Biography of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671

1663 Battle of Ameixial

1665 Great Plague of London

1665 Battle of Vågen

1666 Holme's Bonfire

1666 Great Fire of London

1667 Poll Bill

1668 Bawdy House Riots

On 01 Mar 1599 John Mennes Comptroller was born to Andrew Mennes of Sandwich.

In 1628 John Mennes Comptroller (age 28) was given command of Adventure.

In Aug 1641 John Mennes Comptroller (age 42) took Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England (age 31) to safety in the Netherlands. He was knighted by King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland (age 40) for doing so.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck (age 42). Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller (age 42).

Pepy's Diary. 10 Apr 1661. So to the Salutacion tavern, where Mr. Alcock and many of the town came and entertained us with wine and oysters and other things, and hither come Sir John Minnes (age 62) to us, who is come to-day to see "the Henery", in which he intends to ride as Vice-Admiral in the narrow seas all this summer. Here much mirth, but I was a little troubled to stay too long, because of going to Hempson's, which afterwards we did, and found it in all things a most pretty house, and rarely furnished, only it had a most ill access on all sides to it, which is a greatest fault that I think can be in a house. Here we had, for my sake, two fiddles, the one a base viall, on which he that played, played well some lyra lessons, but both together made the worst musique that ever I heard. We had a fine collacion, but I took little pleasure in that, for the illness of the musique and for the intentness of my mind upon Mrs. Rebecca Allen.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Sep 1661. After dinner to Sir W. Batten's (age 60), where I found Sir W. Pen (age 40) and Captain Holmes. Here we were very merry with Sir W. Pen (age 40) about the loss of his tankard, though all be but a cheat, and he do not yet understand it; but the tankard was stole by Sir W. Batten (age 60), and the letter, as from the thief, wrote by me, which makes: very good sport. Here I staid all the afternoon, and then Captain Holmes and I by coach to White Hall; in our way, I found him by discourse, to be a great friend of my Lord's, and he told me there was many did seek to remove him; but they were old seamen, such as Sir J. Minnes (age 62) (but he would name no more, though I do believe Sir W. Batten (age 60) is one of them that do envy him), but he says he knows that the King do so love him, and the Duke of York (age 27) too, that there is no fear of him. He seems to be very well acquainted with the King's mind, and with all the several factions at Court, and spoke all with so much frankness, that I do take him to be my Lord's good friend, and one able to do him great service, being a cunning fellow, and one (by his own confession to me) that can put on two several faces, and look his enemies in the face with as much love as his friends.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Nov 1661. At the office all the morning; where Sir John Minnes (age 62), our new Comptroller, was fetched by Sir Wm. Pen (age 40) and myself from Sir Wm. Batten's, and led to his place in the office. The first time that he had come hither, and he seems a good fair condition man, and one that I am glad hath the office. After the office done, I to the Wardrobe, and there dined, and in the afternoon had an hour or two's talk with my Lady with great pleasure. And so with the two young ladies by coach to my house, and gave them some entertainment, and so late at night sent them home with Captain Ferrers by coach.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Nov 1661. This morning up early, and to my Lord Chancellor's (age 52) with a letter to him from my Lord, and did speak with him; and he did ask me whether I was son to Mr. Talbot Pepys or no (with whom he was once acquainted in the Court of Requests), and spoke to me with great respect. Thence to Westminster Hall [Map] (it being Term time) and there met with Commissioner Pett (age 51), and so at noon he and I by appointment to the Sun [Map] in New Fish Street, where Sir J. Minnes (age 62), Sir W. Batten (age 60), and we all were to dine, at an invitation of Captain Stoaks and Captain Clerk, and were very merry, and by discourse I found Sir J. Minnes (age 62) a fine gentleman and a very good scholler.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Nov 1661. To Westminster Hall [Map] by water in the morning, where I saw the King (age 31) going in his barge to the Parliament House; this being the first day of their meeting again. And the Bishops, I hear, do take their places in the Lords House this day. I walked long in the Hall, but hear nothing of news, but what Ned Pickering (age 43) tells me, which I am troubled at, that Sir J. Minnes (age 62) should send word to the King (age 31), that if he did not remove all my Lord Sandwich's (age 36) captains out of this fleet, he believed the King (age 31) would not be master of the fleet at its coming again: and so do endeavour to bring disgrace upon my Lord. But I hope all that will not do, for the King (age 31) loves him.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Dec 1661. Then came Mr. Moore, and he and I to Westminster and to Worcester House to see Mr. Montagu before he goes away (this night), but could not see him, nor do I think he has a mind to see us for fear of our demanding of money of him for anything. So back to Whitehall, and eat a bit of meat at Wilkinson's, and then to the Privy Seal, and sealed there the first time this month; and, among other things that passed, there was a patent for Roger Palmer (Madam Palmer's husband) to be Earl of Castlemaine and Baron of Limbricke in Ireland; but the honour is tied up to the males got of the body of this wife, the Lady Barbary: the reason whereof every body knows. That done, by water to the office, when I found Sir W. Pen (age 40) had been alone all the night and was just rose, and so I to him, and with him I found Captain Holmes, who had wrote his case, and gives me a copy, as he hath many among his friends, and presented the same to the King (age 31) and Council. Which I shall make use of in my attempt of writing something concerning the business of striking sail, which I am now about. But he do cry out against Sir John Minnes (age 62), as the veriest knave and rogue and coward in the world, which I was glad to hear, because he has given out bad words concerning my Lord, though I am sorry it is so. Here Captain Cox then came in, and he and I staid a good while and so good night. Home and wrote by the post to my father, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1662. After church to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where on purpose I have not been this fortnight, and I am resolved to keep myself more reserved to avoyd the contempt which otherwise I must fall into, and so home and six and talked and supped with my wife, and so up to prayers and to bed, having wrote a letter this night to Sir J. Mennes (age 62) in the Downs for his opinion in the business of striking of flags.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jan 1662. So home, and I put in at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where Major Holmes was, and in our discourse and drinking I did give Sir J. Mennes' (age 62) health, which he swore he would not pledge, and called him knave and coward (upon the business of Holmes with the Swedish ship lately), which we all and I particularly did desire him to forbear, he being of our fraternity, which he took in great dudgeon, and I was vexed to hear him persist in calling him so, though I believe it to be true, but however he is to blame and I am troubled at it. So home and to prayers, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Feb 1662. Home, and to be as good as my word, I bade Will get me a rod, and he and I called the boy up to one of the upper rooms of the Comptroller's (age 62) house towards the garden, and there I reckoned all his faults, and whipped him soundly, but the rods were so small that I fear they did not much hurt to him, but only to my arm, which I am already, within a quarter of an hour, not able to stir almost. After supper to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 May 1662. Thence home, and to the Trinity House, Deptford [Map]; where the Brethren (who have been at Deptford, Kent [Map] choosing a new Maister; which is Sir J. Minnes (age 63), notwithstanding Sir W. Batten (age 61) did contend highly for it: at which I am not a little pleased, because of his proud lady) about three o'clock came hither, and so to dinner. I seated myself close by Mr. Prin (age 62), who, in discourse with me, fell upon what records he hath of the lust and wicked lives of the nuns heretofore in England, and showed me out of his pocket one wherein thirty nuns for their lust were ejected of their house, being not fit to live there, and by the Pope's command to be put, however, into other nunnerys. I could not stay to end dinner with them, but rose, and privately went out, and by water to my brother's, and thence to take my wife to the Redd Bull, where we saw "Doctor Faustus", but so wretchedly and poorly done, that we were sick of it, and the worse because by a former resolution it is to be the last play we are to see till Michaelmas.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jun 1662. Up by four o'clock and to my business in my chamber, to even accounts with my Lord and myself, and very fain I would become master of £1000, but I have not above £530 toward it yet. At the office all the morning, and Mr. Coventry (age 34) brought his patent and took his place with us this morning. Upon our making a contract, I went, as I use to do, to draw the heads thereof, but Sir W. Pen (age 41) most basely told me that the Comptroller (age 63) is to do it, and so begun to employ Mr. Turner about it, at which I was much vexed, and begun to dispute; and what with the letter of the Duke's orders, and Mr. Barlow's letter, and the practice of our predecessors, which Sir G. Carteret (age 52) knew best when he was Comptroller (age 63), it was ruled for me. What Sir J. Minnes (age 63) will do when he comes I know not, but Sir W. Pen (age 41) did it like a base raskall, and so I shall remember him while I live.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jun 1662. So walked home again as far as over against the Towre, and so over and home, where I found Sir W. Pen (age 41) and Sir John Minnes (age 63) discoursing about Sir John Minnes's (age 63) house and his coming to live with us, and I think he intends to have Mr. Turner's house and he to come to his lodgings, which I shall be very glad of. We three did go to Mr. Turner's to view his house, which I think was to the end that Sir John Minnes (age 63) might see it.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jun 1662. So to the office, and at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where we all met by chance and talked, and they drank wine; but I forebore all their healths. Sir John Minnes (age 63), I perceive, is most excellent company. So home and to bed betimes by daylight.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jun 1662. Then we fell to talk of Sir J. Minnes (age 63), of whom my Lord hath a very slight opinion, and that at first he did come to my Lord very displeased and sullen, and had studied and turned over all his books to see whether it had ever been that two flags should ride together in the main-top, but could not find it, nay, he did call his captains on board to consult them. So when he came by my Lord's side, he took down his flag, and all the day did not hoist it again, but next day my Lord did tell him that it was not so fit to ride without a flag, and therefore told him that he should wear it in the fore-top, for it seems my Lord saw his instructions, which were that he should not wear his flag in the maintop in the presence of the Duke or my Lord. But that after that my Lord did caress him, and he do believe him as much his friend as his interest will let him. I told my Lord of the late passage between Swan and me, and he told me another lately between Dr. Dell and himself when he was in the country.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jun 1662. After dinner comes Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and some captains with him, who had been at a Councill of Warr to-day, who tell us they have acquitted Captain Hall, who was accused of cowardice in letting of old Winter, the Argier pyrate, go away from him with a prize or two; and also Captain Diamond of the murder laid to him of a man that he had struck, but he lived many months after, till being drunk, he fell into the hold, and there broke his jaw and died, but they say there are such bawdy articles against him as never were heard of .... To the pay again, where I left them, and walked to Redriffe [Map], and so home, and there came Mr. Creed and Shepley to me, and staid till night about my Lord's accounts, our proceeding to set them in order, and so parted and I to bed. Mr. Holliard (age 53) had been with my wife to-day, and cured her of her pain in her ear by taking out a most prodigious quantity of hard wax that had hardened itself in the bottom of the ear, of which I am very glad.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Sep 1662. After dinner I came home and found Sir John Minnes (age 63) come this day, and I went to him to Sir W. Batten's (age 61), where it pleased me to see how jealous Sir Williams both are of my going down to Woolwich, Kent [Map], &c., and doing my duty as I nowadays do, and of my dining with the Commission of the Customs.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Sep 1662. Lay long, that is, till 6 and past before I rose, in order to sweat a little away the cold which I was afraid I might have got yesterday, but I bless God I am well. So up and to my office, and then we met and sat till noon, very full of business. Then Sir John Minnes (age 63), both Sir Williams and I to the Trinity House, Deptford [Map], where we had at dinner a couple of venison pasties, of which I eat but little, being almost cloyed, having been at five pasties in three days, namely, two at our own feast, and one yesterday, and two to-day.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Sep 1662. Lord's Day. Up betimes and round about by the streets to my office, and walked in the garden and in my office till my man Will rose, and then sent to tell Sir J. Minnes (age 63) that I would go with him to Whitehall, which anon we did, in his coach, and to the Chapell, where I heard a good sermon of the Dean of Ely's, upon returning to the old ways, and a most excellent anthem, with symphonys between, sung by Captain Cooke (age 46). Then home with Mr. Fox (age 35) and his lady; and there dined with them, where much company come to them. Most of our discourse was what ministers are flung out that will not conform: and the care of the Bishop of London (age 64) that we are here supplied with very good men.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Sep 1662. Up betimes and to my office preparing an account to give the Duke this morning of what we have of late done at the office. About 7 o'clock I went forth thinking to go along with Sir John Minnes (age 63) and the rest, and I found them gone, which did vex me, so I went directly to the Old Swan [Map] and took boat before them to Sir G. Carteret's (age 52) lodgings at Whitehall, and there staying till he was dressed talking with him, he and I to St. James's, where Sir Williams both and Sir John were come, and so up with Mr. Coventry (age 34) to the Duke; who, after he was out of his bed, did send for us in; and, when he was quite ready, took us into his closet, and there told us that he do intend to renew the old custom for the Admirals to have their principal officers to meet them once a-week, to give them an account what they have done that week; which I am glad of: and so the rest did tell his Royal Highness that I could do it best for the time past.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Sep 1662. We took boat again at the Falcon, and there parted, and I to the Old Swan [Map], and so to the Change [Map], and there meeting Sir W. Warren did step to a tavern, and there sat and talked about price of masts and other things, and so broke up and to my office to see what business, and so we took water again, and at the Tower I over to Redriffe [Map], and there left him in the boat and walked to Deptford, and there up and down the yard speaking with people, and so Sir W. Pen (age 41) coming out of the payhouse did single me out to tell me Sir J. Minnes' (age 63) dislike of my blinding his lights over his stairs (which indeed is very bad) and blocking up the house of office on the leads.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Sep 1662. At my office betimes, and by and by we sat, and at noon Mr. Coventry (age 34), Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Mr. Pett (age 52), and myself by water to Deptford, where we met Sir G. C. (age 52), Sir W. B. (age 61), and Sir W. P. (age 41) at the pay of a ship, and we dined together on a haunch of good venison boiled, and after dinner returned again to the office, and there met several tradesmen by our appointment to know of them their lowest rates that they will take for their several provisions that they sell to us, for I do resolve to know that, and to buy no dearer, that so when we know the lowest rate, it shall be the Treasurer's fault, and not ours, that we pay dearer.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Sep 1662. This afternoon Sir John Minnes (age 63), Mr. Coventry (age 34), and I went into Sir John's lodgings, where he showed us how I have blinded all his lights, and stopped up his garden door, and other things he takes notice of that he resolves to abridge me of, which do vex me so much that for all this evening and all night in my bed, so great a fool I am, and little master of my passion, that I could not sleep for the thoughts of my losing the privilege of the leads, and other things which in themselves are small and not worth half the trouble. The more fool am I, and must labour against it for shame, especially I that used to preach up Epictetus's rule:1 Late at my office, troubled in mind, and then to bed, but could hardly sleep at night.

Note 1. "Some things are in our power, others are not" Pepys means, "I ought not to vex myself about what I cannot control"..

Pepy's Diary. 10 Sep 1662. Up and to my house, and there contrived a way how Sir John Minnes (age 63) shall come into the leads, and yet I save part of the closet I hoped for, which, if it will not please him, I am a madman to be troubled at it. To my office, and then at my house among my lazy workmen all day.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Sep 1662. Up betimes and to my office, and up to my workmen, which goes on slowly and troubles me much. Besides, my mind is troubled till I see how Sir John Minnes (age 63) will carry himself to me about my lodgings, for all my fear is that he will get my best chamber from me, for as for the leads I care not a farthing for them.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Sep 1662. So to my office to prepare notes to read to the Duke to-morrow morning, and so to my lodgings and to bed, my mind a little eased because I am resolved to know the worst concerning my lodgings tomorrow. Among other things Sir W. Pen (age 41) did tell me of one of my servants looking into Sir J. Minnes' (age 63) window when my Lady Batten lay there, which do much trouble them, and me also, and I fear will wholly occasion my loosing the leads. One thing more he told me of my Jane's cutting off a carpenter's long mustacho, and how the fellow cried, and his wife would not come near him a great while, believing that he had been among some of his wenches. At which I was merry, though I perceive they discourse of it as a crime of hers, which I understand not.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Sep 1662. So home again by water and to church, and from church Sir Williams both and Sir John Minnes (age 63) into the garden, and anon Sir W. Pen (age 41) and I did discourse about my lodgings and Sir J. Minnes (age 63), and I did open all my mind to him, and he told me what he had heard, and I do see that I shall hardly keep my best lodging chamber, which troubles me, but I did send for Goodenough the plasterer, who tells me that it did ever belong to my lodgings, but lent by Mr. Payles to Mr. Smith, and so I will strive hard for it before I lose it.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Sep 1662. So by water with Sir Wm. Pen (age 41) to White Hall; and, with much ado, was fain to walk over the piles through the bridge, while Sir W. Batten (age 61) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) were aground against the bridge, and could not in a great while get through.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1662. All this morning we sat at the office, Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and I And so dined at home, and among my workmen all the afternoon, and in the evening Tom brought Mr. Lull to me, a friend of his mistress, a serious man, with whom I spoke, and he gives me a good account of her and of their satisfaction in Tom, all which pleases me well. We walked a good while in the garden together, and did give him a glass of wine at my office, and so parted.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1662. Up betimes and to my workmen, and then to the office, where we sat all the morning. So home to dinner alone and then to my workmen till night, and so to my office till bedtime, and so after supper to my lodgings and to bed. This evening I sat awhile at Sir W. Batten's (age 61) with Sir J. Minnes (age 63), &c., where he told us among many other things how in Portugal they scorn to make a seat for a house of office, but they do .... all in pots and so empty them in the river. I did also hear how the woman, formerly nurse to Mrs. Lemon (Sir W. Batten's (age 61) daughter), her child was torn to pieces by two doggs at Walthamstow [Map] this week, and is dead, which is very strange.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Oct 1662. This day Sir W. Pen (age 41) did speak to me from Sir J. Minnes (age 63) to desire my best chamber of me, and my great joy is that I perceive he do not stand upon his right, which I was much afraid of, and so I hope I shall do well enough with him for it, for I will not part with it by fair means, though I contrive to let him have another room for it.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Oct 1662. Then coming Mr. Creede in order to some business with Sir J. Minnes (age 63) about his accounts, this afternoon I took him to the Treasury office, where Sir John and I did stay late paying some money to the men that are saved out of the Satisfaction that was lost the other day. The King (age 32) gives them half-pay, which is more than is used in such cases, for they never used to have any thing, and yet the men were most outrageously discontented, and did rail and curse us till I was troubled to hear it, and wished myself unconcerned therein. Mr. Creede seeing us engaged took leave of us.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Oct 1662. Up and in Sir J. Minnes's (age 63) coach with him and Sir W. Batten (age 61) to White Hall, where now the Duke is come again to lodge: and to Mr. Coventry's (age 34) little new chamber there.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Oct 1662. After having done with him to the office, and there all the morning, and in the middle of our sitting my workmen setting about the putting up of my rails upon my leads, Sir J. Minnes (age 63) did spy them and fell a-swearing, which I took no notice of, but was vexed, and am still to the very heart for it, for fear it should put him upon taking the closett and my chamber from me, which I protest I am now afraid of. But it is my very great folly to be so much troubled at these trifles, more than at the loss of £100, or things of greater concernment; but I forget the lesson I use to preach to others.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1662. So home and dined there with my wife upon a most excellent dish of tripes of my own directing, covered with, mustard, as I have heretofore seen them done at my Lord Crew's, of which I made a very great meal, and sent for a glass of wine for myself, and so to see Sir W. Pen (age 41), who continues bed-rid in great pain, and hence to the Treasury to Sir J. Minnes (age 63) paying off of tickets, and at night home, and in my study (after seeing Sir W. Batten (age 61), who also continues ill) I fell to draw out my conceptions about books for the clerk that cheques in the yard to keep according to the distinct works there, which pleases me very well, and I am confident it will be of great use.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Oct 1662. Up, and after giving order to the plasterer now to set upon the finishing of my house, then by water to wait upon the Duke, and walking in the matted Gallery, by and by comes Mr. Coventry (age 34) and Sir John Minnes (age 63), and then to the Duke, and after he was ready, to his closet, where I did give him my usual account of matters, and afterwards, upon Sir J. Minnes' (age 63) desire to have one to assist him in his employment, Sir W. Pen (age 41) is appointed to be his, and Mr. Pett (age 52) to be the Surveyor's assistant. Mr. Coventry (age 34) did desire to be excused, and so I hope (at least it is my present opinion) to have none joined with me, but only Mr. Coventry (age 34) do desire that I would find work for one of his clerks, which I did not deny, but however I will think of it, whether without prejudice to mine I can do it.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Oct 1662. Lord Mayor's Day. Intended to have made me fine, and by invitation to have dined with the Lord Mayor to-day, but going to see Sir W. Batten (age 61) this morning, I found Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) going with Sir W. Batten (age 61) and myself to examine Sir G. Carteret's (age 52) accounts for the last year, whereupon I settled to it with them all the day long, only dinner time (which Sir G. Carteret (age 52) gave us), and by night did as good as finish them, and so parted, and thence to my office, and there set papers in order and business against to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Oct 1662. And as to his own taking of too large fees or rewards for places that he had sold, he will prove that he was directed to it by Sir George (age 52) himself among others. And yet he did not deny Sir G. Carteret (age 52) his due, in saying that he is a man that do take the most pains, and gives himself the most to do business of any man about the Court, without any desire of pleasure or divertisements; which is very true. But which pleased me mightily, he said in these words, that he was resolved, whatever it cost him, to make an experiment, and see whether it was possible for a man to keep himself up in Court by dealing plainly and walking uprightly, with any private game a playing: in the doing whereof, if his ground do slip from under him, he will be contented; but he is resolved to try, and never to baulke taking notice of any thing that is to the King's prejudice, let it fall where it will; which is a most brave resolucion. He was very free with me; and by my troth, I do see more reall worth in him than in most men that I do know. I would not forget two passages of Sir J. Minnes's (age 63) at yesterday's dinner. The one, that to the question how it comes to pass that there are no boars seen in London, but many sows and pigs; it was answered, that the constable gets them a-nights. The other, Thos. Killigrew's way of getting to see plays when he was a boy. He would go to the Red Bull, and when the man cried to the boys, "Who will go and be a devil, and he shall see the play for nothing?" then would he go in, and be a devil upon the stage, and so get to see plays.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Oct 1662. Thus ends this month, I and my family in good health, but weary heartily of dirt, but now in hopes within two or three weeks to be out of it. My head troubled with much business, but especially my fear of Sir J. Minnes (age 63) claiming my bed-chamber of me, but I hope now that it is almost over, for I perceive he is fitting his house to go into it the next week. Then my law businesses for Brampton makes me mad almost, for that I want time to follow them, but I must by no means neglect them. I thank God I do save money, though it be but a little, but I hope to find out some job or other that I may get a sum by to set me up.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Nov 1662. Thence to my office, sent for to meet Mr. Leigh again; from Sir H. Bennet (age 44). And he and I, with Wade and his intelligencer and labourers, to the Tower cellars, to make one tryall more; where we staid two or three hours digging, and dug a great deal all under the arches, as it was now most confidently directed, and so seriously, and upon pretended good grounds, that I myself did truly expect to speed; but we missed of all: and so we went away the second time like fools. And to our office, whither, a coach being come, Mr. Leigh goes home to Whitehall; and I by appointment to the Dolphin Tavern, to meet Wade and the other, Captn. Evett, who now do tell me plainly, that he that do put him upon this is one that had it from Barkestead's own mouth, and was advised with by him, just before the King's coming in, how to get it out, and had all the signs told him how and where it lay, and had always been the great confident of Barkestead even to the trusting him with his life and all he had. So that he did much convince me that there is good ground for what we go about. But I fear it may be that he did find some conveyance of it away, without the help of this man, before he died. But he is resolved to go to the party once more, and then to determine what we shall do further. So we parted, and I to my office, where after sending away my letters to the post I do hear that Sir J. Minnes (age 63) is resolved to turn part of our entry into a room and to divide the back yard between Sir W. Pen (age 41) and him, which though I do not see how it will annoy me much particularly, yet it do trouble me a little for fear it should, but I do not see how it can well unless in his desiring my coming to my back stairs, but for that I shall do as well as himself or Sir W. Pen (age 41), who is most concerned to look after it.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Nov 1662. Up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 63) in his coach to White Hall, to the Duke's; but found him gone out a-hunting.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1662. Dined at home with my wife, and all the afternoon among my workmen, and at night to my office to do business there, and then to see Sir W. Pen (age 41), who is still sick, but his pain less than it was. He took occasion to talk with me about Sir J. Minnes's (age 63) intention to divide the entry and the yard, and so to keep him out of the yard, and forcing him to go through the garden to his house. Which he is vexed at, and I am glad to see that Sir J. Minnes (age 63) do use him just as he do me, and so I perceive it is not anything extraordinary his carriage to me in the matter of our houses, for this is worse than anything he has done to me, that he should give order for the stopping up of his way to his house without so much as advising with him or letting of him know it, and I confess that it is very highly and basely done of him.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Nov 1662. So home, and by and by Sir W. Pen (age 41) did send for me to his bedside; and tell me how really Sir J. Minnes (age 63) did resolve to have one of my rooms, and that he was very angry and hot, and said he would speak to the Duke. To which, knowing that all this was but to scare me, and to get him to put off his resolution of making up the entry, I did tell him plainly how I did not value his anger more, than he did mine, and that I should be willing to do what the Duke commanded, and I was sure to have justice of him, and that was all I did say to him about it, though I was much vexed, and after a little stay went home; and there telling my wife she did put me into heart, and resolve to offer him to change lodgings, and believe that that will one way or other bring us to some end in this dispute. At night I called up my maids, and schooled Jane, who did answer me so humbly and drolly about it, that though I seemed angry, I was much pleased with her and [my] wife also. So at night to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Nov 1662. At the office forenoon and afternoon till late at night, very busy answering my Lord Treasurer's (age 55) letter, and my mind troubled till we come to some end with Sir J. Minnes (age 63) about our lodgings, and so home. And after some pleasant discourse and supper to bed, and in my dream much troubled by being with Will. Swan, a great fanatic, my old acquaintance, and, methought, taken and led up with him for a plotter, all our discourse being at present about the late plots.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Nov 1662. Lord's Day. Lay alone a good while, my mind busy about pleading to-morrow to the Duke if there shall be occasion for this chamber that I lie in against Sir J., Minnes (age 63). Then up, and after being ready walked to my brother's, where my wife is, calling at many churches, and then to the Temple [Map], hearing a bit there too, and observing that in the streets and churches the Sunday is kept in appearance as well as I have known it at any time. Then to dinner to my brother's, only he and my wife, and after dinner to see Mr. Moore, who is pretty well, and he and I to St. Gregory's, where I escaped a great fall down the staires of the gallery: so into a pew there and heard Dr. Ball make a very good sermon, though short of what I expected, as for the most part it do fall out.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Nov 1662. So home with Mr. Moore to his chamber, and after a little talk I walked home to my house and staid at Sir W. Batten's (age 61). Till late at night with him and Sir J. Minnes (age 63), with whom we did abundance of most excellent discourse of former passages of sea commanders and officers of the navy, and so home and to bed, with my mind well at ease but only as to my chamber, which I fear to lose.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1662. Up betimes and to set my workmen to work, and then a little to the office, and so with Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and myself by coach to White Hall, to the Duke (age 29), who, after he was ready, did take us into his closett. Thither come my Lord General Monk (age 53), and did privately talk with the Duke (age 29) about having the life-guards pass through the City today only for show and to fright people, for I perceive there are great fears abroad; for all which I am troubled and full of doubt that things will not go well. He being gone, we fell to business of the Navy. Among other things, how to pay off this fleet that is now come from Portugall; the King (age 32) of Portugall sending them home, he having no more use for them, which we wonder at, that his condition should be so soon altered. And our landmen also are coming back, being almost starved in that poor country. Having done here I went by my Lord Sandwich's (age 37), who was not at home, and so to Westminster Hall [Map], where full of term, and here met with many about business, among others my cozen Roger Pepys (age 45), who is all for a composition with my uncle Thomas, which upon any fair terms I am for also and desire it.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1662. Thence by coach to my Lady's, and, hiding my wife with Sarah below, I went up and heard some musique with my Lord, and afterwards discoursed with him alone, and so good night to him and below, having sent for Mr. Creed, had thought to have shown my wife a play before the King (age 32), but it is so late that we could not, and so we took coach, and taking up Sarah at my brother's with their night geare we went home, and I to my office to settle matters, and so home and to bed. This morning in the Duke's chamber Sir J. Minnes (age 63) did break to me his desire about my chamber, which I did put off to another time to discourse of, he speaking to me very kindly to make me the less trouble myself, hoping to save myself and to contrive something or other to pleasure him as well, though I know not well what. The town, I hear, is full of discontents, and all know of the King's new bastard by Mrs. Haslerigge, and as far as I can hear will never be contented with Episcopacy, they are so cruelly set for Presbytery, and the Bishopps carry themselves so high, that they are never likely to gain anything upon them.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Nov 1662. Up and began our discontent again and sorely angered my wife, who indeed do live very lonely, but I do perceive that it is want of work that do make her and all other people think of ways of spending their time worse, and this I owe to my building, that do not admit of her undertaking any thing of work, because the house has been and is still so dirty. I to my office, and there sat all the morning and dined with discontent with my wife at noon, and so to my office, and there this afternoon we had our first meeting upon our commission of inspecting the Chest, and there met Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir Francis Clerke, Mr. Heath, Atturney of the Dutchy, Mr. Prin (age 62)n, Sir W. Rider, Captn. Cocke, and myself. Our first work to read over the Institution, which is a decree in Chancery in the year 1617, upon an inquisition made at Rochester, Kent [Map] about that time into the revenues of the Chest, which had then, from the year 1588 or 1590, by the advice of the Lord High Admiral (age 29) and principal officers then being, by consent of the seamen, been settled, paying sixpence per month, according to their wages then, which was then but 10s. which is now 24s. We adjourned to a fortnight hence.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Nov 1662. Lord's Day. About 3 o'clock in the morning waked with a rude noise among Sir J. Minnes (age 63) his servants (he not being yet come to his lodgings), who are the rudest people but they that lived before, one Mrs. Davis, that ever I knew in my life. To sleep again, and after long talking pleasantly with my wife, up and to church, where Mrs. Goodyer, now Mrs. Buckworth, was churched. I love the woman for her gravity above any in the parish.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1662. Up and to the office, where Mr. Phillip the lawyer came to me, but I put him off to the afternoon. At noon I dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 61), Sir John Minnes (age 63) being here, and he and I very kind, but I every day expect to pull a crow with him about our lodgings. My mind troubled about Gosnell and my law businesses. So after dinner to Mr. Phillips his chamber, where he demands an abatement for Piggott's money, which vexes me also, but I will not give it him without my father's consent, which I will write to him to-night about, and have done it. Here meeting my uncle Thomas, he and I to my cozen Roger's (age 45) chamber, and there I did give my uncle him and Mr. Philips to be my two arbiters against Mr. Cole and Punt, but I expect no great good of the matter.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Nov 1662. Within all day long, helping to put up my hangings in my house in my wife's chamber, to my great content. In the afternoon I went to speak to Sir J. Minnes (age 63) at his lodgings, where I found many great ladies, and his lodgings made very fine indeed. At night to supper and to bed: this night having first put up a spitting sheet, which I find very convenient. This day come the King's pleasure-boats from Calais, with the Dunkirk money, being 400,000 pistolles.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Nov 1662. Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and I, going forth toward White Hall, we hear that the King (age 32) and Duke (age 29) are come this morning to the Tower to see the Dunkirk money! So we by coach to them, and there went up and down all the magazines with them; but methought it was but poor discourse and frothy that the King's companions (young Killigrew (age 25) among the rest) about the codpieces of some of the men in armour there to be seen, had with him. We saw none of the money, but Mr. Slingsby did show the King (age 32), and I did see, the stamps of the new money that is now to be made by Blondeau's fashion1, which are very neat, and like the King (age 32).

Note 1. Peter Blondeau was employed by the Commonwealth to coin their money. After the Restoration, November 3rd, 1662, he received letters of denization, and a grant for being engineer of the Mint in the Tower of London, and for using his new invention for coining gold and silver with the mill and press, with the fee of £100 per annum (Walpole's "Anecdotes of Painting").

Pepy's Diary. 01 Dec 1662. Up and by coach with Sir John Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 61) to White Hall to the Duke's chamber, where, as is usual, my Lord Sandwich (age 37) and all of us, after his being ready, to his closett, and there discoursed of matters of the Navy, and here Mr. Coventry (age 34) did do me the great kindness to take notice to the Duke (age 29) of my pains in making a collection of all contracts about masts, which have been of great use to us.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Dec 1662. Thence I to my Lord Sandwich's (age 37), to Mr. Moore, to talk a little about business; and then over the Parke (where I first in my life, it being a great frost, did see people sliding with their skeates1, which is a very pretty art), to Mr. Coventry's (age 34) chamber to St. James's, where we all met to a venison pasty, and were very merry, Major Norwood being with us, whom they did play upon for his surrendering of Dunkirk. Here we staid till three or four o'clock; and so to the Council Chamber, where there met the Duke of York (age 29), Prince Rupert (age 42), Duke of Albemarle (age 53), my Lord Sandwich (age 37), Sir Win. Compton (age 37), Mr. Coventry (age 34), Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir R. Ford (age 48), Sir W. Rider, myself, and Captain Cuttance, as Commissioners for Tangier. And after our Commission was read by Mr. Creed, who I perceive is to be our Secretary, we did fall to discourse of matters: as, first, the supplying them forthwith with victualls; then the reducing it to make way for the money, which upon their reduction is to go to the building of the Mole; and so to other matters, ordered as against next meeting.

Note 1. Iron skates appear to have been introduced by the Dutch, as the name certainly was; but we learn from Fitzstephen that bone skates (although not so called) were used in London in the twelfth century.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Dec 1662. So home and late with Sir John Minnes (age 63) at the office looking over Mr. Creed's accounts, and then home and to supper, and my wife and I melancholy to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Dec 1662. Then to the Dolphin, where Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 61), and I, did treat the Auditors of the Exchequer, Auditors Wood and Beale, and hither come Sir G. Carteret (age 52) to us. We had a good dinner, cost us £5 and 6s., whereof my share 26s., and after dinner did discourse of our salarys and other matters, which I think now they will allow.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Dec 1662. So back to the office with Sir J. Minnes (age 63), in his coach, but so great a snow that we could hardly pass the streets. So we and Sir W. Batten (age 61) to the office, and there did discourse of Mr. Creed's accounts, and I fear it will be a good while before we shall go through them, and many things we meet with, all of difficulty.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Dec 1662. Slept long to-day till Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 61) were set out towards Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] before I rose, and Sir G. Carteret (age 52) came to the office to speak with me before I was up. So I started up and down to him.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1662. Thence called at the Major-General's, Sir R. Browne, about my being assessed armes to the militia; but he was abroad; and so driving through the backside of the Shambles in Newgate Market, my coach plucked down two pieces of beef into the dirt, upon which the butchers stopped the horses, and a great rout of people in the street, crying that he had done him 40s and £5 worth of hurt; but going down, I saw that he had done little or none; and so I give them a shilling for it and they were well contented, and so home, and there to my Lady Batten's to see her, who tells me she hath just now a letter from Sir William, how that he and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) did very narrowly escape drowning on the road, the waters are so high; but is well. But, Lord! what a hypocrite-like face she made to tell it me.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1662. And slept hard till 8 o'clock this morning, and so up and to the office, where I found Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 61) come unexpectedly home last night from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], having done the Pay there before we could have, thought it. Sat all the morning, and at noon home to dinner with my wife alone, and after dinner sat by the fire, and then up to make up my accounts with her, and find that my ordinary housekeeping comes to £7 a month, which is a great deal.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Dec 1662. Lay pleasantly, talking to my wife, till 8 o'clock, then up and to Sir W. Batten's (age 61) to see him and Sir G. Carteret (age 52) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) take coach towards the Pay at Chatham, Kent [Map], which they did and I home, and took money in my pocket to pay many reckonings to-day in the town, as my bookseller's, and paid at another shop £4 10s. for "Stephens's Thesaurus Graecae Linguae", given to Paul's School.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1663. Up and to the Duke (age 29), who himself told me that Sir J. Lawson (age 48) was come home to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] from the Streights, who is now come with great renown among all men, and, I perceive, mightily esteemed at Court by all. The Duke (age 29) did not stay long in his chamber; but to the King's chamber, whither by and by the Russia Embassadors (age 18) come; who, it seems, have a custom that they will not come to have any treaty with our or any King's Commissioners, but they will themselves see at the time the face of the King (age 32) himself, be it forty days one after another; and so they did to-day only go in and see the King (age 32); and so out again to the Council-chamber. The Duke (age 29) returned to his chamber, and so to his closett, where Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 63), Sir W. Batten (age 62), Mr. Coventry (age 35), and myself attended him about the business of the Navy; and after much discourse and pleasant talk he went away.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1663. Up pretty early, that is by seven o'clock, it being not yet light before or then. So to my office all the morning, signing the Treasurer's ledger, part of it where I have not put my hand, and then eat a mouthful of pye at home to stay my stomach, and so with Mr. Waith by water to Deptford, and there among other things viewed old pay-books, and found that the Commanders did never heretofore receive any pay for the rigging time, but only for seatime, contrary to what Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) told the Duke the other day. I also searched all the ships in the Wett Dock for fire, and found all in good order, it being very dangerous for the King that so many of his ships lie together there. I was among the canvass in stores also, with Mr. Harris, the saylemaker, and learnt the difference between one sort and another, to my great content, and so by water home again, where my wife tells me stories how she hears that by Sarah's going to live at Sir W. Pen's (age 41), all our affairs of my family are made known and discoursed of there and theirs by my people, which do trouble me much, and I shall take a time to let Sir W. Pen (age 41) know how he has dealt in taking her without our full consent. So to my office, and by and by home to supper, and so to prayers and bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jan 1663. Up and to the office. From thence, before we sat, Sir W. Pen (age 41) sent for me to his bedside to talk (indeed to reproach me with my not owning to Sir J. Minnes (age 63) that he had my advice in the blocking up of the garden door the other day, which is now by him out of fear to Sir J. Minnes (age 63) opened again), to which I answered him so indifferently that I think he and I shall be at a distance, at least to one another, better than ever we did and love one another less, which for my part I think I need not care for.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jan 1663. So to the office, and sat till noon, then rose and to dinner, and then to the office again, where Mr. Creed sat with me till late talking very good discourse, as he is full of it, though a cunning knave in his heart, at least not to be too much trusted, till Sir J. Minnes (age 63) came in, which at last he did, and so beyond my expectation he was willing to sign his accounts, notwithstanding all his objections, which really were very material, and yet how like a doting coxcomb he signs the accounts without the least satisfaction, for which we both sufficiently laughed at him and Sir W. Batten (age 62) after they had signed them and were gone, and so sat talking together till 11 o'clock at night, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1663. Lord's Day. Lay long talking pleasant with my wife, then up and to church, the pew being quite full with strangers come along with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63), so after a pitifull sermon of the young Scott, home to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1663. In the evening to Sir W. Pen's (age 41), where Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and afterwards came Sir G. Carteret (age 53). There talked about business, and afterwards to Sir W. Batten's (age 62), where we staid talking and drinking Syder, and so I went away to my office a little, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jan 1663. Up, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) to bid him and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) adieu, they going this day towards Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], and then to Sir W. Pen's (age 41) to see Sir J. Lawson (age 48), who I heard was there, where I found him the same plain man that he was, after all his success in the Straights, with which he is come loaded home.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1663. To the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) are come from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map]. We sat till dinner time. Then home, and Mr. Dixon by agreement came to dine, to give me an account of his success with Mr. Wheatly for his daughter for my brother; and in short it is, that his daughter cannot fancy my brother because of his imperfection in his speech, which I am sorry for, but there the business must die, and we must look out for another. There came in also Mrs. Lodum, with an answer from her brother Ashwell's daughter, who is likely to come to me, and with her my wife's brother, and I carried Commissioner Pett (age 52) in with me, so I feared want of victuals, but I had a good dinner, and mirth, and so rose and broke up, and with the rest of the officers to Mr. Russell's buriall, where we had wine and rings, and a great and good company of aldermen and the livery of the Skinners' Company.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1663. At noon dined with Mr. Coventry (age 35) at Sir J. Minnes (age 63) his lodgings, the first time that ever I did yet, and am sorry for doing it now, because of obliging me to do the like to him again. Here dined old Captn. Marsh of the Tower with us.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Feb 1663. By coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) to the Duke (age 29); and after discourse as usual with him in his closett, I went to my Lord's: the King (age 32) and Duke (age 29) being gone to chappell, it being collar-day1, it being Candlemas-day; where I staid with him a while until towards noon, there being Jonas Moore (age 45) talking about some mathematical businesses, and thence I walked at noon to Mr. Povey's, where Mr. Gawden met me, and after a neat and plenteous dinner as is usual, we fell to our victualling business, till Mr. Gawden and I did almost fall out, he defending himself in the readiness of his provision, when I know that the ships everywhere stay for them.

