navy. And afterwards, my Lord Barkeley merrily discoursing that he wished his profit greater than it was, and that he did believe that he had got £50,000 since he came in, Mr. Coventry (age 35) did openly declare that his Lordship, or any of us, should have not only all he had got, but all that he had in the world (and yet he did not come a beggar into the Navy, nor would yet be thought to speak in any contempt of his Royall Highness's bounty), and should have a year to consider of it too, for £25,000. The Duke's answer was, that he wished we all had made more profit than he had of our places, and that we had all of us got as much as one man below stayres in the Court, which he presently named, and it was Sir George Lane (age 43)! This being ended, and the list left in the Duke's hand, we parted, and I with Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and Sir W. Batten (age 62) by coach to the Exchange [Map], and there a while, and so home, and whether it be the jogging, or by having my mind more employed (which I believe is a great matter) I know not, but.... I begin to be suddenly well, at least better than I was.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Oct 1663. Thence home and after dinner my wife and I, by Mr. Rawlinson's (age 49) conduct, to the Jewish Synagogue: where the men and boys in their vayles, and the women behind a lattice out of sight; and some things stand up, which I believe is their Law, in a press to which all coming in do bow; and at the putting on their vayles do say something, to which others that hear him do cry Amen, and the party do kiss his vayle. Their service all in a singing way, and in Hebrew. And anon their Laws that they take out of the press are carried by several men, four or five several burthens in all, and they do relieve one another; and whether it is that every one desires to have the carrying of it, I cannot tell, thus they carried it round about the room while such a service is singing. And in the end they had a prayer for the King (age 33), which they pronounced his name in Portugall; but the prayer, like the rest, in Hebrew. But, Lord! to see the disorder, laughing, sporting, and no attention, but confusion in all their service, more like brutes than people knowing the true God, would make a man forswear ever seeing them more and indeed I never did see so much, or could have imagined there had been any religion in the whole world so absurdly performed as this. Away thence with my mind strongly disturbed with them, by coach and set down my wife in Westminster Hall [Map], and I to White Hall, and there the Tangier Committee met, but the Duke and the Africa Committee meeting in our room, Sir G. Carteret (age 53); Sir Wm. Compton (age 38), Mr. Coventry (age 35), Sir W. Rider, Cuttance and myself met in another room, with chairs set in form but no table, and there we had very fine discourses of the business of the fitness to keep Sally, and also of the terms of our King's paying the Portugees that deserted their house at Tangier, which did much please me, and so to fetch my wife, and so to the New Exchange about her things, and called at Thomas Pepys the turner's and bought something there, an so home to supper and to bed, after I had been a good while with Sir W. Pen (age 42), railing and speaking freely our minds against Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), but no more than the folly of one and the knavery of the other do deserve.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Oct 1663. Up and to my office, and there we sat a very full board all the morning upon some accounts of Mr. Gauden's. Here happened something concerning my Will which Sir W. Batten (age 62) would fain charge upon him, and I heard him mutter something against him of complaint for his often receiving people's money to Sir G. Carteret (age 53), which displeased me much, but I will be even with him.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1663. A fine French dinner, and so we after dinner broke up and to Creed's new lodgings in Axe-yard [Map], which I like very well and so with him to White Hall and walked up and down in the galleries with good discourse, and anon Mr. Coventry (age 35) and Povy (age 49), sad for the loss of one of our number we sat down as a Committee for Tangier and did some business and so broke up, and I down with Mr. Coventry (age 35) and in his chamber discoursing of business of the office and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten's (age 62) carriage, when he most ingeniously tells me how they have carried themselves to him in forbearing to speak the other day to the Duke what they know they have so largely at other times said to him, and I told him what I am put to about the bargain for masts. I perceive he thinks of it all and will remember it.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1663. So up; and going by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to St. James's, they tell me that Sir Wm. Compton (deceased), who it is true had been a little sickly for a week or fortnight, but was very well upon Friday at night last at the Tangier Committee with us, was dead-died yesterday: at which I was most exceedingly surprised, he being, and so all the world saying that he was, one of the worthyest men and best officers of State now in England; and so in my conscience he was: of the best temper, valour, abilities of mind, integrity, birth, fine person, and diligence of any one man he hath left behind him in the three kingdoms; and yet not forty years old, or if so, that is all1. I find the sober men of the Court troubled for him; and yet not so as to hinder or lessen their mirth, talking, laughing, and eating, drinking, and doing every thing else, just as if there was no such thing, which is as good an instance for me hereafter to judge of death, both as to the unavoidableness, suddenness, and little effect of it upon the spirits of others, let a man be never so high, or rich, or good; but that all die alike, no more matter being made of the death of one than another, and that even to die well, the praise of it is not considerable in the world, compared to the many in the world that know not nor make anything of it, nor perhaps to them (unless to one that like this poor gentleman, who is one of a thousand, there nobody speaking ill of him) that will speak ill of a man.

Note 1. Sir William Compton (1625-1663) (deceased) was knighted at Oxford, December 12th, 1643. He was called by Cromwell "the sober young man and the godly cavalier". After the Restoration he was M.P. for Cambridge (1661), and appointed Master of the Ordnance. He died in Drury Lane, suddenly, as stated in the text, and was buried at Compton Wynyates, Warwickshire [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1663. Back to St. James's, and there dined with my Lord Barkeley (age 61) and his lady (age 25), where Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and myself, with two gentlemen more; my Lady, and one of the ladies of honour to the Duchesse (age 26) (no handsome woman, but a most excellent hand).

Great Plague of London

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1663. After being a little with the Duke (age 30), and being invited to dinner to my Lord Barkeley's (age 61), and so, not knowing how to spend our time till noon, Sir W. Batten (age 62) and I took coach, and to the Coffee-house in Cornhill [Map]1; where much talk about the Turk's proceedings, and that the plague is got to Amsterdam, brought by a ship from Argier; and it is also carried to Hambrough. The Duke says the King (age 33) purposes to forbid any of their ships coming into the river. The Duke also told us of several Christian commanders (French) gone over to the Turks to serve them; and upon inquiry I find that the King of France (age 25) do by this aspire to the Empire, and so to get the Crown of Spayne also upon the death of the King (age 33), which is very probable, it seems.

Note 1. This may be the Coffee House in Exchange Alley, which had for a sign, Morat the Great, or The Great Turk, where coffee was sold in berry, in powder, and pounded in a mortar. There is a token of the house, see "Boyne's Tokens", ed. Williamson, vol. i., p. 592.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jul 1664. Thence back again homewards, and Sir W. Batten (age 63) and I to the Coffee-house, but no newes, only the plague is very hot still, and encreases among the Dutch.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Oct 1665. Thus we end the month merrily; and the more for that, after some fears that the plague would have increased again this week, I hear for certain that there is above 400 [less], the whole number being 1,388, and of them of the plague, 1,031. Want of money in the Navy puts everything out of order. Men grow mutinous; and nobody here to mind the business of the Navy but myself. At least Sir W. Batten (age 64) for the few days he has been here do nothing. I in great hopes of my place of Surveyor-Generall of the Victualling, which will bring me £300 per annum.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Mar 1666. Up, and to the office and there all the morning sitting and at noon to dinner with my Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir W. Batten (age 65) and Sir W. Pen (age 44) at the White Horse in Lombard Street [Map], where, God forgive us! good sport with Captain Cocke's (age 49) having his mayde sicke of the plague a day or two ago and sent to the pest house, where she now is, but he will not say anything but that she is well.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Apr 1666. Being mighty weary last night, lay long this morning, then up and to the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 65), Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I met, and toward noon took coach and to White Hall, where I had the opportunity to take leave of the Prince (age 46), and again of the Duke of Albemarle (age 57); and saw them kiss the King's (age 35) hands and the Duke's (age 32); and much content, indeed, there seems to be in all people at their going to sea, and [they] promise themselves much good from them. This morning the House of Parliament do meet, only to adjourne again till winter. The plague, I hear, encreases in the towne much, and exceedingly in the country everywhere.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Oct 1663. Up, and by and by comes my brother Tom (age 29) to me, though late (which do vex me to the blood that I could never get him to come time enough to me, though I have spoke a hundred times; but he is very sluggish, and too negligent ever to do well at his trade I doubt), and having lately considered with my wife very much of the inconvenience of my going in no better plight, we did resolve of putting me into a better garb, and, among other things, to have a good velvet cloake; that is, of cloth lined with velvet and other things modish, and a perruque, and so I sent him and her out to buy me velvet, and I to the Exchange [Map], and so to Trinity House, Deptford [Map], and there dined with Sir W. Batten (age 62), having some business to speak with him, and Sir W. Rider.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Oct 1663. Thence by coach, my mind being troubled for not meeting with Dr. Williams, to St. Catharine's to look at a Dutch ship or two for some good handsome maps, but met none, and so back to Cornhill [Map] to Moxon's, but it being dark we staid not to see any, then to coach again, and presently spying Sir W. Batten (age 62); I 'light and took him in and to the Globe in Fleete Streete, by appointment, where by and by he and I with our solicitor to Sir F. Turner about Field's business, and back to the Globe, and thither I sent for Dr. Williams, and he is willing to swear in my behalf against T. Trice, viz., that at T. Trice's desire we have met to treat about our business.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Oct 1663. Thence (I drinking no wine) after an hour's stay Sir W. Batten (age 62) and another, and he drinking, we home by coach, and so to my office and set down my Journall, and then home to supper and to bed, my washing being in a good condition over. I did give Dr. Williams 20s. tonight, but it was after he had answered me well to what I had to ask him about this business, and it was only what I had long ago in my petty bag book allotted for him besides the bill of near £4 which I paid him a good while since by my brother Tom (age 29) for physique for my wife, without any consideration to this business that he is to do for me, as God shall save me. Among the rest, talking of the Emperor (age 23)1 at table to-day one young gentleman, a pretty man, and it seems a Parliament man, did say that he was a sot; for he minded nothing of the Government, but was led by the Jesuites. Several at table took him up, some for saying that he was a sot in being led by the Jesuites, [who] are the best counsel he can take. Another commander, a Scott[ish] Collonell, who I believe had several under him, that he was a man that had thus long kept out the Turke till now, and did many other great things, and lastly Mr. Progers, one of our courtiers, who told him that it was not a thing to be said of any Soveraigne Prince, be his weaknesses what they will, to be called a sot, which methinks was very prettily said.

Note 1. Leopold I (age 23), the Holy Roman Emperor, was born June 9th, 1640. He became King of Hungary in 1655, and King of Bohemia in 1658, in which year he received the imperial crown. The Princes of the German Empire watched for some time the progress of his struggle with the Turks with indifference, but in 1663 they were induced to grant aid to Leopold after he had made a personal appeal to them in the diet at Ratisbon.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Nov 1663. Up, and by coach to White Hall, and there in the long Matted Gallery I find Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and Sir W. Batten (age 62)-and by and by comes the King (age 33) to walk there with three or four with him; and soon as he saw us, says he, "Here is the Navy Office", and there walked twenty turns the length of the gallery, talking, methought, but ordinary talke.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1663. Up and to my office, shewing myself to Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and no great matter made of my periwigg, as I was afeard there would be. Among other things there came to me Shales of Portsmouth, by my order, and I began to discourse with him about the arrears of stores belonging to the Victualling Office there, and by his discourse I am in some hopes that if I can get a grant from the King (age 33) of such a part of all I discover I may chance to find a way to get something by the by, which do greatly please me the very thoughts of.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Nov 1663. He being gone, I to my office, and put on my new shagg purple gowne, with gold buttons and loop lace, I being a little fearful of taking cold and of pain coming upon me. Here I staid making an end of a troublesome letter, but to my advantage, against Sir W. Batten (age 62), giving Sir G. Carteret (age 53) an account of our late great contract with Sir W. Warren for masts, wherein I am sure I did the King (age 33) £600 service.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Nov 1663. Up and to the office, where we sat, and after we had almost done, Sir W. Batten (age 62) desired to have the room cleared, and there he did acquaint the board how he was obliged to answer to something lately said which did reflect upon the Comptroller (age 64) and him, and to that purpose told how the bargain for Winter's timber did not prove so bad as I had reported to the board it would. After he had done I cleared the matter that I did not mention the business as a thing designed by me against them, but was led to it by Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and that I said nothing but what I was told by Mayers the surveyor as much as by Deane (age 29) upon whom they laid all the fault, which I must confess did and do still trouble me, for they report him to be a fellow not fit to be employed, when in my conscience he deserves better than any officer in the yard. I thought it not convenient to vindicate him much now, but time will serve when I will do it, and I am bound to do it. I offered to proceed to examine and prove what I said if they please, but Mr. Coventry (age 35) most discreetly advised not, it being to no purpose, and that he did believe that what I said did not by my manner of speaking it proceed from any design of reproaching them, and so it ended. But my great trouble is for poor Deane (age 29).

