Biography of William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner 1620-1684

1665 Great Plague of London

1665 Battle of Vågen

1666 Great Storm

1666 Four Days' Battle

1666 Holme's Bonfire

1667 Poll Bill

1668 Bawdy House Riots

1688 Siege of Colchester

In 1620 William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner was born to William Brouncker 1st Viscount Brouncker (age 35) in Castlelyons, County Cork.

In 1645 [his father] William Brouncker 1st Viscount Brouncker (age 60) was created 1st Viscount Brouckner of Lyons in Leinster.

In 1649 [his father] William Brouncker 1st Viscount Brouncker (age 64) died. His son William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner (age 29) succeeded 2nd Viscount Brouckner of Lyons in Leinster.

In 1662 William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner (age 42) was appointed Chancellor to Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England (age 23).

In 1662 William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner (age 42) was appointed President of the Royal Society.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Aug 1662. Thence to Lambeth; and there saw the little pleasure-boat in building by the King (age 32), my Lord Brunkard (age 42), and the virtuosoes of the town, according to new lines, which Mr. Pett (age 52) cries up mightily, but how it will prove we shall soon see.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Sep 1662. Up by break of day at 5 o'clock, and down by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map]: in my way saw the yacht lately built by our virtuosoes (my Lord Brunkard (age 42) and others, with the help of Commissioner Pett (age 52) also) set out from Greenwich, Kent [Map] with the little Dutch bezan, to try for mastery; and before they got to Woolwich, Kent [Map] the Dutch beat them half-a-mile (and I hear this afternoon, that, in coming home, it got above three miles); which all our people are glad of.

Wiltshire Archaeological Magazine Volume 4 Pages 307-363. "1663. King Charles II (age 32) discoursing one morning with my Lord Brownker (age 43) and Dr. Charleton1 concerning Stoneheng, they told his Majestie, what they had heard me say, concerning Aubury, se. that it did as much exceed Stoneheng as a Cathedral does a Parish Church. His Majesty admired that none of our Chorographers had taken notice of it: and commanded Dr. Charlton to bring me to him the next morning. I brought with me a draught of it donne by memorie only: but well enough resembling it, with which his Majesty was pleased: gave me his hand to kisse and commanded me to waite on him at Marleborough when he went to Bath with the Queen (which was about a fortnight after) which I did: and the next day, when the court were on their journie, his Majesty left the Queen and diverted to Aubury, where I shewed him that stupendious Antiquity, with the view whereof, He and his Royal Highness, the Duke of Yorke, were very well pleased. His Majesty commanded me to write a Description of it, and present it to him: and the Duke of Yorke commanded me to give an account of the old Camps, and Barrows on the Plaines.

"As his Majesty departed from Aubury to overtake the Queen, he cast his eie on Silsbury-hill [Map] about a mile off: which they had the curiosity to see, and walkt up to the top of it, with the Duke of Yorke, Dr. Charlton and I attending them. They went to Lacock2 to dinner: and that evening to Bath; all the Gentry and Commonaltie of those parts waiting on them, with great acclamations of joy, &c.

"There have been several books writt by learned men concerning Stoneheng, much differing from one another, some affirming one thing, some another. Now I come in the rear of all by comparative arguments to give a clear evidence that these monuments were pagan temples, which was not made out before; and have also (with humble submission to better judgments) offered a probability, that they were temples of the Druids.

"When a traveller rides along by the ruines of a Monastery, he knows by the manner of building, sc. Chapell, Cloysters, &c., that it was a Convent, but of what order (sc. Benedictine, Dominican, &e.,) it was, he cannot tell by the bare view. So it is cleer that all the monuments, which I have here recounted were Temples. Now my presumption is, That the Druids being the most eminent Priests [or Order of Priests] among the Britaines, 'tis odds, but that these ancient monuments [sc. Aubury, Stonehenge, Kerrig y Druidd &c.] were Temples of the Priests of the most eminent Order, viz., Druids, and it is strongly to be presumed, that Aubury, Stoneheng, &c., are as ancient as these times.

"This inquiry, I must confess, is a gropeing in the dark: but although I have not brought it into a cleer light, yet I can affirm that I have brought it from an utter darkness to a thin mist, and have gonne farther in this essay than any one before me.

"These antiquities are so exceedingly old that no bookes doe reach them, se. that there is no way to retrive them but by comparative antiquitie, which I have writt upon the spott from the monuments themselves,— 'Historia quoque modo scripta, bona est;'3 and though this be writt, as I rode a gallop, yet the novelty of it, and the faithfulness of the delivery, may make some amends for the uncorrectness of the style.

"The first draught was worn out with time and handling, and now, methinks, after many years lying dormant, I come abroad, like the ghost of one of those Druids.

"I beg the reader's pardon for running this preface into a storie, and wish him as much pleasure in reading them, as I met in seeing them. Vale.

John Aubrey (age 36).

Note 1. William Visc. Brouncker of Earlstoke (age 43), was the first President of the Royal Scciety. Dr. Walter Charleton was the King's Physician, and author of a treatise advocating the Danish origin of Stonehenge.

Note 2. Sir John Talbot's.

Note 3. History is also just written, it is good.