Note 1. TT. Collar-day. A designated days on which the collar forming part of the insignia of certain members of British orders of knighthood may be worn. Collars are special large and elaborate ceremonial metal chains worn over the shoulders, hanging equally over the front and back, often tied with a bow at the shoulders, with a distinctive pendant attached to the front.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Feb 1663. In the evening came Sir J. Minnes (age 63) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) to see me, and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) advises me to the same thing, but would not have me take anything from the apothecary, but from him, his Venice treacle1 being better than the others, which I did consent to and did anon take and fell into a great sweat, and about 10 or 11 o'clock came out of it and shifted myself, and slept pretty well alone, my wife lying in the red chamber above.

Note 1. TT. A ancient medicine containing numerous ingredients such as viper flesh, opium, cinnamon, agarics and gum arabic. The ingredients were pulverized and reduced to an electuary with honey

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1663. In the afternoon several people came to see me, my uncle Thomas, Mr. Creed, Sir J. Minnes (age 63) (who has been, God knows to what end, mighty kind to me and careful of me in my sickness). At night my wife read Sir H. Vane's tryall to me, which she began last night, and I find it a very excellent thing, worth reading, and him to have been a very wise man. So to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Feb 1663. Up and by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 63) to White Hall, and, after we had done our usual business with the Duke (age 29), to my Lord Sandwich (age 37) and by his desire to Sir W. Wheeler (age 52), who was brought down in a sedan chair from his chamber, being lame of the gout, to borrow £1000 of him for my Lord's occasions, but he gave me a very kind denial that he could not, but if any body else would, he would be bond with my Lord for it.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. Here I staid vexing, and yet pleased to see every body, man and woman, my Lady and Mr. Turner especially, for me, till 10 at night; and so home, where my people are mightily surprized to see this business, but it troubles me not very much, it being nothing touching my particular person or estate. Being in talk to-day with Sir W. Batten (age 62) he tells me that little is done yet in the Parliament-house, but only this day it was moved and ordered that all the members of the House do subscribe to the renouncing of the Covenant, which is thought will try some of them. There is also a bill brought in for the wearing of nothing but cloth or stuffs of our own manufacture, and is likely to be passed. Among other talk this evening, my lady did speak concerning Commissioner Pett's (age 52) calling the present King bastard, and other high words heretofore; and Sir W. Batten (age 62) did tell us, that he did give the Duke or Mr. Coventry (age 35) an account of that and other like matters in writing under oath, of which I was ashamed, and for which I was sorry, but I see there is an absolute hatred never to be altered there, and Sir J. Minnes (age 63), the old coxcomb, has got it by the end, which troubles me for the sake of the King's service, though I do truly hate the expressions laid to him. To my office and set down this day's journall, and so home with my mind out of order, though not very sad with it, but ashamed for myself something, and for the honour of the office much more. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. By and by comes Sir J. Minnes (age 63), who (like himself and all that he do) tells us that he can do no good, but that my Chancellor (age 54) wonders that we did not cause the seamen to fall about their ears: which we wished we could have done without our being seen in it; and Captain Grove being there, he did give them some affront, and would have got some seamen to have drubbed them, but he had not time, nor did we think it fit to have done it, they having executed their commission; but there was occasion given that he did draw upon one of them and he did complain that Grove had pricked him in the breast, but no hurt done; but I see that Grove would have done our business to them if we had bid him.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. By and by at my parler-window comes Sir W. Batten's Mungo, to tell me that his master and lady would have me come to their house through Sir J. Minnes's (age 63) lodgings, which I could not do; but, however, by ladders, did get over the pale between our yards, and so to their house, where I found them (as they have reason) to be much concerned for me, my lady especially. The fellows staid in the yard swearing with one or two constables, and some time we locked them into the yard, and by and by let them out again, and so kept them all the afternoon, not letting them see me, or know where I was. One time I went up to the top of Sir W. Batten's (age 62) house, and out of one of their windows spoke to my wife out of one of ours; which methought, though I did it in mirth, yet I was sad to think what a sad thing it would be for me to be really in that condition.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1663. Up and to the office, where Sir J. Minnes (age 63) (most of the rest being at the Parliament-house), all the morning answering petitions and other business. Towards noon there comes a man in as if upon ordinary business, and shows me a writ from the Exchequer, called a Commission of Rebellion, and tells me that I am his prisoner in Field's business; which methought did strike me to the heart, to think that we could not sit in the middle of the King's business. I told him how and where we were employed, and bid him have a care; and perceiving that we were busy, he said he would, and did withdraw for an hour: in which time Sir J. Minnes (age 63) took coach and to Court, to see what he could do from thence; and our solicitor against Field came by chance and told me that he would go and satisfy the fees of the Court, and would end the business. So he went away about that, and I staid in my closett, till by and by the man and four more of his fellows came to know what I would do; I told them stay till I heard from the King (age 32) or my Lord Chief Baron (age 53), to both whom I had now sent. With that they consulted, and told me that if I would promise to stay in the house they would go and refresh themselves, and come again, and know what answer I had: so they away, and I home to dinner, whither by chance comes Mr. Hawley and dined with me. Before I had dined, the bayleys come back again with the constable, and at the office knock for me, but found me not there; and I hearing in what manner they were come, did forbear letting them know where I was; so they stood knocking and enquiring for me.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Feb 1663. Lord's Day. Lay long in bed and went not out all day; but after dinner to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) and Sir W. Pen's (age 41), where discoursing much of yesterday's trouble and scandal; but that which troubled me most was Sir J. Minnes (age 63) coming from Court at night, and instead of bringing great comfort from thence (but I expected no better from him), he tells me that the Duke and Mr. Coventry (age 35) make no great matter of it. So at night discontented to prayers, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Feb 1663. Thence with great satisfaction to me back to the Company, where I heard good discourse, and so to the afternoon Lecture upon the heart and lungs, &c., and that being done we broke up, took leave, and back to the office, we two, Sir W. Batten (age 62), who dined here also, being gone before. Here late, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 62) to speak upon some business, where I found Sir J. Minnes (age 63) pretty well fuddled I thought: he took me aside to tell me how being at my Chancellor's (age 54) to-day, my Lord told him that there was a Great Seal passing for Sir W. Pen (age 41), through the impossibility of the Comptroller's duty to be performed by one man; to be as it were joynt-comptroller with him, at which he is stark mad; and swears he will give up his place, and do rail at Sir W. Pen (age 41) the cruellest; he I made shift to encourage as much as I could, but it pleased me heartily to hear him rail against him, so that I do see thoroughly that they are not like to be great friends, for he cries out against him for his house and yard and God knows what. For my part, I do hope, when all is done, that my following my business will keep me secure against all their envys. But to see how the old man do strut, and swear that he understands all his duty as easily as crack a nut, and easier, he told my Chancellor (age 54), for his teeth are gone; and that he understands it as well as any man in England; and that he will never leave to record that he should be said to be unable to do his duty alone; though, God knows, he cannot do it more than a child. All this I am glad to see fall out between them and myself safe, and yet I hope the King's service well done for all this, for I would not that should be hindered by any of our private differences. So to my office, and then home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Feb 1663. So home and to bed. Coming by, I put in at White Hall, and at the Privy Seal I did see the docquet by which Sir W. Pen (age 41) is made the Comptroller's assistant, as Sir J. Minnes (age 63) told me last night, which I must endeavour to prevent.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Mar 1663. Thence I to the Privy Seal Office, and there got a copy of Sir W. Pen's (age 41) grant to be assistant to Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Comptroller, which, though there be not much in it, yet I intend to stir up Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to oppose, only to vex Sir W. Pen (age 41).

Pepy's Diary. 05 Mar 1663. Rose this morning early, only to try with intention to begin my last summer's course in rising betimes. So to my office a little, and then to Westminster by coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), in our way talking of Sir W. Pen's (age 41) business of his patent, which I think I have put a stop to wholly, for Sir J. Minnes (age 64) swears he will never consent to it.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1663. Thence after dinner back to Deptford, where we did as before, and so home, good discourse in our way, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) being good company, though a simple man enough as to the business of his office, but we did discourse at large again about Sir W. Pen's (age 41) patent to be his assistant, and I perceive he is resolved never to let it pass.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1663. Up betimes, and about eight o'clock by coach with four horses, with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), to Woolwich, Kent [Map], a pleasant day. There at the yard we consulted and ordered several matters, and thence to the rope yard and did the like, and so into Mr. Falconer's, where we had some fish, which we brought with us, dressed; and there dined with us his new wife, which had been his mayde, but seems to be a genteel woman, well enough bred and discreet.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Mar 1663. Lord's Day. Being sent to by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to know whether I would go with him to White Hall to-day, I rose but could not get ready before he was gone, but however I walked thither and heard Dr. King (age 71), Bishop of Chichester, make a good and eloquent sermon upon these words, "They that sow in tears, shall reap in joy". Thence (the chappell in Lent being hung with black, and no anthem sung after sermon, as at other times), to my Lord Sandwich (age 37) at Sir W. Wheeler's (age 52). I found him out of order, thinking himself to be in a fit of an ague, but in the afternoon he was very cheery. I dined with Sir William, where a good but short dinner, not better than one of mine commonly of a Sunday.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Mar 1663. Up and to my office all the morning, and great pleasure it is to be doing my business betimes. About noon Sir J. Minnes (age 64) came to me and staid half an hour with me in my office talking about his business with Sir W. Pen (age 41), and (though with me an old doter) yet he told me freely how sensible he is of Sir W. Pen's (age 41) treachery in this business, and what poor ways he has taken all along to ingratiate himself by making Mr. Turner write out things for him and then he gives them to the Duke, and how he directed him to give Mr. Coventry (age 35) £100 for his place, but that Mr. Coventry (age 35) did give him £20 back again. All this I am pleased to hear that his knavery is found out. Dined upon a poor Lenten dinner at home, my wife being vexed at a fray this morning with my Lady Batten about my boy's going thither to turn the watercock with their maydes' leave, but my Lady was mighty high upon it and she would teach his mistress better manners, which my wife answered aloud that she might hear, that she could learn little manners of her.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Mar 1663. Up betimes, and to my office, walked a little in the garden with Sir W. Batten (age 62), talking about the difference between his Lady and my wife yesterday, and I doubt my wife is to blame. About noon had news by Mr. Wood that Butler, our chief witness against Field, was sent by him to New England contrary to our desire, which made me mad almost; and so Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Pen (age 41), and I dined together at Trinity House, Deptford [Map], and thither sent for him to us and told him our minds, which he seemed not to value much, but went away. I wrote and sent an express to Walthamstow [Map] to Sir W. Pen (age 41), who is gone thither this morning, to tell him of it. However, in the afternoon Wood sends us word that he has appointed another to go, who shall overtake the ship in the Downes. So I was late at the office, among other things writing to the Downes, to the Commander-in-Chief, and putting things into the surest course I could to help the business. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Mar 1663. Lord's Day. Up and with my wife and her woman Ashwell the first time to church, where our pew was so full with Sir J. Minnes's (age 64) sister and her daughter, that I perceive, when we come all together, some of us must be shut out, but I suppose we shall come to some order what to do therein.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1663. Up very betimes and to my office, where, with several Masters of the King's ships, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I advising upon the business of Slopps, wherein the seaman is so much abused by the Pursers, and that being done, then I home to dinner, and so carried my wife to her mother's, set her down and Ashwell to my Lord's lodging, there left her, and I to the Duke (age 29), where we met of course, and talked of our Navy matters. Then to the Commission of Tangier, and there, among other things, had my Lord Peterborough's (age 41) Commission read over; and Mr. Secretary Bennet (age 45) did make his querys upon it, in order to the drawing one for my Lord Rutherford more regularly, that being a very extravagant thing. Here long discoursing upon my Lord Rutherford's despatch, and so broke up, and so going out of the Court I met with Mr. Coventry (age 35), and so he and I walked half an hour in the long Stone Gallery, where we discoursed of many things, among others how the Treasurer doth intend to come to pay in course, which is the thing of the world that will do the King (age 32) the greatest service in the Navy, and which joys my heart to hear of. He tells me of the business of Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Pen (age 41), which I knew before, but took no notice or little that I did know it. But he told me it was chiefly to make Mr. Pett's (age 52) being joyned with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to go down the better, and do tell me how he well sees that neither one nor the other can do their duties without help. But however will let it fall at present without doing more in it to see whether they will do their duties themselves, which he will see, and saith they do not. We discoursed of many other things to my great content and so parted, and I to my wife at my Lord's lodgings, where I heard Ashwell play first upon the harpsicon, and I find she do play pretty well, which pleaseth me very well.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Mar 1663. This discourse done, and things put in a way of doing, they went away, and Captain Holmes (age 41) being called in he began his high complaint against his Master Cooper, and would have him forthwith discharged. Which I opposed, not in his defence but for the justice of proceeding not to condemn a man unheard, upon [which] we fell from one word to another that we came to very high terms, such as troubled me, though all and the worst that I ever said was that that was insolently or ill mannerdly spoken. When he told me that it was well it was here that I said it. But all the officers, Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir W. Pen (age 41) cried shame of it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Mar 1663. Thence Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I homewards calling at Browne's, the mathematician in the Minnerys, with a design of buying White's ruler to measure timber with, but could not agree on the price.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Mar 1663. By and by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I to the Victualling Office by appointment to meet several persons upon stating the demands of some people of money from the King (age 32). Here we went into their Bakehouse, and saw all the ovens at work, and good bread too, as ever I would desire to eat.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1663. So to my office all the afternoon till night, and then home, calling at Sir W. Batten's (age 62), where was Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Pen (age 41), I telling them how by my letter this day from Commissioner Pett (age 52) I hear that his Stempeese1 he undertook for the new ship at Woolwich, Kent [Map], which we have been so long, to our shame, in looking for, do prove knotty and not fit for service. Lord! how Sir J. Minnes (age 64), like a mad coxcomb, did swear and stamp, swearing that Commissioner Pett (age 52) hath still the old heart against the King (age 32) that ever he had, and that this was his envy against his brother that was to build the ship, and all the damnable reproaches in the world, at which I was ashamed, but said little; but, upon the whole, I find him still a fool, led by the nose with stories told by Sir W. Batten (age 62), whether with or without reason. So, vexed in my mind to see things ordered so unlike gentlemen, or men of reason, I went home and to bed.

Note 1. Stemples, cross pieces which are put into a frame of woodwork to cure and strengthen a shaft.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1663. By and by the House rises and I home again with Sir W. Pen (age 41), and all the way talking of the same business, to whom I did on purpose tell him my mind freely, and let him see that it must be a wiser man than Holmes (in these very words) that shall do me any hurt while I do my duty. I to remember him of Holmes's words against Sir J. Minnes (age 64), that he was a knave, rogue, coward, and that he will kick him and pull him by the ears, which he remembered all of them and may have occasion to do it hereafter to his owne shame to suffer them to be spoke in his presence without any reply but what I did give him, which, has caused all this feud. But I am glad of it, for I would now and then take occasion to let the world know that I will not be made a novice. Sir W. Pen (age 41) took occasion to speak about my wife's strangeness to him and his daughter, and that believing at last that it was from his taking of Sarah to be his maid, he hath now put her away, at which I am glad. He told me, that this day the King (age 32) hath sent to the House his concurrence wholly with them against the Popish priests, Jesuits, &c., which gives great content, and I am glad of it.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Apr 1663. By and by, much against my will, being twice sent for, to Sir G. Carteret's (age 53) to pass his accounts there, upon which Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir W. Pen (age 41), and myself all the morning, and again after dinner to it, being vexed at my heart to see a thing of that importance done so slightly and with that neglect for which God pardon us, and I would I could mend it.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Apr 1663. After dinner to the office, where Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did make a great complaint to me alone, how my clerk Mr. Hater had entered in one of the Sea books a ticket to have been signed by him before it had been examined, which makes the old fool mad almost, though there was upon enquiry the greatest reason in the world for it. Which though it vexes me, yet it is most to see from day to day what a coxcomb he is, and that so great a trust should lie in the hands of such a fool. We sat all the afternoon, and I late at my office, it being post night, and so home to supper, my father being come again to my house, and after supper to bed, and after some talk to sleep.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1663. Up betimes and to my office, and by and by, about 8 o'clock, to the Temple [Map] to Commissioner Pett (age 52) lately come to town and discoursed about the affairs of our office, how ill they go through the corruption and folly of Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64).

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1663. To bed vexed also to think of Sir J. Minnes (age 64) finding fault with Mr. Hater for what he had done the other day, though there be no hurt in the thing at all but only the old fool's jealousy, made worse by Sir W. Batten (age 62).

Pepy's Diary. 12 Apr 1663. Lord's Day. Lay till 8 o'clock, which I have not done a great while, then up and to church, where I found our pew altered by taking some of the hind pew to make ours bigger, because of the number of women, more by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) company than we used to have.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Apr 1663. Up betimes to my office, where busy till 8 o'clock that Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Pen (age 41) and I down by barge to Woolwich, Kent [Map], to see "The Royal James" launched, where she has been under repair a great while. We staid in the yard till almost noon, and then to Mr. Falconer's to a dinner of fish of our own sending, and when it was just ready to come upon the table, word is brought that the King (age 32) and Duke (age 29) are come, so they all went away to shew themselves, while I staid and had a little dish or two by myself, resolving to go home, and by the time I had dined they came again, having gone to little purpose, the King (age 32), I believe, taking little notice of them. So they to dinner, and I staid a little with them, and so good bye. I walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map], studying the Slide Rule for measuring of timber, which is very fine.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Apr 1663. Up betimes and to my office, met to pass Mr. Pitt's (anon Sir J. Lawson's (age 48) Secretary and Deputy Treasurer) accounts for the voyage last to the Streights, wherein the demands are strangely irregular, and I dare not oppose it alone for making an enemy and do no good, but only bring a review upon my Lord Sandwich (age 37), but God knows it troubles my heart to see it, and to see the Comptroller (age 64), whose duty it is, to make no more matter of it. At noon home for an hour to dinner, and so to the office public and private till late at night, so home to supper and bed with my father.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Apr 1663. With Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and Sir John Minnes (age 64) by coach to my Lord Treasurer's (age 56), thinking to have spoken about getting money for paying the Yards; but we found him with some ladies at cards: and so, it being a bad time to speak, we parted, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I home, and after walking with my wife in the garden late, to supper and to bed, being somewhat troubled at Ashwell's desiring and insisting over eagerly upon her going to a ball to meet some of her old companions at a dancing school here in town next Friday, but I am resolved she shall not go.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Apr 1663. After dinner, it raining very hard, by coach to Whitehall, where, after Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Mr. Coventry (age 35) and I had been with the Duke, we to the Committee of Tangier and did matters there dispatching wholly my Lord Teviott, and so broke up.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Apr 1663. Up betimes and to my vyall and song book a pretty while, and so to my office, and there we sat all the morning. Among other things Sir W. Batten (age 62) had a mind to cause Butler (our chief witness in the business of Field, whom we did force back from an employment going to sea to come back to attend our law sute) to be borne as a mate on the Rainbow in the Downes in compensation for his loss for our sakes. This he orders an order to be drawn by Mr. Turner for, and after Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir W. Pen (age 42) had signed it, it came to me and I was going to put it up into my book, thinking to consider of it and give them my opinion upon it before I parted with it, but Sir W. Pen (age 42) told me I must sign it or give it him again, for it should not go without my hand. I told him what I meant to do, whereupon Sir W. Batten (age 62) was very angry, and in a great heat (which will bring out any thing which he has in his mind, and I am glad of it, though it is base in him to have a thing so long in his mind without speaking of it, though I am glad this is the worst, for if he had worse it would out as well as this some time or other) told me that I should not think as I have heretofore done, make them sign orders and not sign them myself. Which what ignorance or worse it implies is easy to judge, when he shall sign to things (and the rest of the board too as appears in this business) for company and not out of their judgment for. After some discourse I did convince them that it was not fit to have it go, and Sir W. Batten (age 62) first, and then the rest, did willingly cancel all their hands and tear the order, for I told them, Butler being such a rogue as I know him, and we have all signed him to be to the Duke, it will be in his power to publish this to our great reproach, that we should take such a course as this to serve ourselves in wronging the King (age 32) by putting him into a place he is no wise capable of, and that in an Admiral ship.

Pepy's Diary. 01 May 1663. And so home to see Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who is well again, and after staying talking with him awhile, I took leave and went to hear Mrs. Turner's (age 40) daughter, at whose house Sir J. Minnes (age 64) lies, play on the harpsicon; but, Lord! it was enough to make any man sick to hear her; yet I was forced to commend her highly.

Pepy's Diary. 05 May 1663. Up betimes and to my office, and there busy all the morning, among other things walked a good while up and down with Sir J. Minnes (age 64), he telling many old stories of the Navy, and of the state of the Navy at the beginning of the late troubles, and I am troubled at my heart to think, and shall hereafter cease to wonder, at the bad success of the King's cause, when such a knave as he (if it be true what he says) had the whole management of the fleet, and the design of putting out of my Lord Warwick, and carrying the fleet to the King (age 32), wherein he failed most fatally to the King's ruin.

Pepy's Diary. 06 May 1663. Up betimes and to my office a good while at my new rulers, then to business, and towards noon to the Exchange [Map] with Creed, where we met with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) coming in his coach from Westminster, who tells us, in great heat, that, by God, the Parliament will make mad work; that they will render all men incapable of any military or civil employment that have borne arms in the late troubles against the King, excepting some persons; which, if it be so, as I hope it is not, will give great cause of discontent, and I doubt will have but bad effects.

Pepy's Diary. 19 May 1663. Up pretty betimes, but yet I observe how my dancing and lying a morning or two longer than ordinary for my cold do make me hard to rise as I used to do, or look after my business as I am wont. To my chamber to make an end of my papers to my father to be sent by the post to-night, and taking copies of them, which was a great work, but I did it this morning, and so to my office, and thence with Sir John Minnes (age 64) to the Tower; and by Mr. Slingsby, and Mr. Howard, Controller of the Mint, we were shown the method of making this new money, from the beginning to the end, which is so pretty that I did take a note of every part of it and set them down by themselves for my remembrance hereafter.

Pepy's Diary. 22 May 1663. So to Woolwich, Kent [Map] yard, and after doing many things there, among others preparing myself for a dispute against Sir W. Pen (age 42) in the business of Bowyer's, wherein he is guilty of some corruption to the King's wrong, we walked back again without drinking, which I never do because I would not make my coming troublesome to any, nor would become obliged too much to any. In our going back we were overtook by Mr. Steventon, a purser, and uncle to my clerk Will, who told me how he was abused in the passing of his accounts by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to the degree that I am ashamed to hear it, and resolve to retrieve the matter if I can though the poor man has given it over. And however am pleased enough to see that others do see his folly and dotage as well as myself, though I believe in my mind the man in general means well.

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1663. Waked this morning between four and five by my blackbird, which whistles as well as ever I heard any; only it is the beginning of many tunes very well, but there leaves them, and goes no further. So up and to my office, where we sat, and among other things I had a fray with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) in defence of my Will in a business where the old coxcomb would have put a foot upon him, which was only in Jack Davis and in him a downright piece of knavery in procuring a double ticket and getting the wrong one paid as well as the second was to the true party. But it appeared clear enough to the board that Will was true in it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1663. Thence to Greatorex's (age 38), and there seeing Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Pen (age 42) go by coach I went in to them and to White Hall; where, in the Matted Gallery, Mr. Coventry (age 35) was, who told us how the Parliament have required of Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and him an account what money shall be necessary to be settled upon the Navy for the ordinary charge, which they intend to report £200,000 per annum. And how to allott this we met this afternoon, and took their papers for our perusal, and so we parted. Only there was walking in the gallery some of the Barbary company, and there we saw a draught of the arms of the company, which the King (age 32) is of, and so is called the Royall Company, which is, in a field argent an elephant proper, with a canton on which England and France is quartered, supported by two Moors. The crest an anchor winged, I think it is, and the motto too tedious: "Regio floret, patrocinio commercium, commercioque Regnum1".

Note 1. TT. By royal patronage commerce flourishes, by commerce the realm".

Pepy's Diary. 24 May 1663. After sermon to Sir W. Pen's (age 42), with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to do a little business to answer Mr. Coventry (age 35) to-night. And so home and with my wife and Ashwell into the garden walking a great while, discoursing what this pretty wench should be by her garb and deportment; with respect to Mrs. Pen she may be her woman, but only that she sat in the pew with her, which I believe he would not let her do.

Pepy's Diary. 25 May 1663. So by and by to dinner, and then carried my wife and Ashwell to St. James's, and there they sat in the coach while I went in, and finding nobody there likely to meet with the Duke, but only Sir J. Minnes (age 64) with my Lord Barkely (age 61) (who speaks very kindly, and invites me with great compliments to come now and then and eat with him, which I am glad to hear, though I value not the thing, but it implies that my esteem do increase rather than fall), and so I staid not, but into the coach again, and taking up my wife's taylor, it raining hard, they set me down, and who should our coachman be but Carleton the Vintner, that should have had Mrs. Sarah, at Westminster, my Chancellor's (age 54), and then to Paternoster Row [Map]. I staid there to speak with my Lord Sandwich (age 37), and in my staying, meeting Mr. Lewis Phillips of Brampton, he and afterwards others tell me that news came last night to Court, that the King of France (age 24) is sick of the spotted fever, and that they are struck in again; and this afternoon my Lord Mandeville (age 29) is gone from the King (age 32) to make him a visit; which will be great news, and of great import through Europe.

Pepy's Diary. 27 May 1663. So to my office, to put things in order there, and by and by comes Pembleton, and word is brought me from my wife thereof that I might come home. So I sent word that I would have her go dance, and I would come presently. So being at a great loss whether I should appear to Pembleton or no, and what would most proclaim my jealousy to him, I at last resolved to go home, and took Tom Hater with me, and staid a good while in my chamber, and there took occasion to tell him how I hear that Parliament is putting an act out against all sorts of conventicles1, and did give him good counsel, not only in his own behalf, but my own, that if he did hear or know anything that could be said to my prejudice, that he would tell me, for in this wicked age (specially Sir W. Batten (age 62) being so open to my reproaches, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), for the neglect of their duty, and so will think themselves obliged to scandalize me all they can to right themselves if there shall be any inquiry into the matters of the Navy, as I doubt there will) a man ought to be prepared to answer for himself in all things that can be inquired concerning him. After much discourse of this nature to him I sent him away, and then went up, and there we danced country dances, and single, my wife and I; and my wife paid him off for this month also, and so he is cleared.

Note 1. 16 Car. II, cap. 4, "An Act to prevent and suppresse seditious Conventicles". It was enacted that anyone of the age of sixteen or upwards present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle was to incur fine or imprisonment. A conventicle was defined as an assembly of more than five persons besides the members of a family met together for holding worship not according to the rites of the Church of England. The act was amended 22 Car. II, cap. i (1670), and practically repealed by the Toleration Act of 1689, but the act 22 Car. II, cap. i, was specially repealed 52 Geo. III, cap. 155, s. 1.

Pepy's Diary. 31 May 1663. To church again after dinner (my wife finding herself ill.... did not go), and there the Scot preaching I slept most of the sermon. This day Sir W. Batten's (age 62) son's child is christened in the country, whither Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and Sir W, Batten, and Sir W. Pen (age 42) are all gone. I wonder, and take it highly ill that I am not invited by the father, though I know his father and mother, with whom I am never likely to have much kindness, but rather I study the contrary, are the cause of it, and in that respect I am glad of it.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jun 1663. So to my office, where a while and then about several businesses, in my way to my brother's, where I dined (being invited) with Mr. Peter and Dean Honiwood, where Tom did give us a very pretty dinner, and we very pleasant, but not very merry, the Dean being but a weak man, though very good. I was forced to rise, being in haste to St. James's to attend the Duke (age 29), and left them to end their dinner; but the Duke (age 29) having been a-hunting to-day, and so lately come home and gone to bed, we could not see him, and Mr. Coventry (age 35) being out of the house too, we walked away to White Hall and there took coach, and I with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to the Strand May-pole; and there 'light out of his coach, and walked to the New Theatre [Map], which, since the King's players are gone to the Royal one, is this day begun to be employed by the fencers to play prizes at. And here I came and saw the first prize I ever saw in my life: and it was between one Mathews, who did beat at all weapons, and one Westwicke, who was soundly cut several times both in the head and legs, that he was all over blood: and other deadly blows they did give and take in very good earnest, till Westwicke was in a most sad pickle. They fought at eight weapons, three bouts at each weapon. It was very well worth seeing, because I did till this day think that it has only been a cheat; but this being upon a private quarrel, they did it in good earnest; and I felt one of their swords, and found it to be very little, if at all blunter on the edge, than the common swords are. Strange to see what a deal of money is flung to them both upon the stage between every bout. But a woful rude rabble there was, and such noises, made my head ake all this evening.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jun 1663. So home, and seeing my wife had dined I went, being invited, and dined with Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and others, at Sir W. Batten's (age 62), Captain Allen (age 51) giving them a Foy' dinner, he being to go down to lie Admiral in the Downs this summer. I cannot but think it a little strange that having been so civil to him as I have been he should not invite me to dinner, but I believe it was but a sudden motion, and so I heard not of it.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1663. Home by water, where by and by comes Dean Honiwood, and I showed him my double horizontal diall, and promise to give him one, and that shall be it. So, without eating or drinking, he went away to Mr. Turner's, where Sir J. Minnes (age 64) do treat my Chancellor (age 54) and a great deal of guests to-day with a great dinner, which I thank God I do not pay for; and besides, I doubt it is too late for any man to expect any great service from my Chancellor (age 54), for which I am sorry, and pray God a worse do not come in his room. So I to dinner alone, and so to my chamber, and then to the office alone, my head aching and my mind in trouble for my wife, being jealous of her spending the day, though God knows I have no great reason. Yet my mind is troubled.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jun 1663. Thence, taking the little History of England with me, I went by water to Deptford, where Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) attending the Pay; I dined with them, and there Dr. Britton, parson of the town, a fine man and good company, dined with us, and good discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jun 1663. Up and to my office a while, and thence by coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to St. James's to the Duke (age 29), where Mr. Coventry (age 35) and us two did discourse with the Duke a little about our office business, which saved our coming in the afternoon, and so to rights home again and to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jun 1663. So he with me home to dinner and after dinner walk in the garden, and then we met at the office, where Coventry, Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and I, and so in the evening, business done, I went home and spent my time till night with my wife.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jun 1663. By and by in comes Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and so we sat talking. Among other things, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) brought many fine expressions of Chaucer, which he doats on mightily, and without doubt he is a very fine poet1. Sir W. Pen (age 42) continues lame of the gout, that he cannot rise from his chair. So after staying an hour with him, we went home and to supper, and so to prayers and bed.

Note 1. Pepys continued through life an admirer of Chaucer, and we have the authority of Dryden (age 31) himself for saying that we owe his character of the Good Parson to Pepys's recommendation.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jun 1663. Both at and after dinner we had great discourses of the nature and power of spirits, and whether they can animate dead bodies; in all which, as of the general appearance of spirits, my Lord Sandwich (age 37) is very scepticall. He says the greatest warrants that ever he had to believe any, is the present appearing of the Devil1 in Wiltshire, much of late talked of, who beats a drum up and down. There are books of it, and, they say, very true; but my Lord observes, that though he do answer to any tune that you will play to him upon another drum, yet one tune he tried to play and could not; which makes him suspect the whole; and I think it is a good argument. Sometimes they talked of handsome women, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) saying that there was no beauty like what he sees in the country-markets, and specially at Bury, in which I will agree with him that there is a prettiest women I ever saw. My Lord replied thus: "Sir John, what do you think of your neighbour's wife?" looking upon me. "Do you not think that he hath a great beauty to his wife? Upon my word he hath". Which I was not a little proud of.

Note 1. In 1664, there being a generall report all over the Kingdom of Mr. Monpesson his house being haunted, which hee himself affirming to the King (age 33) and Queene (age 53) to be true, the King (age 33) sent the Lord Falmouth, and the Queene (age 53) sent mee, to examine the truth of; but wee could neither see nor heare anything that was extraordinary; and about a year after, his Majesty told me that hee had discovered the cheat, and that Mr. Monpesson, upon his Majesty sending for him, confessed it to him. And yet Mr. Monpesson, in a printed letter, had afterwards the confidence to deny that hee had ever made any such confession" ("Letters of the Second Earl of Chesterfield", p. 24, 1829, 8vo.). Joseph Glanville published a relation of the famous disturbance at the house of Mr. Monpesson, at Tedworth, Wilts, occasioned by the beating of an invisible drum every night for a year. This story, which was believed at the time, furnished the plot for Addison's play of "The Drummer", or the "Haunted House". In the "Mercurius Publicus", April 16-23, 1663, there is a curious examination on this subject, by which it appears that one William Drury, of Uscut, Wilts, was the invisible drummer. B.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jun 1663. After dinner with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to see some pictures at Brewer's, said to be of good hands, but I do not like them. So I to the office and thence to Stacy's, his Tar merchant, whose servant with whom I agreed yesterday for some tar do by combination with Bowyer and Hill fall from our agreement, which vexes us all at the office, even Sir W. Batten (age 62), who was so earnest for it.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jun 1663. Thence with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) (who poor man had forgot that he carried me the other day to the painter's to see some pictures which he has since bought and are brought home) to his lodgings to see some base things he calls them of great masters of painting. So I said nothing that he had shown me them already, but commended them, and I think they are indeed good enough.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jun 1663. So I by and by to the office, and there had a great fray with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who, like an old dotard, is led by the nose by him. It was in Captain Cocke's (age 46) business of hemp, wherein the King (age 33) is absolutely abused; but I was for peace sake contented to be quiet and to sign to his bill, but in my manner so as to justify myself, and so all was well; but to see what a knave Sir W. Batten (age 62) is makes my heart ake. So late at my office, and then home to supper and to bed, my man Will not being well.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1663. He tells me, too, that he hath lately been observed to tack about at Court, and to endeavour to strike in with the persons that are against the Chancellor (age 54); but this he says of him, that he do not say nor do anything to the prejudice of the Chancellor (age 54). But he told me that the Chancellor (age 54) was rising again, and that of late Sir G. Carteret's (age 53) business and employment hath not been so full as it used to be while the Chancellor (age 54) stood up. From that we discoursed of the evil of putting out men of experience in business as the Chancellor (age 54), and from that to speak of the condition of the King's party at present, who, as the Papists, though otherwise fine persons, yet being by law kept for these fourscore years out of employment, they are now wholly uncapable of business; and so the Cavaliers for twenty years, who, says he, for the most part have either given themselves over to look after country and family business, and those the best of them, and the rest to debauchery, &c.; and that was it that hath made him high against the late Bill brought into the House for the making all men incapable of employment that had served against the King (age 33). Why, says he, in the sea-service, it is impossible to do any thing without them, there being not more than three men of the whole King's side that are fit to command almost; and these were Captain Allen (age 51), Smith, and Beech; and it may be Holmes, and Utber, and Batts might do something. I desired him to tell me if he thought that I did speak anything that I do against Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) out of ill will or design. He told me quite the contrary, and that there was reason enough. After a good deal of good and fine discourse, I took leave, and so to my Lord Sandwich's (age 37) house, where I met my Lord, and there did discourse of our office businesses, and how the Duke do show me kindness, though I have endeavoured to displease more or less of my fellow officers, all but Mr. Coventry (age 35) and Pett; but it matters not. Yes, says my Lord, Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who is great with the Chancellor (age 54); I told him the Chancellor (age 54) I have thought was declining, and however that the esteem he has among them is nothing but for a jester or a ballad maker; at which my Lord laughs, and asks me whether I believe he ever could do that well.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jun 1663. So by water home, and after a little while getting me ready, Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), my Lady Batten, and I by coach to Bednall Green, to Sir W. Rider's to dinner, where a fine place, good lady mother, and their daughter, Mrs. Middleton, a fine woman. A noble dinner, and a fine merry walk with the ladies alone after dinner in the garden, which is very pleasant; the greatest quantity of strawberrys I ever saw, and good, and a collation of great mirth, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) reading a book of scolding very prettily. This very house1 was built by the Blind Beggar of Bednall Green, so much talked of and sang in ballads; but they say it was only some of the outhouses of it. We drank great store of wine, and a beer glass at last which made me almost sick. At table, discoursing of thunder and lightning, they told many stories of their own knowledge at table of their masts being shivered from top to bottom, and sometimes only within and the outside whole, but among the rest Sir W. Rider did tell a story of his own knowledge, that a Genoese gally in Leghorn Roads was struck by thunder, so as the mast was broke a-pieces, and the shackle upon one of the slaves was melted clear off of his leg without hurting his leg. Sir William went on board the vessel, and would have contributed towards the release of the slave whom Heaven had thus set free, but he could not compass it, and so he was brought to his fetters again.

Note 1. Sir William Rider's house was known as Kirby Castle, and was supposed to have been built in 1570 by John Thorpe for John Kirby. It was associated in rhyme with other follies of the time in bricks and mortar, as recorded by Stow "Kirkebyes Castell, and Fisher's Follie, Spinila's pleasure, and Megse's glorie". The place was known in Strype's time as the "Blind Beggar's House", but he knew nothing of the ballad, "The Beggar's Daughter of Bednall Green", for he remarks, "perhaps Kirby beggared himself by it". Sr. William Rider died at this house in 1669.

Note 2. From www.spitalfieldmusic.org.uk. The story starts with the sad story of the Blind Beggar, a man who didn't have a penny to his name but his pride and joy was his daughter Bessy - "a fair daughter, most pleasant and bright". Many men, including a gentleman of fortune, a London merchant and an innkeeper's son, could not help to fall in love with Bessy due to her great beauty and her sweet countenance. However, most would soon turn their backs on her once they found out about her lowly status and her poor blind father, who spent his days begging for charity accompanied by his faithful dog. There was one man who was different! He was described as a Knight and he was determined to marry young Bessy and wanted to meet her father to ask for her hand in marriage as he believed that you "weigh true love not by the weight of the purse". A wedding soon followed that featured the most skillful musicians, the most scrumptious foods and attended by many of the noblest families - a wedding of "joy and delight". This was when the secret was finally revealed! The Blind Beggar was in fact the son of Simon de Montford who had been an influential baron during reign of King John. Despite being blinded at the Battle of Evesham (other sources say he died at the battle), he was indeed a man of substantial means; he lived the life of a Blind Beggar to ensure that whoever would win the heart and love of young Bessy was not after her money!