Pepy's Diary. 14 Nov 1663. In the evening Mr. Moore came to tell me that he had no opportunity of speaking his mind to my Lord yesterday, and so I am resolved to write to him very suddenly. So after my business done I home, I having staid till 12 o'clock at night almost, making an end of a letter to Sir G. Carteret (age 53) about the late contract for masts, wherein I have done myself right, and no wrong to Sir W. Batten (age 62).

Pepy's Diary. 16 Nov 1663. Thence away, and Sir G. Carteret (age 53) did call me to him and discourse with me about my letter yesterday, and did seem to take it unkindly that I should doubt of his satisfaction in the bargain of masts, and did promise me that hereafter whatever he do hear to my prejudice he would tell me before he would believe it, and that this was only Sir W. Batten's (age 62) report in this business, which he says he did ever approve of, in which I know he lies.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1663. After dinner came Sir W. Batten (age 62), and I left him to pay off another ship, and I walked home again reading of a little book of new poems of Cowley's (age 45), given me by his brother. Abraham do lie, it seems, very sicke, still, but like to recover.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Nov 1663. Up, and to the office, where (Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) being gone this morning to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map]) the rest of us met, and rode at noon. So I to the 'Change [Map], where little business, and so home to dinner, and being at dinner Mr. Creed in and dined with us, and after dinner Mr. Gentleman, my Jane's father, to see us and her. And after a little stay with them, I was sent for by Sir G. Carteret (age 53) by agreement, and so left them, and to him and with him by coach to my Lord Treasurer (age 56), to discourse with him about Mr. Gauden's having of money, and to offer to him whether it would not be necessary, Mr. Gauden's credit being so low as it is, to take security of him if he demands any great sum, such as £20,000, which now ought to be paid him upon his next year's declaration. Which is a sad thing, that being reduced to this by us, we should be the first to doubt his credit; but so it is. However, it will be managed with great tenderness to him. My Lord Treasurer (age 56) we found in his bed-chamber, being laid up of the goute. I find him a very ready man, and certainly a brave servant to the King (age 33): he spoke so quick and sensibly of the King's charge. Nothing displeased me in him but his long nails, which he lets grow upon a pretty thick white short hand, that it troubled me to see them.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Nov 1663. I left him in good humour, and I to White Hall, to the Duke of York (age 30) and Mr. Coventry (age 35), and there advised about insuring the hempe ship at 12 per cent., notwithstanding her being come to Newcastle [Map], and I do hope that in all my three places which are now my hopes and supports I may not now fear any thing, but with care, which through the Lord's blessing I will never more neglect, I don't doubt but to keep myself up with them all. For in the Duke (age 30), and Mr. Coventry (age 35), my Lord Sandwich (age 38) and Sir G. Carteret (age 53) I place my greatest hopes, and it pleased me yesterday that Mr. Coventry (age 35) in the coach (he carrying me to the Exchange [Map] at noon from the office) did, speaking of Sir W. Batten (age 62), say that though there was a difference between them, yet he would embrace any good motion of Sir W. Batten (age 62) to the King's advantage as well as of Mr. Pepys' or any friend he had. And when I talked that I would go about doing something of the Controller's work when I had time, and that I thought the Controller would not take it ill, he wittily replied that there was nothing in the world so hateful as a dog in the manger.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1663. Lord's Day. This morning I put on my best black cloth suit, trimmed with scarlett ribbon, very neat, with my cloake lined with velvett, and a new beaver, which altogether is very noble, with my black silk knit canons I bought a month ago. I to church alone, my wife not going, and there I found my [his wife] Lady Batten in a velvet gown, which vexed me that she should be in it before my wife, or that I am able to put her into one, but what cannot be, cannot be. However, when I came home I told my wife of it, and to see my weaknesse, I could on the sudden have found my heart to have offered her one, but second thoughts put it by, and indeed it would undo me to think of doing as Sir W. Batten (age 62) and his Lady do, who has a good estate besides his office.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Dec 1663. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and then with the whole board, viz., Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and myself along with Captain Allen (age 51) home to dinner, where he lives hard by in Mark Lane [Map], where we had a very good plain dinner and good welcome, in a pretty little house but so smoky that it was troublesome to us all till they put out the fire, and made one of charcoale. I was much pleased with this dinner for the many excellent stories told by Mr. Coventry (age 35), which I have put down in my book of tales and so shall not mention them here.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Dec 1663. After done there Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Captain Allen (age 51) and I by coach to the Temple [Map], where I 'light, they going home, and indeed it being my trouble of mind to try whether I could meet with my Lord Sandwich (age 38) and try him to see how he will receive me.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Dec 1663. Lay long in bed, and then up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and among other things my Lord Barkely (age 61) called in question his clerk Mr. Davy for something which Sir W. Batten (age 62) and I did tell him yesterday, but I endeavoured to make the least of it, and so all was put up.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Dec 1663. Then, my Lord Sandwich (age 38) being there, we all went into the Duke's closet and did our business. But among other things, Lord! what an account did Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) make of the pulling down and burning of the head of the Charles, where Cromwell was placed with people under his horse, and Peter, as the Duke called him, is praying to him; and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) would needs infer the temper of the people from their joy at the doing of this and their building a gibbet for the hanging of his head up, when God knows, it is even the flinging away of £100 out of the King's purse, to the building of another, which it seems must be a Neptune.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Dec 1663. Then we fell to talk of Sir J. Minnes's (age 64) and Sir W. Batten's (age 62) burning of Oliver's head, while he was there; which was done with so much insulting and folly as I never heard of, and had the Trayned Band of Rochester, Kent [Map] to come to the solemnity, which when all comes to all, Commissioner Pett (age 53) says it never was made for him; but it troubles me the King (age 33) should suffer £100 losse in his purse, to make a new one after it was forgot whose it was, or any words spoke of it.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1663. At dinner comes a messenger from the Counter with an execution against me for the £30 10s., given the last verdict to Field. The man's name is Thomas, of the Poultry Counter. I sent Griffin with him to the Dolphin, where Sir W. Batten (age 62) was at dinner, and he being satisfied that I should pay the money, I did cause the money to be paid him, and Griffin to tell it out to him in the office. He offered to go along with me to Sir R. Ford (age 49), but I thought it not necessary, but let him go with it, he also telling me that there is never any receipt for it given, but I have good witness of the payment of it.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1663. So up and to the office, where the greatest business was Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) against me for Sir W. Warren's contract for masts, to which I may go to my memorandum book to see what past, but came off with conquest, and my Lord Barkely (age 61) and Mr. Coventry (age 35) well convinced that we are well used.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1663. At noon to the 'Change [Map] and there met with Mr. Wood by design, and got out of him to my advantage a condition which I shall make good use of against Sir W. Batten (age 62) (vide my book of Memorandums touching the contract of masts of Sir W. Warren about which I have had so much trouble).

Pepy's Diary. 21 Dec 1663. Up betimes, my wife having a mind to have gone abroad with me, but I had not because of troubling me, and so left her, though against my will, to go and see her father and mother by herself, and I straight to my Lord Sandwich's (age 38), and there I had a pretty kind salute from my Lord, and went on to the Duke's (age 30), where my fellow officers by and by came, and so in with him to his closet, and did our business, and so broke up, and I with Sir W. Batten (age 62) by coach to Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, and there spoke with Clerk our Solicitor about Field's business, and so parted, and I to Mrs. Turner's (age 40), and there saw the achievement pretty well set up, and it is well done.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Dec 1663. Anon came Sir W. Warren, and after talking of his business of the masts and helping me to understand some foul dealing in the business of Woods we fell to other talk, and particularly to speak of some means how to part this great familiarity between Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and it is easy to do by any good friend of Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to whom it will be a good service, and he thinks that Sir J. Denham (age 48) will be a proper man for it, and so do I. So after other discourse we parted, and I home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Dec 1663. Up betimes and by coach to my Lord Sandwich (age 38), who I met going out, and he did aske me how his cozen, my wife; did, the first time he hath done so since his being offended, and, in my conscience, he would be glad to be free with me again, but he knows not how to begin. So he went out, and I through the garden to Mr. Coventry (age 35), where I saw Mr. Ch. Pett (age 43) bringing him a modell, and indeed it is a pretty one, for a New Year's gift; but I think the work not better done than mine. With him by coach to London, with good and friendly discourse of business and against Sir W. Batten (age 62) and his foul dealings.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Dec 1663. At the office I am well, though envied to the devil by Sir William Batten (age 62), who hates me to death, but cannot hurt me. The rest either love me, or at least do not show otherwise, though I know Sir W. Pen (age 42) to be a false knave touching me, though he seems fair. My father and mother well in the country; and at this time the young ladies of Hinchingbroke [Map] with them, their house having the small-pox in it. The Queene (age 54) after a long and sore sicknesse is become well again; and the King (age 33) minds his mistresse a little too much, if it pleased God! but I hope all things will go well, and in the Navy particularly, wherein I shall do my duty whatever comes of it.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Dec 1663. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and among other things Sir W. Warren came about some contract, and there did at the open table, Sir W. Batten (age 62) not being there; openly defy him, and insisted how Sir W. Batten (age 62) did endeavour to oppose him in everything that he offered. Sir W. Pen (age 42) took him up for it, like a counterfeit rogue, though I know he was as much pleased to hear him talk so as any man there. But upon his speaking no more was said but to the business.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jan 1664. At noon to the 'Change [Map], but did little, and so home to dinner with my poor wife, and after dinner read a lecture to her in Geography, which she takes very prettily and with great pleasure to her and me to teach her, and so to the office again, where as busy as ever in my life, one thing after another, and answering people's business, particularly drawing up things about Mr. Wood's masts, which I expect to have a quarrel about with Sir W. Batten (age 63) before it be ended, but I care not.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jan 1664. Up and to the office, where all the morning, and at noon all of us, viz., Sir G. Carteret (age 54) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) at one end, and Mr. Coventry (age 36), Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I (in the middle at the other end, being taught how to sit there all three by my sitting so much the backwarder) at the other end, to Sir G. Carteret's (age 54), and there dined well. Here I saw Mr. Scott (age 26), the bastard that married his youngest daughter. Much pleasant talk at table, and then up and to the office, where we sat long upon our design of dividing the Controller's work into some of the rest of our hands for the better doing of it, but he would not yield to it, though the simple man knows in his heart that he do not do one part of it. So he taking upon him to do it all we rose, I vexed at the heart to see the King's service run after this manner, but it cannot be helped.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jan 1664. So home and to my office, did business, and then up to Sir W. Pen (age 42) and did express my trouble about this day's business, he not being there, and plainly told him what I thought of it, and though I know him a false fellow yet I adventured, as I have done often, to tell him clearly my opinion of Sir W. Batten (age 63) and his design in this business, which is very bad.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jan 1664. Up and by coach to Whitehall to my Lord's lodgings, and seeing that knowing that I was in the house, my Lord did not nevertheless send for me up, I did go to the Duke's lodgings, and there staid while he was making ready, in which time my Lord Sandwich (age 38) came, and so all into his closet and did our common business, and so broke up, and I homeward by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 63), and staid at Warwick Lane and there called upon Mr. Commander and did give him my last will and testament to write over in form, and so to the 'Change [Map], where I did several businesses.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Feb 1664. Up (my maids rising early this morning to washing), and being ready I found Mr. Strutt the purser below with 12 bottles of sacke, and tells me (which from Sir W. Batten (age 63) I had heard before) how young Jack Davis has railed against Sir W. Batten (age 63) for his endeavouring to turn him out of his place, at which for the fellow's sake, because it will likely prove his ruin, I am sorry, though I do believe he is a very arch rogue.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Feb 1664. This evening Mr. Hempson came and told me how Sir W. Batten (age 63) his master will not hear of continuing him in his employment as Clerk of the Survey at Chatham, Kent [Map], from whence of a sudden he has removed him without any new or extraordinary cause, and I believe (as he himself do in part write, and J. Norman do confess) for nothing but for that he was twice with me the other day and did not wait upon him. So much he fears me and all that have to do with me. Of this more in the Mem. Book of my office upon this day, there I shall find it.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Feb 1664. Up, and down by water, a brave morning, to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and there spent an houre or two to good purpose, and so walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map] and thence to Deptford, Kent [Map], where I found (with Sir W. Batten (age 63) upon a survey) Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Pen (age 42), and my [his wife] Lady Batten come down and going to dinner. I dined with them, and so after dinner by water home, all the way going and coming reading "Faber Fortunae", which I can never read too often.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1664. Up, after much pleasant discourse with my wife, and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and did much business, and some much to my content by prevailing against Sir W. Batten (age 63) for the King's profit.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1664. Thence by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 63) to the city, and his son Castle, who talks mighty highly against Captain Tayler, calling him knave, and I find that the old Boating father is led and talks just as the son do, or the son as the father would have him. 'Light and to Mr. Moxon's, and there saw our office globes in doing, which will be very handsome but cost money.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Mar 1664. So to the office, where very busy all the morning, and so to the 'Change [Map], and off hence with Sir W. Rider to the Trinity House, Deptford [Map], and there dined very well: and good discourse among the old men of Islands now and then rising and falling again in the Sea, and that there is many dangers of grounds and rocks that come just up to the edge almost of the sea, that is never discovered and ships perish without the world's knowing the reason of it. Among other things, they observed, that there are but two seamen in the Parliament house, viz., Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir W. Pen (age 42), and not above twenty or thirty merchants; which is a strange thing in an island, and no wonder that things of trade go no better nor are better understood.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1664. After dinner Sir W. Batten (age 63) sent to speak with me, and told me that he had proffered our bill today in the House, and that it was read without any dissenters, and he fears not but will pass very well, which I shall be glad of. He told me also how Sir [Richard] Temple (age 29) hath spoke very discontentfull words in the House about the Tryennial Bill; but it hath been read the second time to-day, and committed; and, he believes, will go on without more ado, though there are many in the House are displeased at it, though they dare not say much. But above all expectation, Mr. Prin (age 64) is the man against it, comparing it to the idoll whose head was of gold, and his body and legs and feet of different metal. So this Bill had several degrees of calling of Parliaments, in case the King (age 33), and then the Council, and then the Chancellor (age 55), and then the Sheriffes, should fail to do it. He tells me also, how, upon occasion of some 'prentices being put in the pillory to-day for beating of their masters, or some such like thing, in Cheapside, a company of 'prentices came and rescued them, and pulled down the pillory; and they being set up again, did the like again. So that the Lord Mayor (age 48) and Major Generall Browne (age 62) was fain to come and stay there, to keep the peace; and drums, all up and down the city, was beat to raise the trained bands, for to quiett the towne, and by and by, going out with my uncle (age 62) and aunt Wight (age 45) by coach with my wife through Cheapside (the rest of the company after much content and mirth being broke up), we saw a trained band stand in Cheapside upon their guard. We went, much against my uncle's will, as far almost as Hyde Park, he and my aunt (age 45) falling out all the way about it, which vexed me, but by this I understand my uncle more than ever I did, for he was mighty soon angry, and wished a pox take her, which I was sorry to hear. The weather I confess turning on a sudden to rain did make it very unpleasant, but yet there was no occasion in the world for his being so angry, but she bore herself very discreetly, and I must confess she proves to me much another woman than I thought her, but all was peace again presently, and so it raining very fast, we met many brave coaches coming from the Parke and so we turned and set them down at home, and so we home ourselves, and ended the day with great content to think how it hath pleased the Lord in six years time to raise me from a condition of constant and dangerous and most painfull sicknesse and low condition and poverty to a state of constant health almost, great honour and plenty, for which the Lord God of heaven make me truly thankfull.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Mar 1664. At last, at past 4 o'clock I heard that the Parliament was not up yet, and so walked to Westminster Hall [Map], and there found it so, and meeting with Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and being very hungry, went over with him to the Leg, and before we had cut a bit, the House rises, however we eat a bit and away to St. James's and there eat a second part of our dinner with Mr. Coventry (age 36) and his brother Harry (age 45), Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir W. Pen (age 42). The great matter today in the House hath been, that Mr. Vaughan (age 60), the great speaker, is this day come to towne, and hath declared himself in a speech of an houre and a half, with great reason and eloquence, against the repealing of the Bill for Triennial Parliaments; but with no successe: but the House have carried it that there shall be such Parliaments, but without any coercive power upon the King (age 33), if he will bring this Act. But, Lord! to see how the best things are not done without some design; for I perceive all these gentlemen that I was with to-day were against it (though there was reason enough on their side); yet purely, I could perceive, because it was the King's mind to have it; and should he demand any thing else, I believe they would give it him. But this the discontented Presbyters, and the faction of the House will be highly displeased with; but it was carried clearly against them in the House. We had excellent good table-talke, some of which I have entered in my book of stories.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Mar 1664. Was called up this morning by a messenger from Sir G. Carteret (age 54) to come to him to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), and so I rose and thither to him, and with him and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to, Sir G. Carteret's (age 54) to examine his accounts, and there we sat at it all the morning. About noon Sir W. Batten (age 63) came from the House of Parliament and told us our Bill for our office was read the second time to-day, with great applause, and is committed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Mar 1664. In the evening comes Sir W. Batten (age 63), who tells us that the Committee have approved of our bill with very few amendments in words, not in matter.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1664. Up and to my office, and afterwards sat, where great contest with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Mr. Wood, and that doating fool Sir J. Minnes (age 65), that says whatever Sir W. Batten (age 63) says, though never minding whether to the King's profit or not.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1664. I went to the 'Change [Map], and there found most people gone, and so home to dinner, and thence to Sir W. Warren's, and with him past the whole afternoon, first looking over two ships' of Captain Taylor's and Phin. Pett's now in building, and am resolved to learn something of the art, for I find it is not hard and very usefull, and thence to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and after seeing Mr. Falconer, who is very ill, I to the yard, and there heard Mr. Pett (age 53) tell me several things of Sir W. Batten's (age 63) ill managements, and so with Sir W. Warren walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map], having good discourse, and thence by water, it being now moonshine and 9 or 10 o'clock at night, and landed at Wapping, and by him and his man safely brought to my door, and so he home, having spent the day with him very well.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Apr 1664. Thence to dinner, where my wife got me a pleasant French fricassee of veal for dinner, and thence to the office, where vexed to see how Sir W. Batten (age 63) ordered things this afternoon (vide my office book, for about this time I have begun, my notions and informations encreasing now greatly every day, to enter all occurrences extraordinary in my office in a book by themselves), and so in the evening after long discourse and eased my mind by discourse with Sir W. Warren, I to my business late, and so home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1664. Up betimes and to the office, and anon, it begunn to be fair after a great shower this morning, Sir W. Batten (age 63) and I by water (calling his son [his son-in-law] Castle (age 35) by the way, between whom and I no notice at all of his letter the other day to me) to Deptford, Kent [Map], and after a turn in the yard, I went with him to the Almes'-house to see the new building which he, with some ambition, is building of there, during his being Master of Trinity House, Deptford [Map]; and a good worke it is, but to see how simply he answered somebody concerning setting up the arms of the corporation upon the door, that and any thing else he did not deny it, but said he would leave that to the master that comes after him.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1664. This morning betimes came to my office to me boatswain Smith of Woolwich, Kent [Map], telling me a notable piece of knavery of the officers of the yard and Mr. Gold in behalf of a contract made for some old ropes by Mr. Wood, and I believe I shall find Sir W. Batten (age 63) of the plot (vide my office daybook)1.