In 1664 William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner (age 44) was appointed Commissioner of the Royal Navy.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Aug 1664. Thence I to Cocker's (age 33) again, and sat by him with good discourse again for an hour or two, and then left him, and by agreement with Captain Silas Taylor (age 40) (my old acquaintance at the Exchequer) to the Post Officer to hear some instrument musique of Mr. Berchenshaw's before my Lord Brunkard (age 44) and Sir Robert Murray (age 56). I must confess, whether it be that I hear it but seldom, or that really voice is better, but so it is that I found no pleasure at all in it, and methought two voyces were worth twenty of it.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1664. Thence home well pleased with this accident, and so home to my office, where late, and then to supper and to bed. This day I had a letter from Mr. Coventry (age 36), that tells me that my Lord Brunkard (age 44) is to be one of our Commissioners, of which I am very glad, if any more must be.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Dec 1664. At the office all the morning, where comes my Lord Brunkard (age 44) with his patent in his hand, and delivered it to Sir J. Minnes (age 65) and myself, we alone being there all the day, and at noon I in his coach with him to the 'Change [Map], where he set me down; a modest civil person he seems to be, but wholly ignorant in the business of the Navy as possible, but I hope to make a friend of him, being a worthy man.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Dec 1664. Thence homeward, called at my bookseller's and bespoke some books against the year's out, and then to the 'Change [Map], and so home to dinner, and then to the office, where my Lord Brunkard (age 44) comes and reads over part of our Instructions in the Navy-and I expounded it to him, so he is become my disciple. He gone, comes Cutler to tell us that the King of France (age 26) hath forbid any canvass to be carried out of his kingdom, and I to examine went with him to the East India house to see a letter, but came too late.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1665. Then to the Hall, and there agreed with Mrs. Martin, and to her lodgings which she has now taken to lie in, in Bow Streete, pitiful poor things, yet she thinks them pretty, and so they are for her condition I believe good enough. Here I did 'ce que je voudrais avec' her most freely, and it having cost 2s. in wine and cake upon her, I away sick of her impudence, and by coach to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45), by appointment, in the Piazza, in Covent-Guarding; where I occasioned much mirth with a ballet I brought with me, made from the seamen at sea to their ladies in town; saying Sir W. Pen (age 43), Sir G. Ascue (age 49), and Sir J. Lawson (age 50) made them. Here a most noble French dinner and banquet, the best I have seen this many a day and good discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1665. After dinner to Gresham College to my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Commissioner Pett (age 54), taking, Mr. Castle (age 36) with me there to discourse over his draught of a ship he is to build for us. Where I first found reason to apprehend Commissioner Pett (age 54) to be a man of an ability extraordinary in any thing, for I found he did turn and wind Castle (age 36) like a chicken in his business, and that most pertinently and mister-like, and great pleasure it was to me to hear them discourse, I, of late having studied something thereof, and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) is a very able person also himself in this sort of business, as owning himself to be a master in the business of all lines and Conicall Sections.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1665. Thence my Lord Bruncker (age 45) carried me as far as Mr. Povy's (age 51), and there I 'light and dined, meeting Mr. Sherwin, Creed, &c., there upon his accounts.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1665. Up and to my office, where all the morning. At noon to 'Change [Map] by coach with my Lord Brunkard (age 45), and thence after doing much business home to dinner, and so to my office all the afternoon till past 12 at night very busy. So home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Feb 1665. Thence with Creed to Gresham College, where I had been by Mr. Povy (age 51) the last week proposed to be admitted a member1 and was this day admitted, by signing a book and being taken by the hand by the President, my Lord Brunkard (age 45), and some words of admittance said to me. But it is a most acceptable thing to hear their discourse, and see their experiments; which were this day upon the nature of fire, and how it goes out in a place where the ayre is not free, and sooner out where the ayre is exhausted, which they showed by an engine on purpose. After this being done, they to the Crowne Taverne, behind the 'Change [Map], and there my Lord and most of the company to a club supper; Sir P. Neale (age 52), Sir R. Murrey, Dr. Clerke, Dr. Whistler, Dr. Goddard, and others of most eminent worth. Above all, Mr. Boyle (age 38) to-day was at the meeting, and above him Mr. Hooke (age 29), who is the most, and promises the least, of any man in the world that ever I saw. Here excellent discourse till ten at night, and then home, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), where I hear that Sir Thos. Harvy intends to put Mr. Turner out of his house and come in himself, which will be very hard to them, and though I love him not, yet for his family's sake I pity him. So home and to bed.

Note 1. According to the minutes of the Royal Society for February 15th, 1664-65, "Mr. Pepys was unanimously elected and admitted". Notes of the experiments shown by Hooke and Boyle are given in Birch's "History of the Royal Society", vol. ii., p. 15.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Feb 1665. Up, and to the office, where sat all the morning; at noon to the 'Change [Map], and thence to the Royall Oake taverne in Lombard Street, where Sir William Petty (age 41) and the owners of the double-bottomed boat (The Experiment) did entertain my Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir R. Murrey, myself, and others, with marrow bones and a chine of beefe of the victuals they have made for this ship; and excellent company and good discourse: but, above all, I do value Sir William Petty (age 41).

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1665. So to the office, and after office my Lord Brunckerd (age 45) carried me to Lincolne's Inne Fields, and there I with my Lady Sandwich (age 40) (good lady) talking of innocent discourse of good housewifery and husbands for her daughters, and the luxury and looseness of the times and other such things till past 10 o'clock at night, and so by coach home, where a little at my office, and so to supper and to bed. My Lady tells me how my Lord Castlemayne (age 31) is coming over from France, and is believed will be made friends with his Lady (age 24) again. What mad freaks the Mayds of Honour at Court have: that Mrs. Jenings (age 18), one of the Duchesses mayds, the other day dressed herself like an orange wench, and went up and down and cried oranges; till falling down, or by such accident, though in the evening, her fine shoes were discerned, and she put to a great deale of shame; that such as these tricks being ordinary, and worse among them, thereby few will venture upon them for wives: my Baroness Castlemayne (age 24) will in merriment say that her daughter (not above a year old or two) will be the first mayde in the Court that will be married. This day my Lord Sandwich (age 39) writ me word from the Downes, that he is like to be in towne this week.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Apr 1665. Home and after a mouthfull of dinner to the office, where till 6 o'clock, and then to White Hall, and there with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) and my Lord Brunckerd (age 45) attended the Duke of Albemarle (age 56) about the business of money. I also went to Jervas's, my barber, for my periwigg that was mending there, and there do hear that Jane is quite undone, taking the idle fellow for her husband yet not married, and lay with him several weeks that had another wife and child, and she is now going into Ireland.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Apr 1665. So home and to the 'Change [Map], and thence to the "Old James" to dine with Sir W. Rider, Cutler, and Mr. Deering, upon the business of hemp, and so hence to White Hall to have attended the King (age 34) and Chancellor (age 56) about the debts of the navy and to get some money, but the meeting failed. So my Lord Brunkard (age 45) took me and Sir Thomas Harvy (age 39) in his coach to the Parke, which is very troublesome with the dust; and ne'er a great beauty there to-day but Mrs. Middleton (age 20), and so home to my office, where Mr. Warren proposed my getting of £100 to get him a protection for a ship to go out, which I think I shall do.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Apr 1665. Dined at home and thence to White Hall again (where I lose most of my time now-a-days to my great trouble, charge, and loss of time and benefit), and there, after the Council rose, Sir G. Carteret (age 55), my Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir Thomas Harvy (age 39), and myself, down to my Lord Treasurer's (age 58) chamber to him and the Chancellor (age 56), and the Duke of Albemarle (age 56); and there I did give them a large account of the charge of the Navy, and want of money. But strange to see how they held up their hands crying, "What shall we do?" Says my Lord Treasurer (age 58), "Why, what means all this, Mr. Pepys? This is true, you say; but what would you have me to do? I have given all I can for my life. Why will not people lend their money? Why will they not trust the King (age 34) as well as Oliver? Why do our prizes come to nothing, that yielded so much heretofore?" And this was all we could get, and went away without other answer, which is one of the saddest things that, at such a time as this, with the greatest action on foot that ever was in England, nothing should be minded, but let things go on of themselves do as well as they can.

Pepy's Diary. 01 May 1665. Thence to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), where I was sorry to find myself to come a little late, and so home, and at noon going to the 'Change [Map] I met my Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir Robert Murry (age 57), Deane Wilkins (age 51), and Mr. Hooke (age 29), going by coach to Colonell Blunts (age 61) to dinner. So they stopped and took me with them. Landed at the Tower-wharf, and thence by water to Greenwich, Kent [Map]; and there coaches met us; and to his house, a very stately sight for situation and brave plantations; and among others, a vineyard, the first that ever I did see. No extraordinary dinner, nor any other entertainment good; but only after dinner to the tryall of some experiments about making of coaches easy. And several we tried; but one did prove mighty easy (not here for me to describe, but the whole body of the coach lies upon one long spring), and we all, one after another, rid in it; and it is very fine and likely to take. These experiments were the intent of their coming, and pretty they are.