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jun 1663. Thence home and at my office all the morning, and then by water to St. James's, but no meeting to-day being holy day, but met Mr. Creed in the Park, and after a walk or two, discoursing his business, took leave of him in Westminster Hall [Map], whither we walked, and then came again to the Hall and fell to talk with Mrs. Lane, and after great talk that she never went abroad with any man as she used heretofore to do, I with one word got her to go with me and to meet me at the further Rhenish wine-house, where I did give her a lobster and do so touse her and feel her all over, making her believe how fair and good a skin she has, and indeed she has a very white thigh and leg, but monstrous fat. When weary I did give over and somebody, having seen some of our dalliance, called aloud in the street, "Sir! why do you kiss the gentlewoman so?" and flung a stone at the window, which vexed me, but I believe they could not see my touzing her, and so we broke up and I went out the back way, without being observed I think, and so she towards the Hall and I to White Hall, where taking water I to the Temple [Map] with my cozen Roger (age 46) and Mr. Goldsborough to Gray's Inn to his counsel, one Mr. Rawworth, a very fine man, where it being the question whether I as executor should give a warrant to Goldsborough in my reconveying her estate back again, the mortgage being performed against all acts of the testator, but only my own, my cozen said he never heard it asked before; and the other that it was always asked, and he never heard it denied, or scrupled before, so great a distance was there in their opinions, enough to make a man forswear ever having to do with the law; so they agreed to refer it to Serjeant Maynard. So we broke up, and I by water home from the Temple [Map], and there to Sir W. Batten (age 62) and eat with him, he and his lady and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) having been below to-day upon the East India men that are come in, but never tell me so, but that they have been at Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Deptford, and done great deal of business. God help them.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1663. Thus, by God's blessing, ends this book of two years; I being in all points in good health and a good way to thrive and do well. Some money I do and can lay up, but not much, being worth now above £700, besides goods of all sorts. My wife in the country with Ashwell, her woman, with my father; myself at home with W. Hewer (age 21) and my cooke-maid Hannah, my boy Wayneman being lately run away from me. In my office, my repute and understanding good, especially with the Duke (age 29) and Mr. Coventry (age 35); only the rest of the officers do rather envy than love me, I standing in most of their lights, specially Sir W. Batten (age 62), whose cheats I do daily oppose to his great trouble, though he appears mighty kind and willing to keep friendship with me, while Sir J. Minnes (age 64), like a dotard, is led by the nose by him. My wife and I, by my late jealousy, for which I am truly to be blamed, have not the kindness between us which we used and ought to have, and I fear will be lost hereafter if I do not take course to oblige her and yet preserve my authority. Publique matters are in an ill condition; Parliament sitting and raising four subsidys for the King (age 33), which is but a little, considering his wants; and yet that parted withal with great hardness. They being offended to see so much money go, and no debts of the publique's paid, but all swallowed by a luxurious Court: which the King (age 33) it is believed and hoped will retrench in a little time, when he comes to see the utmost of the revenue which shall be settled on him: he expecting to have his £1,200,000 made good to him, which is not yet done by above £150,000, as he himself reports to the House. My differences with my uncle Thomas at a good quiett, blessed be God! and other matters. The town full of the great overthrow lately given to the Spaniards by the Portugalls, they being advanced into the very middle of Portugall. The weather wet for two or three months together beyond belief, almost not one fair day coming between till this day, which has been a very pleasant day and the first pleasant day this summer. The charge of the Navy intended to be limited to £200,000 per annum, the ordinary charge of it, and that to be settled upon the Customs. The King (age 33) yet greatly taken up with Madam Castlemaine (age 22) and Mrs. Stewart (age 15), which God of Heaven put an end to! Myself very studious to learn what I can of all things necessary for my place as an officer of the Navy, reading lately what concerns measuring of timber and knowledge of the tides. I have of late spent much time with Creed, being led to it by his business of his accounts, but I find him a fellow of those designs and tricks, that there is no degree of true friendship to be made with him, and therefore I must cast him off, though he be a very understanding man, and one that much may be learned of as to cunning and judging of other men. Besides, too, I do perceive more and more that my time of pleasure and idleness of any sort must be flung off to attend to getting of some money and the keeping of my family in order, which I fear by my wife's liberty may be otherwise lost.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1663. Thence by water with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to Trinity House, Deptford [Map], there to dine with him, which we did; and after dinner we fell talking, Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Mr. Batten and I; Mr. Batten telling us of a late triall of Sir Charles Sydly (age 24) the other day, before my Lord Chief Justice Foster and the whole bench, for his debauchery a little while since at Oxford Kate's1, coming in open day into the Balcone and showed his nakedness,.... and abusing of scripture and as it were from thence preaching a mountebank sermon from the pulpit, saying that there he had to sell such a powder as should make all the (women) in town run after him, 1000 people standing underneath to see and hear him, and that being done he took a glass of wine.... and then drank it off, and then took another and drank the King's health. It seems my Lord and the rest of the judges did all of them round give him a most high reproof; my Lord Chief justice saying, that it was for him, and such wicked wretches as he was, that God's anger and judgments hung over us, calling him sirrah many times. It's said they have bound him to his good behaviour (there being no law against him for it) in £5000. It being told that my Lord Buckhurst (age 20) was there, my Lord asked whether it was that Buckhurst that was lately tried for robbery; and when answered Yes, he asked whether he had so soon forgot his deliverance at that time, and that it would have more become him to have been at his prayers begging God's forgiveness, than now running into such courses again...

Note 1. The details in the original are very gross. Dr. Johnson relates the story in the "Lives of the Poets", in his life of Sackville, Lord Dorset "Sackville (age 20), who was then Lord Buckhurst, with Sir Charles Sedley (age 24) and Sir Thomas Ogle, got drunk at the Cock, in Bow Street, by Covent Garden [Map], and going into the balcony exposed themselves to the populace in very indecent postures. At last, as they grew warmer, Sedley stood forth naked, and harangued the populace in such profane language, that the publick indignation was awakened; the crowd attempted to force the door, and being repulsed, drove in the performers with stones, and broke the windows of the house. For this misdemeanour they were indicted, and Sedley was fined five hundred pounds; what was the sentence of the others is not known. Sedley employed Henry Killigrew and another to procure a remission from the King (age 33), but (mark the friendship of the dissolute!) they begged the fine for themselves, and exacted it to the last groat". (The woman known as Oxford Kate appears to have kept the notorious Cock Tavern in Bow Street at this date.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jul 1663. Walking in the garden this evening with Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir G. Carteret (age 53) told us with great contempt how like a stage-player my Lord Digby (age 50) spoke yesterday, pointing to his head as my Lord did, and saying, "First, for his head", says Sir G. Carteret (age 53), "I know what a calf's head would have done better by half for his heart and his sword, I have nothing to say to them". He told us that for certain his head cost the late King his, for it was he that broke off the treaty at Uxbridge. He told us also how great a man he was raised from a private gentleman in France by Monsieur Grandmont1, and afterwards by the Cardinall, [Mazarin] who raised him to be a Lieutenant-generall, and then higher; and entrusted by the Cardinall, when he was banished out of France, with great matters, and recommended by him to the Queen (age 61) as a man to be trusted and ruled by: yet when he came to have some power over the Queen, he begun to dissuade her from her opinion of the Cardinal; which she said nothing to till the Cardinal was returned, and then she told him of it; who told my Lord Digby (age 50), "Eh bien, Monsieur, vous estes un fort bon amy donc2" but presently put him out of all; and then he was, from a certainty of coming in two or three years' time to be Mareschall of France (to which all strangers, even Protestants, and those as often as French themselves, are capable of coming, though it be one of the greatest places in France), he was driven to go out of France into Flanders; but there was not trusted, nor received any kindness from the Prince of Conde (age 41), as one to whom also he had been false, as he had been to the Cardinal and Grandmont. In fine, he told us how he is a man of excellent parts, but of no great faith nor judgment, and one very easy to get up to great height of preferment, but never able to hold it.

Note 1. Antoine, Duc de Gramont, marshal of France, who died July 12th, 1678, aged seventy-four. His memoirs have been published.

Note 2. TT. Ah well sir, you are a very good friend, therefore.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jul 1663. Up and he home, and I with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) by coach to Westminster, to St. James's, thinking to meet Sir G. Carteret (age 53), and to attend the Duke (age 29), but he not coming we broke up, and so to Westminster Hall [Map], and there meeting with Mr. Moore he tells me great news that my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22) is fallen from Court, and this morning retired. He gives me no account of the reason of it, but that it is so: for which I am sorry: and yet if the King (age 33) do it to leave off not only her but all other mistresses, I should be heartily glad of it, that he may fall to look after business. I hear my Lord Digby (age 50) is condemned at Court for his speech, and that my Chancellor (age 54) grows great again.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jul 1663. Thence to the Change [Map], and meeting Sir J. Minnes (age 64) there, he and I walked to look upon Backwell's design of making another alley from his shop through over against the Exchange [Map] door, which will be very noble and quite put down the other two.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jul 1663. The Duke (age 29) being ready, we retired with him, and there fell upon Mr. Creed's business, where the Treasurer (age 56) did, like a mad coxcomb, without reason or method run over a great many things against the account, and so did Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), which the Duke himself and Mr. Coventry (age 35) and my Lord Barkely (age 61) and myself did remove, and Creed being called in did answer all with great method and excellently to the purpose (myself I am a little conscious did not speak so well as I purposed and do think I used to do, that is, not so intelligibly and persuasively, as I well hoped I should), not that what I said was not well taken, and did carry the business with what was urged and answered by Creed and Mr. Coventry (age 35), till the Duke himself did declare that he was satisfied, and my Lord Barkely (age 61) offered to lay £100 that the King (age 33) would receive no wrong in the account, and the two last knights held their tongues, or at least by not understanding it did say what made for Mr. Creed, and so Sir G. Carteret (age 53) was left alone, but yet persisted to say that the account was not good, but full of corruption and foul dealing. And so we broke up to his shame, but I do fear to the loss of his friendship to me a good while, which I am heartily troubled for.

1663 Battle of Ameixial

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jul 1663. So to St. James's by water with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), I giving occasion to a wager about the tide, that it did flow through bridge, by which Sir W. Batten (age 62) won 5s. of Sir J. Minnes (age 64). At St. James's we staid while the Duke (age 29) made himself ready. Among other things Sir Allen Apsley (age 47) showed the Duke (age 29) the Lisbon Gazette in Spanish, where the late victory is set down particularly, and to the great honour of the English beyond measure. They have since taken back Evora, which was lost to the Spaniards, the English making the assault, and lost not more than three men. Here I learnt that the English foot are highly esteemed all over the world, but the horse not so much, which yet we count among ourselves the best; but they abroad have had no great knowledge of our horse, it seems.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jul 1663. So home again, and by and by up and homewards, calling in our way (Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I only) at Mr. Batten's (who with his lady and child went in another coach by us), which is a very pretty house, and himself in all things within and without very ingenious, and I find a very fine study and good books.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jul 1663. So set out, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I in his coach together, talking all the way of chymistry, wherein he do know something, at least, seems so to me, that cannot correct him, Mr. Batten's man riding my horse, and so home and to my office a while to read my vows, then home to prayers and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jul 1663. At noon down by barge with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) (who is going to Chatham, Kent [Map]) to Woolwich, Kent [Map], in our way eating of some venison pasty in the barge, I having neither eat nor drank to-day, which fills me full of wind. Here also in Mr. Pett's (age 52) garden I eat some and the first cherries I have eat this year, off the tree where the King (age 33) himself had been gathering some this morning.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jul 1663. By and by to supper, and after long discourse, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I, he saw me to my chamber, which not pleasing me, I sent word so to Mrs. Bradford, that I should be crowded into such a hole, while the clerks and boarders of her own take up the best rooms. However I lay there and slept well.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jul 1663. These are the main of the Articles. Upon which my Chancellor (age 54) desired that the noble Lord that brought in these Articles, would sign to them with his hand; which my Lord Bristoll (age 50) did presently. Then the House did order that the judges should, against Monday next, bring in their opinion, Whether these articles are treason, or no? and next, they would know, Whether they were brought in regularly or no, without leave of the Lords' House? After dinner I took boat (H. Russell) and down to Gravesend, Kent [Map] in good time, and thence with a guide post to Chatham, Kent [Map], where I found Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Mr. Wayth walking in the garden, whom I told all this day's news, which I left the town full of, and it is great news, and will certainly be in the consequence of it.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jul 1663. Up to the Lobby, and there sent out for Mr. Coventry (age 35) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and told them if they thought convenient I would go to Chatham, Kent [Map] today, Sir John Minnes (age 64) being already there at a Pay, and I would do such and such business there, which they thought well of, and so I went home and prepared myself to go after, dinner with Sir W. Batten (age 62). Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Mr. Coventry (age 35) tell me that my Lord Bristoll (age 50) hath this day impeached my Chancellor (age 54) in the House of Lords of High Treason. The chief of the articles are these:

Note 1st. That he should be the occasion of the peace made with Holland lately upon such disadvantageous terms, and that he was bribed to it.

Note 2d. That Dunkirke was also sold by his advice chiefly, so much to the damage of England.

Note 3d. That he had £6000 given him for the drawing-up or promoting of the Irish declaration lately, concerning the division of the lands there.

Note 4th. He did carry on the design of the Portugall match, so much to the prejudice of the Crown of England, notwithstanding that he knew the Queen (age 24) is not capable of bearing children.

Note 5th. That the Duke's (age 29) marrying of his daughter (age 26) was a practice of his, thereby to raise his family; and that it was done by indirect courses.

Note 6th. That the breaking-off of the match with Parma, in which he was employed at the very time when the match with Portugall was made up here, which he took as a great slur to him, and so it was; and that, indeed, is the chief occasion of all this fewde.

Note 7th. That he hath endeavoured to bring in Popery, and wrote to the Pope for a cap for a subject of the King (age 33) of England's (my Lord Aubigny (age 43) ); and some say that he lays it to the Chancellor (age 54), that a good Protestant Secretary (Sir Edward Nicholas) was laid aside, and a Papist, Sir H. Bennet (age 45), put in his room: which is very strange, when the last of these two is his own creature, and such an enemy accounted to the Chancellor (age 54), that they never did nor do agree; and all the world did judge the Chancellor (age 54) to be falling from the time that Sir H. Bennet (age 45) was brought in. Besides my Lord Bristoll (age 50) being a Catholique himself, all this is very strange.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jul 1663. Thence by boat ashore, it raining, and I went to Mr. Barrow's, where Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Commissioner Pett (age 52); we staid long eating sweetmeats and drinking, and looking over some antiquities of Mr. Barrow's, among others an old manuscript Almanac, that I believe was made for some monastery, in parchment, which I could spend much time upon to understand. Here was a pretty young lady, a niece of Barrow's, which I took much pleasure to look on.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jul 1663. Thence, it raining as hard as it could pour down, home to the Hillhouse, and anon to supper, and after supper, Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I had great discourse with Captain Cox and Mr. Hempson about business of the yard, and particularly of pursers' accounts with Hempson, who is a cunning knave in that point. So late to bed and, Mr. Wayth being gone, I lay above in the Treasurer's (age 56) bed and slept well. About one or two in the morning the curtains of my bed being drawn waked me, and I saw a man stand there by the inside of my bed calling me French dogg 20 times, one after another, and I starting, as if I would get out of the bed, he fell a-laughing as hard as he could drive, still calling me French dogg, and laid his hand on my shoulder. At last, whether I said anything or no I cannot tell, but I perceived the man, after he had looked wistly upon me, and found that I did not answer him to the names that he called me by, which was Salmon, Sir Carteret's clerk, and Robt. Maddox, another of the clerks, he put off his hat on a suddaine, and forebore laughing, and asked who I was, saying, "Are you Mr. Pepys?" I told him yes, and now being come a little better to myself, I found him to be Tom Willson, Sir W. Batten's (age 62) clerk, and fearing he might be in some melancholy fit, I was at a loss what to do or say. At last I asked him what he meant. He desired my pardon for that he was mistaken, for he thought verily, not knowing of my coming to lie there, that it had been Salmon, the Frenchman, with whom he intended to have made some sport. So I made nothing of it, but bade him good night, and I, after a little pause, to sleep again, being well pleased that it ended no worse, and being a little the better pleased with it, because it was the Surveyor's clerk, which will make sport when I come to tell Sir W. Batten (age 62) of it, it being a report that old Edgeborough, the former Surveyor, who died here, do now and then walk.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jul 1663. Thence walked to the Hill-house, being myself much dissatisfied, and more than I thought I should have been with Commissioner Pett (age 52), being, by what I saw since I came hither, convinced that he is not able to exercise the command in the Yard over the officers that he ought to do, or somebody else, if ever the service be well looked after there. Sat up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) talking, and he speaking his mind in slighting of the Commissioner, for which I wish there was not so much reason. For I do see he is but a man of words, though indeed he is the ablest man that we have to do service if he would or durst. Sir J. Minnes (age 64) being gone to bed, I took Mr. Whitfield, one of the clerks, and walked to the Dock about eleven at night, and there got a boat and a crew, and rowed down to the guard-ships, it being a most pleasant moonshine evening that ever I saw almost. The guard-ships were very ready to hail us, being no doubt commanded thereto by their Captain, who remembers how I surprised them the last time I was here. However, I found him ashore, but the ship in pretty good order, and the arms well fixed, charged, and primed.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jul 1663. So to dinner, Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Commissioner Pett (age 52), and I, &c., and after dinner walked in the garden, it being a very fine day, the best we have had this great while, if not this whole summer. To church again, and after that walked through the Rope-ground to the Dock, and there over and over the Dock and grounds about it, and storehouses, &c., with the officers of the Yard, and then to Commissioner Pett's (age 52) and had a good sullybub and other good things, and merry. Commissioner Pett (age 52) showed me alone his bodys as a secrett, which I found afterwards by discourse with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) that he had shown them him, wherein he seems to suppose great mystery in the nature of Lynes to be hid, but I do not understand it at all.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jul 1663. Lord's Day. Up, and meeting Tom Willson he asked my pardon again, which I easily did give him, telling him only that it was well I was not a woman with child, for it might have made me miscarry. With Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to church, where an indifferent good sermon. Here I saw Mrs. Becky Allen, who hath been married, and is this day churched, after her bearing a child. She is grown tall, but looks very white and thin, and I can find no occasion while I am here to come to have her company, which I desire and expected in my coming, but only coming out of the church I kissed her and her sister and mother-in-law.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jul 1663. By and by the King (age 33) and Queen (age 24), who looked in this dress (a white laced waistcoat and a crimson short pettycoat, and her hair dressed ci la negligence) mighty pretty; and the King (age 33) rode hand in hand with her. Here was also my Baroness Castlemaine (age 22) rode among the rest of the ladies; but the King (age 33) took, methought, no notice of her; nor when they 'light did any body press (as she seemed to expect, and staid for it) to take her down, but was taken down by her own gentleman. She looked mighty out of humour, and had a yellow plume in her hat (which all took notice of), and yet is very handsome, but very melancholy: nor did any body speak to her, or she so much as smile or speak to any body. I followed them up into White Hall, and into the Queen's (age 24) presence, where all the ladies walked, talking and fiddling with their hats and feathers, and changing and trying one another's by one another's heads, and laughing. But it was the finest sight to me, considering their great beautys and dress, that ever I did see in all my life. But, above all, Mrs. Stewart (age 16) in this dress, with her hat cocked and a red plume, with her sweet eye, little Roman nose, and excellent taille, is now the greatest beauty I ever saw, I think, in my life; and, if ever woman can, do exceed my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22), at least in this dress nor do I wonder if the King (age 33) changes, which I verily believe is the reason of his coldness to my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22). Here late, with much ado I left to look upon them, and went away, and by water, in a boat with other strange company, there being no other to be had, and out of him into a sculler half to the bridge, and so home and to Sir W. Batten (age 62), where I staid telling him and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Mrs. Turner (age 40), with great mirth, my being frighted at Chatham, Kent [Map] by young Edgeborough, and so home to supper and to bed, before I sleep fancying myself to sport with Mrs. Stewart (age 16) with great pleasure.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jul 1663. Thence to the Change [Map], and so home, Creed and I to dinner, and after dinner Sir W. Warren came to me, and he and I in my closet about his last night's contract, and from thence to discourse of measuring of timber, wherein I made him see that I could understand the matter well, and did both learn of and teach him something. Creed being gone through my staying talking to him so long, I went alone by water down to Redriffe [Map], and so to sit and talk with Sir W. Pen (age 42), where I did speak very plainly concerning my thoughts of Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64). So as it may cost me some trouble if he should tell them again, but he said as much or more to me concerning them both, which I may remember if ever it should come forth, and nothing but what is true and my real opinion of them, that they neither do understand to this day Creed's accounts, nor do deserve to be employed in their places without better care, but that the King (age 33) had better give them greater salaries to stand still and do nothing.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jul 1663. Up and to my office, where all the morning, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I did a little, and but a little business at the office. So I eat a bit of victuals at home, and so abroad to several places, as my bookseller's, and then to Thomson the instrument maker's (age 25) to bespeak a ruler for my pocket for timber, &c., which I believe he will do to my mind.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jul 1663. At noon, by my Lady Batten's desire, I went over the water to Mr. Castle's (age 34), who brings his wife home to his own house to-day, where I found a great many good old women, and my Lady, Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir J. Minnes (age 64). A good, handsome, plain dinner, and then walked in the garden; which is pleasant enough, more than I expected there, and so Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and I by water to the office, and there sat, and then I by water to the Temple [Map] about my law business, and back again home and wrote letters to my father and wife about my desire that they should observe the feast at Brampton, and have my Lady and the family, and so home to supper and bed, my head aching all the day from my last night's bad rest, and yesterday's distempering myself with over walking, and to-day knocking my head against a low door in Mr. Castle's (age 34) house. This day the Parliament kept a fast for the present unseasonable weather.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jul 1663. So to the yard, and there mustered the yard, and found many faults, and discharged several fellows that were absent from their business. I staid also at Mr. Ackworth's desire at dinner with him and his wife, and there was a simple fellow, a gentleman I believe of the Court, their kinsmen, that threatened me I could have little discourse or begin, acquaintance with Ackworth's wife, and so after dinner away, with all haste home, and there found Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) at the office, and by Sir W. Batten's (age 62) testimony and Sir G. Carteret's (age 53) concurrence was forced to consent to a business of Captain Cocke's (age 46) timber, as bad as anything we have lately disputed about, and all through Mr. Coventry's (age 35) not being with us.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jul 1663. Up and to my office setting papers in order for these two or three days, in which I have been hindered a little, and then having intended this day to go to Banstead Downs, Surrey to see a famous race, I sent Will to get himself ready to go with me, and I also by and by home and put on my riding suit, and being ready came to the office to Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), and did a little of course at the office this morning, and so by boat to White Hall, where I hear that the race is put off, because the Lords do sit in Parliament to-day. However, having appointed Mr. Creed to come to me to Fox Hall, I went over thither, and after some debate, Creed and I resolved to go to Clapham, Surrey, to Mr. Gauden's, who had sent his coach to their place for me because I was to have my horse of him to go to the race. So I went thither by coach and my Will by horse with me; Mr. Creed he went over back again to Westminster to fetch his horse. When I came to Mr. Gauden's one first thing was to show me his house, which is almost built, wherein he and his family live. I find it very regular and finely contrived, and the gardens and offices about it as convenient and as full of good variety as ever I saw in my life. It is true he hath been censured for laying out so much money; but he tells me that he built it for his brother, who is since dead (the Bishop), who when he should come to be Bishop of Winchester, which he was promised (to which bishoprick at present there is no house), he did intend to dwell here. Besides, with the good husbandry in making his bricks and other things I do not think it costs him so much money as people think and discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jul 1663. By and by Mr. Coventry (age 35) only came (Sir John Minnes (age 64) and Sir William Batten (age 62) being gone this morning to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to pay some ships and the yard there), and after doing a little business he and I down to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and there up and down the yard, and by and by came Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and we all looked into matters, and then by water back to Deptford, where we dined with him at his house, a very good dinner and mightily tempted with wines of all sorts and brave French Syder, but I drunk none. But that which is a great wonder I find his little daughter Betty, that was in hanging sleeves but a month or two ago, and is a very little young child; married, and to whom, but to young Scott, son to Madam Catharine Scott, that was so long in law, and at whose triall I was with her husband; he pleading that it was unlawfully got and would not own it, she, it seems, being brought to bed of it, if not got by somebody else at Oxford, but it seems a little before his death he did own the child, and hath left him his estate, not long since. So Sir G. Carteret (age 53) hath struck up of a sudden a match with him for his little daughter. He hath about £2000 per annum; and it seems Sir G. Carteret (age 53) hath by this means over-reached Sir H. Bennet (age 45), who did endeavour to get this gentleman for a sister of his, but Sir G. Carteret (age 53) I say has over-reached him. By this means Sir G. Carteret (age 53) hath married two daughters this year both very well.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Aug 1663. This night Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) returned [from] Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], but I did not go see them.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Aug 1663. So home, and I staid a while with Sir J. Minnes (age 64), at Mrs. Turner's (age 40), hearing his parrat talk, laugh, and crow, which it do to admiration.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Aug 1663. And leaving my wife and her talking highly, I went away by coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) to St. James's, and there attended of course the Duke (age 29).

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1663. Up by four o'clock to go with Sir W. Batten (age 62) to Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), which we did, though not before 6 or 7 by their laying a-bed. Our business was to survey the new wharf building there, in order to the giving more to him that do it (Mr. Randall) than contracted for, but I see no reason for it, though it be well done, yet no better than contracted to be. Here we eat and drank at the Clerke of the Cheques, and in taking water at the Tower gate, we drank a cup of strong water, which I did out of pure conscience to my health, and I think is not excepted by my oaths, but it is a thing I shall not do again, hoping to have no such occasion.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Aug 1663. Home to supper, where I find my house very clean from top to bottom again to my great content. I found a feacho (as he calls it) of fine sugar and a case of orange-flower water come from Mr. Cocke, of Lisbon, the fruits of my last year's service to him, which I did in great justice to the man, a perfect stranger. He sends it me desiring that I would not let Sir J. Minnes (age 64) know it, from whom he expected to have found the service done that he had from me, from whom he could expect nothing, and the other failed him, and would have done I am sure to this day had not I brought it to some end. After supper to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Aug 1663. Up and to my office all the morning, where Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did pay the short allowance money to the East India companies, and by the assistance of the City Marshall and his men, did lay hold of two or three of the chief of the companies that were in the mutiny the other day, and sent them to prison.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Sep 1663. Thence I, leaving Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to look after his indictment drawing up, I home by water, and there found my wife mightily pleased with a present of shells, fine shells given her by Captain Hickes, and so she and I up and look them over, and indeed they are very pleasant ones.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Sep 1663. We staid long without, till by and by my Lord Mayor (age 48) comes, who also was commanded to be there, and he having, we not being within with him, an admonition from the Lords to take better care of preserving the peace, we joyned with him, and the Lords having commanded Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to prosecute the fellows for the riott, we rode along with my Lord Mayor (age 48) in his coach to the Sessions House in the Old Bayley, where the Sessions are now sitting. Here I heard two or three ordinary tryalls, among others one (which, they say, is very common now-a-days, and therefore in my now taking of mayds I resolve to look to have some body to answer for them) a woman that went and was indicted by four names for entering herself a cookemayde to a gentleman that prosecuted her there, and after 3 days run away with a silver tankard, a porringer of silver, and a couple of spoons, and being now found is found guilty, and likely will be hanged.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Sep 1663. Up betimes and to my office, and thence with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) by coach to White Hall, where met us Sir W. Batten (age 62), and there staid by the Council Chamber till the Lords called us in, being appointed four days ago to attend them with an account of the riott among the seamen the other day, when Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did as like a coxcomb as ever I saw any man speak in my life, and so we were dismissed, they making nothing almost of the matter.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Sep 1663. Then up and to the office a while, and then to Sir W. Batten (age 62), who is going this day for pleasure down to the Downes. I eat a breakfast with them, and at my Lady's desire with them by coach to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where I went aboard with them on the Charlotte yacht. The wind very fresh, and I believe they will be all sicke enough, besides that she is mighty troublesome on the water. Methinks she makes over much of her husband's ward, young Mr. Griffin, as if she expected some service from him when he comes to it, being a pretty young boy. I left them under sayle, and I to Deptford, and, after a word or two with Sir J. Minnes (age 64), walked to Redriffe [Map] and so home. In my way, it coming into my head, overtaking of a beggar or two on the way that looked like Gypsys, what the Gypsys 8 or 9 days ago had foretold, that somebody that day se'nnight should be with me to borrow money, but I should lend none; and looking, when I came to my office, upon my journall, that my brother John (age 22) had brought a letter that day from my brother Tom (age 29) to borrow £20 more of me, which had vexed me so that I had sent the letter to my father into the country, to acquaint him of it, and how little he is beforehand that he is still forced to borrow. But it pleased me mightily to see how, contrary to my expectations, having so lately lent him £20, and belief that he had money by him to spare, and that after some days not thinking of it, I should look back and find what the Gypsy had told me to be so true.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Sep 1663. Up very betimes by break of day, and got my wife up, whom the thought of this day's long journey do discourage; and after eating something, and changing of a piece of gold to pay the reckoning, we mounted, and through Baldwicke, where a fayre is kept to-day, and a great one for cheese and other such commodities, and so to Hatfield, Hertfordshire, it being most curious weather from the time we set out to our getting home, and here we dined, and my wife being very weary, and believing that it would be hard to get her home to-night, and a great charge to keep her longer abroad, I took the opportunity of an empty coach that was to go to London, and left her to come in it to London, for half-a-crown, and so I and the boy home as fast as we could drive, and it was even night before we got home. So that I account it very good fortune that we took this course, being myself very weary, much more would my wife have been. At home found all very well and my house in good order. To see Sir W. Pen (age 42), who is pretty well, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), who is a little lame on one foot, and the rest gone to Chatham, Kent [Map], viz.: Sir G. Carteret (age 53) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), who has in my absence inveighed against my contract the other day for Warren's masts, in which he is a knave, and I shall find matter of tryumph, but it vexes me a little.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1663. Lay pretty long in bed, and so to my office all the morning till by and by called out by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62), with them by water to Deptford, where it of a sudden did lighten, thunder, and rain so as we could do nothing but stay in Davis's house, and by and by Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I home again by water, and I home to dinner, and after dinner to the office, and there till night all alone, even of my clerks being there, doing of business, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Sep 1663. So to White Hall, where Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I did spend an hour in the Gallery, looking upon the pictures, in which he hath some judgment. And by and by the Commissioners for Tangier met: and there my Lord Teviott, together with Captain Cuttance, Captain Evans, and Jonas Moore (age 46), sent to that purpose, did bring us a brave draught of the Mole to be built there; and report that it is likely to be the most considerable place the King of England (age 33) hath in the world; and so I am apt to think it will. After discourse of this, and of supplying the garrison with some more horse, we rose; and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I home again, finding the street about our house full, Sir R. Ford (age 49) beginning his shrievalty to-day and, what with his and our houses being new painted, the street begins to look a great deal better than it did, and more gracefull.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Sep 1663. Up, though with pain in my head, stomach, and ear, and that deaf so as in my way by coach to White Hall with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) I called at Mr. Holliard's (age 54), who did give me some pills, and tells me I shall have my hearing again and be well.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Oct 1663. Up and betimes to my office, and then to sit, where Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir W. Batten (age 62), Sir W. Pen (age 42), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Mr. Coventry (age 35) and myself, a fuller board than by the King's progresse and the late pays and my absence has been a great while. Sat late, and then home to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Oct 1663. Up with pain, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 64) by coach to the Temple [Map], and then I to my brother's, and up and down on business, and so to the New Exchange, and there met Creed, and he and I walked two or three hours, talking of many businesses, especially about Tangier, and my Lord Tiviot's bringing in of high accounts, and yet if they were higher are like to pass without exception, and then of my Lord Sandwich (age 38) sending a messenger to know whether the King (age 33) intends to come to Newmarket, Suffolk, as is talked, that he may be ready to entertain him at Hinchingbroke [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 05 Oct 1663. So I to the office till night, about several businesses, and then went and sat an hour or two with Sir W. Pen (age 42), talking very largely of Sir J. Minnes's (age 64) simplicity and unsteadiness, and of Sir W. Batten's (age 62) suspicious dealings, wherein I was open, and he sufficiently, so that I do not care for his telling of tales, for he said as much, but whether that were so or no I said nothing but what is my certain knowledge and belief concerning him. Thence home to bed in great pain.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Oct 1663. Slept pretty well, and my wife waked to ring the bell to call up our mayds to the washing about 4 o'clock, and I was and she angry that our bell did not wake them sooner, but I will get a bigger bell. So we to sleep again till 8 o'clock, and then I up in some ease to the office, where we had a full board, where we examined Cocke's (age 46) second account, when Mr. Turner had drawn a bill directly to be paid the balance thereof, as Mr. Cocke (age 46) demanded, and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did boldly assert the truth of it, and that he had examined it, when there is no such thing, but many vouchers, upon examination, missing, and we saw reason to strike off several of his demands, and to bring down his 5 per cent. commission to 3 per cent. So we shall save the King (age 33) some money, which both the Comptroller (age 64) and his clerke had absolutely given away. There was also two occasions more of difference at the table; the one being to make out a bill to Captain Smith for his salary abroad as commander-in-chief in the Streights. Sir J. Minnes (age 64) did demand an increase of salary for his being Vice-Admiral in the Downes, he having received but 40s. without an increase, when Sir J. Lawson (age 48), in the same voyage, had £3, and others have also had increase, only he, because he was an officer of the board, was worse used than any body else, and particularly told Sir W. Batten (age 62) that he was the opposer formerly of his having an increase, which I did wonder to hear him so boldly lay it to him. So we hushed up the dispute, and offered, if he would, to examine precedents, and report them, if there was any thing to his advantage to be found, to the Duke (age 29). The next was, Mr. Chr. Pett (age 43) and Deane (age 29) were summoned to give an account of some knees1 which Pett reported bad, that were to be served in by Sir W. Warren, we having contracted that none should be served but such as were to be approved of by our officers. So that if they were bad they were to be blamed for receiving them.

Note 1. "Naturally grown timber or bars of iron bent to a right angle or to fit the surfaces and to secure bodies firmly together as hanging knees secure the deck beams to the sides".-Smyth's Sailor's Word- Book. There are several kinds of knees.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Oct 1663. Thence we fell to talk of Warren's other goods, which Pett (age 43) had said were generally bad, and falling to this contract again, I did say it was the most cautious and as good a contract as had been made here, and the only [one] that had been in such terms. Sir J. Minnes (age 64) told me angrily that Winter's timber, bought for 33s. per load, was as good and in the same terms. I told him that it was not so, but that he and Sir W. Batten (age 62) were both abused, and I would prove it was as dear a bargain as had been made this half year, which occasioned high words between them and me, but I am able to prove it and will. That also was so ended, and so to other business.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Oct 1663. Up, and not in any good ease yet, but had pain in making water, and some course. I see I must take besides keeping myself warm to make myself break wind and go freely to stool before I can be well, neither of which I can do yet, though I have drank the other bottle of Mr. Hollyard's (age 54) against my stomach this morning. I did, however, make shift to go to the office, where we sat, and there Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) did advise me to take some juniper water, and Sir W. Batten (age 62) sent to his Lady for some for me, strong water made of juniper. Whether that or anything else of my draught this morning did it I cannot tell, but I had a couple of stools forced after it.... but whether I shall grow better upon it I cannot tell.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Oct 1663. Up (though slept well) and made some water in the morning [as] I used to do, and a little pain returned to me, and some fears, but being forced to go to the Duke (age 29) at St. James's, I took coach and in my way called upon Mr. Hollyard (age 54) and had his advice to take a glyster. At St. James's we attended the Duke all of us. And there, after my discourse, Mr. Coventry (age 35) of his own accord begun to tell the Duke how he found that discourse abroad did run to his prejudice about the fees that he took, and how he sold places and other things; wherein he desired to appeal to his Highness, whether he did any thing more than what his predecessors did, and appealed to us all. So Sir G. Carteret (age 53) did answer that some fees were heretofore taken, but what he knows not; only that selling of places never was nor ought to be countenanced. So Mr. Coventry (age 35) very hotly answered to Sir G. Carteret (age 53), and appealed to himself whether he was not one of the first that put him upon looking after this taking of fees, and that he told him that Mr. Smith should say that he made £5000 the first year, and he believed he made £7000. This Sir G. Carteret (age 53) denied, and said, that if he did say so he told a lie, for he could not, nor did know, that ever he did make that profit of his place; but that he believes he might say £2500 the first year. Mr. Coventry (age 35) instanced in another thing, particularly wherein Sir G. Carteret (age 53) did advise with him about the selling of the Auditor's place of the stores, when in the beginning there was an intention of creating such an office. This he confessed, but with some lessening of the tale Mr. Coventry (age 35) told, it being only for a respect to my Lord Fitz-Harding (age 33). In fine, Mr. Coventry (age 35) did put into the Duke's hand a list of above 250 places that he did give without receiving one farthing, so much as his ordinary fees for them, upon his life and oath; and that since the Duke's establishment of fees he had never received one token more of any man; and that in his whole life he never conditioned or discoursed of any consideration from any commanders since he came to the Navy. And afterwards, my Lord Barkeley merrily discoursing that he wished his profit greater than it was, and that he did believe that he had got £50,000 since he came in, Mr. Coventry (age 35) did openly declare that his Lordship, or any of us, should have not only all he had got, but all that he had in the world (and yet he did not come a beggar into the Navy, nor would yet be thought to speak in any contempt of his Royall Highness's bounty), and should have a year to consider of it too, for £25,000. The Duke's answer was, that he wished we all had made more profit than he had of our places, and that we had all of us got as much as one man below stayres in the Court, which he presently named, and it was Sir George Lane (age 43)! This being ended, and the list left in the Duke's hand, we parted, and I with Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and Sir W. Batten (age 62) by coach to the Exchange [Map], and there a while, and so home, and whether it be the jogging, or by having my mind more employed (which I believe is a great matter) I know not, but.... I begin to be suddenly well, at least better than I was.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Oct 1663. Thence home and after dinner my wife and I, by Mr. Rawlinson's (age 49) conduct, to the Jewish Synagogue: where the men and boys in their vayles, and the women behind a lattice out of sight; and some things stand up, which I believe is their Law, in a press to which all coming in do bow; and at the putting on their vayles do say something, to which others that hear him do cry Amen, and the party do kiss his vayle. Their service all in a singing way, and in Hebrew. And anon their Laws that they take out of the press are carried by several men, four or five several burthens in all, and they do relieve one another; and whether it is that every one desires to have the carrying of it, I cannot tell, thus they carried it round about the room while such a service is singing. And in the end they had a prayer for the King (age 33), which they pronounced his name in Portugall; but the prayer, like the rest, in Hebrew. But, Lord! to see the disorder, laughing, sporting, and no attention, but confusion in all their service, more like brutes than people knowing the true God, would make a man forswear ever seeing them more and indeed I never did see so much, or could have imagined there had been any religion in the whole world so absurdly performed as this. Away thence with my mind strongly disturbed with them, by coach and set down my wife in Westminster Hall [Map], and I to White Hall, and there the Tangier Committee met, but the Duke and the Africa Committee meeting in our room, Sir G. Carteret (age 53); Sir Wm. Compton (age 38), Mr. Coventry (age 35), Sir W. Rider, Cuttance and myself met in another room, with chairs set in form but no table, and there we had very fine discourses of the business of the fitness to keep Sally, and also of the terms of our King's paying the Portugees that deserted their house at Tangier, which did much please me, and so to fetch my wife, and so to the New Exchange about her things, and called at Thomas Pepys the turner's and bought something there, an so home to supper and to bed, after I had been a good while with Sir W. Pen (age 42), railing and speaking freely our minds against Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), but no more than the folly of one and the knavery of the other do deserve.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Oct 1663. Up and to my office, where all the morning, and part of it Sir J. Minnes (age 64) spent, as he do every thing else, like a fool, reading the Anatomy of the body to me, but so sillily as to the making of me understand any thing that I was weary of him, and so I toward the 'Change [Map] and met with Mr. Grant (age 43), and he and I to the Coffee-house, where I understand by him that Sir W. Petty (age 40) and his vessel are coming, and the King (age 33) intends to go to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] to meet it.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Oct 1663. Lord's Day. Up, and troubled at a distaste my wife took at a small thing that Jane did, and to see that she should be so vexed that I took part with Jane, wherein I had reason; but by and by well again, and so my wife in her best gown and new poynt that I bought her the other day, to church with me, where she has not been these many weeks, and her mayde Jane with her. I was troubled to see Pembleton there, but I thought it prudence to take notice myself first of it and show my wife him, and so by little and little considering that it mattered not much his being there I grew less concerned and so mattered it not much, and the less when, anon, my wife showed me his wife, a pretty little woman, and well dressed, with a good jewel at her breast. The parson, Mr. Mills, I perceive, did not know whether to pray for the Queen (age 24) or no, and so said nothing about her; which makes me fear she is dead. But enquiring of Sir J. Minnes (age 64), he told me that he heard she was better last night.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1663. A fine French dinner, and so we after dinner broke up and to Creed's new lodgings in Axe-yard [Map], which I like very well and so with him to White Hall and walked up and down in the galleries with good discourse, and anon Mr. Coventry (age 35) and Povy (age 49), sad for the loss of one of our number we sat down as a Committee for Tangier and did some business and so broke up, and I down with Mr. Coventry (age 35) and in his chamber discoursing of business of the office and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten's (age 62) carriage, when he most ingeniously tells me how they have carried themselves to him in forbearing to speak the other day to the Duke what they know they have so largely at other times said to him, and I told him what I am put to about the bargain for masts. I perceive he thinks of it all and will remember it.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1663. So up; and going by coach with Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to St. James's, they tell me that Sir Wm. Compton (deceased), who it is true had been a little sickly for a week or fortnight, but was very well upon Friday at night last at the Tangier Committee with us, was dead-died yesterday: at which I was most exceedingly surprised, he being, and so all the world saying that he was, one of the worthyest men and best officers of State now in England; and so in my conscience he was: of the best temper, valour, abilities of mind, integrity, birth, fine person, and diligence of any one man he hath left behind him in the three kingdoms; and yet not forty years old, or if so, that is all1. I find the sober men of the Court troubled for him; and yet not so as to hinder or lessen their mirth, talking, laughing, and eating, drinking, and doing every thing else, just as if there was no such thing, which is as good an instance for me hereafter to judge of death, both as to the unavoidableness, suddenness, and little effect of it upon the spirits of others, let a man be never so high, or rich, or good; but that all die alike, no more matter being made of the death of one than another, and that even to die well, the praise of it is not considerable in the world, compared to the many in the world that know not nor make anything of it, nor perhaps to them (unless to one that like this poor gentleman, who is one of a thousand, there nobody speaking ill of him) that will speak ill of a man.