Note 1. These note-books referred to in the Diary are not known to exist now.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1664. The last night, whether it was from cold I got to-day upon the water I know not, or whether it was from my mind being over concerned with Stanes's business of the platery of the navy, for my minds was mighty troubled with the business all night long, I did wake about one o'clock in the morning, a thing I most rarely do, and pissed a little with great pain, continued sleepy, but in a high fever all night, fiery hot, and in some pain. Towards morning I slept a little and waking found myself better, but.... with some pain, and rose I confess with my clothes sweating, and it was somewhat cold too, which I believe might do me more hurt, for I continued cold and apt to shake all the morning, but that some trouble with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) kept me warm.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Apr 1664. In the afternoon my father came to see us, and he gone I up to my morning's work again, and so in the evening a little to the office and to see Sir W. Batten (age 63), who is ill again, and so home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Apr 1664. All the afternoon at the office with W. Boddam looking over his particulars about the Chest of Chatham, which shows enough what a knave Commissioner Pett (age 53) hath been all along, and how Sir W. Batten (age 63) hath gone on in getting good allowance to himself and others out of the poors' money. Time will show all.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Apr 1664. Though late, past 12, before we went to bed, yet I heard my poor father up, and so I rang up my people, and I rose and got something to eat and drink for him, and so abroad, it being a mighty foul day, by coach, setting my father down in Fleet Streete and I to St. James's, where I found Mr. Coventry (age 36) (the Duke (age 30) being now come thither for the summer) with a goldsmith, sorting out his old plate to change for new; but, Lord! what a deale he hath! I staid and had two or three hours discourse with him, talking about the disorders of our office, and I largely to tell him how things are carried by Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to my great grief. He seems much concerned also, and for all the King's matters that are done after the same rate every where else, and even the Duke's house hold matters too, generally with corruption, but most indeed with neglect and indifferency. I spoke very loud and clear to him my thoughts of Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and the other, and trust him with the using of them.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Apr 1664. Coronation Day. Up, and after doing something at my office, and, it being a holiday, no sitting likely to be, I down by water to Sir W. Warren's, who hath been ill, and there talked long with him good discourse, especially about Sir W. Batten's (age 63) knavery and his son [his son-in-law] Castle's (age 35) ill language of me behind my back, saying that I favour my fellow traytours, but I shall be even with him.

Pepy's Diary. 02 May 1664. Lay pretty long in bed. So up and by water to St. James's, and there attended the Duke (age 30) with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and having done our work with him walked to Westminster Hall [Map], and after walking there and talking of business met Mr. Rawlinson (age 50) and by coach to the 'Change [Map], where I did some business, and home to dinner, and presently by coach to the King's Play-house to see "The Labyrinth", but, coming too soon, walked to my Lord's to hear how my Lady do, who is pretty well; at least past all fear.

Pepy's Diary. 03 May 1664. I in the evening to my uncle Wight's (age 62), and not finding them come home, they being gone to the Parke and the Mulberry garden, I went to the 'Change [Map], and there meeting with Mr. Hempson, whom Sir W. Batten (age 63) has lately turned out of his place, merely because of his coming to me when he came to town before he went to him, and there he told me many rogueries of Sir W. Batten (age 63), how he knows and is able to prove that Captain Cox of Chatham, Kent [Map] did give him £10 in gold to get him to certify for him at the King's coming in, and that Tom Newborne did make [the] poor men give him £3 to get Sir W. Batten (age 63) to cause them to be entered in the yard, and that Sir W. Batten (age 63) had oftentimes said: "by God, Tom, you shall get something and I will have some on't". His present clerk that is come in Norman's' room has given him something for his place; that they live high and (as Sir Francis Clerk's lady told his wife) do lack money as well as other people, and have bribes of a piece of sattin and cabinetts and other things from people that deal with him, and that hardly any body goes to see or hath anything done by Sir W. Batten (age 63) but it comes with a bribe, and that this is publickly true that his [his wife] wife was a whore, and that he had libells flung within his doors for a cuckold as soon as he was married; that he received £100 in money and in other things to the value of £50 more of Hempson, and that he intends to give him back but £50; that he hath abused the Chest and hath now some £1000 by him of it.

Pepy's Diary. 05 May 1664. So to the 'Change [Map], and meeting Sir W. Warren, with him to a taverne, and there talked, as we used to do, of the evils the King suffers in our ordering of business in the Navy, as Sir W. Batten (age 63) now forces us by his knavery.

Pepy's Diary. 22 May 1664. Thence, after staying and seeing the throng of people to attend the King (age 33) to Chappell (but, Lord! what a company of sad, idle people they are) I walked to St. James's with Colonell Remes, where staid a good while and then walked to White Hall with Mr. Coventry (age 36), talking about business. So meeting Creed, took him with me home and to dinner, a good dinner, and thence by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map], where mighty kindly received by Mrs. Falconer and her husband, who is now pretty well again, this being the first time I ever carried my wife thither. I walked to the Docke, where I met Mrs. Ackworth alone at home, and God forgive me! what thoughts I had, but I had not the courage to stay, but went to Mr. Pett's (age 53) and walked up and down the yard with him and Deane (age 30) talking about the dispatch of the ships now in haste, and by and by Creed and my wife and a friend of Mr. Falconer's came with the boat and called me, and so by water to Deptford, Kent [Map], where I landed, and after talking with others walked to Half-way house with Mr. Wayth talking about the business of his supplying us with canvas, and he told me in discourse several instances of Sir W. Batten's (age 63) cheats.

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1664. Up and to the office, where Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), and myself met and did business, we being in a mighty hurry. The King (age 33) is gone down with the Duke (age 30) and a great crew this morning by break of day to Chatham, Kent [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1664. So home, it raining terribly, but we still dry, and at the office late discoursing with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63), who like a couple of sots receive all I say but to little purpose. So late home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 May 1664. Up to the office, where we sat, and I had some high words with Sir W. Batten (age 63) about canvas, wherein I opposed him and all his experience, about seams in the middle, and the profit of having many breadths and narrow, which I opposed to good purpose, to the rejecting of the whole business.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1664. So by coach home, and at my office late, and so to supper and to bed, my body by plenty of breaking of wind being just now pretty well again, having had a constant akeing in my back these 5 or 6 days. Mr. Coventry (age 36) discoursing this noon about Sir W. Batten (age 63) (what a sad fellow he is!) told me how the King (age 34) told him the other day how Sir W. Batten (age 63), being in the ship with him and Prince Rupert (age 44) when they expected to fight with Warwick, did walk up and down sweating with a napkin under his throat to dry up his sweat; and that Prince Rupert (age 44) being a most jealous man, and particularly of Batten, do walk up and down swearing bloodily to the King (age 34), that Batten had a mind to betray them to-day, and that the napkin was a signal; "but, by God", says he, "if things go ill, the first thing I will do is to shoot him".