Pepy's Diary. 05 May 1665. Thence home by water, and presently down to Woolwich, Kent [Map] and back to Blackewall [Map], and there, viewed the Breach, in order to a Mast Docke, and so to Deptford to the Globe, where my Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 64), and Commissioner Pett (age 54) were at dinner, having been at the Breach also, but they find it will be too great charge to make use of it.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jun 1665. Thence to the Dolphin Taverne, where Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Lord Brunkard (age 45), Sir Thomas Harvy (age 40), and myself dined, upon Sir G. Carteret's (age 55) charge, and very merry we were, Sir Thomas Harvy (age 40) being a very drolle.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jul 1665. Thence, after a little merry discourse of our marrying business, I parted, and by coach to several places, among others to see my Lord Brunckerd (age 45), who is not well, but was at rest when I come. I could not see him, nor had much mind, one of the great houses within two doors of him being shut up: and, Lord! the number of houses visited, which this day I observed through the town quite round in my way by Long Lane and London Wall.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jul 1665. Lay long, being sleepy, and then up to the office, my Lord Bruncker (age 45) (after his sickness) being come to the office, and did what business there was, and so I by water, at night late, to Sir G. Carteret's (age 55), but there being no oars to carry me, I was fain to call a skuller that had a gentleman already in it, and he proved a man of love to musique, and he and I sung together the way down with great pleasure, and an incident extraordinary to be met with.

Great Plague of London

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jul 1665. At noon to the 'Change [Map], which was very thin, and thence homeward, and was called in by Mr. Rawlinson (age 51), with whom I dined and some good company very harmlessly merry. But sad the story of the plague in the City, it growing mightily. This day my Lord Bruncker (age 45) did give me Mr. Grant's' (age 45) book upon the Bills of Mortality, new printed and enlarged.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Sep 1665. Church being done, my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and I up to the Vestry at the desire of the justices of the Peace, Sir Theo. Biddulph (age 53) and Sir W. Boreman (age 53) and Alderman Hooker (age 53), in order to the doing something for the keeping of the plague from growing; but Lord! to consider the madness of the people of the town, who will (because they are forbid) come in crowds along with the dead corps to see them buried; but we agreed on some orders for the prevention thereof.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Sep 1665. Writing letters all the morning, among others to my Baroness Carteret (age 63), the first I have wrote to her, telling her the state of the city as to health and other sorrowfull stories, and thence after dinner to Greenwich, Kent [Map], to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), where I found my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and having staid our hour for the justices by agreement, the time being past we to walk in the Park with Mr. Hammond and Turner, and there eat some fruit out of the King's garden and walked in the Parke, and so back to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and thence walked home, my Lord Bruncker (age 45) giving me a very neat cane to walk with; but it troubled me to pass by Coome farme where about twenty-one people have died of the plague, and three or four days since I saw a dead corps in a coffin lie in the Close unburied, and a watch is constantly kept there night and day to keep the people in, the plague making us cruel, as doggs, one to another.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Dec 1665. Up betimes and finished my journall for five days back, and then after being ready to my Lord Bruncker (age 45) by appointment, there to order the disposing of some money that we have come into the office, and here to my great content I did get a bill of imprest to Captain Cocke (age 48) to pay myself in part of what is coming to me from him for my Lord Sandwich's (age 40) satisfaction and my owne, and also another payment or two wherein I am concerned, and having done that did go to Mr. Pierce's, where he and his wife made me drink some tea, and so he and I by water together to London. Here at a taverne in Cornhill [Map] he and I did agree upon my delivering up to him a bill of Captain Cocke's (age 48), put into my hand for Pierce's use upon evening of reckonings about the prize goods, and so away to the 'Change [Map], and there hear the ill news, to my great and all our great trouble, that the plague is encreased again this week, notwithstanding there hath been a day or two great frosts; but we hope it is only the effects of the late close warm weather, and if the frosts continue the next week, may fall again; but the town do thicken so much with people, that it is much if the plague do not grow again upon us. Off the 'Change [Map] invited by Sheriff Hooker (age 53), who keeps the poorest, mean, dirty table in a dirty house that ever I did see any Sheriff of London; and a plain, ordinary, silly man I think he is, but rich; only his son, Mr. Lethulier (age 32), I like, for a pretty, civil, understanding merchant; and the more by much, because he happens to be husband to our noble, fat, brave lady in our parish, that I and my wife admire so.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Dec 1665. Thus ends this year, to my great joy, in this manner. I have raised my estate from £1300 in this year to £4400. I have got myself greater interest, I think, by my diligence, and my employments encreased by that of Treasurer for Tangier, and Surveyour of the Victualls. It is true we have gone through great melancholy because of the great plague, and I put to great charges by it, by keeping my family long at Woolwich, Kent [Map], and myself and another part of my family, my clerks, at my charge at Greenwich, Kent [Map], and a mayde at London; but I hope the King (age 35) will give us some satisfaction for that. But now the plague is abated almost to nothing, and I intending to get to London as fast as I can. My family, that is my wife and maids, having been there these two or three weeks. The Dutch war goes on very ill, by reason of lack of money; having none to hope for, all being put into disorder by a new Act that is made as an experiment to bring credit to the Exchequer, for goods and money to be advanced upon the credit of that Act. I have never lived so merrily (besides that I never got so much) as I have done this plague time, by my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) and Captain Cocke's (age 48) good company, and the acquaintance of Mrs. Knipp, Coleman and her husband, and Mr. Laneare, and great store of dancings we have had at my cost (which I was willing to indulge myself and wife) at my lodgings. The great evil of this year, and the only one indeed, is the fall of my Lord of Sandwich (age 40), whose mistake about the prizes hath undone him, I believe, as to interest at Court; though sent (for a little palliating it) Embassador into Spayne, which he is now fitting himself for. But the Duke of Albemarle (age 57) goes with the Prince to sea this next year, and my Lord very meanly spoken of; and, indeed, his miscarriage about the prize goods is not to be excused, to suffer a company of rogues to go away with ten times as much as himself, and the blame of all to be deservedly laid upon him1. My whole family hath been well all this while, and all my friends I know of, saving my aunt Bell, who is dead, and some children of my cozen Sarah's, of the plague. But many of such as I know very well, dead; yet, to our great joy, the town fills apace, and shops begin to be open again. Pray God continue the plague's decrease! for that keeps the Court away from the place of business, and so all goes to rack as to publick matters, they at this distance not thinking of it.