Note 1. Sir William Compton (1625-1663) (deceased) was knighted at Oxford, December 12th, 1643. He was called by Cromwell "the sober young man and the godly cavalier". After the Restoration he was M.P. for Cambridge (1661), and appointed Master of the Ordnance. He died in Drury Lane, suddenly, as stated in the text, and was buried at Compton Wynyates, Warwickshire [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 20 Oct 1663. Up and to the office, where we sat; and at noon Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and I to dinner to my Lord Mayor's, being invited, where was the Farmers of the Customes, my Chancellor's (age 54) three sons, and other great and much company, and a very great noble dinner, as this Mayor [Sir John Robinson (age 48).] is good for nothing else. No extraordinary discourse of any thing, every man being intent upon his dinner, and myself willing to have drunk some wine to have warmed my belly, but I did for my oath's sake willingly refrain it, but am so well pleased and satisfied afterwards thereby, for it do keep me always in so good a frame of mind that I hope I shall not ever leave this practice.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1663. Up and to my office, where busy all the morning about Mr. Gauden's account, and at noon to dinner with him at the Dolphin, where mighty merry by pleasant stories of Mr. Coventry's (age 35) and Sir J. Minnes's (age 64), which I have put down some of in my book of tales.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Nov 1663. Up, and by coach to White Hall, and there in the long Matted Gallery I find Sir G. Carteret (age 53), Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and Sir W. Batten (age 62)-and by and by comes the King (age 33) to walk there with three or four with him; and soon as he saw us, says he, "Here is the Navy Office", and there walked twenty turns the length of the gallery, talking, methought, but ordinary talke.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1663. Up and to my office, shewing myself to Sir W. Batten (age 62), and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and no great matter made of my periwigg, as I was afeard there would be. Among other things there came to me Shales of Portsmouth, by my order, and I began to discourse with him about the arrears of stores belonging to the Victualling Office there, and by his discourse I am in some hopes that if I can get a grant from the King (age 33) of such a part of all I discover I may chance to find a way to get something by the by, which do greatly please me the very thoughts of.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Nov 1663. Up and to the office, where we sat, and after we had almost done, Sir W. Batten (age 62) desired to have the room cleared, and there he did acquaint the board how he was obliged to answer to something lately said which did reflect upon the Comptroller (age 64) and him, and to that purpose told how the bargain for Winter's timber did not prove so bad as I had reported to the board it would. After he had done I cleared the matter that I did not mention the business as a thing designed by me against them, but was led to it by Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and that I said nothing but what I was told by Mayers the surveyor as much as by Deane (age 29) upon whom they laid all the fault, which I must confess did and do still trouble me, for they report him to be a fellow not fit to be employed, when in my conscience he deserves better than any officer in the yard. I thought it not convenient to vindicate him much now, but time will serve when I will do it, and I am bound to do it. I offered to proceed to examine and prove what I said if they please, but Mr. Coventry (age 35) most discreetly advised not, it being to no purpose, and that he did believe that what I said did not by my manner of speaking it proceed from any design of reproaching them, and so it ended. But my great trouble is for poor Deane (age 29).

Pepy's Diary. 19 Nov 1663. Up, and to the office, where (Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) being gone this morning to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map]) the rest of us met, and rode at noon. So I to the 'Change [Map], where little business, and so home to dinner, and being at dinner Mr. Creed in and dined with us, and after dinner Mr. Gentleman, my Jane's father, to see us and her. And after a little stay with them, I was sent for by Sir G. Carteret (age 53) by agreement, and so left them, and to him and with him by coach to my Lord Treasurer (age 56), to discourse with him about Mr. Gauden's having of money, and to offer to him whether it would not be necessary, Mr. Gauden's credit being so low as it is, to take security of him if he demands any great sum, such as £20,000, which now ought to be paid him upon his next year's declaration. Which is a sad thing, that being reduced to this by us, we should be the first to doubt his credit; but so it is. However, it will be managed with great tenderness to him. My Lord Treasurer (age 56) we found in his bed-chamber, being laid up of the goute. I find him a very ready man, and certainly a brave servant to the King (age 33): he spoke so quick and sensibly of the King's charge. Nothing displeased me in him but his long nails, which he lets grow upon a pretty thick white short hand, that it troubled me to see them.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Dec 1663. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and then with the whole board, viz., Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Batten (age 62), and myself along with Captain Allen (age 51) home to dinner, where he lives hard by in Mark Lane [Map], where we had a very good plain dinner and good welcome, in a pretty little house but so smoky that it was troublesome to us all till they put out the fire, and made one of charcoale. I was much pleased with this dinner for the many excellent stories told by Mr. Coventry (age 35), which I have put down in my book of tales and so shall not mention them here.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Dec 1663. Then we fell to talk of Sir J. Minnes's (age 64) and Sir W. Batten's (age 62) burning of Oliver's head, while he was there; which was done with so much insulting and folly as I never heard of, and had the Trayned Band of Rochester, Kent [Map] to come to the solemnity, which when all comes to all, Commissioner Pett (age 53) says it never was made for him; but it troubles me the King (age 33) should suffer £100 losse in his purse, to make a new one after it was forgot whose it was, or any words spoke of it.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Dec 1663. Then, my Lord Sandwich (age 38) being there, we all went into the Duke's closet and did our business. But among other things, Lord! what an account did Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) make of the pulling down and burning of the head of the Charles, where Cromwell was placed with people under his horse, and Peter, as the Duke called him, is praying to him; and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) would needs infer the temper of the people from their joy at the doing of this and their building a gibbet for the hanging of his head up, when God knows, it is even the flinging away of £100 out of the King's purse, to the building of another, which it seems must be a Neptune.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1663. So up and to the office, where the greatest business was Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and Sir W. Batten (age 62) against me for Sir W. Warren's contract for masts, to which I may go to my memorandum book to see what past, but came off with conquest, and my Lord Barkely (age 61) and Mr. Coventry (age 35) well convinced that we are well used.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Dec 1663. Up and to church alone and so home to dinner with my wife very pleasant and pleased with one another's company, and in our general enjoyment one of another, better we think than most other couples do. So after dinner to the French church, but came too late, and so back to our owne church, where I slept all the sermon the Scott preaching, and so home, and in the evening Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I met at Sir W. Pen's (age 42) about ordering some business of the Navy, and so I home to supper, discourse, prayers, and bed.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Dec 1663. Anon came Sir W. Warren, and after talking of his business of the masts and helping me to understand some foul dealing in the business of Woods we fell to other talk, and particularly to speak of some means how to part this great familiarity between Sir W. Batten (age 62) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64), and it is easy to do by any good friend of Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to whom it will be a good service, and he thinks that Sir J. Denham (age 48) will be a proper man for it, and so do I. So after other discourse we parted, and I home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1664. After dinner by coach with Sir G. Carteret (age 54) and Sir J. Minnes (age 64) by appointment to Auditor Beale's in Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, and there we did with great content look over some old ledgers to see in what manner they were kept, and indeed it was in an extraordinary good method, and such as (at least out of design to keep them employed) I do persuade Sir J. Minnes (age 64) to go upon, which will at least do as much good it may be to keep them for want of something to do from envying those that do something.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jan 1664. Up and all the morning at my office and with Sir J. Minnes (age 64), directing him and Mr. Turner about keeping of their books according to yesterday's work, wherein I shall make them work enough.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1664. Thence to the Coffee-house, whither comes Sir W. Petty (age 40) and Captain Grant (age 43), and we fell in talke (besides a young gentleman, I suppose a merchant, his name Mr. Hill (age 34), that has travelled and I perceive is a master in most sorts of musique and other things) of musique; the universal character; art of memory; Granger's counterfeiting of hands and other most excellent discourses to my great content, having not been in so good company a great while, and had I time I should covet the acquaintance of that Mr. Hill (age 34). This morning I stood by the King (age 33) arguing with a pretty Quaker woman, that delivered to him a desire of hers in writing. The King (age 33) showed her Sir J. Minnes (age 64), as a man the fittest for her quaking religion, saying that his beard was the stiffest thing about him, and again merrily said, looking upon the length of her paper, that if all she desired was of that length she might lose her desires; she modestly saying nothing till he begun seriously to discourse with her, arguing the truth of his spirit against hers; she replying still with these words, "O King!" and thou'd him all along.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jan 1664. Up and to the office, where all the morning, and at noon all of us, viz., Sir G. Carteret (age 54) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) at one end, and Mr. Coventry (age 36), Sir J. Minnes (age 64) and I (in the middle at the other end, being taught how to sit there all three by my sitting so much the backwarder) at the other end, to Sir G. Carteret's (age 54), and there dined well. Here I saw Mr. Scott (age 26), the bastard that married his youngest daughter. Much pleasant talk at table, and then up and to the office, where we sat long upon our design of dividing the Controller's work into some of the rest of our hands for the better doing of it, but he would not yield to it, though the simple man knows in his heart that he do not do one part of it. So he taking upon him to do it all we rose, I vexed at the heart to see the King's service run after this manner, but it cannot be helped.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Feb 1664. Up, and down by water, a brave morning, to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and there spent an houre or two to good purpose, and so walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map] and thence to Deptford, Kent [Map], where I found (with Sir W. Batten (age 63) upon a survey) Sir J. Minnes (age 64), Sir W. Pen (age 42), and my Lady Batten come down and going to dinner. I dined with them, and so after dinner by water home, all the way going and coming reading "Faber Fortunae", which I can never read too often.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Feb 1664. Church being done, I back to Sir John's (age 49) house and there left him and home, and by and by to Sir W. Pen (age 42), and staid a while talking with him about Sir J. Minnes (age 64) his folly in his office, of which I am sicke and weary to speak of it, and how the King (age 33) is abused in it, though Pen (age 42), I know, offers the discourse only like a rogue to get it out of me, but I am very free to tell my mind to him, in that case being not unwilling he should tell him again if he will or any body else.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Mar 1664. Lay long pleasantly entertaining myself with my wife, and then up and to the office, where busy till noon, vexed to see how Sir J. Minnes (age 65) deserves rather to be pitied for his dotage and folly than employed at a great salary to ruin the King's business.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1664. That being done Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and I sat all the morning, and then I to the 'Change [Map], and there got away by pretence of business with my uncle Wight (age 62) to put off Creed, whom I had invited to dinner, and so home, and there found Madam Turner (age 41), her daughter The., Joyce Norton, my father and Mr. Honywood, and by and by come my uncle Wight (age 62) and aunt. This being my solemn feast for my cutting of the stone, it being now, blessed be God! this day six years since the time; and I bless God I do in all respects find myself free from that disease or any signs of it, more than that upon the least cold I continue to have pain in making water, by gathering of wind and growing costive, till which be removed I am at no ease, but without that I am very well. One evil more I have, which is that upon the least squeeze almost my cods begin to swell and come to great pain, which is very strange and troublesome to me, though upon the speedy applying of a poultice it goes down again, and in two days I am well again. Dinner not being presently ready I spent some time myself and shewed them a map of Tangier left this morning at my house by Creed, cut by our order, the Commissioners, and drawn by Jonas Moore (age 47), which is very pleasant, and I purpose to have it finely set out and hung up. Mrs. Hunt coming to see my wife by chance dined here with us.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Mar 1664. At last, at past 4 o'clock I heard that the Parliament was not up yet, and so walked to Westminster Hall [Map], and there found it so, and meeting with Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and being very hungry, went over with him to the Leg, and before we had cut a bit, the House rises, however we eat a bit and away to St. James's and there eat a second part of our dinner with Mr. Coventry (age 36) and his brother Harry (age 45), Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir W. Pen (age 42). The great matter today in the House hath been, that Mr. Vaughan (age 60), the great speaker, is this day come to towne, and hath declared himself in a speech of an houre and a half, with great reason and eloquence, against the repealing of the Bill for Triennial Parliaments; but with no successe: but the House have carried it that there shall be such Parliaments, but without any coercive power upon the King (age 33), if he will bring this Act. But, Lord! to see how the best things are not done without some design; for I perceive all these gentlemen that I was with to-day were against it (though there was reason enough on their side); yet purely, I could perceive, because it was the King's mind to have it; and should he demand any thing else, I believe they would give it him. But this the discontented Presbyters, and the faction of the House will be highly displeased with; but it was carried clearly against them in the House. We had excellent good table-talke, some of which I have entered in my book of stories.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Mar 1664. Was called up this morning by a messenger from Sir G. Carteret (age 54) to come to him to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), and so I rose and thither to him, and with him and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to, Sir G. Carteret's (age 54) to examine his accounts, and there we sat at it all the morning. About noon Sir W. Batten (age 63) came from the House of Parliament and told us our Bill for our office was read the second time to-day, with great applause, and is committed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Mar 1664. Up very betimes to my office, and thence at 7 o'clock to Sir G. Carteret (age 54), and there with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) made an end of his accounts, but staid not dinner, my Lady having made us drink our morning draft there of several wines, but I drank: nothing but some of her coffee, which was poorly made, with a little sugar in it.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1664. Up and to my office, and afterwards sat, where great contest with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Mr. Wood, and that doating fool Sir J. Minnes (age 65), that says whatever Sir W. Batten (age 63) says, though never minding whether to the King's profit or not.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1664. The last night, whether it was from cold I got to-day upon the water I know not, or whether it was from my mind being over concerned with Stanes's business of the platery of the navy, for my minds was mighty troubled with the business all night long, I did wake about one o'clock in the morning, a thing I most rarely do, and pissed a little with great pain, continued sleepy, but in a high fever all night, fiery hot, and in some pain. Towards morning I slept a little and waking found myself better, but.... with some pain, and rose I confess with my clothes sweating, and it was somewhat cold too, which I believe might do me more hurt, for I continued cold and apt to shake all the morning, but that some trouble with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) kept me warm.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Apr 1664. Though late, past 12, before we went to bed, yet I heard my poor father up, and so I rang up my people, and I rose and got something to eat and drink for him, and so abroad, it being a mighty foul day, by coach, setting my father down in Fleet Streete and I to St. James's, where I found Mr. Coventry (age 36) (the Duke (age 30) being now come thither for the summer) with a goldsmith, sorting out his old plate to change for new; but, Lord! what a deale he hath! I staid and had two or three hours discourse with him, talking about the disorders of our office, and I largely to tell him how things are carried by Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to my great grief. He seems much concerned also, and for all the King's matters that are done after the same rate every where else, and even the Duke's house hold matters too, generally with corruption, but most indeed with neglect and indifferency. I spoke very loud and clear to him my thoughts of Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and the other, and trust him with the using of them.

Pepy's Diary. 02 May 1664. Lay pretty long in bed. So up and by water to St. James's, and there attended the Duke (age 30) with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and having done our work with him walked to Westminster Hall [Map], and after walking there and talking of business met Mr. Rawlinson (age 50) and by coach to the 'Change [Map], where I did some business, and home to dinner, and presently by coach to the King's Play-house to see "The Labyrinth", but, coming too soon, walked to my Lord's to hear how my Lady do, who is pretty well; at least past all fear.

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1664. Up and to the office, where Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), and myself met and did business, we being in a mighty hurry. The King (age 33) is gone down with the Duke (age 30) and a great crew this morning by break of day to Chatham, Kent [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1664. So home, it raining terribly, but we still dry, and at the office late discoursing with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63), who like a couple of sots receive all I say but to little purpose. So late home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 24 May 1664. Up and to the office, where Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and I sat all the morning, and after dinner thither again, and all the afternoon hard at the office till night, and so tired home to supper and to bed. This day I heard that my uncle Fenner is dead, which makes me a little sad, to see with what speed a great many of my friends are gone, and more, I fear, for my father's sake, are going.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jun 1664. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and then to the 'Change [Map], where after some stay by coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Mr. Coventry (age 36) to St. James's, and there dined with Mr. Coventry (age 36) very finely, and so over the Parke to White Hall to a Committee of Tangier about providing provisions, money, and men for Tangier. At it all the afternoon, but it is strange to see how poorly and brokenly things are done of the greatest consequence, and how soon the memory of this great man is gone, or, at least, out of mind by the thoughts of who goes next, which is not yet knowne. My Lord of Oxford (age 37), Muskerry, and several others are discoursed of. It seems my Lord Tiviott's design was to go a mile and half out of the towne, to cut down a wood in which the enemy did use to lie in ambush. He had sent several spyes; but all brought word that the way was clear, and so might be for any body's discovery of an enemy before you are upon them. There they were all snapt, he and all his officers, and about 200 men, as they say; there being left now in the garrison but four captains. This happened the 3d of May last, being not before that day twelvemonth of his entering into his government there: but at his going out in the morning he said to some of his officers, "Gentlemen, let us look to ourselves, for it was this day three years that so many brave Englishmen were knocked on the head by the Moores, when Fines made his sally out". Here till almost night, and then home with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) by coach, and so to my office a while, and home to supper and bed, being now in constant pain in my back, but whether it be only wind or what it is the Lord knows, but I fear the worst.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jun 1664. Lord's Day. All the morning in my chamber consulting my lesson of ship building, and at noon Mr. Creed by appointment came and dined with us, and sat talking all the afternoon till, about church time, my wife and I began our great dispute about going to Griffin's child's christening, where I was to have been godfather, but Sir J. Minnes (age 65) refusing, he wanted an equal for me and my Lady Batten, and so sought for other. Then the question was whether my wife should go, and she having dressed herself on purpose, was very angry, and began to talk openly of my keeping her within doors before Creed, which vexed me to the guts, but I had the discretion to keep myself without passion, and so resolved at last not to go, but to go down by water, which we did by H. Russell [a waterman] to the Half-way house, and there eat and drank, and upon a very small occasion had a difference again broke out, where without any the least cause she had the cunning to cry a great while, and talk and blubber, which made me mighty angry in mind, but said nothing to provoke her because Creed was there, but walked home, being troubled in my mind also about the knavery and neglect of Captain Fudge and Taylor, who were to have had their ship for Tangier ready by Thursday last, and now the men by a mistake are come on board, and not any master or man or boy of the ship's company on board with them when we came by her side this afternoon, and also received a letter from Mr. Coventry (age 36) this day in complaint of it.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Jun 1664. So home to my office, there very late, and then to supper and to bed mightily troubled in my mind to hear how Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) do labour all they can to abuse or enable others to abuse the King (age 34).

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jun 1664. Lord's Day. Up, and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) set me down at my Lord Sandwich's (age 38), where I waited till his coming down, when he came, too, could find little to say to me but only a general question or two, and so good-bye. Here his little daughter, my Lady Katharine (age 2) was brought, who is lately come from my father's at Brampton, to have her cheek looked after, which is and hath long been sore. But my Lord will rather have it be as it is, with a scarr in her face, than endanger it being worse by tampering.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jul 1664. Up, and at the office all the morning. In the afternoon by coach with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to White Hall, and there to a Committee for Fishing; but the first thing was swearing to be true to the Company, and we were all sworne; but a great dispute we had, which, methought, is very ominous to the Company; some, that we should swear to be true to the best of our power, and others to the best of our understanding; and carried in the last, though in that we are the least able to serve the Company, because we would not be obliged to attend the business when we can, but when we list. This consideration did displease me, but it was voted and so went. We did nothing else, but broke up till a Committee of Guinny was set and ended, and then met again for Tangier and there I did my business about my Lord Peterborough's (age 42) order and my own for my expenses for the garrison lately.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jul 1664. After dinner down with Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and Sir W. Batten (age 63) to view, and did like a place by Deptford, Kent [Map] yard to lay masts in.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1664. Thence I to the Half Moone [Map], against the 'Change [Map], to acquaint Lanyon and his friends of our proceedings, and thence to my Chancellor's (age 55), and there heard several tryals, wherein I perceive my Lord is a most able and ready man. After all done, he himself called, "Come, Mr. Pepys, you and I will take a turn in the garden". So he was led down stairs, having the goute, and there walked with me, I think, above an houre, talking most friendly, yet cunningly. I told him clearly how things were; how ignorant I was of his Lordship's concernment in it; how I did not do nor say one word singly, but what was done was the act of the whole Board. He told me by name that he was more angry with Sir G. Carteret (age 54) than with me, and also with the whole body of the Board. But thinking who it was of the Board that knew him least, he did place his fear upon me; but he finds that he is indebted to none of his friends there. I think I did thoroughly appease him, till he thanked me for my desire and pains to satisfy him; and upon my desiring to be directed who I should of his servants advise with about this business, he told me nobody, but would be glad to hear from me himself. He told me he would not direct me in any thing, that it might not be said that the Chancellor (age 55) did labour to abuse the King (age 34); or (as I offered) direct the suspending the Report of the Purveyors but I see what he means, and I will make it my worke to do him service in it. But, Lord! to see how he is incensed against poor Deane (age 30), as a fanatique rogue, and I know not what: and what he did was done in spite to his Lordship, among all his friends and tenants. He did plainly say that he would not direct me in any thing, for he would not put himself into the power of any man to say that he did so and so; but plainly told me as if he would be glad I did something. Lord! to see how we poor wretches dare not do the King (age 34) good service for fear of the greatness of these men. He named Sir G. Carteret (age 54), and Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and the rest; and that he was as angry with them all as me. But it was pleasant to think that, while he was talking to me, comes into the garden Sir G. Carteret (age 54); and my Lord avoided speaking with him, and made him and many others stay expecting him, while I walked up and down above an houre, I think; and would have me walk with my hat on. And yet, after all this, there has been so little ground for this his jealousy of me, that I am sometimes afeard that he do this only in policy to bring me to his side by scaring me; or else, which is worse, to try how faithfull I would be to the King (age 34); but I rather think the former of the two. I parted with great assurance how I acknowledged all I had to come from his Lordship; which he did not seem to refuse, but with great kindness and respect parted. So I by coach home, calling at my Lord's, but he not within.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jul 1664. Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning, among other things making a contract with Sir W. Warren for almost 1000 Gottenburg masts, the biggest that ever was made in the Navy, and wholly of my compassing and a good one I hope it is for the King (age 34). Dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 63), where I have not eat these many months. Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Mr. Coventry (age 36), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and myself there only, and my Lady. A good venison pasty, and very merry, and pleasant I made myself with my Lady, and she as much to me. This morning to the office comes Nicholas Osborne, Mr. Gauden's clerke, to desire of me what piece of plate I would choose to have a £100, or thereabouts, bestowed upon me in, he having order to lay out so much; and, out of his freedom with me, do of himself come to make this question. I a great while urged my unwillingnesse to take any, not knowing how I could serve Mr. Gauden, but left it wholly to himself; so at noon I find brought home in fine leather cases, a pair of the noblest flaggons that ever I saw all the days of my life; whether I shall keepe them or no I cannot tell; for it is to oblige me to him in the business of the Tangier victualling, wherein I doubt I shall not; but glad I am to see that I shall be sure to get something on one side or other, have it which will: so, with a merry heart, I looked upon them, and locked them up.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jul 1664. Thence to the Clerke of the Cheques, from whose house Mr. Falconer was buried to-day; Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and I the only principal officers that were there. We walked to church with him, and then I left them without staying the sermon and straight home by water, and there find, as I expected, Mr. Hill (age 34), and Andrews, and one slovenly and ugly fellow, Seignor Pedro, who sings Italian songs to the Theorbo most neatly, and they spent the whole evening in singing the best piece of musique counted of all hands in the world, made by Seignor Charissimi, the famous master in Rome. Fine it was, indeed, and too fine for me to judge of. They have spoke to Pedro to meet us every weeke, and I fear it will grow a trouble to me if we once come to bid judges to meet us, especially idle Masters, which do a little displease me to consider. They gone comes Mr. Lanyon, who tells me Mr. Alsopp is now become dangerously ill, and fears his recovery, covery, which shakes my expectation of £630 per annum by the business; and, therefore, bless God for what Mr. Gauden hath sent me, which, from some discourse to-day with Mr. Osborne, swearing that he knows not any thing of this business of the victualling; but, the contrary, that it is not that moves Mr. Gauden to send it me, for he hath had order for it any time these two months. Whether this be true or no, I know not; but I shall hence with the more confidence keepe it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jul 1664. At noon to the 'Change [Map], where I took occasion to break the business of my Chancellor's (age 55) timber to Mr. Coventry (age 36) in the best manner I could. He professed to me, that, till, Sir G. Carteret (age 54) did speake of it at the table, after our officers were gone to survey it, he did not know that my Chancellor (age 55) had any thing to do with it; but now he says that he had been told by the Duke (age 30) that Sir G. Carteret (age 54) had spoke to him about it, and that he had told the Duke that, were he in my Chancellor's (age 55) case, if he were his father, he would rather fling away the gains of two or £3,000, than have it said that the timber, which should have been the King's, if it had continued the Duke of Albemarle's (age 55), was concealed by us in favour of my Chancellor (age 55); for, says he, he is a great man, and all such as he, and he himself particularly, have a great many enemies that would be glad of such an advantage against him. When I told him it was strange that Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir G. Carteret (age 54), that knew my Chancellor's (age 55) concernment therein, should not at first inform us, he answered me that for Sir J. Minnes (age 65), he is looked upon to be an old good companion, but by nobody at the other end of the towne as any man of business, and that my Chancellor (age 55), he dares say, never did tell him of it, only Sir G. Carteret (age 54), he do believe, must needs know it, for he and Sir J. Shaw are the greatest confidants he hath in the world. So for himself, he said, he would not mince the matter, but was resolved to do what was fit, and stand upon his owne legs therein, and that he would speak to the Duke, that he and Sir G. Carteret (age 54) might be appointed to attend my Chancellor (age 55) in it. All this disturbs me mightily. I know not what to say to it, nor how to carry myself therein; for a compliance will discommend me to Mr. Coventry (age 36), and a discompliance to my Chancellor (age 55). But I think to let it alone, or at least meddle in it as little more as I can.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jul 1664. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) by coach to St. James's, but there the Duke (age 30) being gone out we to my Lord Berkeley's (age 62) chamber, Mr. Coventry (age 36) being there, and among other things there met with a printed copy of the King's commission for the repair of Paul's, which is very large, and large power for collecting money, and recovering of all people that had bought or sold formerly any thing belonging to the Church. And here I find my Lord Mayor of the City (age 48) set in order before the Archbishopp (age 66) or any nobleman, though all the greatest officers of state are there. But yet I do not hear by my Lord Berkeley (age 62), who is one of them, that any thing is like to come of it.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1664. So home, and thither, inviting him yesterday, comes Mr. Hill (age 34), at which I was a little troubled, but made up all very well, carrying him with me to Sir J. Minnes (age 65), where I was invited and all our families to a venison pasty. Here good cheer and good discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Aug 1664. Up, my mind very light from my last night's accounts, and so up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), and Sir W. Pen (age 43) to St. James's, where among other things having prepared with some industry every man a part this morning and no sooner (for fear they should either consider of it or discourse of it one to another) Mr. Coventry (age 36) did move the Duke (age 30) and obtain it that one of the clerkes of the Clerke of the Acts should have an addition of £30 a year, as Mr. Turner hath, which I am glad of, that I may give T. Hater £20 and keep £10 towards a boy's keeping.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Aug 1664. Up and abroad with Sir W. Batten (age 63), by coach to St. James's, where by the way he did tell me how Sir J. Minnes (age 65) would many times arrogate to himself the doing of that that all the Board have equal share in, and more that to himself which he hath had nothing to do in, and particularly the late paper given in by him to the Duke (age 30), the translation of a Dutch print concerning the quarrel between us and them, which he did give as his own when it was Sir Richard Ford's (age 50) wholly. Also he told me how Sir W. Pen (age 43) (it falling in our discourse touching Mrs. Falconer) was at first very great for Mr. Coventry (age 36) to bring him in guests, and that at high rates for places, and very open was he to me therein.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1664. Up, and through pain, to my great grief forced to wear my gowne to keep my legs warm. At the office all the morning, and there a high dispute against Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir W. Pen (age 43) about the breadth of canvas again, they being for the making of it narrower, I and Mr. Coventry (age 36) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) for the keeping it broader.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1664. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) by coach to St. James's, and there did our business with the Duke (age 30), who tells us more and more signs of a Dutch warr, and how we must presently set out a fleete for Guinny, for the Dutch are doing so, and there I believe the warr will begin.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1664. So I walked home contented with my speaking with her, and walked to my uncle Wight's (age 62), where they were all at supper, and among others comes fair Mrs. Margarett Wight, who indeed is very pretty. So after supper home to prayers and to bed. This afternoon, it seems, Sir J. Minnes (age 65) fell sicke at church, and going down the gallery stairs fell down dead, but came to himself again and is pretty well.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1664. Dined with little heart at noon, in the afternoon against my will to the office, where Sir G. Carteret (age 54) and we met about an order of the Council for the hiring him a house, giving him £1000 fine, and £70 per annum for it. Here Sir J. Minnes (age 65) took occasion, in the most childish and most unbeseeming manner, to reproach us all, but most himself, that he was not valued as Comptroller (age 65) among us, nor did anything but only set his hand to paper, which is but too true; and every body had a palace, and he no house to lie in, and wished he had but as much to build him a house with, as we have laid out in carved worke. It was to no end to oppose, but all bore it, and after laughed at him for it.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1664. Up with Sir J. Minnes (age 65), by coach, to St. James's; and there all the newes now of very hot preparations for the Dutch: and being with the Duke (age 30), he told us he was resolved to make a tripp himself, and that Sir W. Pen (age 43) should go in the same ship with him. Which honour, God forgive me! I could grudge him, for his knavery and dissimulation, though I do not envy much the having the same place myself. Talke also of great haste in the getting out another fleete, and building some ships; and now it is likely we have put one another by each other's dalliance past a retreate.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Oct 1664. Going home in coach with Sir W. Batten (age 63) he told me how Sir J. Minnes (age 65) by the means of Sir R. Ford (age 50) was the last night brought to his house and did discover the reason of his so long discontent with him, and now they are friends again, which I am sorry for, but he told it me so plainly that I see there is no thorough understanding between them, nor love, and so I hope there will be no great combination in any thing, nor do I see Sir J. Minnes (age 65) very fond as he used to be.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1664. Up and in Sir J. Minnes' (age 65) coach (alone with Mrs. Turner (age 41) as far as Paternoster Row [Map], where I set her down) to St. James's, and there did our business, and I had the good lucke to speak what pleased the Duke (age 31) about our great contract in hand with Sir W. Warren against Sir W. Batten (age 63), wherein the Duke (age 31) is very earnest for our contracting.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Oct 1664. At noon, Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), Sir W. Pen (age 43), and myself, were treated at the Dolphin by Mr. Foly, the ironmonger, where a good plain dinner, but I expected musique, the missing of which spoiled my dinner, only very good merry discourse at dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1664. Waked very betimes and lay long awake, my mind being so full of business. Then up and to St. James's, where I find Mr. Coventry (age 36) full of business, packing up for his going to sea with the Duke (age 31). Walked with him, talking, to White Hall, where to the Duke's lodgings, who is gone thither to lodge lately. I appeared to the Duke (age 31), and thence Mr. Coventry (age 36) and I an hour in the Long gallery, talking about the management of our office, he tells me the weight of dispatch will lie chiefly on me, and told me freely his mind touching Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65), the latter of whom, he most aptly said, was like a lapwing; that all he did was to keepe a flutter, to keepe others from the nest that they would find. He told me an old story of the former about the light-houses, how just before he had certified to the Duke (age 31) against the use of them, and what a burden they are to trade, and presently after, at his being at Harwich [Map], comes to desire that he might have the setting one up there, and gets the usefulness of it certified also by the Trinity House, Deptford [Map]. After long discoursing and considering all our stores and other things, as how the King (age 34) hath resolved upon Captain Taylor1 and Colonell Middleton, the first to be Commissioner for Harwich [Map] and the latter for Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], I away to the 'Change [Map], and there did very much business, so home to dinner, and Mr. Duke, our Secretary for the Fishery, dined with me.

Note 1. Coventry (age 36), writing to Secretary Bennet (age 46) (November 14th, 1664), refers to the objections made to Taylor, and adds: "Thinks the King (age 34) will not easily consent to his rejection, as he is a man of great abilities and dispatch, and was formerly laid aside at Chatham, Kent [Map] on the Duchess of Albemarle's (age 45) earnest interposition for another. He is a fanatic, it is true, but all hands will be needed for the work cut out; there is less danger of them in harbour than at sea, and profit will convert most of them" ("Calendar of State Papers", Domestic, 1664-65, p. 68).

Pepy's Diary. 08 Nov 1664. At noon, I and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Lord Barkeley (age 62) (who with Sir J. Duncum (age 42), and Mr. Chichly (age 50), are made Masters of the Ordnance), to the office of the Ordnance, to discourse about wadding for guns.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1664. So to the office, where vexed at the malice of Sir W. Batten (age 63) and folly of Sir J. Minnes (age 65) against Sir W. Warren, but I prevented, and shall do, though to my own disquiet and trouble.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Batten (age 63) to the Council Chamber at White Hall, to the Committee of the Lords for the Navy, where we were made to wait an houre or two before called in. In that time looking upon some books of heraldry of Sir Edward Walker's making, which are very fine, there I observed the Duke of Monmouth's (age 15) armes are neatly done, and his title, "The most noble and high-born Prince, James Scott, Duke of Monmouth (age 15), &c."; nor could Sir J. Minnes (age 65), nor any body there, tell whence he should take the name of Scott? And then I found my Lord Sandwich (age 39), his title under his armes is, "The most noble and mighty Lord, Edward, Earl of Sandwich, &c".

Calendars. 13 Nov 1664. 93. William Coventry (age 36) to [Sec. Bennet (age 46)]. Hopes the wind will change, and bring the Charles and the other ships out of the river; will not then fear what Opdam can do, though the men are raw, and need a little time at sea. The Ruby and Happy Return have brought some supernumeraries, but 500 more are wanted; 200 are expected from Plymouth, but till some runaways are hanged, the ships cannot be kept well manned. Sends a list of some fit to be made examples of in the several counties where they were pressed, with the names of those who pressed them. The Dutch ship named before is brought in, and two others are stayed at Cowes, Isle of Wight by virtue of the embargo, the order in Council making no exception for foreigners, The King's pleasure should be known therein, as the end, which is to gather seamen, does not seem to require the stopping of foreigners. Prize officers must- be sent speedily to [Portsmouth], Dover, and Deal. Those at Deal, Kent [Map] should have men in readiness to carry prizes up the river, that the men belonging to the fleet be not scattered. Persons should also be hastened to 'take care of the sick and wounded. The Duke (age 31) intends to appoint Erwin captain of the ship hired to go to St. Helena; he is approved by the East India Company, which is important, trade being intermixed with convoy, and they find fault if a commander of the King's ships bring home any little matter privately bought. The Duke has divided the fleet into squadrons, assigning to each a vice and rear adiniral; Sir John Lawson (age 49) and Sir William Berkeley to his own, Mennes (age 65) and Sansum to Prince Rupert's (age 44), Sir George Aiscue (age 48) [Ayscough] and Teddeman to the Earl of Sandwich. Hopes in a few days to be in much better order, if good men can be got. Will send a list of the squadrons. The Guernsey is damaged by running aground. Rear-Admiral Teddeman, with 4 or 5 ships, has gone to course in the Channel, and if he meet any refractory Dutchmen, will teach them their duty. The King's declaration for encouraging seamen has much revived the men, and added to their courage. [Four pages.]

Calendars. 14 Nov 1664. 104. William Coventry (age 36) to [Sec. Bennet. (age 46)] Believes nothing short of hanging will secure the pressed men. Lord St. John's news can hardly be believed, but the report will do no harm, for if the Dutch begin so roughly, seamen will be unwilling to go on merchantmen, and so cannot live without going on men-of-war. Hears that Taylor was objected to by the Committee [for Maritime Affairs] as a [Navy] Commissioner; he was chosen without contradiction by Sir John Mennes (age 65), Sir John Lawson (age 49), and Sir William Penn (age 43), and the warrants sent for him and others to the Attorney-General, as was usual in Lord Northumberland's time. Thinks the King will not easily consent to his rejection, as he is a man of great abilities and dispatch, and was formerly laid aside at Chatham [Map], on the Duchess of Albemarle's (age 45) earnest interposition for another. He is a fanatic, it is true, but all hands will be needed for the work cut out; there is less danger of them in harbour than at sea, and profit will convert most of them. The weather is bad; wonders the Scotchmen have not got to the Hope. The new ship is nearly ready, but has no guns; some spare ones should be sent in some man-of-war. [Two pages.]