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jun 1664. So home, and thence by water to Deptford, Kent [Map], and there found our Trinity Brethren come from their election to church, where Dr. Britton made, methought, an indifferent sermon touching the decency that we ought to observe in God's house, the church, but yet to see how ridiculously some men will carry themselves. Sir W. Batten (age 63) did at open table anon in the name of the whole Society desire him to print his sermon, as if the Doctor could think that they were fit judges of a good sermon.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jun 1664. Then by barge with Sir W. Batten (age 63) to Trinity House, Deptford [Map]. It seems they have with much ado carried it for Sir G. Carteret (age 54) against Captain Harrison, poor man, who by succession ought to have been it, and most hands were for him, but only they were forced to fright the younger Brethren by requiring them to set their hands (which is an ill course) and then Sir G. Carteret (age 54) carryed it. Here was at dinner my Lord Sandwich (age 38), Mr. Coventry (age 36), my Lord Craven (age 56), and others. A great dinner, and good company. Mr. Prin (age 64) also, who would not drink any health, no, not the King's, but sat down with his hat on all the while1 but nobody took notice of it to him at all; but in discourse with the Doctor he did declare himself that he ever was, and has expressed himself in all his books for mixt communion against the Presbyterian examination.

Note 1. William Prynne (age 64) had published in 1628 a small book against the drinking of healths, entitled, "Healthes, Sicknesse; or a compendious and briefe Discourse, prouing, the Drinking and Pledging of Healthes to be sinfull and utterly unlawfull unto Christians ... wherein all those ordinary objections, excuses or pretences, which are made to justifie, extenuate, or excuse the drinking or pledging of Healthes are likewise cleared and answered". The pamphlet was dedicated to Charles I as "more interessed in the theame and subject of this compendious discourse then any other that I know", and "because your Majestie of all other persons within your owne dominions, are most dishonoured, prejudiced, and abused by these Healthes"..

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jun 1664. Thence to Mr. Falconer's, where I met Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Lady, and Captain Tinker, and there dined with them, and so to the Dockyarde and to Deptford, Kent [Map] by water, and there very long informing myself in the business of flags and bewpers and other things, and so home late, being weary, and full of good information to-day, but I perceive the corruptions of the Navy are of so many kinds that it is endless to look after them, especially while such a one as Sir W. Batten (age 63) discourages every man that is honest.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jun 1664. So home to my office, there very late, and then to supper and to bed mightily troubled in my mind to hear how Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) do labour all they can to abuse or enable others to abuse the King (age 34).

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jul 1664. Up and to the office, where all the morning. At noon to the 'Change [Map] a little, then with W. Howe home and dined. So after dinner to my office, and there busy till late at night, having had among other things much discourse with young Gregory about the Chest business, wherein Sir W. Batten (age 63) is so great a knave, and also with Alsop and Lanyon about the Tangier victualling, wherein I hope to get something for myself.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jul 1664. After dinner down with Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and Sir W. Batten (age 63) to view, and did like a place by Deptford, Kent [Map] yard to lay masts in.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jul 1664. After dinner Sir W. Batten (age 63) and I down by water to Woolwich, where coming to the Ropeyard [Map]e we are told that Mr. Falconer, who hath been ill of a relapse these two days, is just now dead. We went up to his widow, who is sicke in bed also. The poor woman in great sorrow, and entreats our friendship, which we shall, I think, in every thing do for her. I am sure I will.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jul 1664. Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning, among other things making a contract with Sir W. Warren for almost 1000 Gottenburg masts, the biggest that ever was made in the Navy, and wholly of my compassing and a good one I hope it is for the King (age 34). Dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 63), where I have not eat these many months. Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Mr. Coventry (age 36), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and myself there only, and my Lady. A good venison pasty, and very merry, and pleasant I made myself with my Lady, and she as much to me. This morning to the office comes Nicholas Osborne, Mr. Gauden's clerke, to desire of me what piece of plate I would choose to have a £100, or thereabouts, bestowed upon me in, he having order to lay out so much; and, out of his freedom with me, do of himself come to make this question. I a great while urged my unwillingnesse to take any, not knowing how I could serve Mr. Gauden, but left it wholly to himself; so at noon I find brought home in fine leather cases, a pair of the noblest flaggons that ever I saw all the days of my life; whether I shall keepe them or no I cannot tell; for it is to oblige me to him in the business of the Tangier victualling, wherein I doubt I shall not; but glad I am to see that I shall be sure to get something on one side or other, have it which will: so, with a merry heart, I looked upon them, and locked them up.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jul 1664. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) by coach to St. James's, but there the Duke (age 30) being gone out we to my Lord Berkeley's (age 62) chamber, Mr. Coventry (age 36) being there, and among other things there met with a printed copy of the King's commission for the repair of Paul's, which is very large, and large power for collecting money, and recovering of all people that had bought or sold formerly any thing belonging to the Church. And here I find my Lord Mayor of the City (age 48) set in order before the Archbishopp (age 66) or any nobleman, though all the greatest officers of state are there. But yet I do not hear by my Lord Berkeley (age 62), who is one of them, that any thing is like to come of it.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Aug 1664. Up, my mind very light from my last night's accounts, and so up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), and Sir W. Pen (age 43) to St. James's, where among other things having prepared with some industry every man a part this morning and no sooner (for fear they should either consider of it or discourse of it one to another) Mr. Coventry (age 36) did move the Duke (age 30) and obtain it that one of the clerkes of the Clerke of the Acts should have an addition of £30 a year, as Mr. Turner hath, which I am glad of, that I may give T. Hater £20 and keep £10 towards a boy's keeping.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Aug 1664. At the office all the morning. At noon dined, and then to, the 'Change [Map], and there walked two hours or more with Sir W. Warren, who after much discourse in general of Sir W. Batten's (age 63) dealings, he fell to talk how every body must live by their places, and that he was willing, if I desired it, that I should go shares with him in anything that he deals in. He told me again and again, too, that he confesses himself my debtor too for my service and friendship to him in his present great contract of masts, and that between this and Christmas he shall be in stocke and will pay it me. This I like well, but do not desire to become a merchant, and, therefore, put it off, but desired time to think of it.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Aug 1664. Thence to the 'Change [Map], and thence home to dinner, and down by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map] to the rope yard, and there visited Mrs. Falconer, who tells me odd stories of how Sir W. Pen (age 43) was rewarded by her husband with a gold watch (but seems not certain of what Sir W. Batten (age 63) told me, of his daughter having a life given her in £80 per ann.) for his helping him to his place, and yet cost him £150 to Mr. Coventry (age 36) besides. He did much advise it seems Mr. Falconer not to marry again, expressing that he would have him make his daughter his heire, or words to that purpose, and that that makes him, she thinks, so cold in giving her any satisfaction, and that W. Boddam hath publickly said, since he came down thither to be Clerk of the Ropeyard of Woolwich that it hath this week cost him £100, and would be glad that it would cost him but half as much more for the place, and that he was better before than now, and that if he had been to have bought it, he would not have given so much for it. Now I am sure that Mr. Coventry (age 36) hath again and again said that he would take nothing, but would give all his part in it freely to him, that so the widow might have something. What the meaning of this is I know not, but that Sir W. Pen (age 43) do get something by it.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Aug 1664. Up and abroad with Sir W. Batten (age 63), by coach to St. James's, where by the way he did tell me how Sir J. Minnes (age 65) would many times arrogate to himself the doing of that that all the Board have equal share in, and more that to himself which he hath had nothing to do in, and particularly the late paper given in by him to the Duke (age 30), the translation of a Dutch print concerning the quarrel between us and them, which he did give as his own when it was Sir Richard Ford's (age 50) wholly. Also he told me how Sir W. Pen (age 43) (it falling in our discourse touching Mrs. Falconer) was at first very great for Mr. Coventry (age 36) to bring him in guests, and that at high rates for places, and very open was he to me therein.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1664. Up, and through pain, to my great grief forced to wear my gowne to keep my legs warm. At the office all the morning, and there a high dispute against Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir W. Pen (age 43) about the breadth of canvas again, they being for the making of it narrower, I and Mr. Coventry (age 36) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) for the keeping it broader.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Aug 1664. Wakened about two o'clock this morning with the noise of thunder, which lasted for an houre, with such continued lightnings, not flashes, but flames, that all the sky and ayre was light; and that for a great while, not a minute's space between new flames all the time; such a thing as I never did see, nor could have believed had ever been in nature. And being put into a great sweat with it, could not sleep till all was over. And that accompanied with such a storm of rain as I never heard in my life. I expected to find my house in the morning overflowed with the rain breaking in, and that much hurt must needs have been done in the city with this lightning; but I find not one drop of rain in my house, nor any newes of hurt done. But it seems it has been here and all up and down the countrie hereabouts the like tempest, Sir W. Batten (age 63) saying much of the greatness thereof at Epsum.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Aug 1664. Up, and going to Sir W. Batten (age 63) to speak to him about business, he did give me three bottles of his Epsum water, which I drank and it wrought well with me, and did give me many good stools, and I found myself mightily cooled with them and refreshed.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1664. By and by came Mr. Coventry (age 36), and so we met at the office, to hire ships for Guinny, and that done broke up. I to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), there to discourse with Mrs. Falconer, who hath been with Sir W. Pen (age 43) this evening, after Mr. Coventry (age 36) had promised her half what W. Bodham had given him for his place, but Sir W. Pen (age 43), though he knows that, and that Mr. Bodham hath said that his place hath cost him £100 and would £100 more, yet is he so high against the poor woman that he will not hear to give her a farthing, but it seems do listen after a lease where he expects Mr. Falconer hath put in his daughter's life, and he is afraid that that is not done, and did tell Mrs. Falconer that he would see it and know what is done therein in spite of her, when, poor wretch, she neither do nor can hinder him the knowing it. Mr. Coventry (age 36) knows of this business of the lease, and I believe do think of it as well as I But the poor woman is gone home without any hope, but only Mr. Coventry's (age 36) own nobleness. So I to my office and wrote many letters, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1664. And thence to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), whither Sir Richard Ford (age 50) came, the Sheriffe, who hath been at this fire all the while; and he tells me, upon my question, that he and the Mayor (age 48) were there, as it is their dutys to be, not only to keep the peace, but they have power of commanding the pulling down of any house or houses, to defend the whole City.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1664. Up, my wife and I having a little anger about her woman already, she thinking that I take too much care of her at table to mind her (my wife) of cutting for her, but it soon over, and so up and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir W. Pen (age 43) to St. James's, and there did our business with the Duke (age 30), and thence homeward straight, calling at the Coffee-house, and there had very good discourse with Sir--Blunt and Dr. Whistler about Egypt and other things.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Oct 1664. But Sir W. Batten (age 63) do raffle still against Mr. Turner and his wife, telling me he is a false fellow, and his wife a false woman, and has rotten teeth and false, set in with wire, and as I know they are so, so I am glad he finds it so.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Oct 1664. Going home in coach with Sir W. Batten (age 63) he told me how Sir J. Minnes (age 65) by the means of Sir R. Ford (age 50) was the last night brought to his house and did discover the reason of his so long discontent with him, and now they are friends again, which I am sorry for, but he told it me so plainly that I see there is no thorough understanding between them, nor love, and so I hope there will be no great combination in any thing, nor do I see Sir J. Minnes (age 65) very fond as he used to be.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Oct 1664. Rose very well and not weary, and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) to St. James's; there did our business. I saw Sir J. Lawson (age 49) since his return from sea first this morning, and hear that my Lord Sandwich (age 39) is come from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to town.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Oct 1664. Thence I with Mr. Gray in his coach to White Hall, but the King (age 34) and Duke being abroad, we returned to Somersett House [Map]. In discourse I find him a very worthy and studious gentleman in the business of trade, and among-other things he observed well to me, how it is not the greatest wits, but the steady man, that is a good merchant: he instanced in Ford and Cocke, the last of whom he values above all men as his oracle, as Mr. Coventry (age 36) do Mr. Jolliffe. He says that it is concluded among merchants, that where a trade hath once been and do decay, it never recovers again, and therefore that the manufacture of cloath of England will never come to esteem again; that, among other faults, Sir Richard Ford (age 50) cannot keepe a secret, and that it is so much the part of a merchant to be guilty of that fault that the Duke of Yoke is resolved to commit no more secrets to the merchants of the Royall Company; that Sir Ellis Layton is, for a speech of forty words, the wittiest man that ever he knew in his life, but longer he is nothing, his judgment being nothing at all, but his wit most absolute. At Somersett House [Map] he carried me in, and there I saw the Queene's (age 54) new rooms, which are most stately and nobly furnished; and there I saw her, and the Duke of Yorke (age 31) and Duchesse (age 27) were there. The Duke (age 31) espied me, and came to me, and talked with me a very great while about our contract this day with Sir W. Warren, and among other things did with some contempt ask whether we did except Polliards, which Sir W. Batten (age 63) did yesterday (in spite, as the Duke I believe by my Lord Barkely (age 62) do well enough know) among other things in writing propose.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1664. At noon dined at home; then abroad by coach to buy for the office "Herne upon the Statute of Charitable Uses", in order to the doing something better in the Chest than we have done, for I am ashamed to see Sir W. Batten (age 63) possess himself so long of so much money as he hath done.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1664. Up and in Sir J. Minnes' (age 65) coach (alone with Mrs. Turner (age 41) as far as Paternoster Row [Map], where I set her down) to St. James's, and there did our business, and I had the good lucke to speak what pleased the Duke (age 31) about our great contract in hand with Sir W. Warren against Sir W. Batten (age 63), wherein the Duke (age 31) is very earnest for our contracting.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Oct 1664. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and finished Sir W. Warren's great contract for timber, with great content to me, because just in the terms I wrote last night to Sir W. Warren and against the terms proposed by Sir W. Batten (age 63).