Note 1. According to Granville Penn ("Memorials of Sir W. Penn (age 44)", ii. 488 n.) £2000 went to Lord Sandwich (age 40) and £8000 among eight others.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jan 1666. Home with his Lordship to Mrs. Williams's, in Covent-Garden [Map], to dinner (the first time I ever was there), and there met Captain Cocke (age 49); and pretty merry, though not perfectly so, because of the fear that there is of a great encrease again of the plague this week. And again my Lord Bruncker (age 46) do tell us, that he hath it from Sir John Baber; who is related to my Lord Craven (age 57), that my Lord Craven (age 57) do look after Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) place, and do reckon himself sure of it.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Mar 1666. Up, and to the office and there all the morning sitting and at noon to dinner with my Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir W. Batten (age 65) and Sir W. Pen (age 44) at the White Horse in Lombard Street [Map], where, God forgive us! good sport with Captain Cocke's (age 49) having his mayde sicke of the plague a day or two ago and sent to the pest house, where she now is, but he will not say anything but that she is well.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Apr 1666. Being mighty weary last night, lay long this morning, then up and to the office, where Sir W. Batten (age 65), Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I met, and toward noon took coach and to White Hall, where I had the opportunity to take leave of the Prince (age 46), and again of the Duke of Albemarle (age 57); and saw them kiss the King's (age 35) hands and the Duke's (age 32); and much content, indeed, there seems to be in all people at their going to sea, and [they] promise themselves much good from them. This morning the House of Parliament do meet, only to adjourne again till winter. The plague, I hear, encreases in the towne much, and exceedingly in the country everywhere.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Aug 1665. In the morning up, and my wife showed me several things of her doing, especially one fine woman's Persian head mighty finely done, beyond what I could expect of her; and so away by water, having ordered in the yarde six or eight bargemen to be whipped, who had last night stolen some of the King's cordage from out of the yarde. I to Deptford, Kent [Map], and there by agreement met with my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and there we kept our office, he and I, and did what there was to do, and at noon parted to meet at the office next week. Sir W. Warren and I thence did walk through the rain to Half-Way House, and there I eat a piece of boiled beef and he and I talked over several businesses, among others our design upon the mast docke, which I hope to compass and get 2 or £300 by.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Aug 1665. At noon I home to dinner alone, and after dinner Bagwell's wife waited at the door, and went with me to my office.... So parted, and I to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), and there sat the most of the afternoon talking and drinking too much with my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir G. Smith (age 50), G. Cocke (age 48) and others very merry. I drunk a little mixed, but yet more than I should do.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Aug 1665. We sat late, and then by invitation my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 64) and I to Sir G. Smith's (age 50) to dinner, where very good company and good cheer. Captain Cocke (age 48) was there and Jacke Fenn, but to our great wonder Alderman Bence, and tells us that not a word of all this is true, and others said so too, but by his owne story his wife hath been ill, and he fain to leave his house and comes not to her, which continuing a trouble to me all the time I was there.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Aug 1665. Thence by agreement to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) lodgings, where I found my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and so by water to the ferry, and there took Sir W. Batten's (age 64) coach that was sent for us, and to Sir W. Batten's (age 64), where very merry, good cheer, and up and down the garden with great content to me, and, after dinner, beat Captain Cocke (age 48) at billiards, won about 8s. of him and my Lord Bruncker (age 45). So in the evening after, much pleasure back again and I by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map], where supped with my wife, and then to bed betimes, because of rising to-morrow at four of the clock in order to the going out with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) toward Cranborne to my Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 17) in his way to Court.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Aug 1665. Thence he and I to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) by invitation, where Sir W. Batten (age 64) and my Lady, and my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and all of us dined upon a venison pasty and other good meat, but nothing well dressed. But my pleasure lay in getting some bills signed by Sir G. Carteret (age 55), and promise of present payment from Mr. Fenn, which do rejoice my heart, it being one of the heaviest things I had upon me, that so much of the little I have should lie (viz. near £1000) in the King's hands. Here very merry and (Sir G. Carteret (age 55) being gone presently after dinner) to Captain Cocke's (age 48), and there merry, and so broke up and I by water to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), with whom I spoke a great deale in private, they being designed to send a fleete of ships privately to the Streights. No news yet from our fleete, which is much wondered at, but the Duke says for certain guns have been heard to the northward very much. It was dark before I could get home, and so land at Church-yard stairs, where, to my great trouble, I met a dead corps of the plague, in the narrow ally just bringing down a little pair of stairs. But I thank God I was not much disturbed at it. However, I shall beware of being late abroad again.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Aug 1665. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon dined together upon some victuals I had prepared at Sir W. Batten's (age 64) upon the King's charge, and after dinner, I having dispatched some business and set things in order at home, we down to the water and by boat to Greenwich, Kent [Map] to the Bezan yacht, where Sir W. Batten (age 64), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and myself, with some servants (among others Mr. Carcasse, my Lord's clerk, a very civil gentleman), embarked in the yacht and down we went most pleasantly, and noble discourse I had with my Lord Bruneker (age 45), who is a most excellent person. Short of Gravesend, Kent [Map] it grew calme, and so we come to an anchor, and to supper mighty merry, and after it, being moonshine, we out of the cabbin to laugh and talk, and then, as we grew sleepy, went in and upon velvet cushions of the King's that belong to the yacht fell to sleep, which we all did pretty well till 3 or 4 of the clock, having risen in the night to look for a new comet which is said to have lately shone, but we could see no such thing.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1665. Thence to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), at Greenwich, Kent [Map], and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) by appointment, to looke after the lodgings appointed for us there for our office, which do by no means please me, they being in the heart of all the labourers and workmen there, which makes it as unsafe as to be, I think, at London. Mr. Hugh May (age 43), who is a most ingenuous man, did show us the lodgings, and his acquaintance I am desirous of.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1665. Called up, by message from Lord Bruncker (age 45) and the rest of my fellows, that they will meet me at the Duke of Albemarle's (age 56) this morning; so I up, and weary, however, got thither before them, and spoke with my Lord, and with him and other gentlemen to walk in the Parke, where, I perceive, he spends much of his time, having no whither else to go; and here I hear him speake of some Presbyter people that he caused to be apprehended yesterday, at a private meeting in Covent Garden [Map], which he would have released upon paying £5 per man to the poor, but it was answered, they would not pay anything; so he ordered them to another prison from the guard.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1665. So to the King's house, and there met my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and to our lodgings again that are appointed for us, which do please me better to day than last night, and are set a doing.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1665. We parted at my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) doore, where I went in, having never been there before, and there he made a noble entertainment for Sir J. Minnes (age 66), myself, and Captain Cocke (age 48), none else saving some painted lady that dined there, I know not who she is. But very merry we were, and after dinner into the garden, and to see his and her chamber, where some good pictures, and a very handsome young woman for my lady's woman.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1665. Up betimes, and prepared to my great satisfaction an account for the board of my office disbursements, which I had suffered to run on to almost £120. That done I down by water to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where we met the first day my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and I, and I think we shall do well there, and begin very auspiciously to me by having my account abovesaid passed, and put into a way of having it presently paid. When we rose I find Mr. Andrews and Mr. Yeabsly, who is just come from Plymouth, Devon [Map], at the door, and we walked together toward my Lord Bruncker's (age 45), talking about their business, Yeabsly being come up on purpose to discourse with me about it, and finished all in a quarter of an hour, and is gone again. I perceive they have some inclination to be going on with their victualling-business for a while longer before they resign it to Mr. Gauden, and I am well contented, for it brings me very good profit with certainty, yet with much care and some pains.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Aug 1665. In the afternoon I sent down my boy to Woolwich, Kent [Map] with some things before me, in order to my lying there for good and all, and so I followed him. Just now comes newes that the fleete is gone, or going this day, out again, for which God be praised! and my Lord Sandwich (age 40) hath done himself great right in it, in getting so soon out again. I pray God, he may meet the enemy. Towards the evening, just as I was fitting myself, comes W. Hewer (age 23) and shows me a letter which Mercer had wrote to her mother about a great difference between my wife and her yesterday, and that my wife will have her go away presently. This, together with my natural jealousy that some bad thing or other may be in the way, did trouble me exceedingly, so as I was in a doubt whether to go thither or no, but having fitted myself and my things I did go, and by night got thither, where I met my wife walking to the waterside with her paynter, Mr. Browne, and her mayds. There I met Commissioner Pett (age 55), and my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and the lady at his house had been thereto-day, to see her. Commissioner Pett (age 55) staid a very little while, and so I to supper with my wife and Mr. Shelden, and so to bed with great pleasure.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Sep 1665. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) to Captain Cocke's (age 48), where we mighty merry and supped, and very late I by water to Woolwich, Kent [Map], in great apprehensions of an ague. Here was my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) lady of pleasure, who, I perceive, goes every where with him; and he, I find, is obliged to carry her, and make all the courtship to her that can be.