Pepy's Diary. 17 Nov 1664. Up and to my office, and there all the morning mighty busy, and taking upon me to tell the Comptroller (age 65) how ill his matters were done, and I think indeed if I continue thus all the business of the office will come upon me whether I will or no.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Nov 1664. They gone, in the evening comes Mr. Andrews and sings with us, and he gone, I to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), where Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and he and I to talk about our letter to my Lord Treasurer (age 57), where his folly and simple confidence so great in a report so ridiculous that he hath drawn up to present to my Lord, nothing of it being true, that I was ashamed, and did roundly and in many words for an houre together talk boldly to him, which pleased Sir W. Batten (age 63) and my Lady, but I was in the right, and was the willinger to do so before them, that they might see that I am somebody, and shall serve him so in his way another time.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Nov 1664. And I had letters this afternoon, that three are brought into the Downes and Dover; so that the warr is begun: God give a good end to it! After dinner at home all the afternoon busy, and at night with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) looking over the business of stating the accounts of the navy charge to my Lord Treasurer (age 57), where Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) paper served us in no stead almost, but was all false, and after I had done it with great pains, he being by, I am confident he understands not one word in it. At it till 10 at night almost.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Nov 1664. Thence to my Chancellor's (age 55), and there staid long with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65), to speak with my Lord about our Prize Office business; but, being sicke and full of visitants, we could not speak with him, and so away home. Where Sir Richard Ford (age 50) did meet us with letters from Holland this day, that it is likely the Dutch fleete will not come out this year; they have not victuals to keep them out, and it is likely they will be frozen before they can get back. Captain Cocke (age 47) is made Steward for sick and wounded seamen.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and W. Batten (age 63) to White Hall, but no Committee of Lords (which is like to do the King's business well).

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1664. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 63) and Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to the Committee of the Lords, and there did our business; but, Lord! what a sorry dispatch these great persons give to business.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Dec 1664. Thence homeward, and the coach broke with us in Lincoln's Inn Fields, and so walked to Fleete Streete, and there took coach and home, and to my office, whither by and by comes Captain Cocke (age 47), and then Sir W. Batten (age 63), and we all to Sir J. Minnes (age 65), and I did give them a barrel of oysters I had given to me, and so there sat and talked, where good discourse of the late troubles, they knowing things, all of them, very well; and Cocke (age 47), from the King's (age 34) own mouth, being then entrusted himself much, do know particularly that the King's credulity to Cromwell's promises, private to him, against the advice of his friends and the certain discovery of the practices and discourses of Cromwell in council (by Major Huntington)1 did take away his life and nothing else. Then to some loose atheisticall discourse of Cocke's (age 47), when he was almost drunk, and then about 11 o'clock broke up, and I to my office, to fit up an account for Povy (age 50), wherein I hope to get something. At it till almost two o'clock, then to supper and to bed.

Note 1. According to Clarendon the officer here alluded to was a major in Cromwell's own regiment of horse, and employed by him to treat with Charles I whilst at Hampton Court [Map]; but being convinced of the insincerity of the proceeding, communicated his suspicions to that monarch, and immediately gave up his commission. We hear no more of Huntington till the Restoration, when his name occurs with those of many other officers, who tendered their services to the King (age 34). His reasons for laying down his commission are printed in Thurloe's "State Papers" and Maseres's "Tracts". B.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Dec 1664. Up, and to White Hall with Sir J. Minnes (age 65); and there, among an infinite crowd of great persons, did kiss the Duke's (age 31) hand; but had no time to discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Dec 1664. At the office all the morning, where comes my Lord Brunkard (age 44) with his patent in his hand, and delivered it to Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and myself, we alone being there all the day, and at noon I in his coach with him to the 'Change [Map], where he set me down; a modest civil person he seems to be, but wholly ignorant in the business of the Navy as possible, but I hope to make a friend of him, being a worthy man.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1664. But I was forced to rise, and up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to White Hall, and there we waited on the Duke (age 31). And among other things Mr. Coventry (age 36) took occasion to vindicate himself before the Duke and us, being all there, about the choosing of Taylor for Harwich [Map]. Upon which the Duke did clear him, and did tell us that he did expect, that, after he had named a man, none of us shall then oppose or find fault with the man; but if we had anything to say, we ought to say it before he had chose him. Sir G. Carteret (age 54) thought himself concerned, and endeavoured to clear himself: and by and by Sir W. Batten (age 63) did speak, knowing himself guilty, and did confess, that being pressed by the Council he did say what he did, that he was accounted a fanatique; but did not know that at that time he had been appointed by his Royal Highness. To which the Duke [replied] that it was impossible but he must know that he had appointed him; and so it did appear that the Duke did mean all this while Sir W. Batten (age 63).

Pepy's Diary. 22 Dec 1664. Dined at the Dolphin, Sir G. Carteret (age 54), Sir J. Minnes (age 65), Sir W. Batten (age 63), and I, with Sir W. Boreman and Sir Theophilus Biddulph and others, Commissioners of the Sewers, about our place below to lay masts in.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Dec 1664. After dinner I to Sir W. Batten's (age 63), and there received so much good usage (as I have of late done) from him and my Lady, obliging me and my wife, according to promise, to come and dine with them to-morrow with our neighbours, that I was in pain all the day, and night too after, to know how to order the business of my wife's not going, and by discourse receive fresh instances of Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) folly in complaining to Sir G. Carteret (age 54) of Sir W. Batten (age 63) and me for some family offences, such as my having of a stopcock to keepe the water from them, which vexes me, but it would more but that Sir G. Carteret (age 54) knows him very well.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Dec 1664. My people came to bed, after their sporting, at four o'clock in the morning; I up at seven, and to Deptford, Kent [Map] and Woolwich, Kent [Map] in a gally; the Duke (age 31) calling to me out of the barge in which the King (age 34) was with him going down the river, to know whither I was going. I told him to Woolwich, Kent [Map], but was troubled afterward I should say no farther, being in a gally, lest he think me too profuse in my journeys. Did several businesses, and then back again by two o'clock to Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) to dinner by appointment, where all yesterday's company but Mr. Coventry (age 36), who could not come. Here merry, and after an hour's chat I down to the office, where busy late, and then home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jan 1665. Thence home and visited Sir J. Minnes (age 65), who continues ill, but is something better; there he told me what a mad freaking fellow Sir Ellis Layton hath been, and is, and once at Antwerp was really mad.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1665. Thence by coach home (to see Sir J. Minnes (age 65) first), who is still sick, and I doubt worse than he seems to be. Mrs. Turner (age 42) here took me into her closet, and there did give me a glass of most pure water, and shewed me her Rocke, which indeed is a very noble thing but a very bawble. So away to my office, where late, busy, and then home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Feb 1665. After being in bed, my people come and say there is a great stinke of burning, but no smoake. We called up Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) and Sir W. Batten's (age 64) people, and Griffin, and the people at the madhouse, but nothing could be found to give occasion to it. At this trouble we were till past three o'clock, and then the stinke ceasing, I to sleep, and my people to bed, and lay very long in the morning.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Feb 1665. Up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and Sir W. Pen (age 43) to St. James's, but the Duke is gone abroad.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Feb 1665. So to my office, where till 12 at night, being only a little while at noon at Sir W. Batten's (age 64) to see him, and had some high words with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) about Sir W. Warren, he calling him cheating knave, but I cooled him, and at night at Sir W. Pen's (age 43), he being to go to Chatham, Kent [Map] to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Feb 1665. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 65) to attend the Duke (age 31), and then we back again and rode into the beginning of my Chancellor's (age 56) new house, near St. James's; which common people have already called Dunkirke-house, from their opinion of his having a good bribe for the selling of that towne. And very noble I believe it will be. Near that is my Lord Barkeley (age 63) beginning another on one side, and Sir J. Denham (age 50) on the other.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Feb 1665. At noon to the 'Change [Map] to inquire what wages the Dutch give in their men-of-warr at this day, and I hear for certain they give but twelve guilders at most, which is not full 24s., a thing I wonder at. At home to dinner, and then in Sir J. Minnes's (age 65) coach, my wife and I with him, and also Mercer, abroad, he and I to White Hall, and he would have his coach to wait upon my wife on her visits, it being the first time my wife hath been out of doors (but the other day to bathe her) several weeks. We to a Committee of the Council to discourse concerning pressing of men; but, Lord! how they meet; never sit down: one comes, now another goes, then comes another; one complaining that nothing is done, another swearing that he hath been there these two hours and nobody come. At last it come to this, my Lord Annesly (age 43), says he, "I think we must be forced to get the King (age 34) to come to every committee; for I do not see that we do any thing at any time but when he is here". And I believe he said the truth and very constant he is at the council table on council-days; which his predecessors, it seems, very rarely did; but thus I perceive the greatest affair in the world at this day is likely to be managed by us. But to hear how my Lord Barkeley (age 63) and others of them do cry up the discipline of the late times here, and in the former Dutch warr is strange, wishing with all their hearts that the business of religion were not so severely carried on as to discourage the sober people to come among us, and wishing that the same law and severity were used against drunkennesse as there was then, saying that our evil living will call the hand of God upon us again.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1665. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 66) by coach, being a most lamentable cold day as any this year, to St. James's, and there did our business with the Duke (age 31). Great preparations for his speedy return to sea. I saw him try on his buff coat and hatpiece covered with black velvet. It troubles me more to think of his venture, than of anything else in the whole warr.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Mar 1665. Up and to the office, at noon home to dinner, and to the office again, where very late, and then home to supper and to bed. This day returned Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) from Lee Roade, where they have been to see the wrecke of "The London", out of which, they say, the guns may be got, but the hull of her will be wholly lost, as not being capable of being weighed.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Mar 1665. Lord's Day. Up, and borrowing Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) coach, to my Lord Sandwich's (age 39), but he was gone abroad. I sent the coach back for my wife, my Lord a second time dining at home on purpose to meet me, he having not dined once at home but those times since his coming from sea. I sat down and read over the Bishop of Chichester's (age 73) sermon upon the anniversary of the King's death, much cried up, but, methinks, but a mean sermon.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1665. Up before six, to the office, where busy all the morning. At noon dined with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), at the Tower [Map], with Sir J. Robinson (age 50), at a farewell dinner which he gives Major Holmes (age 43) at his going out of the Tower [Map], where he hath for some time, since his coming from Guinny, been a prisoner, and, it seems, had presented the Lieutenant with fifty pieces yesterday. Here a great deale of good victuals and company. Thence home to my office, where very late, and home to supper and to bed weary of business.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1665. In the evening spent an hour in the garden walking with Sir J. Minnes (age 66), talking of the Chest business, wherein Sir W. Batten (age 64) deals so unfairly, wherein the old man is very hot for the present, but that zeal will not last nor is to be trusted.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1665. Thence with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) to my Lord Treasurer (age 58), and by and by come Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and anon we come to my Lord, and there did lay open the expence for the six months past, and an estimate of the seven months to come, to November next: the first arising to above £500,000, and the latter will, as we judge, come to above £1,000,000. But to see how my Lord Treasurer (age 58) did bless himself, crying he could do no more than he could, nor give more money than he had, if the occasion and expence were never so great, which is but a sad story. And then to hear how like a passionate and ignorant asse Sir G. Carteret (age 55) did harangue upon the abuse of Tickets did make me mad almost and yet was fain to hold my tongue.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Apr 1665. Thence home to the office, where I find Sir J. Minnes (age 66) come home from Chatham, Kent [Map], and Sir W. Batten (age 64) both this morning from Harwich [Map], where they have been these 7 or 8 days.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Apr 1665. All the morning busy at the office. In the afternoon to my Lord Treasurer's (age 58), and there got my Lord Treasurer (age 58) to sign the warrant for my striking of tallys, and so doing many jobbs in my way home, and there late writeing letters, being troubled in my mind to hear that Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) do take notice that I am now-a-days much from the office upon no office business, which vexes me, and will make me mind my business the better, I hope in God; but what troubles me more is, that I do omit to write, as I should do, to Mr. Coventry (age 37), which I must not do, though this night I minded it so little as to sleep in the middle of my letter to him, and committed forty blotts and blurrs in my letter to him, but of this I hope never more to be guilty, if I have not already given him sufficient offence. So, late home, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 May 1665. Thence home by water, and presently down to Woolwich, Kent [Map] and back to Blackewall [Map], and there, viewed the Breach, in order to a Mast Docke, and so to Deptford to the Globe, where my Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 64), and Commissioner Pett (age 54) were at dinner, having been at the Breach also, but they find it will be too great charge to make use of it.

Pepy's Diary. 17 May 1665. Thence home, and after dinner to the office, where late, and so home to supper and to bed. Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and I had an angry bout this afternoon with Commissioner Pett (age 54) about his neglecting his duty and absenting himself, unknown to us, from his place at Chatham, Kent [Map], but a most false man I every day find him more and more, and in this very full of equivocation. The fleete we doubt not come to Harwich [Map] by this time. Sir W. Batten (age 64) is gone down this day thither, and the Duchesse of Yorke (age 28) went down yesterday to meet the Duke (age 31).

Pepy's Diary. 18 May 1665. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 66) to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), where we did much business, and I with good content to myself; among other things we did examine Nixon and Stanesby, about their late running from two Dutchmen1 for which they are committed to a vessel to carry them to the fleete to be tried. A most fowle unhandsome thing as ever was heard, for plain cowardice on Nixon's part.

Note 1. Captain Edward Nixon, of the "Elizabeth", and Captain John Stanesby, of the "Eagle". John Lanyon wrote to the Navy Commissioners from Plymouth, Devon [Map], May 16th: "Understands from the seamen that the conduct of Captains Nixon and Stanesby in their late engagement with two Dutch capers was very foul; the night they left the Dutch, no lights were put out as formerly, and though in sight of them in the morning, they still kept on their way; the Eagle lay by some time, and both the enemy's ships plied on her, but finding the Elizabeth nearly out of sight she also made sail; it is true the wind and sea were high, but there were no sufficient reasons for such endeavours to get from them". (Calendar of State Papers, Domestic, 1664-65, p. 367). Both captains were tried; Nixon was condemned to be shot but Stanesby was cleared, and Charnock asserts that he was commander the "Happy Return" in 1672.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jun 1665. Thence to the Dolphin Taverne, where Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir Thomas Harvy (age 40), and myself dined, upon Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) charge, and very merry we were, Sir Thomas Harvy (age 40) being a very drolle.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jun 1665. At noon with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) to my Lord Mayor's to dinner, where much company in a little room, and though a good, yet no extraordinary table. His name, Sir John Lawrence, whose father, a very ordinary old man, sat there at table, but it seems a very rich man. Here were at table three Sir Richard Brownes (age 60), viz.: he of the Councill, a clerk, and the Alderman, and his son; and there was a little grandson also Richard, who will hereafter be Sir Richard Browne (age 60). The Alderman did here openly tell in boasting how he had, only upon suspicion of disturbances, if there had been any bad newes from sea, clapped up several persons that he was afeard of; and that he had several times done the like and would do, and take no bail where he saw it unsafe for the King (age 35). But by and by he said that he was now sued in the Exchequer by a man for false imprisonment, that he had, upon the same score, imprisoned while he was Mayor four years ago, and asked advice upon it. I told him I believed there was none, and told my story of Field, at which he was troubled, and said that it was then unsafe for any man to serve the King (age 35), and, I believed, knows not what to do therein; but that Sir Richard Browne (age 60), of the Councill, advised him to speak with my Chancellor (age 56) about it. My Lord Mayor very respectfull to me; and so I after dinner away and found Sir J. Minnes (age 66) ready with his coach and four horses at our office gate, for him and me to go out of towne to meet the Duke of Yorke (age 31) coming from Harwich [Map] to-night, and so as far as Ilford, and there 'light.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jun 1665. And so to my office, where, after my letters wrote, to supper and to bed. All our discourse in our way was Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) telling me passages of the late King's and his father's, which I was mightily pleased to hear for information, though the pride of some persons and vice of most was but a sad story to tell how that brought the whole kingdom and King to ruine.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jun 1665. Up and to White Hall with Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and to the Committee of Tangier, where my Lord Treasurer (age 58) was, the first and only time he ever was there, and did promise us £15,000 for Tangier and no more, which will be short. But if I can pay Mr. Andrews all his money I care for no more, and the Bills of Exchange.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jun 1665. Sir J. Minnes (age 66) carried me and my wife to White Hall, and thence his coach along with my wife where she would.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jun 1665. Thence by coach to several places, and so home, and all the evening with Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and all the women of the house (excepting my Lady Batten) late in the garden chatting. At 12 o'clock home to supper and to bed. My Lord Sandwich (age 39) is gone towards the sea to-day, it being a sudden resolution, I having taken no leave of him.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jul 1665. Up and by water with Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) to White Hall to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), where, after a little business, we parted, and I to the Harp and Ball, and there staid a while talking to Mary, and so home to dinner.

Great Plague of London

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jul 1665. Thence mighty full of the honour of this day, I took coach and to Kate Joyce's, but she not within, but spoke with Anthony, who tells me he likes well of my proposal for Pall to Harman (age 28), but I fear that less than £500 will not be taken, and that I shall not be able to give, though I did not say so to him. After a little other discourse and the sad news of the death of so many in the parish of the plague, forty last night, the bell always going, I back to the Exchange [Map], where I went up and sat talking with my beauty, Mrs. Batelier, a great while, who is indeed one of the finest women I ever saw in my life. After buying some small matter, I home, and there to the office and saw Sir J. Minnes (age 66) now come from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], I home to set my Journall for these four days in order, they being four days of as great content and honour and pleasure to me as ever I hope to live or desire, or think any body else can live. For methinks if a man would but reflect upon this, and think that all these things are ordered by God Almighty to make me contented, and even this very marriage now on foot is one of the things intended to find me content in, in my life and matter of mirth, methinks it should make one mightily more satisfied in the world than he is. This day poor Robin Shaw at Backewell's died, and Backewell himself now in Flanders. The King (age 35) himself asked about Shaw, and being told he was dead, said he was very sorry for it. The sicknesse is got into our parish this week, and is got, indeed, every where; so that I begin to think of setting things in order, which I pray God enable me to put both as to soul and body.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Sep 1665. Church being done, my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and I up to the Vestry at the desire of the justices of the Peace, Sir Theo. Biddulph (age 53) and Sir W. Boreman (age 53) and Alderman Hooker (age 53), in order to the doing something for the keeping of the plague from growing; but Lord! to consider the madness of the people of the town, who will (because they are forbid) come in crowds along with the dead corps to see them buried; but we agreed on some orders for the prevention thereof.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Sep 1665. Writing letters all the morning, among others to my Baroness Carteret (age 63), the first I have wrote to her, telling her the state of the city as to health and other sorrowfull stories, and thence after dinner to Greenwich, Kent [Map], to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), where I found my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and having staid our hour for the justices by agreement, the time being past we to walk in the Park with Mr. Hammond and Turner, and there eat some fruit out of the King's garden and walked in the Parke, and so back to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and thence walked home, my Lord Bruncker (age 45) giving me a very neat cane to walk with; but it troubled me to pass by Coome farme where about twenty-one people have died of the plague, and three or four days since I saw a dead corps in a coffin lie in the Close unburied, and a watch is constantly kept there night and day to keep the people in, the plague making us cruel, as doggs, one to another.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Aug 1665. We sat late, and then by invitation my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I to Sir G. Smith's (age 50) to dinner, where very good company and good cheer. Captain Cocke (age 48) was there and Jacke Fenn, but to our great wonder Alderman Bence, and tells us that not a word of all this is true, and others said so too, but by his owne story his wife hath been ill, and he fain to leave his house and comes not to her, which continuing a trouble to me all the time I was there.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Aug 1665. Thence by agreement to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) lodgings, where I found my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and so by water to the ferry, and there took Sir W. Batten's (age 64) coach that was sent for us, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), where very merry, good cheer, and up and down the garden with great content to me, and, after dinner, beat Captain Cocke (age 48) at billiards, won about 8s. of him and my Lord Bruncker (age 45). So in the evening after, much pleasure back again and I by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map], where supped with my wife, and then to bed betimes, because of rising to-morrow at four of the clock in order to the going out with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) toward Cranborne to my Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 17) in his way to Court.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1665. Thence he and I to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) by invitation, where Sir W. Batten (age 64) and my Lady, and my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and all of us dined upon a venison pasty and other good meat, but nothing well dressed. But my pleasure lay in getting some bills signed by Sir G. Carteret (age 55), and promise of present payment from Mr. Fenn, which do rejoice my heart, it being one of the heaviest things I had upon me, that so much of the little I have should lie (viz. near £1000) in the King's hands. Here very merry and (Sir G. Carteret (age 55) being gone presently after dinner) to Captain Cocke's (age 48), and there merry, and so broke up and I by water to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), with whom I spoke a great deale in private, they being designed to send a fleete of ships privately to the Streights. No news yet from our fleete, which is much wondered at, but the Duke says for certain guns have been heard to the northward very much. It was dark before I could get home, and so land at Church-yard stairs, where, to my great trouble, I met a dead corps of the plague, in the narrow ally just bringing down a little pair of stairs. But I thank God I was not much disturbed at it. However, I shall beware of being late abroad again.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Aug 1665. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon dined together upon some victuals I had prepared at Sir W. Batten's (age 64) upon the King's charge, and after dinner, I having dispatched some business and set things in order at home, we down to the water and by boat to Greenwich, Kent [Map] to the Bezan yacht, where Sir W. Batten (age 64), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and myself, with some servants (among others Mr. Carcasse, my Lord's clerk, a very civil gentleman), embarked in the yacht and down we went most pleasantly, and noble discourse I had with my Lord Bruneker (age 45), who is a most excellent person. Short of Gravesend, Kent [Map] it grew calme, and so we come to an anchor, and to supper mighty merry, and after it, being moonshine, we out of the cabbin to laugh and talk, and then, as we grew sleepy, went in and upon velvet cushions of the King's that belong to the yacht fell to sleep, which we all did pretty well till 3 or 4 of the clock, having risen in the night to look for a new comet which is said to have lately shone, but we could see no such thing.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1665. Thence to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), at Greenwich, Kent [Map], and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) by appointment, to looke after the lodgings appointed for us there for our office, which do by no means please me, they being in the heart of all the labourers and workmen there, which makes it as unsafe as to be, I think, at London. Mr. Hugh May (age 43), who is a most ingenuous man, did show us the lodgings, and his acquaintance I am desirous of.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1665. Thence walked, it being now dark, to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), and there staid at the door talking with him an hour while messengers went to get a boat for me, to carry me to Woolwich, Kent [Map], but all to no purpose; so I was forced to walk it in the darke, at ten o'clock at night, with Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) George with me, being mightily troubled for fear of the doggs at Coome farme, and more for fear of rogues by the way, and yet more because of the plague which is there, which is very strange, it being a single house, all alone from the towne, but it seems they use to admit beggars, for their owne safety, to lie in their barns, and they brought it to them; but I bless God I got about eleven of the clock well to my wife, and giving 4s. in recompence to George, I to my wife, and having first viewed her last piece of drawing since I saw her, which is seven or eight days, which pleases me beyond any thing in the world, to bed with great content but weary.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1665. So to the King's house, and there met my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and to our lodgings again that are appointed for us, which do please me better to day than last night, and are set a doing.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Aug 1665. At noon down to Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Lord Bruncker to Greenwich, Kent [Map] to sign some of the Treasurer's books, and there dined very well; and thence to look upon our rooms again at the King's house, which are not yet ready for us.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1665. Up betimes, and prepared to my great satisfaction an account for the board of my office disbursements, which I had suffered to run on to almost £120. That done I down by water to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where we met the first day my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and I, and I think we shall do well there, and begin very auspiciously to me by having my account abovesaid passed, and put into a way of having it presently paid. When we rose I find Mr. Andrews and Mr. Yeabsly, who is just come from Plymouth, Devon [Map], at the door, and we walked together toward my Lord Bruncker's (age 45), talking about their business, Yeabsly being come up on purpose to discourse with me about it, and finished all in a quarter of an hour, and is gone again. I perceive they have some inclination to be going on with their victualling-business for a while longer before they resign it to Mr. Gauden, and I am well contented, for it brings me very good profit with certainty, yet with much care and some pains.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1665. We parted at my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) doore, where I went in, having never been there before, and there he made a noble entertainment for Sir J. Minnes (age 66), myself, and Captain Cocke (age 48), none else saving some painted lady that dined there, I know not who she is. But very merry we were, and after dinner into the garden, and to see his and her chamber, where some good pictures, and a very handsome young woman for my lady's woman.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Aug 1665. In the morning waking, among other discourse my wife begun to tell me the difference between her and Mercer, and that it was only from restraining her to gad abroad to some Frenchmen that were in the town, which I do not wholly yet in part believe, and for my quiet would not enquire into it. So rose and dressed myself, and away by land walking a good way, then remembered that I had promised Commissioner Pett (age 55) to go with him in his coach, and therefore I went back again to him, and so by his coach to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and called at Sir Theophilus Biddulph's, a sober, discreet man, to discourse of the preventing of the plague in Greenwich, Kent [Map], and Woolwich, Kent [Map], and Deptford, Kent [Map], where in every place it begins to grow very great. We appointed another meeting, and so walked together to Greenwich, Kent [Map] and there parted, and Pett and I to the office, where all the morning, and after office done I to Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and dined with him, and thence to Deptford, Kent [Map] thinking to have seen Bagwell, but did not, and so straight to Redriffe [Map], and home, and late at my business to dispatch away letters, and then home to bed, which I did not intend, but to have staid for altogether at Woolwich, Kent [Map], but I made a shift for a bed for Tom, whose bed is gone to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Sep 1665. This morning I wrote letters to Mr. Hill (age 35) and Andrews to come to dine with me to-morrow, and then I to the office, where busy, and thence to dine with Sir J. Minnes (age 66), where merry, but only that Sir J. Minnes (age 66) who hath lately lost two coach horses, dead in the stable, has a third now a dying.

1665 Battle of Vågen

Pepy's Diary. 10 Sep 1665. But before I come out there happened newes to come to the by an expresse from Mr. Coventry (age 37), telling me the most happy news of my Lord Sandwich's (age 40) meeting with part of the Dutch; his taking two of their East India ships, and six or seven others, and very good prizes and that he is in search of the rest of the fleet, which he hopes to find upon the Wellbancke, with the loss only of the Hector, poor Captain Cuttle. This newes do so overjoy me that I know not what to say enough to express it, but the better to do it I did walk to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and there sending away Mr. Andrews (age 33), I to Captain Cocke's (age 48), where I find my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and his mistress, and Sir J. Minnes (age 66). Where we supped (there was also Sir W. Doyly (age 51) and Mr. Evelyn (age 44)); but the receipt of this newes did put us all into such an extacy of joy, that it inspired into Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Mr. Evelyn (age 44) such a spirit of mirth, that in all my life I never met with so merry a two hours as our company this night was. Among other humours, Mr. Evelyn's (age 44) repeating of some verses made up of nothing but the various acceptations of may and can, and doing it so aptly upon occasion of something of that nature, and so fast, did make us all die almost with laughing, and did so stop the mouth of Sir J. Minnes (age 66) in the middle of all his mirth (and in a thing agreeing with his own manner of genius), that I never saw any man so out-done in all my life; and Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) mirth too to see himself out-done, was the crown of all our mirth. In this humour we sat till about ten at night, and so my Lord (age 45) and his mistress home, and we to bed, it being one of the times of my life wherein I was the fullest of true sense of joy.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1665. So to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where when come I find my Lord Rutherford and Creed come from Court, and among other things have brought me several orders for money to pay for Tangier; and, among the rest £7000 and more, to this Lord, which is an excellent thing to consider, that, though they can do nothing else, they can give away the King's money upon their progresse. I did give him the best answer I could to pay him with tallys, and that is all they could get from me. I was not in humour to spend much time with them, but walked a little before Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) door and then took leave, and I by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map], where with my wife to a game at tables1, and to bed.

Note 1. The old name for backgammon, used by Shakespeare and others. The following lines are from an epitaph entirely made up of puns on backgammon "Man's life's a game at tables, and he may Mend his bad fortune by his wiser play". Wit's Recre., i. 250, reprint, 1817.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1665. Up and walked to the office, there to do some business till ten of the clock, and then by agreement my Lord, Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Doyly (age 51), and I took boat and over to the ferry, where Sir W. Batten's (age 64) coach was ready for us, and to Walthamstow [Map] drove merrily, excellent merry discourse in the way, and most upon our last night's revells; there come we were very merry, and a good plain venison dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Sep 1665. Up, and walked to the office, where we sat late, and thence to dinner home with Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and so to the office, where writing letters, and home in the evening, where my wife shews me a letter from her brother speaking of their father's being ill, like to die, which, God forgive me! did not trouble me so much as it should, though I was indeed sorry for it. I did presently resolve to send him something in a letter from my wife, viz. 20s. So to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Sep 1665. Up, and walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map], taking pleasure to walk with my minute watch in my hand, by which I am come now to see the distances of my way from Woolwich, Kent [Map] to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and do find myself to come within two minutes constantly to the same place at the end of each quarter of an houre. Here we rendezvoused at Captain Cocke's (age 48), and there eat oysters, and so my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and I took boat, and in my Lord's coach to Sir W. Hickes's, whither by and by my Lady Batten and Sir William comes. It is a good seat, with a fair grove of trees by it, and the remains of a good garden; but so let to run to ruine, both house and every thing in and about it, so ill furnished and miserably looked after, I never did see in all my life. Not so much as a latch to his dining-room door; which saved him nothing, for the wind blowing into the room for want thereof, flung down a great bow pott that stood upon the side-table, and that fell upon some Venice glasses, and did him a crown's worth of hurt. He did give us the meanest dinner (of beef, shoulder and umbles of venison1 which he takes away from the keeper of the Forest, and a few pigeons, and all in the meanest manner) that ever I did see, to the basest degree.

Note 1. Dr. Johnson was puzzled by the following passage in "The Merry Wives of Windsor", act v., sc. 3: "Divide me like a bribe-buck, each a haunch. I will keep the sides to myself; my shoulders for the fellow of this walk". If he could have read the account of Sir William Hickes's dinner, he would at once have understood the allusion to the keeper's perquisites of the shoulders of all deer killed in his walk. B.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Sep 1665. Up, and walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map] reading a play, and to the office, where I find Sir J. Minnes (age 66) gone to the fleete, like a doating foole, to do no good, but proclaim himself an asse; for no service he can do there, nor inform my Lord, who is come in thither to the buoy of the Nore, in anything worth his knowledge.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Sep 1665. Thence with Captain Cocke (age 48), in his coach, home to dinner, whither comes by invitation my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and his mistresse and very good company we were, but in dinner time comes Sir J. Minnes (age 66) from the fleete, like a simple weak man, having nothing to say of what he hath done there, but tells of what value he imagines the prizes to be, and that my Lord Sandwich (age 40) is well, and mightily concerned to hear that I was well. But this did put me upon a desire of going thither; and, moving of it to my Lord, we presently agreed upon it to go this very tide, we two and Captain Cocke (age 48). So every body prepared to fit himself for his journey, and I walked to Woolwich, Kent [Map] to trim and shift myself, and by the time I was ready they come down in the Bezan yacht, and so I aboard and my boy Tom, and there very merrily we sailed to below Gravesend, Kent [Map], and there come to anchor for all night, and supped and talked, and with much pleasure at last settled ourselves to sleep having very good lodging upon cushions in the cabbin.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. But by and by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) goes away and others of the company, and when I expected Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and his sister should have staid to have made Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Lady sup, I find they go up in snuffe to bed without taking any manner of leave of them, but left them with Mr. Boreman. The reason of this I could not presently learn, but anon I hear it is that Sir J. Minnes (age 66) did expect and intend them a supper, but they without respect to him did first apply themselves to Boreman, which makes all this great feude.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. After dinner I to the office, and there wrote letters and did business till night and then to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), where I find my Lady Batten come, and she and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and his mistresse, and the whole house-full there at cards.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. I find here a design in my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Captain Cocke (age 48) to have had my Lord Bruncker (age 45) chosen as one of us to have been sent aboard one of the East Indiamen, and Captain Cocke (age 48) as a merchant to be joined with him, and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) for the other, and Sir G. Smith (age 50) to be joined with him. But I did order it so that my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) were ordered, but I did stop the merchants to be added, which would have been a most pernicious thing to the King (age 35) I am sure. In this I did, I think, a very good office, though I cannot acquit myself from some envy of mine in the business to have the profitable business done by another hand while I lay wholly imployed in the trouble of the office.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. That being done I to Sir J. Minnes (age 66) where I find Sir W. Batten (age 64) and his Lady gone home to Walthamstow [Map] in great snuffe as to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), but yet with some necessity, hearing that a mayde-servant of theirs is taken ill. Here I staid and resolved of my going in my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach which he would have me to take, though himself cannot go with me as he intended, and so to my last night's lodging to bed very weary.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. So I up, and after being trimmed, the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths, I think, and more, went to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), where I find all out of order still, they having not seen one another till by and by Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Sir W. Batten (age 64) met, to go into my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach, and so we four to Lambeth, Surrey [Map], and thence to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), to inform him what we have done as to the fleete, which is very little, and to receive his direction.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. Thence away by water, and I walked with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) home, and there at dinner comes a letter from my Lord Sandwich (age 40) to tell me that he would this day be at Woolwich, Kent [Map], and desired me to meet him. Which fearing might have lain in Sir J. Minnes' (age 66) pocket a while, he sending it me, did give my Lord Bruncker (age 45), his mistress, and I occasion to talk of him as the most unfit man for business in the world.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. Among other discourse concerning long life, Sir J. Minnes (age 66) saying that his great-grandfather was alive in Edward the Vth's time; my Lord Sandwich (age 40) did tell us how few there have been of his family since King Harry the VIIIth; that is to say, the then Chiefe Justice, and his son the Lord Montagu, who was father to Sir Sidney1, who was his father. And yet, what is more wonderfull, he did assure us from the mouth of my Lord Montagu (age 40) himself, that in King James's time ([when he] had a mind to get the King (age 35) to cut off the entayle of some land which was given in Harry the VIIIth's time to the family, with the remainder in the Crowne); he did answer the King (age 35) in showing how unlikely it was that ever it could revert to the Crown, but that it would be a present convenience to him; and did show that at that time there were 4,000 persons derived from the very body of the Chiefe Justice. It seems the number of daughters in the family having been very great, and they too had most of them many children, and grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. This he tells as a most known and certain truth.

Note 1. These are the words in the MS., and not "his son and the Lord Montagu", as in some former editions. Pepys seems to have written Lord Montagu by mistake for Sir Edward Montagu.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. Though at last afterwards I found that he was not in this faulty, but hereby I have got a clear evidence of my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) opinion of him. My Lord Bruncker (age 45) presently ordered his coach to be ready and we to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and my Lord Sandwich (age 40) not being come, we took a boat and about a mile off met him in his Catch, and boarded him, and come up with him; and, after making a little halt at my house, which I ordered, to have my wife see him, we all together by coach to Mr. Boreman's, where Sir J. Minnes (age 66) did receive him very handsomely, and there he is to lie; and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) did give him on the sudden, a very handsome supper and brave discourse, my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and Captain Cocke (age 48), and Captain Herbert being there, with myself. Here my Lord did witness great respect to me, and very kind expressions, and by other occasions, from one thing to another did take notice how I was overjoyed at first to see the King's letter to his Lordship, and told them how I did kiss it, and that, whatever he was, I did always love the King (age 35). This my Lord Bruncker (age 45) did take such notice [of] as that he could not forbear kissing me before my Lord, professing his finding occasion every day more and more to love me, and Captain Cocke (age 48) has since of himself taken notice of that speech of my Lord then concerning me, and may be of good use to me.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. Up betimes and to the office, meaning to have entered my last 5 or 6 days' Journall, but was called away by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and to Blackwall [Map], there to look after the storehouses in order to the laying of goods out of the East India ships when they shall be unloaden.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1665. Thence by coach to Lambeth, Surrey [Map], his Lordship, and all our office, and Mr. Evelyn (age 44), to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), where, after the compliment with my Lord very kind, we sat down to consult of the disposing and supporting of the fleete with victuals and money, and for the sicke men and prisoners; and I did propose the taking out some goods out of the prizes, to the value of £10,000, which was accorded to, and an order, drawn up and signed by the Duke (age 31) and my Lord, done in the best manner I can, and referred to my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), but what inconveniences may arise from it I do not yet see, but fear there may be many.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Sep 1665. Up by five o'clock and got post horses and so set out for Greenwich, Kent [Map], calling and drinking at Dartford. Being come to Greenwich, Kent [Map] and shifting myself I to the office, from whence by and by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) set out toward Erith, Kent to take charge of the two East India shipps, which I had a hand in contriving for the King's service and may do myself a good office too thereby. I to dinner with Mr. Wright to his father-in-law in Greenwich, Kent [Map], one of the most silly, harmless, prating old men that ever I heard in my life. Creed dined with me, and among other discourses got of me a promise of half that he could get my Lord Rutherford to give me upon clearing his business, which should not be less, he says, than £50 for my half, which is a good thing, though cunningly got of him.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Oct 1665. So to walk up and down the Cathedral [Map], and thence to the Crowne, whither Mr. Fowler, the Mayor of the towne, was come in his gowne, and is a very reverend magistrate. After I had eat a bit, not staying to eat with them, I went away, and so took horses and to Gravesend, Kent [Map], and there staid not, but got a boat, the sicknesse being very much in the towne still, and so called on board my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir John Minnes (age 66), on board one of the East Indiamen at Erith, Kent, and there do find them full of envious complaints for the pillageing of the ships, but I did pacify them, and discoursed about making money of some of the goods, and do hope to be the better by it honestly.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Oct 1665. By and by comes Cocke (age 48) to tell me that Fisher and his fellow were last night mightily satisfied and promised all friendship, but this morning he finds them to have new tricks and shall be troubled with them. So he being to go down to Erith, Kent with them this afternoon about giving security, I advised him to let them go by land, and so he and I (having eat something at his house) by water to Erith, Kent, but they got thither before us, and there we met Mr. Seymour (age 32), one of the Commissioners for Prizes, and a Parliament-man, and he was mighty high, and had now seized our goods on their behalf; and he mighty imperiously would have all forfeited, and I know not what. I thought I was in the right in a thing I said and spoke somewhat earnestly, so we took up one another very smartly, for which I was sorry afterwards, shewing thereby myself too much concerned, but nothing passed that I valued at all. But I could not but think [it odd] that a Parliament-man, in a serious discourse before such persons as we and my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and Sir John Minnes (age 66), should quote Hudibras, as being the book I doubt he hath read most. They I doubt will stand hard for high security, and Cocke (age 48) would have had me bound with him for his appearing, but I did stagger at it, besides Seymour (age 32) do stop the doing it at all till he has been with the Duke of Albemarle (age 56).

Pepy's Diary. 23 Oct 1665. Thence on board the East India ship, where my Lord Bruncker (age 45) had provided a great dinner, and thither comes by and by Sir John Minnes (age 66) and before him Sir W. Warren and anon a Perspective glasse maker, of whom we, every one, bought a pocket glasse. But I am troubled with the much talke and conceitedness of Mrs. Williams and her impudence, in case she be not married to my Lord (age 45).

Pepy's Diary. 28 Oct 1665. Up, and sent for Thomas Willson, and broke the victualling business to him and he is mightily contented, and so am I that I have bestowed it on him, and so I to Mr. Boreman's, where Sir W. Batten (age 64) is, to tell him what I had proposed to Thomas Willson, and the newes also I have this morning from Sir W. Clerke (age 42), which is, that notwithstanding all the care the Duke of Albemarle (age 56) hath taken about the putting the East India prize goods into the East India Company hands, and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) having laden out a great part of the goods, an order is come from Court to stop all, and to have the goods delivered to the Sub-Commissioners of prizes. At which I am glad, because it do vex this simple weake man, and we shall have a little reparation for the disgrace my Lord Sandwich (age 40) has had in it.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Nov 1665. To the office again after dinner and there late writing letters, and then about 8 at night set out from my office and fitting myself at my lodgings intended to have gone this night in a Ketch down to the Fleete, but calling in my way at Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), who is come up from Erith, Kent about something about the prizes, they persuaded me not to go till the morning, it being a horrible darke and a windy night. So I back to my lodging and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Nov 1665. Lord's Day. Up, though very late abed, yet before day to dress myself to go toward Erith, Kent, which I would do by land, it being a horrible cold frost to go by water: so borrowed two horses of Mr. Hovell and his friend, and with much ado set out, after my horses being frosted1 (which I know not what it means to this day), and my boy having lost one of my spurs and stockings, carrying them to the smith's; but I borrowed a stocking, and so got up, and Mr. Tooker with me, and rode to Erith, Kent, and there on board my Lord Bruncker (age 45), met Sir W. Warren upon his business, among others, and did a great deale, Sir J. Minnes (age 66), as God would have it, not being there to hinder us with his impertinences.