Pepy's Diary. 26 Oct 1664. Thence I to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), and there sat late with him, Sir R. Ford (age 50), and Sir John Robinson (age 49); the last of whom continues still the same foole he was, crying up what power he has in the City, in knowing their temper, and being able to do what he will with them. It seems the City did last night very freely lend the King (age 34) £100,000 without any security but the King's word, which was very noble. But this loggerhead and Sir R. Ford (age 50) would make us believe that they did it. Now Sir R. Ford (age 50) is a cunning man, and makes a foole of the other, and the other believes whatever the other tells him. But, Lord! to think that such a man should be Lieutenant of the Tower, and so great a man as he is, is a strange thing to me. With them late and then home and with my wife to bed, after supper.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Oct 1664. Thence I to Mr. Ackworth, and there eat and drank with Commissioner Pett (age 54) and his wife, and thence to Shelden's, where Sir W. Batten (age 63) and his Lady were.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Oct 1664. By and by I took coach after I had enquired for my wife or her boat, but found none. Going out of the gate, an ordinary woman prayed me to give her room to London, which I did, but spoke not to her all the way, but read, as long as I could see, my book again. Dark when we came to London, and a stop of coaches in Southwark, Surrey [Map]e. I staid above half an houre and then 'light, and finding Sir W. Batten's (age 63) coach, heard they were gone into the Beare [Map] at the bridge foot, and thither I to them. Presently the stop is removed, and then going out to find my coach, I could not find it, for it was gone with the rest; so I fair to go through the darke and dirt over the bridge, and my leg fell in a hole broke on the bridge, but, the constable standing there to keep people from it, I was catched up, otherwise I had broke my leg; for which mercy the Lord be praised! So at Fanchurch [Map] I found my coach staying for me, and so home, where the little girle hath looked to the house well, but no wife come home, which made me begin to fear [for] her, the water being very rough, and cold and darke. But by and by she and her company come in all well, at which I was glad, though angry.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Oct 1664. At noon, Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), Sir W. Pen (age 43), and myself, were treated at the Dolphin by Mr. Foly, the ironmonger, where a good plain dinner, but I expected musique, the missing of which spoiled my dinner, only very good merry discourse at dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Oct 1664. Thence to the 'Change [Map] a little, and thence home with Luellin to dinner, where Deane (age 30) met me by appointment, and after dinner he and I up to my chamber, and there hard at discourse, and advising him what to do in his business at Harwich [Map], and then to discourse of our old business of ships and taking new rules of him to my great pleasure, and he being gone I to my office a little, and then to see Sir W. Batten (age 63), who is sick of a greater cold than I, and thither comes to me Mr. Holliard (age 55), and into the chamber to me, and, poor man (beyond all I ever saw of him), was a little drunk, and there sat talking and finding acquaintance with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and my Lady by relations on both sides, that there we staid very long. At last broke up, and he home much overcome with drink, but well enough to get well home. So I home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Nov 1664. So home to supper and to bed. This night Sir W. Batten (age 63) did, among other things, tell me strange newes, which troubles me, that my Lord Sandwich (age 39) will be sent Governor to Tangier, which, in some respects, indeed, I should be glad of, for the good of the place and the safety of his person; but I think his honour will suffer, and, it may be, his interest fail by his distance.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1664. Waked very betimes and lay long awake, my mind being so full of business. Then up and to St. James's, where I find Mr. Coventry (age 36) full of business, packing up for his going to sea with the Duke (age 31). Walked with him, talking, to White Hall, where to the Duke's lodgings, who is gone thither to lodge lately. I appeared to the Duke (age 31), and thence Mr. Coventry (age 36) and I an hour in the Long gallery, talking about the management of our office, he tells me the weight of dispatch will lie chiefly on me, and told me freely his mind touching Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65), the latter of whom, he most aptly said, was like a lapwing; that all he did was to keepe a flutter, to keepe others from the nest that they would find. He told me an old story of the former about the light-houses, how just before he had certified to the Duke (age 31) against the use of them, and what a burden they are to trade, and presently after, at his being at Harwich [Map], comes to desire that he might have the setting one up there, and gets the usefulness of it certified also by the Trinity House, Deptford [Map]. After long discoursing and considering all our stores and other things, as how the King (age 34) hath resolved upon Captain Taylor1 and Colonell Middleton, the first to be Commissioner for Harwich [Map] and the latter for Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], I away to the 'Change [Map], and there did very much business, so home to dinner, and Mr. Duke, our Secretary for the Fishery, dined with me.

Note 1. Coventry (age 36), writing to Secretary Bennet (age 46) (November 14th, 1664), refers to the objections made to Taylor, and adds: "Thinks the King (age 34) will not easily consent to his rejection, as he is a man of great abilities and dispatch, and was formerly laid aside at Chatham, Kent [Map] on the Duchess of Albemarle's (age 45) earnest interposition for another. He is a fanatic, it is true, but all hands will be needed for the work cut out; there is less danger of them in harbour than at sea, and profit will convert most of them" ("Calendar of State Papers", Domestic, 1664-65, p. 68).

Pepy's Diary. 07 Nov 1664. Up and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) to White Hall, where mighty thrusting about the Duke now upon his going. We were with him long. He advised us to follow our business close, and to be directed in his absence by the Committee of the Councell for the Navy.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1664. So to the office, where vexed at the malice of Sir W. Batten (age 63) and folly of Sir J. Minnes (age 65) against Sir W. Warren, but I prevented, and shall do, though to my own disquiet and trouble.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1664. At noon dined with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and the Auditors of the Exchequer at the Dolphin by Mr. Wayth's desire, and after dinner fell to business relating to Sir G. Carteret's (age 54) account, and so home to the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 63) begins, too fast, to shew his knavish tricks in giving what price he pleases for commodities.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) to the Council Chamber at White Hall, to the Committee of the Lords for the Navy, where we were made to wait an houre or two before called in. In that time looking upon some books of heraldry of Sir Edward Walker's making, which are very fine, there I observed the Duke of Monmouth's (age 15) armes are neatly done, and his title, "The most noble and high-born Prince, James Scott, Duke of Monmouth (age 15), &c."; nor could Sir J. Minnes (age 65), nor any body there, tell whence he should take the name of Scott? And then I found my Lord Sandwich (age 39), his title under his armes is, "The most noble and mighty Lord, Edward, Earl of Sandwich, &c".

Pepy's Diary. 14 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) to White Hall, to the Lords of the Admiralty, and there did our business betimes.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Nov 1664. Up and to my business, and then to White Hall, there to attend the Lords Commissioners, and so directly home and dined with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and my Lady, and after dinner had much discourse tending to profit with Sir W. Batten (age 63), how to get ourselves into the prize office1 or some other fair way of obliging the King (age 34) to consider us in our extraordinary pains.

Note 1. The Calendars of State Papers are full of references to applications for Commissionerships of the Prize Office. In December, 1664, the Navy Committee appointed themselves the Commissioners for Prize Goods, Sir Henry Bennet (age 46) being appointed Comptroller, and Lord Ashley (age 43) treasurer.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Nov 1664. They gone, in the evening comes Mr. Andrews and sings with us, and he gone, I to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), where Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and he and I to talk about our letter to my Lord Treasurer (age 57), where his folly and simple confidence so great in a report so ridiculous that he hath drawn up to present to my Lord, nothing of it being true, that I was ashamed, and did roundly and in many words for an houre together talk boldly to him, which pleased Sir W. Batten (age 63) and my Lady, but I was in the right, and was the willinger to do so before them, that they might see that I am somebody, and shall serve him so in his way another time.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Nov 1664. And I had letters this afternoon, that three are brought into the Downes and Dover; so that the warr is begun: God give a good end to it! After dinner at home all the afternoon busy, and at night with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) looking over the business of stating the accounts of the navy charge to my Lord Treasurer (age 57), where Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) paper served us in no stead almost, but was all false, and after I had done it with great pains, he being by, I am confident he understands not one word in it. At it till 10 at night almost.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Nov 1664. Thence by their order to the Attorney General's about a new warrant for Captain Taylor which I shall carry for him to be Commissioner in spite of Sir W. Batten (age 63), and yet indeed it is not I, but the ability of the man, that makes the Duke (age 31) and Mr. Coventry (age 36) stand by their choice.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Nov 1664. At the office all the morning. Sir G. Carteret (age 54), upon a motion of Sir W. Batten's (age 63), did promise, if we would write a letter to him, to shew it to the King (age 34) on our behalf touching our desire of being Commissioners of the Prize office.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Nov 1664. Thence to my Chancellor's (age 55), and there staid long with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65), to speak with my Lord about our Prize Office business; but, being sicke and full of visitants, we could not speak with him, and so away home. Where Sir Richard Ford (age 50) did meet us with letters from Holland this day, that it is likely the Dutch fleete will not come out this year; they have not victuals to keep them out, and it is likely they will be frozen before they can get back. Captain Cocke (age 47) is made Steward for sick and wounded seamen.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Nov 1664. Thence I home, calling my wife, and at Sir W. Batten's (age 63) hear that the House have given the King (age 34) £2,500,000 to be paid for this warr, only for the Navy, in three years' time; which is a joyfull thing to all the King's party I see, but was much opposed by Mr. Vaughan (age 61) and others, that it should be so much.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and W. Batten (age 63) to White Hall, but no Committee of Lords (which is like to do the King's business well).

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1664. Thence to the Parliament House, and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) home and dined with him, my wife being gone to my Lady Sandwich's (age 39), and then to the office, where we sat all the afternoon, and I at my office till past 12 at night, and so home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1664. This day I hear that the King (age 34) should say that the Dutch do begin to comply with him. Sir John Robinson (age 49) told Sir W. Batten (age 63) that he heard the King (age 34) say so. I pray God it may be so.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) to the Committee of Lords at the Council Chamber, where Sir G. Carteret (age 54) told us what he had said to the King (age 34), and how the King (age 34) inclines to our request of making us Commissioners of the Prize office, but meeting him anon in the gallery, he tells me that my Lord Barkely (age 62) is angry we should not acquaint him with it, so I found out my Lord and pacified him, but I know not whether he was so in earnest or no, for he looked very frowardly.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to the Committee of the Lords, and there did our business; but, Lord! what a sorry dispatch these great persons give to business.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Dec 1664. Thence homeward, and the coach broke with us in Lincoln's Inn Fields, and so walked to Fleete Streete, and there took coach and home, and to my office, whither by and by comes Captain Cocke (age 47), and then Sir W. Batten (age 63), and we all to Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and I did give them a barrel of oysters I had given to me, and so there sat and talked, where good discourse of the late troubles, they knowing things, all of them, very well; and Cocke (age 47), from the King's (age 34) own mouth, being then entrusted himself much, do know particularly that the King's credulity to Cromwell's promises, private to him, against the advice of his friends and the certain discovery of the practices and discourses of Cromwell in council (by Major Huntington)1 did take away his life and nothing else. Then to some loose atheisticall discourse of Cocke's (age 47), when he was almost drunk, and then about 11 o'clock broke up, and I to my office, to fit up an account for Povy (age 50), wherein I hope to get something. At it till almost two o'clock, then to supper and to bed.