Note 1. TT. Assumed to be Abigail Clere aka Williams Actor who William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner (age 45) lived with for many years.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Sep 1665. After dinner left them and I by water to Greenwich, Kent [Map], where much ado to be suffered to come into the towne because of the sicknesse, for fear I should come from London, till I told them who I was. So up to the church, where at the door I find Captain Cocke (age 48) in my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach, and he come out and walked with me in the church-yarde till the church was done, talking of the ill government of our Kingdom, nobody setting to heart the business of the Kingdom, but every body minding their particular profit or pleasures, the King (age 35) himself minding nothing but his ease, and so we let things go to wracke. This arose upon considering what we shall do for money when the fleete comes in, and more if the fleete should not meet with the Dutch, which will put a disgrace upon the King's actions, so as the Parliament and Kingdom will have the less mind to give more money, besides so bad an account of the last money, we fear, will be given, not half of it being spent, as it ought to be, upon the Navy. Besides, it is said that at this day our Lord Treasurer (age 58) cannot tell what the profit of Chimney money is, what it comes to per annum, nor looks whether that or any other part of the revenue be duly gathered as it ought; the very money that should pay the City the £200,000 they lent the King (age 35), being all gathered and in the hands of the Receiver and hath been long and yet not brought up to pay the City, whereas we are coming to borrow 4 or £500,000 more of the City, which will never be lent as is to be feared.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Sep 1665. Thence home with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) to dinner where very merry with him and his doxy.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Sep 1665. Waked, and fell in talk with my wife about the letter, and she satisfied me that she did not know from whence it come, but believed it might be from her cozen Franke Moore lately come out of France. The truth is the thing I think cannot have much in it, and being unwilling (being in other things so much at ease) to vex myself in a strange place at a melancholy time, passed all by and were presently friends. Up, and several with me about business. Anon comes my Lord Bruncker (age 45), as I expected, and we to the enquiring into the business of the late desertion of the Shipwrights from worke, who had left us for three days together for want of money, and upon this all the morning, and brought it to a pretty good issue, that they, we believe, will come to-morrow to work.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Sep 1665. In the evening my Lord Bruncker (age 45) hearing that Mr. Ackeworth's clerke, the Dutchman who writes and draws so well, was transcribing a book of Rates and our ships for Captain Millet a gallant of his mistress's, we sent for him for it. He would not deliver it, but said it was his mistress's and had delivered it to her. At last we were forced to send to her for it; she would come herself, and indeed the book was a very neat one and worth keeping as a rarity, but we did think fit, and though much against my will, to cancell all that he had finished of it, and did give her the rest, which vexed her, and she bore it discreetly enough, but with a cruel deal of malicious rancour in her looks. I must confess I would have persuaded her to have let us have it to the office, and it may be the board would not have censured too hardly of it, but my intent was to have had it as a Record for the office, but she foresaw what would be the end of it and so desired it might rather be cancelled, which was a plaguy deal of spite. My Lord Bruncker (age 45) being gone and company, and she also, afterwards I took my wife and people and walked into the fields about a while till night, and then home, and so to sing a little and then to bed. I was in great trouble all this day for my boy Tom who went to Greenwich, Kent [Map] yesterday by my order and come not home till to-night for fear of the plague, but he did come home to-night, saying he staid last night by Mr. Hater's advice hoping to have me called as I come home with my boat to come along with me.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Sep 1665. At noon, by invitation, to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45), all of us, to dinner, where a good venison pasty, and mighty merry. Here was Sir W. Doyly (age 51), lately come from Ipswich about the sicke and wounded, and Mr. Evelyn (age 44) and Captain Cocke (age 48). My wife also was sent for by my Lord Bruncker (age 45), by Cocke (age 48), and was here.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Sep 1665. After dinner, my Lord (age 45) and his mistress would see her home again, it being a most cursed rainy afternoon, having had none a great while before, and I, forced to go to the office on foot through all the rain, was almost wet to my skin, and spoiled my silke breeches almost. Rained all the afternoon and evening, so as my letters being done, I was forced to get a bed at Captain Cocke's (age 48), where I find Sir W. Doyly (age 51), and he, and Evelyn (age 44) at supper; and I with them full of discourse of the neglect of our masters, the great officers of State, about all business, and especially that of money: having now some thousands prisoners, kept to no purpose at a great charge, and no money provided almost for the doing of it. We fell to talk largely of the want of some persons understanding to look after businesses, but all goes to rack. "For", says Captain Cocke (age 48), "my Lord Treasurer (age 58), he minds his ease, and lets things go how they will: if he can have his £8000 per annum, and a game at l'ombre, [Spanish card game] he is well. My Chancellor (age 56) he minds getting of money and nothing else; and my Lord Ashly (age 44) will rob the Devil and the Alter, but he will get money if it be to be got".

1665 Battle of Vågen

Pepy's Diary. 10 Sep 1665. But before I come out there happened newes to come to the by an expresse from Mr. Coventry (age 37), telling me the most happy news of my Lord Sandwich's (age 40) meeting with part of the Dutch; his taking two of their East India ships, and six or seven others, and very good prizes and that he is in search of the rest of the fleet, which he hopes to find upon the Wellbancke, with the loss only of the Hector, poor Captain Cuttle. This newes do so overjoy me that I know not what to say enough to express it, but the better to do it I did walk to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and there sending away Mr. Andrews (age 33), I to Captain Cocke's (age 48), where I find my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and his mistress, and Sir J. Minnes (age 66). Where we supped (there was also Sir W. Doyly (age 51) and Mr. Evelyn (age 44)); but the receipt of this newes did put us all into such an extacy of joy, that it inspired into Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Mr. Evelyn (age 44) such a spirit of mirth, that in all my life I never met with so merry a two hours as our company this night was. Among other humours, Mr. Evelyn's (age 44) repeating of some verses made up of nothing but the various acceptations of may and can, and doing it so aptly upon occasion of something of that nature, and so fast, did make us all die almost with laughing, and did so stop the mouth of Sir J. Minnes (age 66) in the middle of all his mirth (and in a thing agreeing with his own manner of genius), that I never saw any man so out-done in all my life; and Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) mirth too to see himself out-done, was the crown of all our mirth. In this humour we sat till about ten at night, and so my Lord (age 45) and his mistress home, and we to bed, it being one of the times of my life wherein I was the fullest of true sense of joy.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Sep 1665. At noon to dinner to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), where Sir W. Batten (age 64) and his Lady come, by invitation, and very merry we were, only that the discourse of the likelihood of the increase of the plague this weeke makes us a little sad, but then again the thoughts of the late prizes make us glad.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1665. After dinner to billiards, where I won an angel1, and among other sports we were merry with my pretending to have a warrant to Sir W. Hickes (who was there, and was out of humour with Sir W. Doyly's (age 51) having lately got a warrant for a leash of buckes, of which we were now eating one) which vexed him, and at last would compound with me to give my Lord Bruncker (age 45) half a buck now, and me a Doe for it a while hence when the season comes in, which we agreed to and had held, but that we fear Sir W. Doyly (age 51) did betray our design, which spoiled all; however, my Lady Batten invited herself to dine with him this week, and she invited us all to dine with her there, which we agreed to, only to vex him, he being the most niggardly fellow, it seems, in the world. Full of good victuals and mirth we set homeward in the evening, and very merry all the way.