Note 1. Frosting means, having the horses' shoes turned up by the smith.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1665. Back with my Lord to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), where I left him and the rest of a great deale of company, and so I to my office, where late writing letters and then home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1665. He gone, I to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) on board the Bezan to examine W. Howe again, who I find upon this tryall one of much more wit and ingenuity in his answers than ever I expected, he being very cunning and discreet and well spoken in them. I said little to him or concerning him; but, Lord! to see how he writes to me a-days, and styles me "My Honour". So much is a man subjected and dejected under afflictions as to flatter me in that manner on this occasion.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1665. At noon by agreement comes Hatcham Pepys (age 54) to dine with me. I thought to have had him to Sir J. Minnes (age 66) to a good venison pasty with the rest of my fellows, being invited, but seeing much company I went away with him and had a good dinner at home. He did give me letters he hath wrote to my Lord and Moore about my Lord's money to get it paid to my cozen, which I will make good use of. I made mighty much of him, but a sorry dull fellow he is, fit for nothing that is ingenious, nor is there a turd of kindnesse or service to be had from him. So I shall neglect him if I could get but him satisfied about this money that I may be out of bonds for my Lord to him. To see that this fellow could desire me to helpe him to some employment, if it were but of £100 per annum: when he is not worth less than, I believe, £20,000.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Dec 1665. Up, and was trimmed, but not time enough to save my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach or Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), and so was fain to walk to Lambeth, Surrey [Map] on foot, but it was a very fine frosty walke, and great pleasure in it, but troublesome getting over the River for ice. I to the Duke of Albemarle (age 57), whither my brethren were all come, but I was not too late. There we sat in discourse upon our Navy business an houre, and thence in my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach alone, he walking before (while I staid awhile talking with Sir G. Downing (age 40) about the Act, in which he is horrid troublesome) to the Old Exchange [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 22 Dec 1665. By and by, by agreement, comes Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Sir W. Batten (age 64), and then to read them publicly and consider of putting them in execution. About this all the morning, and, it appearing necessary for the Controller to have another Clerke, I recommended Poynter to him, which he accepts, and I by that means rid of one that I fear would not have been fit for my turne, though he writes very well.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Dec 1665. Up, and to the office, where Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and I met, to give our directions to the Commanders of all the ships in the river to bring in lists of their ships' companies, with entries, discharges, &c., all the last voyage, where young Seymour, among 20 that stood bare, stood with his hat on, a proud, saucy young man.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1666. Up by candlelight again, and wrote the greatest part of my business fair, and then to the office, and so home to dinner, and after dinner up and made an end of my fair writing it, and that being done, set two entering while to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), and there find Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and all his company, and Mr. Boreman and Mrs. Turner (age 43), but, above all, my dear Mrs. Knipp, with whom I sang, and in perfect pleasure I was to hear her sing, and especially her little Scotch song of "Barbary Allen"1 and to make our mirthe the completer, Sir J. Minnes (age 66) was in the highest pitch of mirthe, and his mimicall tricks, that ever I saw, and most excellent pleasant company he is, and the best mimique that ever I saw, and certainly would have made an excellent actor, and now would be an excellent teacher of actors.

Note 1. The Scottish ballad is entitled, "Sir John Grehme and Barbara Allan", and the English version, "Barbara Allen's Cruelty". Both are printed in Percy's "Reliques", Series III.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1666. He anon took leave and took Mrs. Barbary his niece home with him, and seems very thankful to me for the £10 I did give him for my wife's rent of his house, and I am sure I am beholding to him, for it was a great convenience to me, and then my wife home to London by water and I to the office till 8 at night, and so to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), thinking to have been merry, having appointed a meeting for Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and his company and Mrs. Knipp again, but whatever hindered I know not, but no company come, which vexed me because it disappointed me of the glut of mirthe I hoped for. However, good discourse with my Lord and merry, with Mrs. Williams's descants upon Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) and Mrs. Turner's (age 43) not coming. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1666. Up, and to the office, where my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I, against Sir W. Batten (age 65) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and the whole table, for Sir W. Warren in the business of his mast contract, and overcome them and got them to do what I had a mind to, for indeed my Lord being unconcerned in what I aimed at.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jan 1666. Thence to the 'Change [Map] and there met Mr. Moore, newly come to towne, and took him home to dinner with me and after dinner to talke, and he and I do conclude my Lord's case to be very bad and may be worse, if he do not get a pardon for his doings about the prizes and his business at Bergen, and other things done by him at sea, before he goes for Spayne. I do use all the art I can to get him to get my Lord to pay my cozen Pepys, for it is a great burden to my mind my being bound for my Lord in £1000 to him. Having done discourse with him and directed him to go with my advice to my Lord expresse to-morrow to get his pardon perfected before his going, because of what I read the other night in Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) letter, I to the office, and there had an extraordinary meeting of Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 65), and Sir W. Pen (age 44), and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I to hear my paper read about pursers, which they did all of them with great good will and great approbation of my method and pains in all, only Sir W. Pen (age 44), who must except against every thing and remedy nothing, did except against my proposal for some reasons, which I could not understand, I confess, nor my Lord Bruncker (age 46) neither, but he did detect indeed a failure or two of mine in my report about the ill condition of the present pursers, which I did magnify in one or two little things, to which, I think, he did with reason except, but at last with all respect did declare the best thing he ever heard of this kind, but when Sir W. Batten (age 65) did say, "Let us that do know the practical part of the Victualling meet Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 44) and I and see what we can do to mend all", he was so far from offering or furthering it, that he declined it and said, he must be out of towne. So as I ever knew him never did in his life ever attempt to mend any thing, but suffer all things to go on in the way they are, though never so bad, rather than improve his experience to the King's advantage.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Jan 1666. Thence with Sir J. Minnes (age 66) to the Duke of Albemarle's (age 57), and carried all well, and met Norwood (age 52) but prevented him in desiring a meeting of the Commissioners for Tangier.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jan 1666. At Brainford [Map] I 'light, having need to shit, and went into an Inne doore that stood open, found the house of office and used it, but saw no people, only after I was in the house, heard a great dogg barke, and so was afeard how I should get safe back again, and therefore drew my sword and scabbard out of my belt to have ready in my hand, but did not need to use it, but got safe into the coach again, but lost my belt by the shift, not missing it till I come to Hampton Court [Map]. At the Wicke found Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Sir W. Batten (age 65) at a lodging provided for us by our messenger, and there a good dinner ready.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Feb 1666. So home. I find my wife gone out to Hales, her Paynter's (age 57), and I after a little dinner do follow her, and there do find him at worke, and with great content I do see it will be a very brave picture. Left her there, and I to my Lord Treasurer's (age 58), where Sir G. Carteret (age 56) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) met me, and before my Lord Treasurer (age 58) and Duke of Albemarle (age 57) the state of our Navy debts were laid open, being very great, and their want of money to answer them openly professed, there being but £1,500,000 to answer a certaine expense and debt of £2,300,000.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1666. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 66) to White Hall by his coach, by the way talking of my brother John (age 25) to get a spiritual promotion for him, which I am now to looke after, for as much as he is shortly to be Master in Arts, and writes me this weeke a Latin letter that he is to go into orders this Lent. There to the Duke's chamber, and find our fellows discoursing there on our business, so I was sorry to come late, but no hurte was done thereby. Here the Duke (age 32), among other things, did bring out a book of great antiquity of some of the customs of the Navy, about 100 years since, which he did lend us to read and deliver him back again.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Mar 1666. Thence to Sir Robert Long's (age 66), absent. About much the same business, but have not the satisfaction we would have there neither. So Sir W. Coventry (age 38) parted, and my Lord and I to Mrs. Williams's, and there I saw her closett, where indeed a great many fine things there are, but the woman I hate. Here we dined, and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) come to us, and after dinner we walked to the King's play-house, all in dirt, they being altering of the stage to make it wider. But God knows when they will begin to act again; but my business here was to see the inside of the stage and all the tiring-rooms and machines; and, indeed, it was a sight worthy seeing. But to see their clothes, and the various sorts, and what a mixture of things there was; here a wooden-leg, there a ruff, here a hobbyhorse, there a crown, would make a man split himself to see with laughing; and particularly Lacy's (age 51) wardrobe, and Shotrell's. But then again, to think how fine they show on the stage by candle-light, and how poor things they are to look now too near hand, is not pleasant at all. The machines are fine, and the paintings very pretty.

Pepy's Diary. 25 May 1666. Thence to Sir G. Carteret (age 56), who is at the pay of the tickets with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) this day, and here I sat with them a while, the first time I ever was there, and thence to dinner with him, a good dinner. Here come a gentleman over from France arrived here this day, Mr. Browne of St. Mellos, who, among other things, tells me the meaning of the setting out of doggs every night out of the towne walls, which are said to secure the city; but it is not so, but only to secure the anchors, cables, and ships that lie dry, which might otherwise in the night be liable to be robbed. And these doggs are set out every night, and called together in every morning by a man with a home, and they go in very orderly.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1666. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) to White Hall in the latter's coach, where, when we come, we find the Duke (age 32) at St. James's, whither he is lately gone to lodge. So walking through the Parke we saw hundreds of people listening at the Gravel-pits, [Kensington] and to and again in the Parke to hear the guns, and I saw a letter, dated last night, from Strowd (age 38), Governor of Dover Castle, which says that the Prince (age 46) come thither the night before with his fleete, but that for the guns which we writ that we heard, it is only a mistake for thunder1 and so far as to yesterday it is a miraculous thing that we all Friday, and Saturday and yesterday, did hear every where most plainly the guns go off, and yet at Deale [Map] and Dover, Kent [Map] to last night they did not hear one word of a fight, nor think they heard one gun. This, added to what I have set down before the other day about the Katharine, makes room for a great dispute in philosophy, how we should hear it and they not, the same wind that brought it to us being the same that should bring it to them: but so it is. Major Halsey, however (he was sent down on purpose to hear newes), did bring newes this morning that he did see the Prince (age 46) and his fleete at nine of the clock yesterday morning, four or five leagues to sea behind the Goodwin [Map], so that by the hearing of the guns this morning we conclude he is come to the fleete.

Note 1. Evelyn (age 45) was in his garden when he heard the guns, and be at once set off to Rochester, Kent [Map] and the coast, but he found that nothing had been heard at Deal (see his "Diary", June 1st, 1666).

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jun 1666. Away go I by coach to the New Exchange, and there did spread this good newes a little, though I find it had broke out before. And so home to our own church, it being the common Fast-day, and it was just before sermon; but, Lord! how all the people in the church stared upon me to see me whisper to Sir John Minnes (age 67) and my Lady Pen (age 42). Anon I saw people stirring and whispering below, and by and by comes up the sexton from my Lady Ford to tell me the newes (which I had brought), being now sent into the church by Sir W. Batten (age 65) in writing, and handed from pew to pew. But that which pleased me as much as the newes, was, to have the fair Mrs. Middleton (age 21) at our church, who indeed is a very beautiful lady. Here after sermon comes to our office 40 people almost of all sorts and qualities to hear the newes, which I took great delight to tell them.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jul 1666. Thence satisfied exceedingly with all this we home and to discourse many pretty things, and so staid out the afternoon till it began to be dark, and then they away and I to Sir W. Batten (age 65), where the Lieutenant of the Tower (age 51) was, and Sir John Minnes (age 67), and the newes I find is no more or less than what I had heard before; only that our Blue squadron, it seems, was pursued the most of the time, having more ships, a great many, than its number allotted to her share. Young Seamour is killed, the only captain slain. The Resolution burned; but, as they say, most of her [crew] and commander saved. This is all, only we keep the sea, which denotes a victory, or at least that we are not beaten; but no great matters to brag of, God knows.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1666. Good friends in the morning and up to the office, where sitting all the morning, and while at table we were mightily joyed with newes brought by Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and Sir W. Batten (age 65) of the death of De Ruyter (age 59), but when Sir W. Coventry (age 38) come, he told us there was no such thing, which quite dashed me again, though, God forgive me! I was a little sorry in my heart before lest it might give occasion of too much glory to the Duke of Albemarle (age 57). Great bandying this day between Sir W. Coventry (age 38) and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) about Captain Cocke (age 49), which I am well pleased with, while I keepe from any open relyance on either side, but rather on Sir W. Coventry's (age 38).

Pepy's Diary. 17 Aug 1666. So home to supper and to bed, understanding this evening, since I come home, that our Victuallers are all come in to the fleete, which is good newes. Sir John Minnes (age 67) come home tonight not well, from Chatham, Kent [Map], where he hath been at a pay, holding it at Upnor Castle, Kent [Map], because of the plague so much in the towne of Chatham, Kent [Map]. He hath, they say, got an ague, being so much on the water.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1666. Waked this morning, about six o'clock, with a violent knocking at Sir J. Minnes's (age 67) doore, to call up Mrs. Hammon, crying out that Sir J. Minnes (age 67) is a-dying. He come home ill of an ague on Friday night. I saw him on Saturday, after his fit of the ague, and then was pretty lusty. Which troubles me mightily, for he is a very good, harmless, honest gentleman, though not fit for the business. But I much fear a worse may come, that may be more uneasy to me. Up, and to Deptford, Kent [Map] by water, reading "Othello, Moore of Venice", which I ever heretofore esteemed a mighty good play, but having so lately read "The Adventures of Five Hours", it seems a mean thing.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1666. So home to dinner, and all the afternoon till almost midnight upon my Tangier accounts, getting Tom Wilson to help me in writing as I read, and at night W. Hewer (age 24), and find myself most happy in the keeping of all my accounts, for that after all the changings and turnings necessary in such an account, I find myself right to a farthing in an account of £127,000. This afternoon I visited Sir J. Minnes (age 67), who, poor man, is much impatient by these few days' sickness, and I fear indeed it will kill him.

Holme's Bonfire

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1666. Up and by coach with £100 to the Exchequer to pay fees there. There left it, and I to St. James's, and there with; the Duke of Yorke (age 32). I had opportunity of much talk with Sir. W. Pen (age 45) to-day (he being newly come from the fleete); and he, do much undervalue the honour that is given to the conduct of the late business of Holmes (age 44) in burning the ships and town1 saying it was a great thing indeed, and of great profit to us in being of great losse to the enemy, but that it was wholly a business of chance, and no conduct employed in it. I find Sir W. Pen (age 45) do hold up his head at this time higher than ever he did in his life. I perceive he do look after Sir J. Minnes's (age 67) place if he dies, and though I love him not nor do desire to have him in, yet I do think (he) is the first man in England for it.

Note 1. The town burned (see August 15th, ante) was Brandaris, a place of 1000 houses, on the isle of Schelling; the ships lay between that island and the Fly (i.e. Vlieland), the adjoining island. This attack probably provoked that by the Dutch on Chatham, Kent [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1666. Thence Sir W. Pen (age 45) and I to Islington and there drank at the Katherine Wheele, and so down the nearest way home, where there was no kind of pleasure at all. Being come home, hear that Sir J. Minnes (age 67) has had a very bad fit all this day, and a hickup do take him, which is a very bad sign, which troubles me truly.

Great Fire of London

Pepy's Diary. 04 Sep 1666. Now begins the practice of blowing up of houses in Tower-streete [Map], those next the Tower, which at first did frighten people more than anything, but it stopped the fire where it was done, it bringing down the1 houses to the ground in the same places they stood, and then it was easy to quench what little fire was in it, though it kindled nothing almost. W. Newer this day went to see how his mother did, and comes late home, telling us how he hath been forced to remove her to Islington [Map], her house in Pye-corner being burned; so that the fire is got so far that way, and all the Old Bayly, and was running down to Fleete-streete [Map]; and Paul's [Map] is burned, and all Cheapside [Map]. I wrote to my father this night, but the post-house being burned, the letter could not go2. 5th. I lay down in the office again upon W. Hewer's (age 24), quilt, being mighty weary, and sore in my feet with going till I was hardly able to stand. About two in the morning my wife calls me up and tells me of new cRye [Map]s of fire, it being come to Barkeing Church, which is the bottom of our lane. I up, and finding it so, resolved presently to take her away, and did, and took my gold, which was about £2350, W. Newer, and Jane, down by Proundy's boat to Woolwich, Kent [Map]; but, Lord! what sad sight it was by moone-light to see, the whole City almost on fire, that you might see it plain at Woolwich, Kent [Map], as if you were by it. There, when I come, I find the gates shut, but no guard kept at all, which troubled me, because of discourse now begun, that there is plot in it, and that the French had done it. I got the gates open, and to Mr. Shelden's, where I locked up my gold, and charged, my wife and W. Newer never to leave the room without one of them in it, night, or day. So back again, by the way seeing my goods well in the lighters at Deptford, Kent [Map], and watched well by people.

Note 1. A copy of this letter, preserved among the Pepys MSS. in the author's own handwriting, is subjoined: "SIR, The fire is now very neere us as well on Tower Streete as Fanchurch Street side, and we little hope of our escape but by this remedy, to ye want whereof we doe certainly owe ye loss of ye City namely, ye pulling down of houses, in ye way of ye fire. This way Sir W. Pen (age 45) and myself have so far concluded upon ye practising, that he is gone to Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Deptford, Kent [Map] to supply himself with men and necessarys in order to the doeing thereof, in case at his returne our condition be not bettered and that he meets with his R. Hs. approbation, which I had thus undertaken to learn of you. Pray please to let me have this night (at whatever hour it is) what his R. Hs. directions are in this particular; Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and Sir W. Batten (age 65) having left us, we cannot add, though we are well assured of their, as well as all ye neighbourhood's concurrence. "Yr. obedient servnt. "S. P. "Sir W. Coventry (age 38), "Septr. 4, 1666"..

Note 2. J. Hickes wrote to Williamson on September 3rd from the "Golden Lyon", Red Cross Street Posthouse. Sir Philip (Frowde) and his lady fled from the (letter) office at midnight for: safety; stayed himself till 1 am. till his wife and childrens' patience could stay, no longer, fearing lest they should be quite stopped up; the passage was so tedious they had much ado to get where they are. The Chester and Irish, mails have come-in; sends him his letters, knows not how to dispose of the business (Calendar of State Papers, 1666-67, p. 95).

Pepy's Diary. 17 Sep 1666. Thence by coach over the ruines, down Fleete Streete [Map] and Cheapside [Map] to Broad Streete (age 36) to Sir G. Carteret (age 56), where Sir W. Batten (age 65) (and Sir J. Minnes (age 67), whom I had not seen a long time before, being his first coming abroad) and Lord Bruncker (age 46) passing his accounts.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1666. Thence took my wife home to dinner, and then to the office, where Mr. Hater all the day putting in order and entering in a book all the measures that this account of the Navy hath been made up by, and late at night to Mrs. Turner's (age 43), where she had got my wife and Lady Pen (age 42) and Pegg (age 15), and supped, and after, supper and the rest of the company by design gone, Mrs. Turner (age 43) and her husband did lay their case to me about their lodgings, Sir J. Minnes (age 67) being now gone wholly to his owne, and now, they being empty, they doubt Sir T. Harvy or Lord Bruncker may look after the lodgings. I did give them the best advice, poor people, that I could, and would do them any kindnesse, though it is strange that now they should have ne'er a friend of Sir W. Batten (age 65) or Sir W. Pen (age 45) to trust to but me, that they have disobliged.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Sep 1666. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to St. James's, where every body going to the House, I away by coach to White Hall, and after a few turns, and hearing that our accounts come into the House but to-day, being hindered yesterday by other business, I away by coach home, taking up my wife and calling at Bennet's, our late mercer, who is come into Covent Garden [Map] to a fine house looking down upon the Exchange [Map]; and I perceive many Londoners every day come; and Mr. Pierce hath let his wife's closett, and the little blind bed chamber, and a garret to a silke man for £50 fine, and £30 per annum, and £40 per annum more for dieting the master and two prentices.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Sep 1666. Thence I by coach home to the office, and there intending a meeting, but nobody being there but myself and Sir J. Minnes (age 67), who is worse than nothing, I did not answer any body, but kept to my business in the office till night, and then Sir W. Batten (age 65) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) to me, and thence to Sir W. Batten's (age 65), and eat a barrel of oysters I did give them, and so home, and to bed. I have this evening discoursed with W. Hewer (age 24) about Mercer, I having a mind to have her again; and I am vexed to hear him say that she hath no mind to come again, though her mother hath. No newes of the fleete yet, but that they went by Dover on the 25th towards the Gunfleete, but whether the Dutch be yet abroad, or no, we hear not. De Ruyter (age 59) is not dead, but like to do well. Most think that the gross of the French fleete are gone home again.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1666. Waked betimes, mightily troubled in mind, and in the most true trouble that I ever was in my life, saving in the business last year of the East India prizes. So up, and with Mr. Hater and W. Hewer (age 24) and Griffin to consider of our business, and books and papers necessary for this examination; and by and by, by eight o'clock, comes Birch (age 51), the first, with the lists and books of accounts delivered in. He calls me to work, and there he and I begun, when, by and by, comes Garraway (age 49)1, the first time I ever saw him, and Sir W. Thompson (age 37) and Mr. Boscawen (age 38). They to it, and I did make shift to answer them better than I expected. Sir W. Batten (age 65), Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir W. Pen (age 45), come in, but presently went out; and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) come in, and said two or three words from the purpose, but to do hurt; and so away he went also, and left me all the morning with them alone to stand or fall.

Note 1. William Garway (age 49), elected M.P. for Chichester, March 26th, 1661, and in 1674 he was appointed by the House to confer with Lord Shaftesbury respecting the charge against Pepys being popishly affected. See note to the Life, vol. i., p, xxxii, and for his character, October 6th, 1666.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Oct 1666. So he gone I by water to Westminster Hall [Map] and thence to St. James's, and there found Sir W. Coventry (age 38) waiting for me, and I did give him a good account to his mind of the business he expected about extraordinaries and then fell to other talke, among others, our sad condition contracted by want of a Comptroller1 and it was his words, that he believes, besides all the shame and trouble he hath brought on the office, the King (age 36) had better have given £100,000 than ever have had him there. He did discourse about some of these discontented Parliament-men, and says that Birch (age 51) is a false rogue, but that Garraway (age 49) is a man that hath not been well used by the Court, though very stout to death, and hath suffered all that is possible for the King (age 36) from the beginning. But discontented as he is, yet he never knew a Session of Parliament but he hath done some good deed for the King (age 36) before it rose. I told him the passage Cocke (age 49) told me of his having begged a brace of bucks of the Lord Arlington for him, and when it come to him, he sent it back again. Sir W. Coventry (age 38) told me, it is much to be pitied that the King (age 36) should lose the service of a man so able and faithfull; and that he ought to be brought over, but that it is always observed, that by bringing over one discontented man, you raise up three in his room; which is a State lesson I never knew before. But when others discover your fear, and that discontent procures favour, they will be discontented too, and impose on you.

Note 1. As Sir John Minnes (age 67) performed the duties inefficiently, it was considered necessary to take the office from him: See January 21st.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Oct 1666. Thence, having been informed that, after all this pains, the King (age 36) hath found out how to supply us with 5 or £6000, when £100,000 were at this time but absolutely necessary, and we mentioned £50,000. This is every day a greater and greater omen of ruine. God fit us for it! Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and I home (it raining) by coach, calling only on Sir G. Carteret (age 56) at his lodging (who is I find troubled at my Lord Treasurer (age 59) and Sir Ph. Warwicke (age 56) bungling in his accounts), and come home to supper with my father, and then all to bed. I made my brother in his cassocke to say grace this day, but I like his voice so ill that I begin to be sorry he hath taken this order upon him.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Oct 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and after visiting my father in his chamber, to church, and then home to dinner. Little Michell and his wife come to dine with us, which they did, and then presently after dinner I with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to White Hall, where met by Sir W. Batten (age 65) and Lord Bruncker (age 46), to attend the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 32) at the Cabinet; but nobody had determined what to speak of, but only in general to ask for money. So I was forced immediately to prepare in my mind a method of discoursing. And anon we were called in to the Green Room, where the King (age 36), Duke of York (age 32), Prince Rupert (age 46), Chancellor (age 57), Lord Treasurer (age 59), Duke of Albemarle (age 57), [Sirs] G. Carteret (age 56), W. Coventry (age 38), Morrice (age 63). Nobody beginning, I did, and made a current, and I thought a good speech, laying open the ill state of the Navy: by the greatness of the debt; greatness of work to do against next yeare; the time and materials it would take; and our incapacity, through a total want of money. I had no sooner done, but Prince Rupert (age 46) rose up and told the King (age 36) in a heat, that whatever the gentleman had said, he had brought home his fleete in as good a condition as ever any fleete was brought home; that twenty boats would be as many as the fleete would want: and all the anchors and cables left in the storm might be taken up again. This arose from my saying, among other things we had to do, that the fleete was come in-the greatest fleete that ever his Majesty had yet together, and that in as bad condition as the enemy or weather could put it; and to use Sir W. Pen's (age 45) words, who is upon the place taking a survey, he dreads the reports he is to receive from the Surveyors of its defects. I therefore did only answer, that I was sorry for his Highness's offence, but that what I said was but the report we received from those entrusted in the fleete to inform us. He muttered and repeated what he had said; and so, after a long silence on all hands, nobody, not so much as the Duke of Albemarle (age 57), seconding the Prince, nor taking notice of what he said, we withdrew. I was not a little troubled at this passage, and the more when speaking with Jacke Fenn about it, he told me that the Prince (age 46) will be asking now who this Pepys is, and find him to be a creature of my Lord Sandwich's (age 41), and therefore this was done only to disparage him.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Oct 1666. He being ready, he and my Chancellor (age 57), and Duke of Albemarle (age 57), and Prince Rupert (age 46), Lord Bellasses (age 52), Sir H. Cholmly (age 34), Povy (age 52), and myself, met at a Committee for Tangier. My Lord Bellasses's (age 52) propositions were read and discoursed of, about reducing the garrison to less charge; and indeed I am mad in love with my Chancellor (age 57), for he do comprehend and speak out well, and with the greatest easinesse and authority that ever I saw man in my life. I did never observe how much easier a man do speak when he knows all the company to be below him, than in him; for though he spoke, indeed, excellent welt, yet his manner and freedom of doing it, as if he played with it, and was informing only all the rest of the company, was mighty pretty. He did call again and again upon Mr. Povy (age 52) for his accounts. I did think fit to make the solemn tender of my accounts that I intended. I said something that was liked, touching the want of money, and the bad credit of our tallys. My Chancellor (age 57) moved, that without any trouble to any of the rest of the Lords, I might alone attend the King (age 36), when he was with his private Council; and open the state of the garrison's want of credit; and all that could be done, should. Most things moved were referred to Committees, and so we broke up. And at the end Sir W. Coventry (age 38) come; so I away with him, and he discoursed with me something of the Parliament's business. They have voted giving the [King] for next year £1,800,000; which, were it not for his debts, were a great sum. He says, he thinks the House may say no more to us for the present, but that we must mend our manners against the next tryall, and mend them we will. But he thinks it not a fit time to be found making of trouble among ourselves, meaning about Sir J. Minnes (age 67), who most certainly must be removed, or made a Commissioner, and somebody else Comptroller. But he tells me that the House has a great envy at Sir G. Carteret (age 56), and that had he ever thought fit in all his discourse to have touched upon the point of our want of money and badness of payment, it would have been laid hold on to Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) hurt; but he hath avoided it, though without much reason for it, most studiously, and in short did end thus, that he has never shewn so much of the pigeon in all his life as in his innocence to Sir G. Carteret (age 56) at this time; which I believe, and will desire Sir G. Carteret (age 56) to thank him for it.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Oct 1666. Walking with Pierce in the Court of Wards out comes Sir W. Coventry (age 38), and he and I talked of business. Among others I proposed the making Sir J. Minnes (age 67) a Commissioner, and make somebody else Comptroller. He tells me it is the thing he hath been thinking of, and hath spoke to the Duke of York (age 33) of it. He believes it will be done; but that which I fear is that Pen will be Comptroller, which I shall grudge a little. The Duke of Buckingham (age 38) called him aside and spoke a good while with him. I did presently fear it might be to discourse something of his design to blemish my Lord of Sandwich (age 41), in pursuance of the wild motion he made the other day in the House. Sir W. Coventry (age 38), when he come to me again, told me that he had wrought a miracle, which was, the convincing the Duke of Buckingham (age 38) that something-he did not name what-that he had intended to do was not fit to be done, and that the Duke is gone away of that opinion. This makes me verily believe it was something like what I feared.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Oct 1666. All the afternoon at the office, and at night with Sir W. Batten (age 65), Sir W. Pen (age 45), [and Sir] J. Minnes (age 67), at Sir W. Pen's lodgings, advising about business and orders fit presently to make about discharging of ships come into the river, and which to pay first, and many things in order thereto. But it vexed me that, it being now past seven o'clock, and the businesses of great weight, and I had done them by eight o'clock, and sending them to be signed, they were all gone to bed, and Sir W. Pen (age 45), though awake, would not, being in bed, have them brought to him to sign; this made me quite angry. Late at work at the office, and then home to supper and to bed. Not come to any resolution at the Parliament to-day about the manner of raising this £1,800,000.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Oct 1666. Thence to St. James's by coach, and spoke, at four o'clock or five, with Sir W. Coventry (age 38), newly come from the House, where they have sat all this day and not come to an end of the debate how the money shall be raised. He tells me that what I proposed to him the other day was what he had himself thought on and determined, and that he believes it will speedily be done-the making Sir J. Minnes (age 67) a Commissioner, and bringing somebody else to be Comptroller, and that (which do not please me, I confess, for my own particulars, so well as Sir J. Minnes (age 67)) will, I fear, be Sir W. Pen (age 45), for he is the only fit man for it. Away from him and took up my wife, and left her at Temple Bar to buy some lace for a petticoat, and I took coach and away to Sir R. Viner's (age 35) about a little business, and then home, and by and by to my chamber, and there late upon making up an account for the Board to pass to-morrow, if I can get them, for the clearing all my imprest bills, which if I can do, will be to my very good satisfaction. Having done this, then to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1666. Home, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 65), where I saw my Lady, who is now come down stairs after a great sickness. Sir W. Batten (age 65) was at the pay to-day, and tells me how rude the men were, but did go away quietly, being promised pay on Wednesday next. God send us money for it! So to the office, and then to supper and to bed. Among other things proposed in the House to-day, to give the King (age 36) in lieu of chimneys, there was the bringing up of sealed paper, such as Sir J. Minnes (age 67) shewed me to-night, at Sir W. Batten's (age 65), is used in Spayne, and brings the King (age 36) a great revenue; but it shows what shifts we are put to too much.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Oct 1666. Home to dinner, and after dinner, it being late, I down by water to Shadwell, to see Betty Michell, the first time I was ever at their new dwelling since the fire, and there find her in the house all alone. I find her mighty modest. But had her lips as much as I would, and indeed she is mighty pretty, that I love her exceedingly. I paid her £10 1s. that I received upon a ticket for her husband, which is a great kindness I have done them, and having kissed her as much as I would, I away, poor wretch, and down to Deptford, Kent [Map] to see Sir J. Minnes (age 67) ordering of the pay of some ships there, which he do most miserably, and so home. Bagwell's wife, seeing me come the fields way, did get over her pales to come after and talk with me, which she did for a good way, and so parted, and I home, and to the office, very busy, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1666. Lord's Day. Comes my taylor's man in the morning, and brings my vest home, and coate to wear with it, and belt, and silver-hilted sword. So I rose and dressed myself, and I like myself mightily in it, and so do my wife. Then, being dressed, to church; and after church pulled my Lady Pen (age 42) and Mrs. Markham into my house to dinner, and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) he got Mrs. Pegg along with him. I had a good dinner for them, and very merry; and after dinner to the waterside, and so, it being very cold, to White Hall, and was mighty fearfull of an ague, my vest being new and thin, and the coat cut not to meet before upon my breast. Here I waited in the gallery till the Council was up, and among others did speak with Mr. Cooling, my Lord Camberlain's secretary, who tells me my Lord Generall is become mighty low in all people's opinion, and that he hath received several slurs from the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 33). The people at Court do see the difference between his and the Prince's (age 46) management, and my Lord Sandwich's (age 41). That this business which he is put upon of crying out against the Catholiques and turning them out of all employment, will undo him, when he comes to turn-out the officers out of the Army, and this is a thing of his own seeking. That he is grown a drunken sot, and drinks with nobody but Troutbecke, whom nobody else will keep company with. Of whom he told me this story: That once the Duke of Albemarle (age 57) in his drink taking notice as of a wonder that Nan Hide (age 29) should ever come to be Duchesse of York (age 29), "Nay", says Troutbecke, "ne'er wonder at that; for if you will give me another bottle of wine, I will tell you as great, if not greater, a miracle". And what was that, but that our dirty Besse (meaning his Duchesse (age 47)) should come to be Duchesse of Albemarle? Here we parted, and so by and by the Council rose, and out comes Sir G. Carteret (age 56) and Sir W. Coventry (age 38), and they and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I went to Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) lodgings, there to discourse about some money demanded by Sir W. Warren, and having done that broke up. And Sir G. Carteret (age 56) and I alone together a while, where he shows a long letter, all in cipher, from my Lord Sandwich (age 41) to him. The contents he hath not yet found out, but he tells me that my Lord is not sent for home, as several people have enquired after of me. He spoke something reflecting upon me in the business of pursers, that their present bad behaviour is what he did foresee, and had convinced me of, and yet when it come last year to be argued before the Duke of York (age 33) I turned and said as the rest did. I answered nothing to it, but let it go, and so to other discourse of the ill state of things, of which all people are full of sorrow and observation, and so parted, and then by water, landing in Southwarke [Map], home to the Tower, and so home, and there began to read "Potter's Discourse upon 1666", which pleases me mightily, and then broke off and to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Nov 1666. So to the office, where much business all the morning, and the more by my brethren being all out of the way; Sir W. Pen (age 45) this night taken so ill cannot stir; Sir W. Batten (age 65) ill at Walthamstow [Map]; Sir J. Minnes (age 67) the like at Chatham, Kent [Map], and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) there also upon business. Horrible trouble with the backwardness of the merchants to let us have their ships, and seamen's running away, and not to be got or kept without money. It is worth turning to our letters this day to Sir W. Coventry (age 38) about these matters.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Nov 1666. So to White Hall to Sir W. Coventry (age 38), and there would fain have carried Captain Cocke's (age 49) business for his bargain of hemp, but am defeated and disappointed, and know hardly how to carry myself in it between my interest and desire not to offend Sir W. Coventry (age 38). Sir W. Coventry (age 38) did this night tell me how the business is about Sir J. Minnes (age 67); that he is to be a Commissioner, and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) are to be Controller joyntly, which I am very glad of, and better than if they were either of them alone; and do hope truly that the King's business will be better done thereby, and infinitely better than now it is.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Nov 1666. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to White Hall, where we and the rest attended the Duke of York (age 33), where, among other things, we had a complaint of Sir William Jennings against his lieutenant, Le Neve, one that had been long the Duke's page, and for whom the Duke of York (age 33) hath great kindness. It was a drunken quarrel, where one was as blameable as the other. It was referred to further examination, but the Duke of York (age 33) declared, that as he would not favour disobedience, so neither drunkenness, and therein he said very well.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Nov 1666. Thence with Sir W. Coventry (age 38) to Westminster Hall [Map], and there parted, he having told me how Sir J. Minnes (age 67) do disagree from the proposition of resigning his place, and that so the whole matter is again at a stand, at which I am sorry for the King's sake, but glad that Sir W. Pen (age 45) is again defeated, for I would not have him come to be Comptroller if I could help it, he will be so cruel proud.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Nov 1666. Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning. At noon rose and to my closet, and finished my report to my Lord Treasurer (age 59) of our Tangier wants, and then with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) by coach to Stepney [Map] to the Trinity House, Deptford [Map], where it is kept again now since the burning of their other house in London. And here a great many met at Sir Thomas Allen's (age 33) feast, of his being made an Elder Brother; but he is sick, and so could not be there. Here was much good company, and very merry; but the discourse of Scotland, it seems, is confirmed, and that they are 4000 of them in armes, and do declare for King and Covenant, which is very ill news. I pray God deliver us from the ill consequences we may justly fear from it. Here was a good venison pasty or two and other good victuals; but towards the latter end of the dinner I rose, and without taking leave went away from the table, and got Sir J. Minnes' (age 67) coach and away home, and thence with my report to my Lord Treasurer's (age 59), where I did deliver it to Sir Philip Warwicke (age 56) for my Lord, who was busy, my report for him to consider against to-morrow's council.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Nov 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) by coach to White Hall, and there coming late, I to rights to the chapel, where in my usual place I heard one of the King's chaplains, one Mr. Floyd (age 39), preach. He was out two or three times in his prayer, and as many in his sermon, but yet he made a most excellent good sermon, of our duty to imitate the lives and practice of Christ and the saints departed, and did it very handsomely and excellent stile; but was a little overlarge in magnifying the graces of the nobility and prelates, that we have seen in our memorys in the world, whom God hath taken from us.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Nov 1666. Home, and there to eat presently, and then to the office a little, and to Sir W. Batten (age 65), where Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and Captain Cocke (age 49) was; but no newes from the North at all to-day; and the newes-book makes the business nothing, but that they are all dispersed. I pray God it may prove so.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Dec 1666. After dinner I away to the office, where we sat late upon Mr. Gawden's accounts, Sir J. Minnes (age 67) being gone home sick. I late at the office, and then home to supper and to bed, being mightily troubled with a pain in the small of my back, through cold, or (which I think most true) my straining last night to get open my plate chest, in such pain all night I could not turn myself in my bed. Newes this day from Brampton [Map], of Mr. Ensum, my sister's (age 25) sweetheart, being dead: a clowne.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1666. Anon to chapel, by the King's closet, and heard a very good anthemne. Then with Lord Bruncker (age 46) to Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) chamber; and there we sat with him and talked. He is weary of anything to do, he says, in the Navy. He tells us this Committee of Accounts will enquire sharply into our office. And, speaking of Sir J. Minnes (age 67), he says he will not bear any body's faults but his own. He discoursed as bad of Sir W. Batten (age 65) almost, and cries out upon the discipline of the fleete, which is lost, and that there is not in any of the fourth rates and under scarce left one Sea Commander, but all young gentlemen; and what troubles him, he hears that the gentlemen give out that in two or three years a Tarpaulin shall not dare to look after being better than a Boatswain. Which he is troubled at, and with good reason, and at this day Sir Robert Holmes (age 44) is mighty troubled that his brother do not command in chief, but is commanded by Captain Hannum, who, Sir W. Coventry (age 38) says, he believes to be at least of as good blood, is a longer bred seaman, an elder officer, and an elder commander, but such is Sir R. Holmes's (age 44) pride as never to be stopt, he being greatly troubled at my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) late discharging all his men and officers but the standing officers at Chatham, Kent [Map], and so are all other Commanders, and a very great cry hath been to the King (age 36) from them all in my Lord's absence. But Sir W. Coventry (age 38) do undertake to defend it, and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) got ground I believe by it, who is angry at Sir W. Batten's (age 65) and Sir W. Pen's (age 45) bad words concerning it, and I have made it worse by telling him that they refuse to sign to a paper which he and I signed on Saturday to declare the reason of his actions, which Sir W. Coventry (age 38) likes and would have it sent him and he will sign it, which pleases me well.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1666. Up, and by water down to White Hall, and there with the.Duke of York (age 33) did our usual business, but nothing but complaints of want of money [without] success, and Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) complaint of the defects of our office (indeed Sir J. Minnes's (age 67)) without any amendment, and he tells us so plainly of the Committee of Parliament's resolution to enquire home into all our managements that it makes me resolve to be wary, and to do all things betimes to be ready for them.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Dec 1666. Up, and to the office, where Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir J. Mennes (age 67), Sir W. Penn (age 45), and myself met, and there I did use my notes I took on Saturday night about tickets, and did come to a good settlement in the business of that office, if it be kept to, this morning being a meeting on purpose.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Dec 1666. Up, and walked all the way (it being a most fine frost), to White Hall, to Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) chamber, and thence with him up to the Duke of York (age 33), where among other things at our meeting I did offer my assistance to Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to do the business of his office, relating to the Pursers' accounts, which was well accepted by the Duke of York (age 33), and I think I have and shall do myself good in it, if it be taken, for it will confirm me in the business of the Victualling Office, which I do now very little for.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jan 1667. At noon by invitation to dinner to Sir W. Pen's (age 45), where my Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Batten (age 66), and his lady, myself, and wife, Sir J. Minnes (age 67), and Mr. Turner and his wife. Indifferent merry, to which I contributed the most, but a mean dinner, and in a mean manner.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1667. Up, and seeing things put in order for a dinner at my house to-day, I to the office awhile, and about noon home, and there saw all things in good order. Anon comes our company; my Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Pen (age 45), his lady (age 43), and Pegg (age 16), and her servant, Mr. Lowther (age 26), my Lady Batten (Sir W. Batten (age 66) being forced to dine at Sir R. Ford's (age 53), being invited), Mr. Turner and his wife. Here I had good room for ten, and no more would my table have held well, had Sir J. Minnes (age 67), who was fallen lame, and his sister, and niece, and Sir W. Batten (age 66) come, which was a great content to me to be without them. I did make them all gaze to see themselves served so nobly in plate, and a neat dinner, indeed, though but of seven dishes. Mighty merry I was and made them all, and they mightily pleased. My Lord Bruncker (age 47) went away after dinner to the ticket-office, the rest staid, only my Lady Batten home, her ague-fit coming on her at table. The rest merry, and to cards, and then to sing and talk, and at night to sup, and then to cards; and, last of all, to have a flaggon of ale and apples, drunk out of a wood cupp1, as a Christmas draught, made all merry; and they full of admiration at my plate, particularly my flaggons (which, indeed, are noble), and so late home, all with great mirth and satisfaction to them, as I thought, and to myself to see all I have and do so much outdo for neatness and plenty anything done by any of them.