Note 1. According to Clarendon the officer here alluded to was a major in Cromwell's own regiment of horse, and employed by him to treat with Charles I whilst at Hampton Court [Map]; but being convinced of the insincerity of the proceeding, communicated his suspicions to that monarch, and immediately gave up his commission. We hear no more of Huntington till the Restoration, when his name occurs with those of many other officers, who tendered their services to the King (age 34). His reasons for laying down his commission are printed in Thurloe's "State Papers" and Maseres's "Tracts". B.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Dec 1664. Up, and in Sir W. Batten's (age 63) coach to White Hall, but the Duke (age 31) being gone forth, I to Westminster Hall [Map], and there spent much time till towards noon to and fro with people.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Dec 1664. Lay long, at which I am ashamed, because of so many people observing it that know not how late I sit up, and for fear of Sir W. Batten's (age 63) speaking of it to others, he having staid for me a good while.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Dec 1664. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) by coach to White Hall, where all of us with the Duke (age 31); Mr. Coventry (age 36) privately did tell me the reason of his advice against our pretences to the Prize Office (in his letter from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map]), because he knew that the King (age 34) and the Duke (age 31) had resolved to put in some Parliament men that have deserved well, and that would needs be obliged, by putting them in.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1664. So by and by we parted, and Mr. Coventry (age 36) did privately tell me that he did this day take this occasion to mention the business to give the Duke an opportunity of speaking his mind to Sir W. Batten (age 63) in this business, of which I was heartily glad.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1664. But I was forced to rise, and up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to White Hall, and there we waited on the Duke (age 31). And among other things Mr. Coventry (age 36) took occasion to vindicate himself before the Duke and us, being all there, about the choosing of Taylor for Harwich [Map]. Upon which the Duke did clear him, and did tell us that he did expect, that, after he had named a man, none of us shall then oppose or find fault with the man; but if we had anything to say, we ought to say it before he had chose him. Sir G. Carteret (age 54) thought himself concerned, and endeavoured to clear himself: and by and by Sir W. Batten (age 63) did speak, knowing himself guilty, and did confess, that being pressed by the Council he did say what he did, that he was accounted a fanatique; but did not know that at that time he had been appointed by his Royal Highness. To which the Duke [replied] that it was impossible but he must know that he had appointed him; and so it did appear that the Duke did mean all this while Sir W. Batten (age 63).

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1664. So we broke up and parted and I to the office, where we sat hiring of ships an hour or two, and then to my office, and thence (with Captain Taylor home to my house) to give him instructions and some notice of what to his great satisfaction had happened to-day. Which I do because I hope his coming into this office will a little cross Sir W. Batten (age 63) and may do me good.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Dec 1664. Dined at the Dolphin, Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), and I, with Sir W. Boreman and Sir Theophilus Biddulph and others, Commissioners of the Sewers, about our place below to lay masts in.

1664 Comet

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1664. This day Sir W. Batten (age 63) sent and afterwards spoke to me, to have me and my wife come and dine with them on Monday next: which is a mighty condescension in them, and for some great reason I am sure, or else it pleases God by my late care of business to make me more considerable even with them than I am sure they would willingly owne me to be. God make me thankfull and carefull to preserve myself so, for I am sure they hate me and it is hope or fear that makes them flatter me. It being a bright night, which it has not been a great while, I purpose to endeavour to be called in the morning to see the Comet, though I fear we shall not see it, because it rises in the east but 16 degrees, and then the houses will hinder us.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Dec 1664. After dinner I to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), and there received so much good usage (as I have of late done) from him and my Lady, obliging me and my wife, according to promise, to come and dine with them to-morrow with our neighbours, that I was in pain all the day, and night too after, to know how to order the business of my wife's not going, and by discourse receive fresh instances of Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) folly in complaining to Sir G. Carteret (age 54) of Sir W. Batten (age 63) and me for some family offences, such as my having of a stopcock to keepe the water from them, which vexes me, but it would more but that Sir G. Carteret (age 54) knows him very well.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Dec 1664. Thence to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), where Mr. Coventry (age 36) and all our families here, women and all, and Sir R. Ford (age 50) and his, and a great feast and good discourse and merry, there all the afternoon and evening till late, only stepped in to see my wife, then to my office to enter my day's work, and so home to bed, where my people and wife innocently at cards very merry, and I to bed, leaving them to their sport and blindman's buff.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Dec 1664. Up, and with Sir W. Pen (age 43) to White Hall, and there with the rest did our usual business before the Duke (age 31), and then with Sir W. Batten (age 63) back and to his house, where I by sicknesse excused my wife's coming to them to-day.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Dec 1664. I waked in the morning about 6 o'clock and my wife not come to bed; I lacked a pot, but there was none, and bitter cold, so was forced to rise and piss in the chimney, and to bed again. Slept a little longer, and then hear my people coming up, and so I rose, and my wife to bed at eight o'clock in the morning, which vexed me a little, but I believe there was no hurt in it all, but only mirthe, therefore took no notice. I abroad with Sir W. Batten (age 63) to the Council Chamber, where all of us to discourse about the way of measuring ships and the freight fit to give for them by the tun, where it was strange methought to hear so poor discourses among the Lords themselves, and most of all to see how a little empty matter delivered gravely by Sir W. Pen (age 43) was taken mighty well, though nothing in the earth to the purpose. But clothes, I perceive more and more every day, is a great matter.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Dec 1664. Thence home with Sir W. Batten (age 63) by coach, and I home to dinner, finding my wife still in bed.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jan 1665. Thence to the 'Change [Map] a while, and so home to dinner and to the office, where we sat late, and then I to write my letters, and then to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), who is going out of towne to Harwich [Map] to-morrow to set up a light-house there, which he hath lately got a patent from the King (age 34) to set up, that will turne much to his profit. Here very merry, and so to my office again, where very late, and then home to supper and to bed, but sat up with my wife at cards till past two in the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1665. So to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), but he was set out before I got thither. I sat long talking with my lady, and then home to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1665. At noon dined alone, my wife and family most of them a-bed. Then to see my [his wife] Lady Batten and sit with her a while, Sir W. Batten (age 64) being out of town, and then to my office doing very much business very late, and then home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jan 1665. To my [his wife] Lady Batten's, where I find Pegg Pen, the first time that ever I saw her to wear spots. Here very merry, Sir W. Batten (age 64) being looked for to-night, but is not yet come from Harwich [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jan 1665. Up and with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir W. Pen (age 43) to White Hall, where we did our business with the Duke (age 31).

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jan 1665. So anon to the office, and there sitting very late, and then after a little time at Sir W. Batten's (age 64), where I am mighty great and could if I thought it fit continue so, I to the office again, and there very late, and so home to the sorting of some of my books, and so to bed, the weather becoming pretty warm, and I think and hope the frost will break.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1665. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir W. Pen (age 43) to White Hall; but there finding the Duke (age 31) gone to his lodgings at St. James's for all together, his Duchesse (age 27) being ready to lie in, we to him, and there did our usual business. And here I met the great newes confirmed by the Duke's own relation, by a letter from Captain Allen (age 53). First, of our own loss of two ships, the Phoenix and Nonesuch, in the Bay of Gibraltar: then of his, and his seven ships with him, in the Bay of Cales, or thereabouts, fighting with the 34 Dutch Smyrna fleete; sinking the King Salamon, a ship worth a £150,000 or more, some say £200,000, and another; and taking of three merchant-ships. Two of our ships were disabled, by the Dutch unfortunately falling against their will against them; the Advice, Captain W. Poole, and Antelope, Captain Clerke: The Dutch men-of-war did little service. Captain Allen (age 53) did receive many shots at distance before he would fire one gun, which he did not do till he come within pistol-shot of his enemy. The Spaniards on shore at Cales did stand laughing at the Dutch, to see them run away and flee to the shore, 34 or thereabouts, against eight Englishmen at most. I do purpose to get the whole relation, if I live, of Captain Allen (age 53) himself. In our loss of the two ships in the Bay of Gibraltar, it is observable how the world do comment upon the misfortune of Captain Moone of the Nonesuch (who did lose, in the same manner, the Satisfaction), as a person that hath ill-luck attending him; without considering that the whole fleete was ashore. Captain Allen (age 53) led the way, and Captain Allen (age 53) himself writes that all the masters of the fleete, old and young, were mistaken, and did carry their ships aground. But I think I heard the Duke (age 31) say that Moone, being put into the Oxford, had in this conflict regained his credit, by sinking one and taking another. Captain Seale of the Milford hath done his part very well, in boarding the King Salamon, which held out half an hour after she was boarded; and his men kept her an hour after they did master her, and then she sunk, and drowned about 17 of her men.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1665. After supper I to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), where I found him, Sir W. Pen (age 43), Sir J. Robinson (age 50), Sir R. Ford (age 51) and Captain Cocke (age 48) and Mr. Pen, junior. Here a great deal of sorry disordered talk about the Trinity House, Deptford [Map] men, their being exempted from land service. But, Lord! to see how void of method and sense their discourse was, and in what heat, insomuch as Sir R. Ford (age 51) (who we judged, some of us, to be a little foxed) fell into very high terms with Sir W. Batten (age 64), and then with Captain Cocke (age 48). So that I see that no man is wise at all times.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jan 1665. So to the 'Change [Map], back by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 64), and thence to the Crowne, a taverne hard by, with Sir W. Rider and Cutler, where we alone, a very good dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jan 1665. Up and with Sir W. Batten (age 64) to Westminster, where to speak at the House with my Lord Bellasses (age 50), and am cruelly vexed to see myself put upon businesses so uncertainly about getting ships for Tangier being ordered, a servile thing, almost every day.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Feb 1665. After being in bed, my people come and say there is a great stinke of burning, but no smoake. We called up Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) and Sir W. Batten's (age 64) people, and Griffin, and the people at the madhouse, but nothing could be found to give occasion to it. At this trouble we were till past three o'clock, and then the stinke ceasing, I to sleep, and my people to bed, and lay very long in the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Feb 1665. Thence home to dinner, and visited Sir W. Batten (age 64), who is sick again, worse than he was, and I am apt to think is very ill.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Feb 1665. Up and to my office, where busy all the morning, and at home to dinner. It being Shrove Tuesday, had some very good fritters. All the afternoon and evening at the office, and at night home to supper and to bed. This day, Sir W. Batten (age 64), who hath been sicke four or five days, is now very bad, so as people begin to fear his death; and I am at a loss whether it will be better for me to have him die, because he is a bad man, or live, for fear a worse should come.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Feb 1665. Thence with Creed to Gresham College, where I had been by Mr. Povy (age 51) the last week proposed to be admitted a member1 and was this day admitted, by signing a book and being taken by the hand by the President, my Lord Brunkard (age 45), and some words of admittance said to me. But it is a most acceptable thing to hear their discourse, and see their experiments; which were this day upon the nature of fire, and how it goes out in a place where the ayre is not free, and sooner out where the ayre is exhausted, which they showed by an engine on purpose. After this being done, they to the Crowne Taverne, behind the 'Change [Map], and there my Lord and most of the company to a club supper; Sir P. Neale (age 52), Sir R. Murrey, Dr. Clerke, Dr. Whistler, Dr. Goddard, and others of most eminent worth. Above all, Mr. Boyle (age 38) to-day was at the meeting, and above him Mr. Hooke (age 29), who is the most, and promises the least, of any man in the world that ever I saw. Here excellent discourse till ten at night, and then home, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), where I hear that Sir Thos. Harvy intends to put Mr. Turner out of his house and come in himself, which will be very hard to them, and though I love him not, yet for his family's sake I pity him. So home and to bed.

Note 1. According to the minutes of the Royal Society for February 15th, 1664-65, "Mr. Pepys was unanimously elected and admitted". Notes of the experiments shown by Hooke and Boyle are given in Birch's "History of the Royal Society", vol. ii., p. 15.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Feb 1665. So to my office, where till 12 at night, being only a little while at noon at Sir W. Batten's (age 64) to see him, and had some high words with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) about Sir W. Warren, he calling him cheating knave, but I cooled him, and at night at Sir W. Pen's (age 43), he being to go to Chatham, Kent [Map] to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Feb 1665. Lay in bed, it being Lord's day, all the morning talking with my wife, sometimes pleased, sometimes displeased, and then up and to dinner. All the afternoon also at home, and Sir W. Batten's (age 64), and in the evening comes Mr. Andrews, and we sung together, and then to supper, he not staying, and at supper hearing by accident of my mayds their letting in a rogueing Scotch woman that haunts the office, to helpe them to washe and scoure in our house, and that very lately, I fell mightily out, and made my wife, to the disturbance of the house and neighbours, to beat our little girle, and then we shut her down into the cellar, and there she lay all night. So we to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1665. Up, and to the office (having a mighty pain in my forefinger of my left hand, from a strain that it received last night) in struggling 'avec la femme que je [with the woman that I]' mentioned yesterday, where busy till noon, and then my wife being busy in going with her woman to a hot-house to bathe herself, after her long being within doors in the dirt, so that she now pretends to a resolution of being hereafter very clean. How long it will hold I can guess. I dined with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and my Lady, they being now a'days very fond of me.