Note 1. A gold coin, so called because it bore the image of an angel, varying in value from six shillings and eightpence to ten shillings.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Sep 1665. Up, and walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map], taking pleasure to walk with my minute watch in my hand, by which I am come now to see the distances of my way from Woolwich, Kent [Map] to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and do find myself to come within two minutes constantly to the same place at the end of each quarter of an houre. Here we rendezvoused at Captain Cocke's (age 48), and there eat oysters, and so my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and I took boat, and in my Lord's coach to Sir W. Hickes's, whither by and by my Lady Batten and Sir William comes. It is a good seat, with a fair grove of trees by it, and the remains of a good garden; but so let to run to ruine, both house and every thing in and about it, so ill furnished and miserably looked after, I never did see in all my life. Not so much as a latch to his dining-room door; which saved him nothing, for the wind blowing into the room for want thereof, flung down a great bow pott that stood upon the side-table, and that fell upon some Venice glasses, and did him a crown's worth of hurt. He did give us the meanest dinner (of beef, shoulder and umbles of venison1 which he takes away from the keeper of the Forest, and a few pigeons, and all in the meanest manner) that ever I did see, to the basest degree.

Note 1. Dr. Johnson was puzzled by the following passage in "The Merry Wives of Windsor", act v., sc. 3: "Divide me like a bribe-buck, each a haunch. I will keep the sides to myself; my shoulders for the fellow of this walk". If he could have read the account of Sir William Hickes's dinner, he would at once have understood the allusion to the keeper's perquisites of the shoulders of all deer killed in his walk. B.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Sep 1665. At night to Captain Cocke's (age 48), meaning to lie there, it being late, and he not being at home, I walked to him to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45), and there staid a while, they being at tables; and so by and by parted, and walked to his house; and, after a mess of good broth, to bed, in great pleasure, his company being most excellent.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Sep 1665. Thence with Captain Cocke (age 48), in his coach, home to dinner, whither comes by invitation my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and his mistresse and very good company we were, but in dinner time comes Sir J. Minnes (age 66) from the fleete, like a simple weak man, having nothing to say of what he hath done there, but tells of what value he imagines the prizes to be, and that my Lord Sandwich (age 40) is well, and mightily concerned to hear that I was well. But this did put me upon a desire of going thither; and, moving of it to my Lord, we presently agreed upon it to go this very tide, we two and Captain Cocke (age 48). So every body prepared to fit himself for his journey, and I walked to Woolwich, Kent [Map] to trim and shift myself, and by the time I was ready they come down in the Bezan yacht, and so I aboard and my boy Tom, and there very merrily we sailed to below Gravesend, Kent [Map], and there come to anchor for all night, and supped and talked, and with much pleasure at last settled ourselves to sleep having very good lodging upon cushions in the cabbin.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Sep 1665. After dinner Cocke (age 48) did pray me to helpe him to £500 of W. How, who is deputy Treasurer, wherein my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and I am to be concerned and I did aske it my Lord, and he did consent to have us furnished with £500, and I did get it paid to Sir Roger Cuttance and Mr. Pierce in part for above £1000 worth of goods, Mace, Nutmegs, Cynamon, and Cloves, and he tells us we may hope to get £1500 by it, which God send! Great spoil, I hear, there hath been of the two East India ships, and that yet they will come in to the King (age 35) very rich: so that I hope this journey will be worth £100 to me1.