Note 1. A mazer or drinking-bowl turned out of some kind of wood, by preference of maple, and especially the spotted or speckled variety called "bird's-eye maple" (see W. H. St. John Hope's paper, "On the English Mediaeval Drinking-bowls called Mazers", "Archaeologia", vol. 50, pp. 129,93).

Pepy's Diary. 20 Jan 1667. Lord's Day. Up betimes and down to the Old Swan [Map], there called on Michell and his wife, which in her night linen appeared as pretty almost as ever to my thinking I saw woman. Here I drank some burnt brandy. They shewed me their house, which, poor people, they have built, and is very pretty. I invited them to dine with me, and so away to White Hall to Sir W. Coventry (age 39), with whom I have not been alone a good while, and very kind he is, and tells me how the business is now ordered by order of council for my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to assist Sir J. Minnes (age 67) in all matters of accounts relating to the Treasurer, and Sir W. Pen (age 45) in all matters relating to the victuallers' and pursers' accounts, which I am very glad of, and the more for that I think it will not do me any hurt at all. Other discourse, much especially about the heat the House was in yesterday about the ill management of the Navy, which I was sorry to hear; though I think they were well answered, both by Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and Sir W. Coventry (age 39), as he informs me the substance of their speeches.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1667. She gone, we to bed all. This night, at supper, comes from Sir W. Coventry (age 39) the Order of Councill for my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to do all the Comptroller's part relating to the Treasurer's accounts, and Sir W. Pen (age 45), all relating to the Victualler's, and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to do the rest. This, I hope, will do much better for the King (age 36) than now, and, I think, will give neither of them ground to over-top me, as I feared they would; which pleases me mightily. This evening, Mr. Wren and Captain Cocke (age 50) called upon me at the office, and there told me how the House was in better temper to-day, and hath passed the Bill for the remainder of the money, but not to be passed finally till they have done some other things which they will have passed with it; wherein they are very open, what their meaning is, which was but doubted before, for they do in all respects doubt the King's pleasing them.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1667. So to the office, where among other things I read the Councill's order about my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) to be assistants to the Comptroller, which quietly went down with Sir J. Minnes (age 67), poor man, seeming a little as if he would be thought to have desired it, but yet apparently to his discontent; and, I fear, as the order runs, it will hardly do much good.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jan 1667. Lay pretty long, then to the office, where Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and I did meet, and sat private all the morning about dividing the Controller's work according to the late order of Council, between them two and Sir W. Pen (age 45), and it troubled me to see the poor honest man, Sir J. Minnes (age 67), troubled at it, and yet the King's work cannot be done without it. It was at last friendlily ended, and so up and home to dinner with my wife.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Feb 1667. Up and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) by coach to White Hall, where we attended upon the Duke of York (age 33) to complain of the disorders the other day among the seamen at the Pay at the Ticket Office, and that it arises from lack of money, and that we desire, unless better provided for with money, to have nothing more to do with the payment of tickets, it being not our duty; and the Duke of York (age 33) and Sir W. Coventry (age 39) did agree to it, so that I hope we shall be rid of that trouble. This done, I moved for allowance for a house for Mr. Turner, and got it granted. Then away to Westminster Hall [Map], and there to the Exchequer about my tallies, and so back to White Hall, and so with Lord Bellasses (age 52) to the Excise Office, where met by Sir H. Cholmly (age 34) to consider about our business of money there, and that done, home and to dinner, where I hear Pegg Pen (age 16) is married this day privately; no friends, but two or three relations on his side and hers. Borrowed many things of my kitchen for dressing their dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1667. He gone, I to the office again to dispatch business, and late at night comes in Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 45), and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to the office, and what was it but to examine one Jones, a young merchant, who was said to have spoke the worst against Sir W. Batten (age 66), but he do deny it wholly, yet I do believe Carcasse will go near to prove all that was sworn in the morning, and so it be true I wish it may. That done, I to end my letters, and then home to supper, and set right some accounts of Tangier, and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Feb 1667. At dinner all of us, that is to say, Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir J. Minnes (age 67), Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir T. Harvy (age 41), and myself, to Sir W. Pen's (age 45) house, where some other company. It is instead of a wedding dinner for his daughter (age 16), whom I saw in palterly clothes, nothing new but a bracelet that her servant had given her, and ugly she is, as heart can wish. A sorry dinner, not any thing handsome or clean, but some silver plates they borrowed of me. My wife was here too. So a great deal of talk, and I seemingly merry, but took no pleasure at all. We had favours given us all, and we put them in our hats, I against my will, but that my Lord and the rest did, I being displeased that he did carry Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) himself several days ago, and the people up and down the town long since, and we must have them but to-day.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1667. After dinner to the office again, where by and by Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and I met about receiving Carcasses answers to the depositions against him. Wherein I did see so much favour from my Lord to him that I do again begin to see that my Lord is not right at the bottom, and did make me the more earnest against him, though said little. My Lord rising, declaring his judgement in his behalf, and going away, I did hinder our arguing it by ourselves, and so broke up the meeting, and myself went full of trouble to my office, there to write over the deposition and his answers side by side, and then home to supper and to bed with some trouble of mind to think of the issue of this, how it will breed ill blood among us here.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Feb 1667. Thus this month is ended with great content of mind to me, thriving in my estate, and the affairs in my offices going pretty well as to myself. This afternoon Mr. Gawden was with me and tells me more than I knew before-that he hath orders to get all the victuals he can to Plymouth, Devon [Map], and the Western ports, and other outports, and some to Scotland, so that we do intend to keep but a flying fleete this year; which, it may be, may preserve us a year longer, but the end of it must be ruin. Sir J. Minnes (age 67) this night tells me, that he hears for certain, that ballads are made of us in Holland for begging of a peace; which I expected, but am vexed at. So ends this month, with nothing of weight upon my mind, but for my father and mother, who are both very ill, and have been so for some weeks: whom God help! but I do fear my poor father will hardly be ever thoroughly well again.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Mar 1667. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and Sir W. Batten (age 66) by barge to Deptford, Kent [Map] by eight in the morning, where to the King's yard a little to look after business there, and then to a private storehouse to look upon some cordage of Sir W. Batten's (age 66), and there being a hole formerly made for a drain for tarr to run into, wherein the barrel stood still, full of stinking water, Sir W. Batten (age 66) did fall with one leg into it, which might have been very bad to him by breaking a leg or other hurt, but, thanks be to God, he only sprained his foot a little. So after his shifting his stockings at a strong water shop close by, we took barge again, and so to Woolwich, Kent [Map], where our business was chiefly to look upon the ballast wharfe there, which is offered us for the King's use to hire, but we do not think it worth the laying out much money upon, unless we could buy the fee-simple of it, which cannot be sold us, so we wholly flung it off: So to the Dockyard, and there staid a while talking about business of the yard, and thence to the Rope-yard [Map], and so to the White Hart and there dined, and Captain Cocke (age 50) with us, whom we found at the Rope-yard [Map], and very merry at dinner, and many pretty tales of Sir J. Minnes (age 68), which I have entered in my tale book. But by this time Sir W. Batten (age 66) was come to be in much pain in his foot, so as he was forced to be carried down in a chair to the barge again, and so away to Deptford, Kent [Map], and there I a little in the yard, and then to Bagwell's (age 30), where I find his wife washing, and also I did 'hazer tout que je voudrais con' [Note. have all that I wanted with] her, and then sent for her husband (age 30), and discoursed of his going to Harwich [Map] this week to his charge of the new ship building there, which I have got him, and so away, walked to Redriffe [Map], and there took boat and away home, and upon Tower Hill [Map], near the ticket office, meeting with my old acquaintance Mr. Chaplin (age 40), the cheesemonger, and there fell to talk of news, and he tells me that for certain the King of France (age 28) is denied passage with his army through Flanders, and that he hears that the Dutch do stand upon high terms with us, and will have a promise of not being obliged to strike the flag to us before they will treat with us, and other high things, which I am ashamed of and do hope will never be yielded to. That they do make all imaginable preparations, but that he believes they will be in mighty want of men; that the King of France (age 28) do court us mightily. He tells me too that our Lord-Treasurer is going to lay down, and that Lord Arlington (age 49) is to be Lord Treasurer, but I believe nothing of it, for he is not yet of estate visible enough to have the charge I suppose upon him.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1667. Up, and to the office, where all the morning; at noon home to dinner, and then to the office again in the afternoon, and there all day very busy till night, and then, having done much business, home to supper, and so to bed. This afternoon come home Sir J. Minnes (age 68), who has been down, but with little purpose, to pay the ships below at the Nore.

Poll Bill

Pepy's Diary. 20 Mar 1667. Thence to Westminster Hall [Map] and drank at the Swan [Map], and 'baiserais the petite misse'; and so to Mrs. Martin's... I sent for some burnt wine, and drank and then away, not pleased with my folly, and so to the Hall again, and there staid a little, and so home by water again, where, after speaking with my wife, I with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to our church to the vestry, to be assessed by the late Poll Bill, where I am rated as an Esquire, and for my office, all will come to about £50. But not more than I expected, nor so much by a great deal as I ought to be, for all my offices. So shall be glad to escape so.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Mar 1667. Lord's Day. With Sir W. Batten (age 66) to White Hall, and there I to Sir G. Carteret (age 57), who is mighty cheerful, which makes me think and by some discourse that there is expectation of a peace, but I did not ask (him). Here was Sir J. Minnes (age 68) also: and they did talk of my Lord Bruncker (age 47), whose father, it seems, did give Mr. Ashburnham (age 63) and the present Lord Digby (age 54) £1200 to be made an Irish lord, and swore the same day that he had not 12d. left to pay for his dinner: they make great mirth at this, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) having lately given great matter of offence both to them and us all, that we are at present mightily displeased with him.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Mar 1667. After dinner Balty (age 27) (who dined also with us) and I with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) in his coach to White Hall, but did nothing, but by water to Strand Bridge and thence walked to my Lord Treasurer's (age 60), where the King (age 36), Duke of York (age 33), and the Caball, and much company without; and a fine day.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1667. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) in his coach, set him down at the Treasurer's Office in Broad-streete, and I in his coach to White Hall, and there had the good fortune to walk with Sir W. Coventry (age 39) into the garden, and there read our melancholy letter to the Duke of York (age 33), which he likes. And so to talk: and he flatly owns that we must have a peace, for we cannot set out a fleete; and, to use his own words, he fears that we shall soon have enough of fighting in this new way, which we have thought on for this year. He bemoans the want of money, and discovers himself jealous that Sir G. Carteret (age 57) do not look after, or concern himself for getting, money as he used to do, and did say it is true if Sir G. Carteret (age 57) would only do his work, and my Lord Treasurer (age 60) would do his own, Sir G. Carteret (age 57) hath nothing to do to look after money, but if he will undertake my Lord Treasurer's (age 60) work to raise money of the Bankers, then people must expect that he will do it, and did further say, that he [Carteret] and my Chancellor (age 58) do at this very day labour all they can to villify this new way of raising money, and making it payable, as it now is, into the Exchequer; and expressly said that in pursuance hereof, my Chancellor (age 58) hath prevailed with the King (age 36), in the close of his last speech to the House, to say, that he did hope to see them come to give money as it used to be given, without so many provisos, meaning, as Sir W. Coventry (age 39) says, this new method of the Act.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1667. So away we to the Duke of York (age 33), and there in his closett Sir W. Coventry (age 39) and I delivered the letter, which the Duke of York (age 33) made not much of, I thought, as to laying it to heart, as the matter deserved, but did promise to look after the getting of money for us, and I believe Sir W. Coventry (age 39) will add what force he can to it. I did speak to Sir W. Coventry (age 39) about Balty's (age 27) warrant, which is ready, and about being Deputy Treasurer, which he very readily and friendlily agreed to, at which I was glad, and so away and by coach back to Broad-streete to Sir G. Carteret's (age 57), and there found my brother passing his accounts, which I helped till dinner, and dined there, and many good stories at dinner, among others about discoveries of murder, and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) did tell of the discovery of his own great-grandfather's murder, fifteen years after he was murdered.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Apr 1667. So home to dinner, and in the afternoon met by agreement (being put on it by Harry Bruncker's (age 40) frighting us into a despatch of Carcasse's business) [Lord] Bruncker, T. Harvey, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), Sir W. Batten (age 66), and I (Sir W. Pen (age 46) keeping out of the way still), where a great many high words from Bruncker, and as many from me and others to him, and to better purpose, for I think we have fortified ourselves to overthrow his man Carcasse, and to do no honour to him.

Pepy's Diary. 03 May 1667. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 68), Sir W. Batten (age 66), and Sir W. Pen (age 46) in the last man's coach to St. James's, and thence up to the Duke of York's (age 33) chamber, which, as it is now fretted at the top, and the chimney-piece made handsome, is one of the noblest and best-proportioned rooms that ever, I think, I saw in my life, and when ready, into his closet and did our business, where, among other things, we had a proposition of Mr. Pierce's, for being continued in pay, or something done for him, in reward of his pains as Chyrurgeon-Generall; forasmuch as Troutbecke, that was never a doctor before, hath got £200 a year settled on him for nothing but that one voyage with the Duke of Albemarle (age 58). The Duke of York (age 33) and the whole company did shew most particular kindness to Mr. Pierce, every body moving for him, and the Duke himself most, that he is likely to be a very great man, I believe. Here also we had another mention of Carcasses business, and we directed to bring in a report of our opinion of his case, which vexes us that such a rogue shall make us so much trouble.

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1667. Thence to the office, and did business, and then by coach to St. James's again, but Sir W. Coventry (age 39) not within, so I wrote something to him, and then straight back again and to Sir W. Batten's (age 66), and there talked with him and Sir J. Minnes (age 68), who are mighty hot in Carcasses business, but their judgment's not to be trusted. However, I will go through with it, or otherwise we shall be all slaves to my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and his man's impudence.

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1667. Then home to dinner, where W. Hewer (age 25) dined with us, and he and I after dinner to discourse of Carcasses business, wherein I apparently now do manage it wholly against my Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Pen (age 46), like a false rogue, shrinking out of the collar, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), afoot, being easily led either way, and Sir W. Batten (age 66), a malicious fellow that is not able to defend any thing, so that the whole odium must fall on me, which I will therefore beware how I manage that I may not get enemies to no purpose. It vexes me to see with what a company I am mixed, but then it pleases me to see that I am reckoned the chief mover among them, as they do, confess and esteem me in every thing.

Pepy's Diary. 13 May 1667. So finding no business likely to be done here for Tangier, I having a warrant for tallies to be signed, I away to the New Exchange, and there staid a little, and then to a looking-glass shop to consult about covering the wall in my closet over my chimney, which is darkish, with looking-glasses, and then to my wife's tailor's, but find her not ready to go home, but got to buy things, and so I away home to look after my business and finish my report of Carcasse, and then did get Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and Sir W. Pen (age 46) together, and read it over with all the many papers relating to the business, which they do wonder at, and the trouble I have taken about it, and like the report, so as that they do unanimously resolve to sign it, and stand by it, and after a great deal of discourse of the strange deportment of my Lord Bruncker (age 47) in this business to withstand the whole board in behalf of such an impudent rogue as this is, I parted, and home to my wife, and supped and talked with her, and then to bed, resolving to rise betimes to-morrow to write fair the report.

Pepy's Diary. 14 May 1667. Thence home, and with Fist presently to the finishing the writing fair of our report. And by and by to Sir W. Batten's (age 66), and there he and I and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and Sir W. Pen (age 46) did read and sign it with great good liking, and so away to the office again to look over and correct it, and then home to supper and to bed, my mind being pretty well settled, having this report done, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1667. Being come, we up to the Duke of York's (age 33) chamber, who, when ready, we to our usual business, and being very glad, we all that signed it, that is, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), W. Batten (age 66), W. Pen (age 46), and myself, and then Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and Sir W. Coventry (age 39), Bruncker (age 47), and T. Harvy (age 41), and the officers of the Ordnance, Sir J. Duncombe (age 44), and Mr. Cholmely (age 34) presented our report about Carcasse, and did afterwards read it with that success that the Duke of York (age 33) was for punishing him, not only with turning him out of the office, but with what other punishment he could, which nobody did forward, and so he escaped, only with giving security to secure the King (age 36) against double tickets of his and other things that he might have wronged the King (age 36) or subject in before his dismission.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1667. This morning my wife had some things brought home by a new woman of the New Exchange, one Mrs. Smith, which she would have me see for her fine hand, and indeed it is a fine hand, and the woman I have observed is a mighty pretty looked woman. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to St. James's, and stopt at Temple Bar for Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to go into the Devil's Taverne [Map] to shit, he having drunk whey, and his belly wrought.

Pepy's Diary. 16 May 1667. At noon, this being Holy Thursday, that is, Ascension Day, when the boys go on procession round the parish, we were to go to the Three Tuns' Tavern [Map], to dine with the rest of the parish; where all the parish almost was, Sir Andrew Rickard (age 63) and others; and of our house, J. Minnes (age 68), W. Batten (age 66), W. Pen (age 46), and myself; and Mr. Mills did sit uppermost at the table.

Pepy's Diary. 17 May 1667. Up, and to the office, where all the morning upon some accounts of Mr. Gawden's, and at noon to the Three Tuns [Map] to dinner with Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), W. Batten (age 66), W. Pen (age 46), and T. Harvy (age 41), where very merry, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47) in appearance as good friends as ever, though I know he has a hatred to me in heart.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jun 1667. So we all down to Deptford, Kent [Map], and pitched upon ships and set men at work: but, Lord! to see how backwardly things move at this pinch, notwithstanding that, by the enemy's being now come up as high as almost the Hope, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), who has gone down to pay some ships there, hath sent up the money; and so we are possessed of money to do what we will with.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jun 1667. Up, and more letters still from Sir W. Coventry (age 39) about more fire-ships, and so Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I to the office, where Bruncker (age 47) come to us, who is just now going to Chatham, Kent [Map] upon a desire of Commissioner Pett's (age 56), who is in a very fearful stink for fear of the Dutch, and desires help for God and the King (age 37) and kingdom's sake. So Bruncker (age 47) goes down, and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) also, from Gravesend, Kent [Map]. This morning Pett writes us word that Sheernesse [Map] is lost last night, after two or three hours' dispute. The enemy hath possessed himself of that place; which is very sad, and puts us into great fears of Chatham, Kent [Map]. Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I down by water to Deptford, Kent [Map], and there Sir W. Pen (age 46) and we did consider of several matters relating to the dispatch of the fire-ships, and so Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I home again, and there to dinner, my wife and father having dined, and after dinner, by W. Hewer's (age 25) lucky advice, went to Mr. Fenn, and did get him to pay me above £400 of my wages, and W. Hewer (age 25) received it for me, and brought it home this night.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jun 1667. The City is troubled at their being put upon duty: summoned one hour, and discharged two hours after; and then again summoned two hours after that; to their great charge as well as trouble. And Pelling, the Potticary, tells me the world says all over, that less charge than what the Kingdom is put to, of one kind or other, by this business, would have set out all our great ships. It is said they did in open streets yesterday, at Westminster, cry, "A Parliament! a Parliament!" and I do believe it will cost blood to answer for these miscarriages. We do not hear that the Dutch are come to Gravesend, Kent [Map]; which is a wonder. But a wonderful thing it is that to this day we have not one word yet from Bruncker (age 47), or Peter Pett (age 56), or J. Minnes (age 68), of any thing at Chatham, Kent [Map]. The people that come hither to hear how things go, make me ashamed to be found unable to answer them: for I am left alone here at the office; and the truth is, I am glad my station is to be here, near my own home and out of danger, yet in a place of doing the King (age 37) good service.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jun 1667. All the morning at the office. No newes more than last night; only Purser Tyler comes and tells me that he being at all the passages in this business at Chatham, Kent [Map], he says there have been horrible miscarriages, such as we shall shortly hear of: that the want of boats hath undone us; and it is commonly said, and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) under his hand tells us, that they were employed by the men of the Yard to carry away their goods; and I hear that Commissioner Pett (age 56) will be found the first man that began to remove; he is much spoken against, and Bruncker (age 47) is complained of and reproached for discharging the men of the great ships heretofore.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jun 1667. Up, and hear Sir W. Batten (age 66) is come to town: I to see him; he is very ill of his fever, and come to town only for advice. Sir J. Minnes (age 68), I hear also, is very ill all this night, worse than before.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1667. Up betimes, about 9 o'clock, waked by a damned noise between a sow gelder and a cow and a dog, nobody after we were up being able to tell us what it was. After being ready we took coach, and, being very sleepy, droused most part of the way to Gravesend, Kent [Map], and there 'light, and down to the new batterys, which are like to be very fine, and there did hear a plain fellow cry out upon the folly of the King's officers above, to spend so much money in works at Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Deptford, Kent [Map], and sinking of good ships loaden with goods, when, if half the charge had been laid out here, it would have secured all that, and this place too, before now. And I think it is not only true in this, but that the best of the actions of us all are so silly, that the meanest people begin to see through them, and contemn them. Besides, says he, they spoil the river by it. Then informed ourselves where we might have some creame, and they guided us to one Goody Best's, a little out of the towne towards London road, and thither we went with the coach, and find it a mighty clean, plain house, and had a dish of very good creame to our liking, and so away presently very merry, and fell to reading of the several Advices to a Painter, which made us good sport, and indeed are very witty, and Creed did also repeat to me some of the substance of letters of old Burleigh in Queen (age 28) Elizabeth's time, which he hath of late read in the printed Cabbala, which is a very fine style at this day and fit to be imitated. With this, and talking and laughing at the folly of our masters in the management of things at this day, we got home by noon, where all well, and then to dinner, and after dinner both of us laid down upon the couch and chairs and to sleep, which I did for an hour or two, and then to the office, where I am sorry to hear that Sir J. Minnes (age 68) is likely to die this night, or to-morrow, I forgot to set down that we met this morning upon the road with Mrs. Williams going down to my Lord Bruncker (age 47); we bowed without speaking one to another, but I am ashamed at the folly of the man to have her down at this serious busy time, when the town and country is full of people and full of censure, and against him particularly. At Sir W. Batten's (age 66) my Lady tells me that she hears for certain that my Lord's maid of his lodging here do give out that Mrs. Williams hath been fain of late to sell her best clothes and jewels to get a little money upon, which is a sad condition.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jul 1667. At noon home to dinner, and after dinner my wife and Jane (mighty fine the girle) to go to see Jane's old mistress, who was to see her, and did see my wife the other day, and it is pleasant to hear with what kindness her old mistress speaks of this girle, and how she would still have her, and how the wench cried when she told her that she must come to her old mistress my wife. They gone, I to my chamber, and there dallied a little with my maid Nell.... [Missing text 'to touch her thing, but nothing more'] and so to the office where busy till night, and then comes Mrs. Turner (age 44), and walks with me in the garden to talk with me about her husband's business, and to tell me how she hears at the other end of the town how bad our office is spoken of by the King (age 37) and Prince (age 47) and Duke of Albemarle (age 58), and that there is not a good word said of any of us but of me; and me they all do speak mightily of, which, whether true or no, I am mighty glad to hear, but from all put together that I hear from other people, I am likely to pass as well as anybody. So, she gone, comes my wife and to walk in the garden, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) being still ill and so keeping us from singing, and by and by Sir W. Pen (age 46) come and walked with us and gave us a bottle of Syder, and so we home to supper and to bed. This day I am told that poor Tooker is dead, a very painfull poor man as ever I knew.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jul 1667. Thence by coach home, and there wrote a few letters, and then to consult with my wife about going to Epsum to-morrow, sometimes designing to go and then again not; and at last it grew late and I bethought myself of business to employ me at home tomorrow, and so I did not go. This afternoon I met with Mr. Rolt, who tells me that he is going Cornett under Collonel Ingoldsby (age 49), being his old acquaintance, and Ingoldsby hath a troop now from under the King (age 37), and I think it is a handsome way for him, but it was an ominous thing, methought, just as he was bidding me his last adieu, his nose fell a-bleeding, which ran in my mind a pretty while after. This afternoon Sir Alexander Frazier (age 57), who was of council for Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and had given him over for a dead man, said to me at White Hall:-"What", says he, "Sir J. Minnes (age 68) is dead". I told him, "No! but that there is hopes of his life". Methought he looked very sillily after it, and went his way. Late home to supper, a little troubled at my not going to Epsum to-morrow, as I had resolved, especially having the Duke of York (age 33) and Sir W. Coventry (age 39) out of town, but it was my own fault and at last my judgment to stay, and so to supper and to bed. This day, with great satisfaction, I hear that my Lady Jemimah is brought to bed, at Hinchingbroke [Map], of a boy.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jul 1667. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to St. James's, where the first time I have been there since the enemy's being with us, where little business but lack of money, which now is so professed by Sir W. Coventry (age 39) as nothing is more, and the King's whole business owned to be at a stand for want of it.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Aug 1667. At noon home to dinner, where I find Mrs. Wood, formerly Bab. Shelden, and our Mercer, who is dressed to-day in a paysan dress, that looks mighty pretty. We dined and sang and laughed mighty merry, and then I to the Office, only met at the door with Mrs. Martin and Mrs. Burroughs, who I took in and drank with, but was afraid my wife should see them, they being, especially the first, a prattling gossip, and so after drinking with them parted, and I to the Office, busy as long as my poor eyes would endure, which troubles me mightily and then into the garden with my wife, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 66) with Sir W. Pen (age 46) and Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and there eat a melon and talked, and so home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Aug 1667. After dinner I to the office, and there wrote as long as my eyes would give me leave, and then abroad and to the New Exchange, to the bookseller's there, where I hear of several new books coming out-Mr. Spratt's History of the Royal Society, and Mrs. Phillips's' poems. Sir John Denham's (age 52) poems are going to be all printed together; and, among others, some new things; and among them he showed me a copy of verses of his upon Sir John Minnes's (age 68) going heretofore to Bullogne to eat a pig1. Cowley (deceased), he tells me, is dead; who, it seems, was a mighty civil, serious man; which I did not know before. Several good plays are likely to be abroad soon, as Mustapha and Henry the 5th. Here having staid and divertised myself a good while, I home again and to finish my letters by the post, and so home, and betimes to bed with my wife because of rising betimes to-morrow.

Note 1. The collected edition of Denham's (age 52) poems is dated 1668. The verses referred to are inscribed "To Sir John Mennis being invited from Calice to Bologne to eat a pig", and two of the lines run "Little Admiral John To Bologne is gone"..

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1667. Up, and to the office betimes, where busy, and sat all the morning, vexed with more news of Carcasses proceedings at the Council, insomuch as we four, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), Sir W. Batten (age 66), (Sir) W. Pen (age 46), and myself, did make an appointment to dine with Sir W. Coventry (age 39) to-day to discourse it with him, which we did by going thither as soon as the office was up, and there dined, and very merry, and many good stories, and after dinner to our discourse about Carcasse, and how much we are troubled that we should be brought, as they say we shall, to defend our report before the Council-board with him, and to have a clerk imposed on us. He tells us in short that there is no intention in the Lords for the latter, but wholly the contrary. That they do not desire neither to do anything in disrespect to the Board, and he will endeavour to prevent, as he hath done, our coming to plead at the table with our clerk, and do believe the whole will amount to nothing at the Council, only what he shall declare in behalf of the King (age 37) against the office, if he offers anything, will and ought to be received, to which we all shew a readiness, though I confess even that (though I think I am as clear as the clearest of them), yet I am troubled to think what trouble a rogue may without cause give a man, though it be only by bespattering a man, and therefore could wish that over, though I fear nothing to be proved.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Aug 1667. Walk back home and to our own church, where a dull sermon and our church empty of the best sort of people, they being at their country houses, and so home, and there dined with me Mr. Turner and his daughter Betty (age 14)1. Her mother should, but they were invited to Sir J. Minnes (age 68), where she dined and the others here with me. Betty is grown a fine lady as to carriage and discourse. I and my wife are mightily pleased with her. We had a good haunch of venison, powdered and boiled, and a good dinner and merry.

Note 1. Betty Turner (age 14), who is frequently mentioned after this date, appears to have been a daughter of Serjeant John Turner (age 54) and his wife Jane (age 44), and younger sister of Theophila Turner (age 15) (see January 4th, 6th, 1668-69).

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1667. Up, and to the office; whence Lord Bruncker (age 47), J. Minnes (age 68), W. Pen (age 46), and I, went to examine some men that are put in there, for rescuing of men that were pressed into the service: and we do plainly see that the desperate condition that we put men into for want of their pay, makes them mad, they being as good men as ever were in the world, and would as readily serve the King (age 37) again, were they but paid. Two men leapt overboard, among others, into the Thames, out of the vessel into which they were pressed, and were shot by the soldiers placed there to keep them, two days since; so much people do avoid the King's service! And then these men are pressed without money, and so we cannot punish them for any thing, so that we are forced only to make a show of severity by keeping them in prison, but are unable to punish them.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1667. Then to the office, where we sat upon a particular business all the morning: and my Lord Anglesey (age 53) with us: who, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47), do bring us news how my Chancellor's (age 58) seal is to be taken away from him to-day. The thing is so great and sudden to me, that it put me into a very great admiration what should be the meaning of it; and they do not own that they know what it should be: but this is certain, that the King (age 37) did resolve it on Saturday, and did yesterday send the Duke of Albemarle (age 58), the only man fit for those works, to him for his purse: to which the Chancellor (age 58) answered, that he received it from the King (age 37), and would deliver it to the King's own hand, and so civilly returned the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) without it; and this morning my Chancellor (age 58) is to be with the King (age 37), to come to an end in the business. After sitting, we rose, and my wife being gone abroad with Mrs. Turner (age 44) to her washing at the whitster's, I dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where Mr. Boreman was, who come from White Hall; who tells us that he saw my Chancellor (age 58) come in his coach with some of his men, without his Seal, to White Hall to his chamber; and thither the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 33) come and staid together alone, an hour or more: and it is said that the King (age 37) do say that he will have the Parliament meet, and that it will prevent much trouble by having of him out of their enmity, by his place being taken away; for that all their enmity will be at him. It is said also that my Chancellor (age 58) answers, that he desires he may be brought to his trial, if he have done any thing to lose his office; and that he will be willing, and is most desirous, to lose that, and his head both together. Upon what terms they parted nobody knows but the Chancellor (age 58) looked sad, he says. Then in comes Sir Richard Ford (age 53), and says he hears that there is nobody more presses to reconcile the King (age 37) and Chancellor (age 58) than the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) and Duke of Buckingham (age 39): the latter of which is very strange, not only that he who was so lately his enemy should do it, but that this man, that but the other day was in danger of losing his own head, should so soon come to be a mediator for others: it shows a wise Government. They all say that he [Clarendon] is but a poor man, not worth above £3000 a-year in land; but this I cannot believe: and all do blame him for having built so great a house, till he had got a better estate. Having dined, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and I to White Hall, where we could be informed in no more than we were told before, nobody knowing the result of the meeting, but that the matter is suspended. So I walked to the King's playhouse, there to meet Sir W. Pen (age 46), and saw "The Surprizall", a very mean play, I thought: or else it was because I was out of humour, and but very little company in the house. But there Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I had a great deal of discourse with Moll; who tells us that Nell (age 17) is already left by my Lord Buckhurst (age 24), and that he makes sport of her, and swears she hath had all she could get of him; and Hart1, her great admirer, now hates her; and that she is very poor, and hath lost my Baroness Castlemayne (age 26), who was her great friend also but she is come to the House, but is neglected by them all2. Thence with Sir W. Pen (age 46) home, and I to the office, where late about business, and then home to supper, and so to bed.

Note 1. Charles Hart, great-nephew of Shakespeare, a favourite actor. He is credited with being Nell Gwyn's (age 17) first lover (or Charles I, as the wits put it), and with having brought her on the stage. He died of stone, and was buried at Stanmore Magna, Middlesex, where he had a country house.