Note 1. Or hammock-battens: cleats or battens nailed to the sides of a vessel's beams, from which to suspend the seamen's hammocks.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Mar 1665. At noon dined with Sir W. Batten (age 64) (my wife being gone again to-day to buy things, having bought nothing yesterday for lack of Mrs. Pierce's company), and thence to the office again, where very busy till 12 at night, and vexed at my wife's staying out so late, she not being at home at 9 o'clock, but at last she is come home, but the reason of her stay I know not yet. So shut up my books, and home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Mar 1665. Up and to the office, at noon home to dinner, and to the office again, where very late, and then home to supper and to bed. This day returned Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) from Lee Roade, where they have been to see the wrecke of "The London", out of which, they say, the guns may be got, but the hull of her will be wholly lost, as not being capable of being weighed.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1665. Up before six, to the office, where busy all the morning. At noon dined with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), at the Tower [Map], with Sir J. Robinson (age 50), at a farewell dinner which he gives Major Holmes (age 43) at his going out of the Tower [Map], where he hath for some time, since his coming from Guinny, been a prisoner, and, it seems, had presented the Lieutenant with fifty pieces yesterday. Here a great deale of good victuals and company. Thence home to my office, where very late, and home to supper and to bed weary of business.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Mar 1665. Up and by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 64) to St. James's, where among other things before the Duke (age 31), Captain Taylor was called in, and, Sir J. Robinson (age 50) his accuser not appearing, was acquitted quite from his charge, and declared that he should go to Harwich [Map], which I was very well pleased at.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Mar 1665. Up and to my office, and then with Sir W. Batten (age 64) to St. James's, where many come to take leave, as was expected, of the Duke (age 31), but he do not go till Monday.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Mar 1665. At noon dined alone with Sir W. Batten (age 64), where great discourse of Sir W. Pen (age 43), Sir W. Batten (age 64) being, I perceive, quite out of love with him, thinking him too great and too high, and began to talk that the world do question his courage, upon which I told him plainly I have been told that he was articled against for it, and that Sir H. Vane was his great friend therein. This he was, I perceive, glad to hear.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1665. In the evening spent an hour in the garden walking with Sir J. Minnes (age 66), talking of the Chest business, wherein Sir W. Batten (age 64) deals so unfairly, wherein the old man is very hot for the present, but that zeal will not last nor is to be trusted.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1665. Thence with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) to my Lord Treasurer (age 58), and by and by come Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and anon we come to my Lord, and there did lay open the expence for the six months past, and an estimate of the seven months to come, to November next: the first arising to above £500,000, and the latter will, as we judge, come to above £1,000,000. But to see how my Lord Treasurer (age 58) did bless himself, crying he could do no more than he could, nor give more money than he had, if the occasion and expence were never so great, which is but a sad story. And then to hear how like a passionate and ignorant asse Sir G. Carteret (age 55) did harangue upon the abuse of Tickets did make me mad almost and yet was fain to hold my tongue.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Apr 1665. At the office sat all the morning, where, in the absence of Sir W. Batten (age 64), Sir G. Carteret (age 55) being angry about the business of tickets, spoke of Sir W. Batten (age 64) for speaking some words about the signing of tickets, and called Sir W. Batten (age 64) in his discourse at the table to us (the clerks being withdrawn) "shitten foole", which vexed me.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Apr 1665. Thence home to the office, where I find Sir J. Minnes (age 66) come home from Chatham, Kent [Map], and Sir W. Batten (age 64) both this morning from Harwich [Map], where they have been these 7 or 8 days.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Apr 1665. Up and with Creed in Sir W. Batten's (age 64) coach to White Hall. Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), where very busy.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Apr 1665. All the morning busy at the office. In the afternoon to my Lord Treasurer's (age 58), and there got my Lord Treasurer (age 58) to sign the warrant for my striking of tallys, and so doing many jobbs in my way home, and there late writeing letters, being troubled in my mind to hear that Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) do take notice that I am now-a-days much from the office upon no office business, which vexes me, and will make me mind my business the better, I hope in God; but what troubles me more is, that I do omit to write, as I should do, to Mr. Coventry (age 37), which I must not do, though this night I minded it so little as to sleep in the middle of my letter to him, and committed forty blotts and blurrs in my letter to him, but of this I hope never more to be guilty, if I have not already given him sufficient offence. So, late home, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 02 May 1665. Up and to the office all day, where sat late, and then to the office again, and by and by Sir W. Batten (age 64) and my Lady and my wife and I by appointment yesterday (my Lady Pen (age 41) failed us, who ought to have been with us) to the Rhenish Winehouse at the Steelyard [Map], and there eat a couple of lobsters and some prawns, and pretty merry, especially to see us four together, while my wife and my Lady did never intend ever to be together again after a year's distance between one another.

Pepy's Diary. 05 May 1665. Thence home by water, and presently down to Woolwich, Kent [Map] and back to Blackewall [Map], and there, viewed the Breach, in order to a Mast Docke, and so to Deptford to the Globe, where my Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 64), and Commissioner Pett (age 54) were at dinner, having been at the Breach also, but they find it will be too great charge to make use of it.

Pepy's Diary. 08 May 1665. Thence with Sir W. Batten (age 64) to the Duke of Albemarle's (age 56) and there did much business, and then to the 'Change [Map], and thence off with Sir W. Warren to an ordinary, where we dined and sat talking of most usefull discourse till 5 in the afternoon, and then home, and very busy till late, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 May 1665. Up betimes, and abroad to the Cocke-Pitt, where the Duke (age 56) [of Albemarle] did give Sir W. Batten (age 64) and me an account of the late taking of eight ships, and of his intent to come back to the Gunfleete1 with the fleete presently; which creates us much work and haste therein, against the fleete comes.

Note 1. The Gunfleet Sand off the Essex coast.

Pepy's Diary. 14 May 1665. Thence to Walthamstow [Map], where (failing at the old place) Sir W. Batten (age 64) by and by come home, I walking up and down the house and garden with my Lady very pleasantly, then to supper very merry, and then back by coach by dark night. I all the afternoon in the coach reading the treasonous book of the Court of King James, printed a great while ago, and worth reading, though ill intended. As soon as I come home, upon a letter from the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), I took boat at about 12 at night, and down the River in a gally, my boy and I, down to the Hope and so up again, sleeping and waking, with great pleasure, my business to call upon every one of [continued tomorrow]

Pepy's Diary. 17 May 1665. Thence home, and after dinner to the office, where late, and so home to supper and to bed. Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and I had an angry bout this afternoon with Commissioner Pett (age 54) about his neglecting his duty and absenting himself, unknown to us, from his place at Chatham, Kent [Map], but a most false man I every day find him more and more, and in this very full of equivocation. The fleete we doubt not come to Harwich [Map] by this time. Sir W. Batten (age 64) is gone down this day thither, and the Duchesse of Yorke (age 28) went down yesterday to meet the Duke (age 31).

Pepy's Diary. 22 May 1665. So to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), and thence down by water to Deptford, Kent [Map], it being Trinity Monday, and so the day of choosing the Master of Trinity House, Deptford [Map] for the next yeare, where, to my great content, I find that, contrary to the practice and design of Sir W. Batten (age 64), to breake the rule and custom of the Company in choosing their Masters by succession, he would have brought in Sir W. Rider or Sir W. Pen (age 44), over the head of Hurleston (who is a knave too besides, I believe), the younger brothers did all oppose it against the elder, and with great heat did carry it for Hurleston, which I know will vex him to the heart.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jun 1665. Thence home, and there met an expresse from Sir W. Batten (age 64) at Harwich [Map], that the fleete is all sailed from Solebay [Map], having spied the Dutch fleete at sea, and that, if the calmes hinder not, they must needs now be engaged with them.

Battle of Lowestoft

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jun 1665. Waked in the morning before 4 o'clock with great pain to piss, and great pain in pissing by having, I think, drank too great a draught of cold drink before going to bed. But by and by to sleep again, and then rose and to the office, where very busy all the morning, and at noon to dinner with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) to his house with all our Board, where a good pasty and brave discourse. But our great fear was some fresh news of the fleete, but not from the fleete, all being said to be well and beaten the Dutch, but I do not give much belief to it, and indeed the news come from Sir W. Batten (age 64) at Harwich [Map], and writ so simply that we all made good mirth of it.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jun 1665. They gone, I hear Sir W. Batten (age 64) and my Lady are returned from Harwich [Map]. I went to see them, and it is pretty to see how we appear kind one to another, though neither of us care 2d. one for another.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jun 1665. Up, and to White Hall with Sir W. Batten (age 64) (calling at my Lord Ashly's (age 43), but to no purpose, by the way, he being not up), and there had our usual meeting before the Duke with the officers of the Ordnance with us, which in some respects I think will be the better for us, for despatch sake.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jul 1665. Up and by water with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) to White Hall to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), where, after a little business, we parted, and I to the Harp and Ball, and there staid a while talking to Mary, and so home to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jul 1665. At noon to the 'Change [Map] and thence to the Dolphin, where a good dinner at the cost of one Mr. Osbaston, who lost a wager to Sir W. Batten (age 64), Sir W. Rider, and Sir R. Ford (age 51), a good while since and now it is spent. The wager was that ten of our ships should not have a fight with ten of the enemy's before Michaelmas. Here was other very good company, and merry, and at last in come Mr. Buckeworth, a very fine gentleman, and proves to be a Huntingdonshireshire man.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jul 1665. So home to the office, and thence to Sir W. Batten (age 64), and spent the evening at supper; and, among other discourse, the rashness of Sir John Lawson (deceased), for breeding up his daughter so high and proud, refusing a man of great interest, Sir W. Barkeley (age 26), to match her with a melancholy fellow, Colonell Norton's' (age 49) son, of no interest nor good nature nor generosity at all, giving her £6000, when the other would have taken her with two; when he himself knew that he was not worth the money himself in all the world, he did give her that portion, and is since dead, and left his wife and two daughters beggars, and the other gone away with £6000, and no content in it, through the ill qualities of her father-in-law and husband, who, it seems, though a pretty woman, contracted for her as if he had been buying a horse; and, worst of all, is now of no use to serve the mother and two little sisters in any stead at Court, whereas the other might have done what he would for her: so here is an end of this family's pride, which, with good care, might have been what they would, and done well.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jul 1665. Up, and after doing a little business, down to Deptford, Kent [Map] with Sir W. Batten (age 64), and there left him, and I to Greenwich, Kent [Map] to the Park, where I hear the King (age 35) and Duke (age 31) are come by water this morn from Hampton Court [Map]. They asked me several questions. The King (age 35) mightily pleased with his new buildings there. I followed them to [his son-in-law] Castle's (age 36) ship in building, and there, met Sir W. Batten (age 64), and thence to Sir G. Carteret's (age 55), where all the morning with them; they not having any but the Duke of Monmouth (age 16), and Sir W. Killigrew (age 59), and one gentleman, and a page more. Great variety of talk, and was often led to speak to the King (age 35) and Duke (age 31).

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jul 1665. By and by they to dinner, and all to dinner and sat down to the King (age 35) saving myself, which, though I could not in modesty expect, yet, God forgive my pride! I was sorry I was there, that Sir W. Batten (age 64) should say that he could sit down where I could not, though he had twenty times more reason than I, but this was my pride and folly. I down and walked with [his son-in-law] Mr. Castle (age 36), who told me the design of Ford and Rider to oppose and do all the hurt they can to Captain Taylor in his new ship "The London", and how it comes, and that they are a couple of false persons, which I believe, and withal that he himself is a knave too.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Aug 1665. Then they took coach, and Sir G. Carteret (age 55) kissed me himself heartily, and my Lady several times, with great kindnesse, and then the young ladies, and so with much joy, bade "God be with you!" and an end I think it will be to my mirthe for a great while, it having been the passage of my whole life the most pleasing for the time, considering the quality and nature of the business, and my noble usage in the doing of it, and very many fine journys, entertainments and great company. I returned into the house for a while to do business there with Commissioner Pett (age 54), and there with the officers of the Chest, where I saw more of Sir W. Batten's (age 64) business than ever I did before, for whereas he did own once under his hand to them that he was accountable for £2200, of which he had yet paid but £1600, he writes them a letter lately that he hath but about £50 left that is due to the Chest, but I will do something in it and that speedily.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Aug 1665. At noon I home to dinner alone, and after dinner Bagwell's wife waited at the door, and went with me to my office.... So parted, and I to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), and there sat the most of the afternoon talking and drinking too much with my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir G. Smith (age 50), G. Cocke (age 48) and others very merry. I drunk a little mixed, but yet more than I should do.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Aug 1665. We sat late, and then by invitation my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I to Sir G. Smith's (age 50) to dinner, where very good company and good cheer. Captain Cocke (age 48) was there and Jacke Fenn, but to our great wonder Alderman Bence, and tells us that not a word of all this is true, and others said so too, but by his owne story his wife hath been ill, and he fain to leave his house and comes not to her, which continuing a trouble to me all the time I was there.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Aug 1665. Thence by agreement to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) lodgings, where I found my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and so by water to the ferry, and there took Sir W. Batten's (age 64) coach that was sent for us, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), where very merry, good cheer, and up and down the garden with great content to me, and, after dinner, beat Captain Cocke (age 48) at billiards, won about 8s. of him and my Lord Bruncker (age 45). So in the evening after, much pleasure back again and I by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map], where supped with my wife, and then to bed betimes, because of rising to-morrow at four of the clock in order to the going out with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) toward Cranborne to my Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 17) in his way to Court.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1665. Thence he and I to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) by invitation, where Sir W. Batten (age 64) and my Lady, and my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and all of us dined upon a venison pasty and other good meat, but nothing well dressed. But my pleasure lay in getting some bills signed by Sir G. Carteret (age 55), and promise of present payment from Mr. Fenn, which do rejoice my heart, it being one of the heaviest things I had upon me, that so much of the little I have should lie (viz. near £1000) in the King's hands. Here very merry and (Sir G. Carteret (age 55) being gone presently after dinner) to Captain Cocke's (age 48), and there merry, and so broke up and I by water to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), with whom I spoke a great deale in private, they being designed to send a fleete of ships privately to the Streights. No news yet from our fleete, which is much wondered at, but the Duke says for certain guns have been heard to the northward very much. It was dark before I could get home, and so land at Church-yard stairs, where, to my great trouble, I met a dead corps of the plague, in the narrow ally just bringing down a little pair of stairs. But I thank God I was not much disturbed at it. However, I shall beware of being late abroad again.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Aug 1665. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon dined together upon some victuals I had prepared at Sir W. Batten's (age 64) upon the King's charge, and after dinner, I having dispatched some business and set things in order at home, we down to the water and by boat to Greenwich, Kent [Map] to the Bezan yacht, where Sir W. Batten (age 64), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and myself, with some servants (among others Mr. Carcasse, my Lord's clerk, a very civil gentleman), embarked in the yacht and down we went most pleasantly, and noble discourse I had with my Lord Bruneker (age 45), who is a most excellent person. Short of Gravesend, Kent [Map] it grew calme, and so we come to an anchor, and to supper mighty merry, and after it, being moonshine, we out of the cabbin to laugh and talk, and then, as we grew sleepy, went in and upon velvet cushions of the King's that belong to the yacht fell to sleep, which we all did pretty well till 3 or 4 of the clock, having risen in the night to look for a new comet which is said to have lately shone, but we could see no such thing.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1665. By and by comes my fellow-officers, and the Duke (age 31) walked in, and to counsel with us; and that being done we departed, and Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I to the office, where, after I had done a little business, I to his house to dinner, whither comes Captain Cocke (age 48), for whose epicurisme a dish of partriges was sent for, and still gives me reason to think is the greatest epicure in the world.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1665. Up and walked to the office, there to do some business till ten of the clock, and then by agreement my Lord, Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Doyly (age 51), and I took boat and over to the ferry, where Sir W. Batten's (age 64) coach was ready for us, and to Walthamstow [Map] drove merrily, excellent merry discourse in the way, and most upon our last night's revells; there come we were very merry, and a good plain venison dinner.