Note 1. There is a shorthand journal of proceedings relating to Pepys's purchase of some East India prize goods among the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian Library.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. After dinner I to the office, and there wrote letters and did business till night and then to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), where I find my Lady Batten come, and she and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and his mistresse, and the whole house-full there at cards.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. But by and by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) goes away and others of the company, and when I expected Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and his sister should have staid to have made Sir W. Batten (age 64) and Lady sup, I find they go up in snuffe to bed without taking any manner of leave of them, but left them with Mr. Boreman. The reason of this I could not presently learn, but anon I hear it is that Sir J. Minnes (age 66) did expect and intend them a supper, but they without respect to him did first apply themselves to Boreman, which makes all this great feude.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. About 4 or 5 of the clock we come to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and, having first set down my Lord Bruncker (age 45), Cocke (age 48) and I went to his house, it being light, and there to our great trouble, we being sleepy and cold, we met with the ill newes that his boy Jacke was gone to bed sicke, which put Captain Cocke (age 48) and me also into much trouble, the boy, as they told us, complaining of his head most, which is a bad sign it seems. So they presently betook themselves to consult whither and how to remove him. However I thought it not fit for me to discover too much fear to go away, nor had I any place to go to.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1665. At noon by invitation to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) where we staid till four of the clock for my Lady Batten and she not then coming we to dinner and pretty merry but disordered by her making us stay so long.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. I find here a design in my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Captain Cocke (age 48) to have had my Lord Bruncker (age 45) chosen as one of us to have been sent aboard one of the East Indiamen, and Captain Cocke (age 48) as a merchant to be joined with him, and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) for the other, and Sir G. Smith (age 50) to be joined with him. But I did order it so that my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) were ordered, but I did stop the merchants to be added, which would have been a most pernicious thing to the King (age 35) I am sure. In this I did, I think, a very good office, though I cannot acquit myself from some envy of mine in the business to have the profitable business done by another hand while I lay wholly imployed in the trouble of the office.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. So I up, and after being trimmed, the first time I have been touched by a barber these twelvemonths, I think, and more, went to Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), where I find all out of order still, they having not seen one another till by and by Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and Sir W. Batten (age 64) met, to go into my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach, and so we four to Lambeth, Surrey [Map], and thence to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), to inform him what we have done as to the fleete, which is very little, and to receive his direction.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. Thence back again by my Lord's coach to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) house, where I find my Lady Batten, who is become very great with Mrs. Williams (my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) whore), and there we dined and were mighty merry.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Sep 1665. That being done I to Sir J. Minnes (age 66) where I find Sir W. Batten (age 64) and his Lady gone home to Walthamstow [Map] in great snuffe as to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), but yet with some necessity, hearing that a mayde-servant of theirs is taken ill. Here I staid and resolved of my going in my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach which he would have me to take, though himself cannot go with me as he intended, and so to my last night's lodging to bed very weary.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Sep 1665. After dinner, about 4 of the clock we broke up, and I took coach and home (in fear for the money I had with me, but that this friend of Spicer's, one of the Duke's guard did ride along the best part of the way with us). I got to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) before night, and there I sat and supped with him and his mistresse, and Cocke (age 48) whose boy is yet ill.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. After supper, my Lord Bruncker (age 45) took his leave, and I also did mine, taking Captain Herbert home to my lodging to lie with me, who did mighty seriously inquire after who was that in the black dress with my wife yesterday, and would not believe that it was my wife's mayde, Mercer, but it was she.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. Though at last afterwards I found that he was not in this faulty, but hereby I have got a clear evidence of my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) opinion of him. My Lord Bruncker (age 45) presently ordered his coach to be ready and we to Woolwich, Kent [Map], and my Lord Sandwich (age 40) not being come, we took a boat and about a mile off met him in his Catch, and boarded him, and come up with him; and, after making a little halt at my house, which I ordered, to have my wife see him, we all together by coach to Mr. Boreman's, where Sir J. Minnes (age 66) did receive him very handsomely, and there he is to lie; and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) did give him on the sudden, a very handsome supper and brave discourse, my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and Captain Cocke (age 48), and Captain Herbert being there, with myself. Here my Lord did witness great respect to me, and very kind expressions, and by other occasions, from one thing to another did take notice how I was overjoyed at first to see the King's letter to his Lordship, and told them how I did kiss it, and that, whatever he was, I did always love the King (age 35). This my Lord Bruncker (age 45) did take such notice [of] as that he could not forbear kissing me before my Lord, professing his finding occasion every day more and more to love me, and Captain Cocke (age 48) has since of himself taken notice of that speech of my Lord then concerning me, and may be of good use to me.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. Up betimes and to the office, meaning to have entered my last 5 or 6 days' Journall, but was called away by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and to Blackwall [Map], there to look after the storehouses in order to the laying of goods out of the East India ships when they shall be unloaden.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1665. Thence away by water, and I walked with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) home, and there at dinner comes a letter from my Lord Sandwich (age 40) to tell me that he would this day be at Woolwich, Kent [Map], and desired me to meet him. Which fearing might have lain in Sir J. Minnes' (age 66) pocket a while, he sending it me, did give my Lord Bruncker (age 45), his mistress, and I occasion to talk of him as the most unfit man for business in the world.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1665. Thence by coach to Lambeth, Surrey [Map], his Lordship, and all our office, and Mr. Evelyn (age 44), to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), where, after the compliment with my Lord very kind, we sat down to consult of the disposing and supporting of the fleete with victuals and money, and for the sicke men and prisoners; and I did propose the taking out some goods out of the prizes, to the value of £10,000, which was accorded to, and an order, drawn up and signed by the Duke (age 31) and my Lord, done in the best manner I can, and referred to my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66), but what inconveniences may arise from it I do not yet see, but fear there may be many.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Sep 1665. Up by five o'clock and got post horses and so set out for Greenwich, Kent [Map], calling and drinking at Dartford. Being come to Greenwich, Kent [Map] and shifting myself I to the office, from whence by and by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) set out toward Erith, Kent to take charge of the two East India shipps, which I had a hand in contriving for the King's service and may do myself a good office too thereby. I to dinner with Mr. Wright to his father-in-law in Greenwich, Kent [Map], one of the most silly, harmless, prating old men that ever I heard in my life. Creed dined with me, and among other discourses got of me a promise of half that he could get my Lord Rutherford to give me upon clearing his business, which should not be less, he says, than £50 for my half, which is a good thing, though cunningly got of him.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Sep 1665. Up, and being mightily pleased with my night's lodging, drank a cup of beer, and went out to my office, and there did some business, and so took boat and down to Woolwich, Kent [Map] (having first made a visit to Madam Williams, who is going down to my Lord Bruncker (age 45)) and there dined, and then fitted my papers and money and every thing else for a journey to Nonsuch [Map] to-morrow.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Oct 1665. So to walk up and down the Cathedral [Map], and thence to the Crowne, whither Mr. Fowler, the Mayor of the towne, was come in his gowne, and is a very reverend magistrate. After I had eat a bit, not staying to eat with them, I went away, and so took horses and to Gravesend, Kent [Map], and there staid not, but got a boat, the sicknesse being very much in the towne still, and so called on board my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir John Minnes (age 66), on board one of the East Indiamen at Erith, Kent, and there do find them full of envious complaints for the pillageing of the ships, but I did pacify them, and discoursed about making money of some of the goods, and do hope to be the better by it honestly.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Oct 1665. So took leave (Madam Williams being here also with my Lord (age 45)), and about 8 o'clock got to Woolwich, Kent [Map] and there supped and mighty pleasant with my wife, who is, for ought I see, all friends with her mayds, and so in great joy and content to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1665. That being done, and some musique and other diversions, at last away goes my Lord and Lady, and I sent my wife to visit Mrs. Pierce, and so I to my office, where wrote important letters to the Court, and at night (Creed having clownishly left my wife), I to Mrs. Pierce's and brought her and Mrs. Pierce to the King's Head [Map] and there spent a piece upon a supper for her and mighty merry and pretty discourse, she being as pretty as ever, most of our mirth being upon "my Cozen" (meaning my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) ugly mistress, whom he calls cozen), and to my trouble she tells me that the fine Mrs. Middleton (age 20) is noted for carrying about her body a continued sour base smell, that is very offensive, especially if she be a little hot. Here some bad musique to close the night and so away and all of us saw Mrs. Belle Pierce (as pretty as ever she was almost) home, and so walked to Will's lodging where I used to lie, and there made shift for a bed for Mercer, and mighty pleasantly to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Oct 1665. By and by comes Cocke (age 48) to tell me that Fisher and his fellow were last night mightily satisfied and promised all friendship, but this morning he finds them to have new tricks and shall be troubled with them. So he being to go down to Erith, Kent with them this afternoon about giving security, I advised him to let them go by land, and so he and I (having eat something at his house) by water to Erith, Kent, but they got thither before us, and there we met Mr. Seymour (age 32), one of the Commissioners for Prizes, and a Parliament-man, and he was mighty high, and had now seized our goods on their behalf; and he mighty imperiously would have all forfeited, and I know not what. I thought I was in the right in a thing I said and spoke somewhat earnestly, so we took up one another very smartly, for which I was sorry afterwards, shewing thereby myself too much concerned, but nothing passed that I valued at all. But I could not but think [it odd] that a Parliament-man, in a serious discourse before such persons as we and my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and Sir John Minnes (age 66), should quote Hudibras, as being the book I doubt he hath read most. They I doubt will stand hard for high security, and Cocke (age 48) would have had me bound with him for his appearing, but I did stagger at it, besides Seymour (age 32) do stop the doing it at all till he has been with the Duke of Albemarle (age 56).