Note 2. Lord Buckhurst's (age 24) liaison with Nell Gwyn probably came to an end about this time. We learn from Pepys that in January, 1667-68, the King (age 37) sent several times for Nelly (age 17) (see January 11th, 1667-68). Nell's eldest son by Charles II, Charles Beauclerc, was not born till May 8th, 1670. He was created Earl of Burford in 1676 and Duke of St. Albans in 1684.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Aug 1667. At noon dined at home, and then my wife and I, with Sir W. Pen (age 46), to the New Exchange, set her down, and he and I to St. James's, where Sir J. Minnes (age 68), Sir W. Batten (age 66), and we waited upon the Duke of York (age 33), but did little business, and he, I perceive, his head full of other business, and of late hath not been very ready to be troubled with any of our business. Having done with him, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I to White Hall, and there hear how it is like to go well enough with my Chancellor (age 58); that he is like to keep his Seal, desiring that he may stand his trial in Parliament, if they will accuse him of any thing. Here Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and I looking upon the pictures; and Mr. Chevins (age 65), being by, did take us, of his own accord, into the King's closet, to shew us some pictures, which, indeed, is a very noble place, and exceeding great variety of brave pictures, and the best hands. I could have spent three or four hours there well, and we had great liberty to look and Chevins seemed to take pleasure to shew us, and commend the pictures. Having done here, I to the Exchange [Map], and there find my wife gone with Sir W. Pen (age 46). So I to visit Colonel Fitzgerald, who hath been long sick at Woolwich, Kent [Map], where most of the officers and soldiers quartered there, since the Dutch being in the river, have died or been sick, and he among the rest; and, by the growth of his beard and gray [hairs], I did not know him. His desire to speak with me was about the late command for my paying no more pensions for Tangier.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Sep 1667. This day is kept in the City as a publick fast for the fire this day twelve months: but I was not at church, being commanded, with the rest, to attend the Duke of York (age 33); and, therefore, with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to St. James's, where we had much business before the Duke of York (age 33), and observed all things to be very kind between the Duke of York (age 33) and W. Coventry (age 39), which did mightily joy me. When we had done, Sir W. Coventry (age 39) called me down with him to his chamber, and there told me that he is leaving the Duke of York's (age 33) service, which I was amazed at. But he tells me that it is not with the least unkindness on the Duke of York's (age 33) side, though he expects, and I told him he was in the right, it will be interpreted otherwise, because done just at this time; "but", says he, "I did desire it a good while since, and the Duke of York (age 33) did, with much entreaty, grant it, desiring that I would say nothing of it, that he might have time and liberty to choose his successor, without being importuned for others whom he should not like:" and that he hath chosen Mr. Wren, which I am glad of, he being a very ingenious man; and so Sir W. Coventry (age 39) says of him, though he knows him little; but particularly commends him for the book he writ in answer to "Harrington's (age 56) Oceana", which, for that reason, I intend to buy. He tells me the true reason is, that he, being a man not willing to undertake more business than he can go through, and being desirous to have his whole time to spend upon the business of the Treasury, and a little for his own ease, he did desire this of the Duke of York (age 33). He assures me that the kindness with which he goes away from the Duke of York (age 33) is one of the greatest joys that ever he had in the world. I used some freedom with him, telling him how the world hath discoursed of his having offended the Duke of York (age 33), about the late business of the Chancellor (age 58). He do not deny it, but says that perhaps the Duke of York (age 33) might have some reason for it, he opposing him in a thing wherein he was so earnest but tells me, that, notwithstanding all that, the Duke of York (age 33) does not now, nor can blame him; for he tells me that he was the man that did propose the removal of the Chancellor (age 58); and that he did still persist in it, and at this day publickly owns it, and is glad of it; but that the Duke of York (age 33) knows that he did first speak of it to the Duke of York (age 33), before he spoke to any mortal creature besides, which was fair dealing: and the Duke of York (age 33) was then of the same mind with him, and did speak of it to the King (age 37); though since, for reasons best known to himself, he was afterwards altered. I did then desire to know what was the great matter that grounded his desire of the Chancellor's (age 58) removal? He told me many things not fit to be spoken, and yet not any thing of his being unfaithful to the King (age 37); but, 'instar omnium', he told me, that while he was so great at the Council-board, and in the administration of matters, there was no room for any body to propose any remedy to what was amiss, or to compass any thing, though never so good for the Kingdom, unless approved of by the Chancellor (age 58), he managing all things with that greatness which now will be removed, that the King (age 37) may have the benefit of others' advice. I then told him that the world hath an opinion that he hath joined himself with my Baroness Castlemayne's (age 26) faction in this business; he told me, he cannot help it, but says they are in an errour: but for first he will never, while he lives, truckle under any body or any faction, but do just as his own reason and judgment directs; and, when he cannot use that freedom, he will have nothing to do in public affairs but then he added, that he never was the man that ever had any discourse with my Baroness Castlemayne (age 26), or with others from her, about this or any public business, or ever made her a visit, or at least not this twelvemonth, or been in her lodgings but when called on any business to attend the King (age 37) there, nor hath had any thing to do in knowing her mind in this business. He ended all with telling me that he knows that he that serves a Prince must expect, and be contented to stand, all fortunes, and be provided to retreat, and that that he is most willing to do whenever the King (age 37) shall please. And so we parted, he setting me down out of his coach at Charing Cross [Map], and desired me to tell Sir W. Pen (age 46) what he had told me of his leaving the Duke of York's (age 33) service, that his friends might not be the last that know it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1667. Thence to the Excise office, and so to the Exchange [Map], and did a little business, and so home and took up my wife, and so carried her to the other end, where I 'light at my Lord Ashly's (age 46), by invitation, to dine there, which I did, and Sir H. Cholmly (age 35), Creed, and Yeabsly, upon occasion of the business of Yeabsly, who, God knows, do bribe him very well for it; and it is pretty to see how this great man do condescend to these things, and do all he can in his examining of his business to favour him, and yet with great cunning not to be discovered but by me that am privy to it. At table it is worth remembering that my Lord tells us that the House of Lords is the last appeal that a man can make, upon a poynt of interpretation of the law, and that therein they are above the judges; and that he did assert this in the Lords' House upon the late occasion of the quarrel between my Lord Bristoll (age 54) and the Chancellor (age 58), when the former did accuse the latter of treason, and the judges did bring it in not to be treason: my Lord Ashly (age 46) did declare that the judgment of the judges was nothing in the presence of their Lordships, but only as far as they were the properest men to bring precedents; but not to interpret the law to their Lordships, but only the inducements of their persuasions: and this the Lords did concur in. Another pretty thing was my Lady Ashly's speaking of the bad qualities of glass-coaches; among others, the flying open of the doors upon any great shake: but another was, that my Lady Peterborough (age 45) being in her glass-coach, with the glass up, and seeing a lady pass by in a coach whom she would salute, the glass was so clear, that she thought it had been open, and so ran her head through the glass, and cut all her forehead! After dinner, before we fell to the examination of Yeabsly's business, we were put into my Lord's room before he could come to us, and there had opportunity to look over his state of his accounts of the prizes; and there saw how bountiful the King (age 37) hath been to several people and hardly any man almost, Commander of the Navy of any note, but hath had some reward or other out of it; and many sums to the Privy-purse, but not so many, I see, as I thought there had been: but we could not look quite through it. But several Bedchamber-men and people about the Court had good sums; and, among others, Sir John Minnes (age 68) and Lord Bruncker (age 47) have £200 a-piece for looking to the East India prizes, while I did their work for them.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Oct 1667. After dinner, I down to Deptford, Kent [Map], the first time that I went to look upon "The Maybolt", which the King (age 37) hath given me, and there she is; and I did meet with Mr. Uthwayte, who do tell me that there are new sails ordered to be delivered her, and a cable, which I did not speak of at all to him. So, thereupon, I told him I would not be my own hindrance so much as to take her into my custody before she had them, which was all I said to him, but desired him to take a strict inventory of her, that I might not be cheated by the master nor the company, when they come to understand that the vessel is gone away, which he hath promised me, and so away back again home, reading all the way the book of the collection of oaths in the several offices of this nation, which is worth a man's reading, and so away home, and there my boy and I to sing, and at it all the evening, and to supper, and so to bed. This evening come Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to me, to let me know that a Parliament-man hath been with him, to tell him that the Parliament intend to examine him particularly about Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) selling of places, and about my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) discharging the ships at Chatham, Kent [Map] by ticket: for the former of which I am more particularly sorry that that business of Sir W. Coventry (age 39) should come up again; though this old man tells me, and, I believe, that he can say nothing to it.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Nov 1667. Up, and to the office, where all the morning, and at noon home, where my wife not very well, but is to go to Mr. Mills's child's christening, where she is godmother, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and Sir R. Brookes (age 30) her companions. I left her after dinner (my clerks dining with me) to go with Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and I to the office, where did much business till after candlelight, and then my eyes beginning to fail me, I out and took coach to Arundell House [Map], where the meeting of Gresham College was broke up; but there meeting Creed, I with him to the taverne in St. Clement's Churchyard, where was Deane Wilkins (age 53), Dr. Whistler, Dr. Floyd (age 40), a divine admitted, I perceive, this day, and other brave men; and there, among other things of news, I do hear, that upon the reading of the House of Commons's Reasons of the manner of their proceedings in the business of my Chancellor (age 58), the Reasons were so bad, that my Lord Bristoll (age 55) himself did declare that he would not stand to what he had, and did still, advise the Lords to concur to, upon any of the Reasons of the House of Commons; but if it was put to the question whether it should be done on their Reasons, he would be against them; and indeed it seems the Reasons-however they come to escape the House of Commons, which shews how slightly the greatest matters are done in this world, and even in Parliaments were none of them of strength, but the principle of them untrue; they saying, that where any man is brought before a judge, accused of Treason in general, without specifying the particular, the judge do there constantly and is obliged to commit him. Whereas the question being put by the Lords to my Lord Keeper, he said that quite the contrary was true: and then, in the Sixth Article (I will get a copy of them if I can) there are two or three things strangely asserted to the diminishing of the King's power, as is said, at least things that heretofore would not have been heard of. But then the question being put among the Lords, as my Lord Bristoll (age 55) advised, whether, upon the whole matter and Reasons that had been laid before them, they would commit my Lord Clarendon (age 58), it was carried five to one against it; there being but three Bishops against him, of whom Cosens (age 72) and Dr. Reynolds were two, and I know not the third. This made the opposite Lords, as Bristoll (age 55) and Buckingham (age 39), so mad, that they declared and protested against it, speaking very broad that there was mutiny and rebellion in the hearts of the Lords, and that they desired they might enter their dissents, which they did do, in great fury.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Nov 1667. Up, and all the morning at my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) lodgings with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and Sir W. Pen (age 46) about Sir W. Warren's accounts, wherein I do not see that they are ever very likely to come to an understanding of them, as Sir J. Minnes (age 68) hath not yet handled them. Here till noon, and then home to dinner, where Mr. Pierce comes to me, and there, in general, tells me how the King (age 37) is now fallen in and become a slave to the Duke of Buckingham (age 39), led by none but him, whom he, Mr. Pierce, swears he knows do hate the very person of the King (age 37), and would, as well as will, certainly ruin him. He do say, and I think with right, that the King (age 37) do in this do the most ungrateful part of a master to a servant that ever was done, in this carriage of his to my Chancellor (age 58): that, it may be, the Chancellor (age 58) may have faults, but none such as these they speak of; that he do now really fear that all is going to ruin, for he says he hears that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) hath been, just before his sickness, with the Duke of York (age 34), to ask his forgiveness and peace for what he had done; for that he never could foresee that what he meant so well, in the councilling to lay by the Chancellor (age 58), should come to this. As soon as dined, I with my boy Tom to my bookbinder's, where all the afternoon long till 8 or 9 at night seeing him binding up two or three collections of letters and papers that I had of him, but above all things my little abstract pocket book of contracts, which he will do very neatly. Then home to read, sup, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Nov 1667. Up, and at the office all this morning, and then home to dinner, and then by coach sent my wife to the King's playhouse, and I to White Hall, there intending, with Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and Sir T. Harvy (age 42) to have seen the Duke of York (age 34), whom it seems the King (age 37) and Queen (age 29) have visited, and so we may now well go to see him. But there was nobody could speak with him, and so we parted, leaving a note in Mr. Wren's (age 38) chamber that we had been there, he being at the free conference of the two Houses about this great business of my Chancellor's (age 58), at which they were at this hour, three in the afternoon, and there they say my Lord Anglesey (age 53) do his part admirablyably, and each of us taking a copy of the Guinny company's defence to a petition against them to the Parliament the other day.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1667. Waked about seven o'clock this morning with a noise I supposed I heard, near our chamber, of knocking, which, by and by, increased: and I, more awake, could, distinguish it better. I then waked my wife, and both of us wondered at it, and lay so a great while, while that increased, and at last heard it plainer, knocking, as if it were breaking down a window for people to get out; and then removing of stools and chairs; and plainly, by and by, going up and down our stairs. We lay, both of us, afeard; yet I would have rose, but my wife would not let me. Besides, I could not do it without making noise; and we did both conclude that thieves were in the house, but wondered what our people did, whom we thought either killed, or afeard, as we were. Thus we lay till the clock struck eight, and high day. At last, I removed my gown and slippers safely to the other side of the bed over my wife: and there safely rose, and put on my gown and breeches, and then, with a firebrand in my hand, safely opened the door, and saw nor heard any thing. Then (with fear, I confess) went to the maid's chamber-door, and all quiet and safe. Called Jane up, and went down safely, and opened my chamber door, where all well. Then more freely about, and to the kitchen, where the cook-maid up, and all safe. So up again, and when Jane come, and we demanded whether she heard no noise, she said, "yes, and was afeard", but rose with the other maid, and found nothing; but heard a noise in the great stack of chimnies that goes from Sir J. Minnes (age 68) through our house; and so we sent, and their chimnies have been swept this morning, and the noise was that, and nothing else. It is one of the most extraordinary accidents in my life, and gives ground to think of Don Quixote's adventures how people may be surprised, and the more from an accident last night, that our young gibb-cat1 did leap down our stairs from top to bottom, at two leaps, and frighted us, that we could not tell well whether it was the cat or a spirit, and do sometimes think this morning that the house might be haunted. Glad to have this so well over, and indeed really glad in my mind, for I was much afeard, I dressed myself and to the office both forenoon and afternoon, mighty hard putting papers and things in order to my extraordinary satisfaction, and consulting my clerks in many things, who are infinite helps to my memory and reasons of things, and so being weary, and my eyes akeing, having overwrought them to-day reading so much shorthand, I home and there to supper, it being late, and to bed. This morning Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I did walk together a good while, and he tells me that the Houses are not likely to agree after their free conference yesterday, and he fears what may follow.

Note 1. A male cat. "Gib" is a contraction of the Christian name Gilbert (Old French), "Tibert". "I am melancholy as a gib-cat" Shakespeare, I King Henry IV, act i., sc. 3. Gib alone is also used, and a verb made from it-"to gib", or act like a cat.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Nov 1667. Thence, paying our shot, 6s. apiece, I home, and there to the office and wrote my letters, and then home, my eyes very sore with yesterday's work, and so home and tried to make a piece by my eare and viall to "I wonder what the grave", &c., and so to supper and to bed, where frighted a good while and my wife again with noises, and my wife did rise twice, but I think it was Sir John Minnes's (age 68) people again late cleaning their house, for it was past I o'clock in the morning before we could fall to sleep, and so slept. But I perceive well what the care of money and treasure in a man's house is to a man that fears to lose it. My Lord Anglesey (age 53) told me this day that he did believe the House of Commons would, the next week, yield to the Lords; but, speaking with others this day, they conclude they will not, but that rather the King (age 37) will accommodate it by committing my Lord Clarendon (age 58) himself. I remember what Mr. Evelyn (age 47) said, that he did believe we should soon see ourselves fall into a Commonwealth again. Joseph Williamson I find mighty kind still, but close, not daring to say anything almost that touches upon news or state of affairs.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Dec 1667. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to the Duke of York (age 34), the first time that I have seen him, or we waited on him, since his sickness; and, blessed be God! he is not at all the worse for the smallpox, but is only a little weak yet. We did much business with him, and so parted. My Lord Anglesey (age 53) told me how my Lord Northampton (age 45) brought in a Bill into the House of Lords yesterday, under the name of a Bill for the Honour and Privilege of the House, and Mercy to my Lord Clarendon (age 58): which, he told me, he opposed, saying that he was a man accused of treason by the House of Commons; and mercy was not proper for him, having not been tried yet, and so no mercy needful for him. However, the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) and others did desire that the Bill might be read; and it, was for banishing my Lord Clarendon (age 58) from all his Majesty's dominions, and that it should be treason to have him found in any of them: the thing is only a thing of vanity, and to insult over him, which is mighty poor I think, and so do every body else, and ended in nothing, I think.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Dec 1667. By and by home with Sir J. Minnes (age 68), who tells me that my Lord Clarendon (age 58) did go away in a Custom-house boat, and is now at Calais [Map]: and, I confess, nothing seems to hang more heavy than his leaving of this unfortunate paper behind him, that hath angered both Houses, and hath, I think, reconciled them in that which otherwise would have broke them in pieces; so that I do hence, and from Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) late example and doctrine to me, learn that on these sorts of occasions there is nothing like silence; it being seldom any wrong to a man to say nothing, but, for the most part, it is to say anything. This day, in coming home, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) told me a pretty story of Sir Lewes Dives (age 68), whom I saw this morning speaking with him, that having escaped once out of prison through a house of office, and another time in woman's apparel, and leaping over a broad canal, a soldier swore, says he, this is a strange jade.... He told me also a story of my Lord Cottington, who, wanting a son, intended to make his nephew his heir, a country boy; but did alter his mind upon the boy's being persuaded by another young heir, in roguery, to crow like a cock at my Lord's table, much company being there, and the boy having a great trick at doing that perfectly. My Lord bade them take away that fool from the table, and so gave over the thoughts of making him his heir, from this piece of folly.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Dec 1667. At noon to dinner, where W. How with us, and after dinner, he being gone, I to my chamber again till almost night, and then took boat, the tide serving, and so to White Hall, where I saw the Duchesse of York (age 30), in a fine dress of second mourning for her mother, being black, edged with ermine, go to make her first visit to the Queene (age 58) since the Duke of York (age 34) was sick; and by and by, she being returned, the Queene (age 58) come and visited her. But it was pretty to observe that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) and I, walking an hour and more together in the Matted Gallery, he observed, and so did I, how the Duchesse, as soon as she spied him, turned her head a one side. Here he and I walked thus long, which we have not done a great while before. Our discourse was upon everything: the unhappiness of having our matters examined by people that understand them not; that it was better for us in the Navy to have men that do understand the whole, and that are not passionate; that we that have taken the most pains are called upon to answer for all crimes, while those that, like Sir W. Batten and Sir J. Minnes (age 68), did sit and do nothing, do lie still without any trouble; that, if it were to serve the King (age 37) and kingdom again in a war, neither of us could do more, though upon this experience we might do better than we did; that the commanders, the gentlemen that could never be brought to order, but undid all, are now the men that find fault and abuse others; that it had been much better for the King (age 37) to have given Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and Sir W. Batten £1000 a-year to have sat still, than to have had them in his business this war: that the serving a Prince that minds not his business is most unhappy for them that serve him well, and an unhappiness so great that he declares he will never have more to do with a war, under him. That he hath papers which do flatly contradict the Duke of Albemarle's (age 59) Narrative; and that he hath been with the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) and shewed him them, to prevent his falling into another like fault: that the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) seems to be able to answer them; but he thinks that the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) and the Prince are contented to let their Narratives sleep, they being not only contradictory in some things (as he observed about the business of the Duke of Albemarle's (age 59) being to follow the Prince upon dividing the fleete, in case the enemy come out), but neither of them to be maintained in others. That the business the other night of my Lord Anglesey (age 53) at the Council was happily got over for my Lord, by his dexterous silencing it, and the rest, not urging it further; forasmuch as, had the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) come in time enough, and had got it by the end, he, would have toused him in it; Sir W. Coventry (age 39) telling me that my Lord Anglesey (age 53) did, with such impudence, maintain the quarrel against the Commons and some of the Lords, in the business of my Lord Clarendon (age 58), that he believes there are enough would be glad but of this occasion to be revenged of him. He tells me that he hears some of the Thomsons (age 60) are like to be of the Commission for the Accounts, and Wildman (age 46), which he much wonders at, as having been a false fellow to every body, and in prison most of the time since the King's coming in. But he do tell me that the House is in such a condition that nobody can tell what to make of them, and, he thinks, they were never in before; that every body leads, and nobody follows; and that he do now think that, since a great many are defeated in their expectation of being of the Commission, now they would put it into such hands as it shall get no credit from: for, if they do look to the bottom and see the King's case, they think they are then bound to give the King (age 37) money; whereas, they would be excused from that, and therefore endeavour to make this business of the Accounts to signify little. I spoke with him about my Lord Sandwich's (age 42) business, in which he is very friendly, and do say that the unhappy business of the prizes is it that hath brought all this trouble upon him, and the only thing that made any thing else mentioned, and it is true. So having discoursed with him, I spent some time with Sir Stephen Fox (age 40) about the business of our adjusting the new method of the Excise between the Guards household and Tangier, the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury being now resolved to bring all their management into a course of payment by orders, and not by tallies, and I am glad of it, and so by water home late, and very dark, and when come home there I got my wife to read, and then come Captain Cocke (age 50) to me; and there he tells me, to my great satisfaction, that Sir Robert Brookes (age 30) did dine with him today; and that he told him, speaking of me, that he would make me the darling of the House of Commons, so much he is satisfied concerning me. And this Cocke (age 50) did tell me that I might give him thanks for it; and I do think it may do me good, for he do happen to be held a considerable person, of a young man, both for sobriety and ability. Then to discourse of business of his own about some hemp of his that is come home to receive it into the King's stores, and then parted, and by and by my wife and I to supper, she not being well, her flux being great upon her, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1667. Up before day, and by coach to Sir W. Coventry's (age 39), and with him to White Hall, and there walked a great while with him in the garden till the Commissioners of the Treasury met, and there talked over many businesses, and particularly he tells me that by my desire he hath moved the Duke of York (age 34) that Sir J. Minnes (age 68) might be removed from the Navy, at least the Controller's place, and his business put on my Lord Brouncker (age 47) and Sir W. Pen (age 46); that the Committee for Accounts are good sober men, and such as he thinks we shall have fair play from; that he hopes that the Kingdom will escape ruin in general, notwithstanding all our fears, and yet I find he do seem not very confident in it.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1668. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) by coach to White Hall, and there attended the King (age 37) and the Duke of York (age 34) in the Duke of York's (age 34) lodgings, with the rest of the Officers and many of the Commanders of the fleete, and some of our master shipwrights, to discourse the business of having the topmasts of ships made to lower abaft of the mainmast; a business I understand not, and so can give no good account; but I do see that by how much greater the Council, and the number of Counsellors is, the more confused the issue is of their councils; so that little was said to the purpose regularly, and but little use was made of it, they coming to a very broken conclusion upon it, to make trial in a ship or two. From this they fell to other talk about the fleete's fighting this late war, and how the King's ships have been shattered; though the King (age 37) said that the world would not have it that about ten or twenty ships in any fight did do any service, and that this hath been told so to him himself, by ignorant people. The Prince (age 48), who was there, was mightily surprised at it, and seemed troubled: but the King (age 37) told him that it was only discourse of the world. But Mr. Wren (age 39) whispered me in the eare, and said that the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) had put it into his Narrative for the House, that not above twenty-five ships fought in the engagement wherein he was, but that he was advised to leave it out; but this he did write from sea, I am sure, or words to that effect: and did displease many commanders, among others, Captain Batts, who the Duke of York (age 34) said was a very stout man, all the world knew; and that another was brought into his ship that had been turned out of his place when he was a boatswain, not long before, for being a drunkard. This the Prince took notice of, and would have been angry, I think, but they let their discourse fall: but the Duke of York (age 34) was earnest in it. And the Prince said to me, standing by me, "God damn me, if they will turn out every man that will be drunk, they must turn out all the commanders in the fleete. What is the matter if he be drunk, so when he comes to fight he do his work? At least, let him be punished for his drunkenness, and not put out of his command presently". This he spoke, very much concerned for this idle fellow, one Greene. After this the King (age 37) began to tell stories of the cowardice of the Spaniards in Flanders, when he was there, at the siege of Mardike and Dunkirke; which was very pretty, though he tells them but meanly.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Feb 1668. Up, and to the office a while, and thence to White Hall by coach with Mr. Batelier with me, whom I took up in the street. I thence by water to Westminster Hall [Map], and there with Lord Brouncker (age 48), Sir T. Harvy (age 42), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), did wait all the morning to speak to members about our business, thinking our business of tickets would come before the House to-day, but we did alter our minds about the petition to the House, sending in the paper to them. But the truth is we were in a great hurry, but it fell out that they were most of the morning upon the business of not prosecuting the first victory; which they have voted one of the greatest miscarriages of the whole war, though they cannot lay the fault anywhere yet, because Harman (age 43) is not come home. This kept them all the morning, which I was glad of. So down to the Hall, where my wife by agreement stayed for me at Mrs. Michell's, and there was Mercer and the girl, and I took them to Wilkinson's the cook's in King Street (where I find the master of the house hath been dead for some time), and there dined, and thence by one o'clock to the King's house: a new play, "The Duke of Lerma", of Sir Robert Howard's (age 42): where the King (age 37) and Court was; and Knepp and Nell (age 18) spoke the prologue most excellently, especially Knepp, who spoke beyond any creature I ever, heard. The play designed to reproach our King with his mistresses, that I was troubled for it, and expected it should be interrupted; but it ended all well, which salved all. The play a well-writ and good play, only its design I did not like of reproaching the King (age 37), but altogether a very good and most serious play.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Mar 1668. Up and betimes to the office, where I did much business, and several come to me, and among others I did prepare Mr. Warren, and by and by Sir Prince, about what presents I have had from them, that they may not publish them, or if they do, that in truth I received none on the account of the Navy but Tangier, and this is true to the former, and in both that I never asked any thing of them. I must do the like with the rest. Mr. Moore was with me, and he do tell me, and so W. Hewer (age 26) tells me, he hears this morning that all the town is full of the discourse that the Officers of the Navy shall be all turned out, but honest Sir John Minnes (age 69), who, God knows, is fitter to have been turned out himself than any of us, doing the King (age 37) more hurt by his dotage and folly than all the rest can do by their knavery, if they had a mind to it.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Mar 1668. Thence, it being a cold wet day, I home with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) in his coach, and called by the way at my bookseller's and took home with me Kercher's Musurgia-very well bound, but I had no comfort to look upon them, but as soon as I come home fell to my work at the office, shutting the doors, that we, I and my clerks, might not be interrupted, and so, only with room for a little dinner, we very busy all the day till night that the officers met for me to give them the heads of what I intended to say, which I did with great discontent to see them all rely on me that have no reason at all to trouble myself about it, nor have any thanks from them for my labour, but contrarily Brouncker (age 48) looked mighty dogged, as thinking that I did not intend to do it so as to save him. This troubled me so much as, together with the shortness of the time and muchness of the business, did let me be at it till but about ten at night, and then quite weary, and dull, and vexed, I could go no further, but resolved to leave the rest to to-morrow morning, and so in full discontent and weariness did give over and went home, with[out] supper vexed and sickish to bed, and there slept about three hours, but then waked, and never in so much trouble in all my life of mind, thinking of the task I have upon me, and upon what dissatisfactory grounds, and what the issue of it may be to me.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Mar 1668. With these thoughts I lay troubling myself till six o'clock, restless, and at last getting my wife to talk to me to comfort me, which she at last did, and made me resolve to quit my hands of this Office, and endure the trouble of it no longer than till I can clear myself of it. So with great trouble, but yet with some ease, from this discourse with my wife, I up, and to my Office, whither come my clerks, and so I did huddle the best I could some more notes for my discourse to-day, and by nine o'clock was ready, and did go down to the Old Swan [Map], and there by boat, with T. H[ater] and W. H[ewer] with me, to Westminster, where I found myself come time enough, and my brethren all ready. But I full of thoughts and trouble touching the issue of this day; and, to comfort myself, did go to the Dog [Map] and drink half-a-pint of mulled sack, and in the Hall [Westminster] did drink a dram of brandy at Mrs. Hewlett's; and with the warmth of this did find myself in better order as to courage, truly. So we all up to the lobby; and between eleven and twelve o'clock, were called in, with the mace before us, into the House, where a mighty full House; and we stood at the bar, namely, Brouncker (age 48), Sir J. Minnes (age 69), Sir T. Harvey (age 42), and myself, W. Pen (age 46) being in the House, as a Member. I perceive the whole House was full, and full of expectation of our defence what it would be, and with great prejudice. After the Speaker had told us the dissatisfaction of the House, and read the Report of the Committee, I began our defence most acceptably and smoothly, and continued at it without any hesitation or losse, but with full scope, and all my reason free about me, as if it had been at my own table, from that time till past three in the afternoon; and so ended, without any interruption from the Speaker; but we withdrew. And there all my Fellow-Officers, and all the world that was within hearing, did congratulate me, and cry up my speech as the best thing they ever heard; and my Fellow-Officers overjoyed in it; we were called in again by and by to answer only one question, touching our paying tickets to ticket-mongers; and so out; and we were in hopes to have had a vote this day in our favour, and so the generality of the House was; but my speech, being so long, many had gone out to dinner and come in again half drunk; and then there are two or three that are professed enemies to us and every body else; among others, Sir T. Littleton (age 47), Sir Thomas Lee (age 32), Mr. Wiles, the coxcomb whom I saw heretofore at the cock-fighting, and a few others; I say, these did rise up and speak against the coming to a vote now, the House not being full, by reason of several being at dinner, but most because that the House was to attend the King (age 37) this afternoon, about the business of religion, wherein they pray him to put in force all the laws against Nonconformists and Papists; and this prevented it, so that they put it off to to-morrow come se'nnight. However, it is plain we have got great ground; and everybody says I have got the most honour that any could have had opportunity of getting; and so with our hearts mightily overjoyed at this success, we all to dinner to Lord Brouncker's (age 48)-that is to say, myself, T. Harvey (age 42), and W. Pen (age 46), and there dined; and thence with Sir Anthony Morgan, who is an acquaintance of Brouncker's (age 48), a very wise man, we after dinner to the King's house, and there saw part of "The Discontented Colonel", but could take no great pleasure in it, because of our coming in in the middle of it. After the play, home with W. Pen (age 46), and there to my wife, whom W. Hewer (age 26) had told of my success, and she overjoyed, and I also as to my particular; and, after talking awhile, I betimes to bed, having had no quiet rest a good while.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1668. Thence he to the House, and I to the Hall, where my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and the rest waiting till noon and not called for by the House, they being upon the business of money again, and at noon all of us to Chatelin's, the French house in Covent Garden [Map], to dinner-Brouncker (age 48), J. Minnes (age 69), W. Pen (age 46), T. Harvey (age 42), and myself-and there had a dinner cost us 8s. 6d. a-piece, a damned base dinner, which did not please us at all, so that I am not fond of this house at all, but do rather choose the Beare.

1668 Bawdy House Riots

Pepy's Diary. 25 Mar 1668. By and by the Duke of York (age 34) is ready; and I did wait for an opportunity of speaking my mind to him about Sir J. Minnes (age 69), his being unable to do the King (age 37) any service, which I think do become me to do in all respects, and have Sir W. Coventry's (age 40) concurrence therein, which I therefore will seek a speedy opportunity to do, come what will come of it. The Duke of York (age 34) and all with him this morning were full of the talk of the 'prentices, who are not yet [put] down, though the guards and militia of the town have been in armes all this night, and the night before; and the 'prentices have made fools of them, sometimes by running from them and flinging stones at them. Some blood hath been spilt, but a great many houses pulled down; and, among others, the Duke of York (age 34) was mighty merry at that of Damaris Page's, the great bawd of the seamen; and the Duke of York (age 34) complained merrily that he hath lost two tenants, by their houses being pulled down, who paid him for their wine licenses £15 a year. But here it was said how these idle fellows have had the confidence to say that they did ill in contenting themselves in pulling down the little bawdyhouses, and did not go and pull down the great bawdy-house at White Hall. And some of them have the last night had a word among them, and it was "Reformation and Reducement". This do make the courtiers ill at ease to see this spirit among people, though they think this matter will not come to much: but it speaks people's minds; and then they do say that there are men of understanding among them, that have been of Cromwell's army: but how true that is, I know not.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1668. So home, and there to my chamber till anon comes Mr. Turner and his wife and daughter, and Pelting, to sup with us and talk of my wife's journey to-morrow, her daughter going with my wife; and after supper to talk with her husband about the Office, and his place, which, by Sir J. Minnes's (age 69) age and inability, is very uncomfortable to him, as well as without profit, or certainty what he shall do, when Sir J. Minnes (age 69) dies, which is a sad condition for a man that hath lived so long in the Office as Mr. Turner hath done. But he aymes, and I advise him to it, to look for Mr. Ackworth's place, in case he should be removed. His wife afterwards did take me into my closet, and give me a cellar1 of waters of her own distilling for my father, to be carried down with my wife and her daughter to-morrow, which was very handsome. So broke up and to bed.

Note 1. A box to hold bottles. "Run for the cellar of strong waters quickly" -Ben Jonson, Magnetic Lady, act iii., sc. r.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Apr 1668. Lord's Day. Up, and to my chamber, and there to the writing fair some of my late musique notions, and so to church, where I have not been a good while, and thence home, and dined at home, with W. Hewer (age 26) with me; and after dinner, he and I a great deal of good talk touching this Office, how it is spoiled by having so many persons in it, and so much work that is not made the work of any one man, but of all, and so is never done; and that the best way to have it well done, were to have the whole trust in one, as myself, to set whom I pleased to work in the several businesses of the Office, and me to be accountable for the whole, and that would do it, as I would find instruments: but this is not to be compassed; but something I am resolved to do about Sir J. Minnes (age 69) before it be long. Then to my chamber again, to my musique, and so to church; and then home, and thither comes Captain Silas Taylor (age 43) to me, the Storekeeper of Harwich [Map], where much talk, and most of it against Captain Deane (age 34), whom I do believe to be a high, proud fellow; but he is an active man, and able in his way, and so I love him. He gone, I to my musique again, and to read a little, and to sing with Mr. Pelling, who come to see me, and so spent the evening, and then to supper and to bed. I hear that eight of the ringleaders in the late tumults of the 'prentices at Easter are condemned to die1.

Note 1. Four were executed on May 9th, namely, Thomas Limmerick, Edward Cotton, Peter Massenger, and Richard Beasley. They were drawn, hanged, and quartered at Tyburn [Map], and two of their heads fixed upon London Bridge [Map] ("The London Gazette", No. 259). See "The Tryals of such persons as under the notion of London Apprentices were tumultuously assembled in Moore Fields [Map], under colour of pulling down bawdy-houses", 4to., London, 1668. "It is to be observed", says "The London Gazette", "to the just vindication of the City, that none of the persons apprehended upon the said tumult were found to be apprentices, as was given out, but some idle persons, many of them nursed in the late Rebellion, too readily embracing any opportunity of making their own advantages to the disturbance of the peace, and injury of others".

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1668. Up, and at my office all the morning, doing business, and then at noon home to dinner all alone. Then to White Hall with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) in his coach to attend the Duke of York (age 34) upon our usual business, which was this day but little, and thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48) to the Duke of York's playhouse, where we saw "The Unfortunate Lovers", no extraordinary play, methinks, and thence I to Drumbleby's, and there did talk a great deal about pipes; and did buy a recorder, which I do intend to learn to play on, the sound of it being, of all sounds in the world, most pleasing to me.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Apr 1668. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) to my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and with him all of us to my Lord Ashly (age 46) to satisfy him about the reason of what we do or have done in the business of the tradesmen's certificates, which he seems satisfied with, but is not, but I believe we have done what we can justify, and he hath done what he cannot in stopping us to grant them, and I believe it will come into Parliament and make trouble.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Apr 1668. Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon Sir J. Minnes (age 69) and I to the Dolphin Tavern, there to meet our neighbours, all of the Parish, this being Procession-day, to dine. And did; and much very good discourse; they being, most of them, very able merchants as any in the City: Sir Andrew Rickard (age 64), Mr. Vandeputt, Sir John Fredericke (age 66), Harrington, and others. They talked with Mr. Mills about the meaning of this day, and the good uses of it; and how heretofore, and yet in several places, they do whip a boy at each place they stop at in their procession.

Pepy's Diary. 19 May 1668. Thence W. Coventry (age 40) and I in the Matted Gallery, and there he did talk very well to me about the way to save the credit of the officers of the Navy, and their places too, by making use of this interval of Parliament to be found to be mending of matters in the Navy, and that nothing but this will do it, and gives an instance in themselves of the Treasury, whereof himself and Sir John Duncombe (age 45) all the world knows have enemies, and my Lord Ashly (age 46) a man obnoxious to most, and Sir Thomas Clifford (age 37) one that as a man suddenly rising and a creature of my Lord Arlington's (age 50) hath enemies enough (none of them being otherwise but the Duke of Albemarle (age 59)), yet with all this fault they hear nothing of the business of the Treasury, but all well spoken of there. He is for the removal of Sir John Minnes (age 69), thinking that thereby the world will see a greater change in the hands than now they do; and I will endeavour it, and endeavour to do some good in the office also.

Pepy's Diary. 27 May 1668. Thence by coach to the Exchange [Map], and there met with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) at Colvill's; and there did give him some orders, and so home, and there to the office again, where busy till two o'clock, and then with Sir Prince to his house, with my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and Sir J. Minnes (age 69), to dinner, where we dined very well, and much good company, among others, a Dr., a fat man, whom by face I know, as one that uses to sit in our church, that after dinner did take me out, and walked together, who told me that he had now newly entered himself into Orders, in the decay of the Church, and did think it his duty so to do, thereby to do his part toward the support and reformation thereof; and spoke very soberly, and said that just about the same age Dr. Donne did enter into Orders. I find him a sober gentleman, and a man that hath seen much of the world, and I think may do good.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jun 1668. So to dinner, and then with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) to White Hall, and there attended the Lords of the Treasury and also a committee of Council with the Duke of York (age 34) about the charge of this year's fleete, and thence I to Westminster and to Mrs. Martin's, and did hazer what je would con her, and did once toker la thigh de su landlady, and thence all alone to Fox Hall, and walked and saw young Newport (age 23), and two more rogues of the town, seize on two ladies, who walked with them an hour with their masks on; perhaps civil ladies; and there I left them, and so home, and thence to Mr. Mills's, where I never was before, and here find, whom I indeed saw go in, and that did make me go thither, Mrs. Hallworthy and Mrs. Andrews, and here supped, and, extraordinary merry till one in the morning, Mr. Andrews (age 36) coming to us: and mightily pleased with this night's company and mirth I home to bed. Mrs. Turner (age 45), too, was with us.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jun 1668. Up and with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) to Westminster, and in the Hall there I met with Harris (age 34) and Rolt (age 39), and carried them to the Rhenish wine-house, where I have not been in a morning-nor any tavern, I think, these seven years and more. Here I did get the words of a song of Harris (age 34) that I wanted. Here also Mr. Young and Whistler by chance met us, and drank with us.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jun 1668. Thence with him home, and there to the office till noon, and then with Lord Brouncker (age 48), Sir J. Minnes (age 69), and Sir G. Carteret (age 58), upon whose accounts they have been this day to the Three Tuns [Map] to dinner, and thence back again home, and after doing a little business I by coach to the King's house, and there saw good, part of "The Scornful Lady", and that done, would have takn out Knepp, but she was engaged, and so to my Lord Crew's (age 70) to visit him; from whom I learn nothing but that there hath been some controversy at the Council-table, about my Lord Sandwich's (age 42) signing, where some would not have had him, in the treaty with Portugall; but all, I think, is over in it.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jun 1668. Thence by and by with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) toward St. James's, and I stop at Dr. Turberville's (age 56), and there did receive a direction for some physic, and also a glass of something to drop into my eyes: who gives me hopes that I may do well.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jul 1668. Thence to White Hall, and there waited to attend the Council, but was not called in, and so home, and after dinner back with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) by coach, and there attended, all of us, the Duke of York (age 34), and had the hearing of Mr. Pett's (age 57) business, the Master-Shipwright at Chatham, Kent [Map], and I believe he will be put out. But here Commissioner. Middleton did, among others, shew his good-nature and easiness to the Masters-Attendants, by mitigating their faults, so as, I believe, they will come in again.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1668. Home and to dinner, and then my wife and Deb. and I, with Sir J. Minnes (age 69), to White Hall, she going hence to the New Exchange, and the Duke of York (age 34) not being in the way, Sir J. Minnes (age 69) and I to her and took them two to the King's house, to see the first day of Lacy's (age 53) "Monsieur Ragou", now new acted. The King (age 38) and Court all there, and mighty merry-a farce.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1668. Thence Sir J. Minnes (age 69) giving us, like a gentleman, his coach, hearing we had some business, we to the Park, and so home. Little pleasure there, there being little company, but mightily taken with a little chariot that we saw in the street, and which we are resolved to have ours like it.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Aug 1668. So home; and, after dinner, I took my wife and Deb. round by Hackney, and up and down to take the ayre; and then home, and made visits to Mrs. Turner (age 45), and Mrs. Mercer, and Sir W. Pen (age 47), who is come from Epsom not well, and Sir J. Minnes (age 69), who is not well neither. And so home to supper, and to set my books a little right, and then to bed. This day Betty Michell come and dined with us, the first day after her lying in, whom I was glad to see.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1668. Betimes at my business again, and so to the office, and dined with Brouncker (age 48) and J. Minnes (age 69), at Sir W. Pen's (age 47) at a bad pasty of venison, and so to work again, and at it till past twelve at night, that I might get my great letter1 to the Duke of York (age 34) ready against to-morrow, which I shall do, to my great content. So to bed.

Note 1. In the Pepysian Library is a MS. (No. 2242), entitled, "Papers conteyning my addresse to his Royall Highnesse James Duke of Yorke (age 34), Lord High Admirall of England, &c., by letter dated the 20th of August, 1668, humbly tendering him my advice touching the present State of the Office of the Navy, with his Royall Highness's proceedings upon the same, and their result"..

Pepy's Diary. 07 Sep 1668. At the office all the morning, we met, and at noon dined at home, and after dinner carried my wife and Deb. to Unthanke's, and I to White Hall with Mr. Gibson, where the rest of our officers met us, and to the Commissioners of the Treasury about the Victualling contract, but staid not long, but thence, sending Gibson to my wife, I with Lord Brouncker (age 48) (who was this day in an unusual manner merry, I believe with drink), J. Minnes (age 69), and W. Pen (age 47) to Bartholomew-Fair; and there saw the dancing mare again, which, to-day, I find to act much worse than the other day, she forgetting many things, which her master beat her for, and was mightily vexed; and then the dancing of the ropes, and also the little stage-play, which is very ridiculous, and so home to the office with Lord Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen (age 47), and myself (J. Minnes (age 69) being gone home before not well), and so, after a little talk together, I home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Sep 1668. Thence to Unthanke's, and 'Change [Map], where wife did a little business, while Mercer and I staid in the coach; and, in a quarter of an hour, I taught her the whole Larke's song perfectly, so excellent an eare she hath. Here we at Unthanke's 'light, and walked them to White Hall, my wife mighty angry at it, and did give me ill words before Batelier, which vexed me, but I made no matter of it, but vexed to myself. So landed them, it being fine moonshine, at the Bear [Map], and so took water to the other side, and home. I to the office, where a child is laid at Sir J. Minnes's (age 69) door, as there was one heretofore. So being good friends again, my wife seeking, it, by my being silent I overcoming her, we to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Sep 1668. So took a Hackney and home, and after supper made my wife to read them all over, wherein she is mighty useful to me; and I find them all evasions, and in many things false, and in few, to the full purpose. Little said reflective on me, though W. Pen (age 47) and J. Minnes (age 69) do mean me in one or two places, and J. Minnes (age 69) a little more plainly would lead the Duke of York (age 34) to question the exactness of my keeping my records; but all to no purpose. My mind is mightily pleased by this, if I can but get time to have a copy taken of them, for my future use; but I must return them tomorrow. So to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Sep 1668. Lord's Day. The like all this morning and afternoon, and finished it to my mind. So about four o'clock walked to the Temple [Map], and there by coach to St. James's, and met, to my wish, the Duke of York (age 34) and Mr. Wren; and understand the Duke of York (age 34) hath received answers from Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen (age 47), and J. Minnes (age 69); and as soon as he saw me, he bid Mr. Wren