1665 Battle of Vågen

Pepy's Diary. 16 Sep 1665. At noon to dinner to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), where Sir W. Batten (age 64) and his [his wife] Lady come, by invitation, and very merry we were, only that the discourse of the likelihood of the increase of the plague this weeke makes us a little sad, but then again the thoughts of the late prizes make us glad.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. But by and by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) goes away and others of the company, and when I expected Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and his sister should have staid to have made Sir W. Batten (age 64) and [his wife] Lady sup, I find they go up in snuffe to bed without taking any manner of leave of them, but left them with Mr. Boreman. The reason of this I could not presently learn, but anon I hear it is that Sir J. Minnes (age 66) did expect and intend them a supper, but they without respect to him did first apply themselves to Boreman, which makes all this great feude.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. However I staid and there supped, all of us being in great disorder from this, and more from Cocke's (age 48) boy's being ill, where my [his wife] Lady Batten and Sir W. Batten (age 64) did come to town with an intent to lodge, and I was forced to go seek a lodging which my W. Hewer (age 23) did get me, viz., his own chamber in the towne, whither I went and found it a very fine room, and there lay most excellently.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. So I up, and after being trimmed, the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths, I think, and more, went to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), where I find all out of order still, they having not seen one another till by and by Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Sir W. Batten (age 64) met, to go into my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach, and so we four to Lambeth, Surrey [Map], and thence to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), to inform him what we have done as to the fleete, which is very little, and to receive his direction.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. That being done I to Sir J. Minnes (age 66) where I find Sir W. Batten (age 64) and his [his wife] Lady gone home to Walthamstow [Map] in great snuffe as to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), but yet with some necessity, hearing that a mayde-servant of theirs is taken ill. Here I staid and resolved of my going in my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach which he would have me to take, though himself cannot go with me as he intended, and so to my last night's lodging to bed very weary.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1665. Thence took leave, leaving my Lord Sandwich (age 40) to go visit the Bishop of Canterbury (age 67), and I and Sir W. Batten (age 64) down to the Tower [Map], where he went further by water, and I home, and among other things took out all my gold to carry along with me to-night with Captain Cocke (age 48) downe to the fleete, being £180 and more, hoping to lay out that and a great deal more to good advantage.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Sep 1665. To sleep till 5 o'clock, when it is now very dark, and then rose, being called up by order by Mr. Marlow, and so up and dressed myself, and by and by comes Mr. Lashmore on horseback, and I had my horse I borrowed of Mr. Gillthropp, Sir W. Batten's (age 64) clerke, brought to me, and so we set out and rode hard and was at Nonsuch [Map] by about eight o'clock, a very fine journey and a fine day. There I come just about chappell time and so I went to chappell with them and thence to the several offices about my tallys, which I find done, but strung for sums not to my purpose, and so was forced to get them to promise me to have them cut into other sums. But, Lord! what ado I had to persuade the dull fellows to it, especially Mr. Warder, Master of the Pells, and yet without any manner of reason for their scruple.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Sep 1665. Up and to the office, where busy all the morning, and at noon with Sir W. Batten (age 64) to Coll. Cleggat to dinner, being invited, where a very pretty dinner to my full content and very merry. The great burden we have upon us at this time at the office, is the providing for prisoners and sicke men that are recovered, they lying before our office doors all night and all day, poor wretches.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1665. To the office, where nobody to meet me, Sir W. Batten (age 64) being the only man and he gone this day to meet to adjourne the Parliament to Oxford.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1665. I left him in discourse with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and others, and myself to the office till about 10 at night and so, letters being done, I to him again to Captain Cocke's (age 48), where he supped, and lies, and never saw him more merry, and here is Charles Herbert (age 25), who the King (age 35) hath lately knighted1. My Lord, to my great content, did tell me before them, that never anything was read to the King (age 35) and Council, all the chief Ministers of State being there, as my letter about the Victualling was, and no more said upon it than a most thorough consent to every word was said, and directed, that it be pursued and practised. After much mirth, and my Lord having travelled all night last night, he to bed, and we all parted, I home.

Note 1. This person (age 25), erroneously called by Pepys Sir C. Herbert, will be best defined by subjoining the inscription on his monument in Westminster Abbey: "Sir Charles Harbord (age 25), Knight, third son of Sir Charles Harbord (age 69), Knight, Surveyor-General, and First Lieutenant of the Royall James, under the most noble and illustrious Captaine, Edward, Earle of Sandwich, Vice-Admirall of England, which, after a terrible fight, maintained to admiration against a squadron of the Holland fleet, above six hours, neere the Suffolk coast, having put off two fireships; at last, being utterly disabled, and few of her men remaining unhurt, was, by a third, unfortunately set on fire. But he (though he swome well) neglected to save himselfe, as some did, and out of perfect love to that worthy Lord, whom, for many yeares, he had constantly accompanyed, in all his honourable employments, and in all the engagements of the former warre, dyed with him, at the age of xxxii., much bewailed by his father, whom he never offended; and much beloved by all for his knowne piety, vertue, loyalty, fortitude, and fidelity". B.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1665. Lay long, having a cold. Then to my Lord and sent him going to Oxford, and I to my office, whither comes Sir William Batten (age 64) now newly from Oxford. I can gather nothing from him about my Lord Sandwich (age 40) about the business of the prizes, he being close, but he shewed me a bill which hath been read in the House making all breaking of bulke for the time to come felony, but it is a foolish Act, and will do no great matter, only is calculated to my Lord Sandwich's (age 40) case. He shewed me also a good letter printed from the Bishopp of Munster to the States of Holland shewing the state of their case. Here we did some business and so broke up and I to Cocke (age 48), where Mr. Evelyn (age 44) was, to dinner, and there merry, yet vexed again at publique matters, and to see how little heed is had to the prisoners and sicke and wounded.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Oct 1665. Up, and sent for Thomas Willson, and broke the victualling business to him and he is mightily contented, and so am I that I have bestowed it on him, and so I to Mr. Boreman's, where Sir W. Batten (age 64) is, to tell him what I had proposed to Thomas Willson, and the newes also I have this morning from Sir W. Clerke (age 42), which is, that notwithstanding all the care the Duke of Albemarle (age 56) hath taken about the putting the East India prize goods into the East India Company hands, and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) having laden out a great part of the goods, an order is come from Court to stop all, and to have the goods delivered to the Sub-Commissioners of prizes. At which I am glad, because it do vex this simple weake man, and we shall have a little reparation for the disgrace my Lord Sandwich (age 40) has had in it.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Oct 1665. Up, and to the office, Captain Ferrers going back betimes to my Lord. I to the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 64) met me, and did tell me that Captain Cocke's (age 48) black was dead of the plague, which I had heard of before, but took no notice.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Oct 1665. By and by Captain Cocke (age 48) come to the office, and Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I did send to him that he would either forbear the office, or forbear going to his owne office. However, meeting yesterday the Searchers with their rods in their hands coming from Captain Cocke's (age 48) house, I did overhear them say that the fellow did not die of the plague, but he had I know been ill a good while, and I am told that his boy Jack is also ill.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Nov 1665. This night coming with Sir W. Batten (age 64) into Greenwich, Kent [Map] we called upon Coll. Cleggatt, who tells us for certaine that the King of Denmark (age 56) hath declared to stand for the King of England (age 35), but since I hear it is wholly false.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Nov 1665. At last up, and it being a very foule day for raine and a hideous wind, yet having promised I would go by water to Erith, Kent, and bearing sayle was in danger of oversetting, but ordered them take down their sayle, and so cold and wet got thither, as they had ended their dinner. How[ever], I dined well, and after dinner all on shore, my Lord Bruncker (age 45) with us to Mrs. Williams's lodgings, and Sir W. Batten (age 64), Sir Edmund Pooly (age 46), and others; and there, it being my Lord's birth-day, had every one a green riband tied in our hats very foolishly; and methinks mighty disgracefully for my Lord to have his folly so open to all the world with this woman.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Nov 1665. But by and by Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I took coach, and home to Boreman, and so going home by the backside I saw Captain Cocke (age 48) 'lighting out of his coach (having been at Erith, Kent also with her but not on board) and so he would come along with me to my lodging, and there sat and supped and talked with us, but we were angry a little a while about our message to him the other day about bidding him keepe from the office or his owne office, because of his black dying. I owned it and the reason of it, and would have been glad he had been out of the house, but I could not bid him go, and so supped, and after much other talke of the sad condition and state of the King's matters we broke up, and my friend and I to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1665. They sayled from midnight, and come to Greenwich, Kent [Map] about 5 o'clock in the morning. I however lay till about 7 or 8, and so to my office, my head a little akeing, partly for want of natural rest, partly having so much business to do to-day, and partly from the newes I hear that one of the little boys at my lodging is not well; and they suspect, by their sending for plaister and fume, that it may be the plague; so I sent Mr. Hater and W. Hewer (age 23) to speake with the mother; but they returned to me, satisfied that there is no hurt nor danger, but the boy is well, and offers to be searched, however, I was resolved myself to abstain coming thither for a while. Sir W. Batten (age 64) and myself at the office all the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1665. At noon with him to dinner at Boreman's, where Mr. Seymour (age 32) with us, who is a most conceited fellow and not over much in him. Here Sir W. Batten (age 64) told us (which I had not heard before) that the last sitting day his cloake was taken from Mingo he going home to dinner, and that he was beaten by the seamen and swears he will come to Greenwich, Kent [Map], but no more to the office till he can sit safe.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Nov 1665. Thence in, and Sir W. Batten (age 64) comes in by and by, and so staying till noon, and there being a great deal of company there, Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I took leave of the Duke (age 32) and Sir G. Carteret (age 55), there being no good to be done more for money, and so over the River and by coach to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where at Boreman's we dined, it being late.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Nov 1665. At noon by water, to the King's Head at Deptford, where Captain Taylor invites Sir W: Batten (age 64), Sir John Robinson (age 50) (who come in with a great deale of company from hunting, and brought in a hare alive and a great many silly stories they tell of their sport, which pleases them mightily, and me not at all, such is the different sense of pleasure in mankind), and others upon the score of a survey of his new ship; and strange to see how a good dinner and feasting reconciles everybody, Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Robinson (age 50) being now as kind to him, and report well of his ship and proceedings, and promise money, and Sir W. Batten (age 64) is a solicitor for him, but it is a strange thing to observe, they being the greatest enemys he had, and yet, I believe, hath in the world in their hearts.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Nov 1665. Up and all the morning at the office, busy, and at noon to the King's Head [Map] taverne, where all the Trinity House, Deptford [Map] dined to-day, to choose a new Master in the room of Hurlestone, that is dead, and Captain Crispe is chosen. But, Lord! to see how Sir W. Batten (age 64) governs all and tramples upon Hurlestone, but I am confident the Company will grow the worse for that man's death, for now Batten (age 64), and in him a lazy, corrupt, doating rogue, will have all the sway there.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1665. Up, and met at the office; Sir W. Batten (age 64) with us, who come from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] on Monday last, and hath not been with us to see or discourse with us about any business till this day.