Pepy's Diary. 12 Oct 1665. Called up before day, and so I dressed myself and down, it being horrid cold, by water to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) ship, who advised me to do so, and it was civilly to show me what the King (age 35) had commanded about the prize-goods, to examine most severely all that had been done in the taking out any with or without order, without respect to my Lord Sandwich (age 40) at all, and that he had been doing of it, and find him examining one man, and I do find that extreme ill use was made of my Lord's order. For they did toss and tumble and spoil, and breake things in hold to a great losse and shame to come at the fine goods, and did take a man that knows where the fine goods were, and did this over and over again for many days, Sir W. Berkeley (age 26) being the chief hand that did it, but others did the like at other times, and they did say in doing it that my Lord Sandwich's (age 40) back was broad enough to bear it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Oct 1665. Thence on board the East India ship, where my Lord Bruncker (age 45) had provided a great dinner, and thither comes by and by Sir John Minnes (age 66) and before him Sir W. Warren and anon a Perspective glasse maker, of whom we, every one, bought a pocket glasse. But I am troubled with the much talke and conceitedness of Mrs. Williams and her impudence, in case she be not married to my Lord (age 45).

Pepy's Diary. 23 Oct 1665. Up, and after doing some business I down by water, calling to see my wife, with whom very merry for ten minutes, and so to Erith, Kent, where my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and I kept the office, and dispatched some business by appointment on the Bezan. Among other things about the slopsellers, who have trusted us so long, they are not able, nor can be expected to trust us further, and I fear this winter the fleete will be undone by that particular.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Oct 1665. Thence by horsebacke with Deane (age 31) to Erith, Kent, and so aboard my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and dined, and very merry with him and good discourse between them about ship building, and, after dinner and a little pleasant discourse, we away and by horse back again to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and there I to the office very late, offering my persons for all the victualling posts much to my satisfaction.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Oct 1665. Up, and sent for Thomas Willson, and broke the victualling business to him and he is mightily contented, and so am I that I have bestowed it on him, and so I to Mr. Boreman's, where Sir W. Batten (age 64) is, to tell him what I had proposed to Thomas Willson, and the newes also I have this morning from Sir W. Clerke (age 42), which is, that notwithstanding all the care the Duke of Albemarle (age 56) hath taken about the putting the East India prize goods into the East India Company hands, and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) having laden out a great part of the goods, an order is come from Court to stop all, and to have the goods delivered to the Sub-Commissioners of prizes. At which I am glad, because it do vex this simple weake man, and we shall have a little reparation for the disgrace my Lord Sandwich (age 40) has had in it.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Nov 1665. At last up, and it being a very foule day for raine and a hideous wind, yet having promised I would go by water to Erith, Kent, and bearing sayle was in danger of oversetting, but ordered them take down their sayle, and so cold and wet got thither, as they had ended their dinner. How[ever], I dined well, and after dinner all on shore, my Lord Bruncker (age 45) with us to Mrs. Williams's lodgings, and Sir W. Batten (age 64), Sir Edmund Pooly (age 46), and others; and there, it being my Lord's birth-day, had every one a green riband tied in our hats very foolishly; and methinks mighty disgracefully for my Lord to have his folly so open to all the world with this woman.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Nov 1665. So I on board my Lord Bruncker (age 45); and there he and Sir Edmund Pooly (age 46) carried me down into the hold of the India shipp, and there did show me the greatest wealth lie in confusion that a man can see in the world. Pepper scattered through every chink, you trod upon it; and in cloves and nutmegs, I walked above the knees; whole rooms full. And silk in bales, and boxes of copper-plate, one of which I saw opened.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1665. About nine of the clock, I went on shore, there (calling by the way only to look upon my Lord Bruncker (age 45)) to give Mrs. Williams (age 4) an account of her matters, and so hired an ill-favoured horse, and away to Greenwich, Kent [Map] to my lodgings, where I hear how rude the souldiers have been in my absence, swearing what they would do with me, which troubled me, but, however, after eating a bit I to the office and there very late writing letters, and so home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Nov 1665. Lord's Day. Up, and after being trimmed, alone by water to Erith, Kent, all the way with my song book singing of Mr. Lawes's long recitative song in the beginning of his book. Being come there, on board my Lord Bruncker (age 45), I find Captain Cocke (age 48) and other company, the lady not well, and mighty merry we were; Sir Edmund Pooly (age 46) being very merry, and a right English gentleman, and one of the discontented Cavaliers, that think their loyalty is not considered.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Nov 1665. Lord's Day. Up, though very late abed, yet before day to dress myself to go toward Erith, Kent, which I would do by land, it being a horrible cold frost to go by water: so borrowed two horses of Mr. Hovell and his friend, and with much ado set out, after my horses being frosted1 (which I know not what it means to this day), and my boy having lost one of my spurs and stockings, carrying them to the smith's; but I borrowed a stocking, and so got up, and Mr. Tooker with me, and rode to Erith, Kent, and there on board my Lord Bruncker (age 45), met Sir W. Warren upon his business, among others, and did a great deale, Sir J. Minnes (age 66), as God would have it, not being there to hinder us with his impertinences.

Note 1. Frosting means, having the horses' shoes turned up by the smith.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Nov 1665. After dinner took leave, and on shore to Madam Williams, to give her an account of my Lord's letter to me about Howe, who he has clapped by the heels on suspicion of having the jewells, and she did give me my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) examination of the fellow, that declares his having them; and so away, Sir W. Warren riding with me, and the way being very bad, that is, hard and slippery by reason of the frost, so we could not come to past Woolwich, Kent [Map] till night. However, having a great mind to have gone to the Duke of Albemarle (age 56), I endeavoured to have gone farther, but the night come on and no going, so I 'light and sent my horse by Tooker, and returned on foot to my wife at Woolwich, Kent [Map], where I found, as I had directed, a good dinner to be made against to-morrow, and invited guests in the yarde, meaning to be merry, in order to her taking leave, for she intends to come in a day or two to me for altogether.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Dec 1665. We dined, and in comes Mrs. Owen, a kinswoman of my Lord Bruncker's (age 45), about getting a man discharged, which I did for her, and by and by Mrs. Pierce to speake with me (and Mary my wife's late maid, now gone to her) about her husband's business of money, and she tells us how she prevented Captain Fisher the other day in his purchase of all her husband's fine goods, as pearls and silks, that he had seized in an Apothecary's house, a friend of theirs, but she got in and broke them open and removed all before Captain Fisher came the next day to fetch them away, at which he is starke mad.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Dec 1665. Called up betimes by my Lord Bruncker (age 45), who is come to towne from his long water worke at Erith, Kent last night, to go with him to the Duke of Albemarle (age 57), which by his coach I did. Our discourse upon the ill posture of the times through lacke of money. At the Duke's did some business, and I believe he was not pleased to see all the Duke's discourse and applications to me and everybody else. Discoursed also with Sir G. Carteret (age 55) about office business, but no money in view. Here my Lord and I staid and dined, the Vice-Chamberlain taking his leave. At table the Duchesse (age 46), a damned ill-looked woman, complaining of her Lord's going to sea the next year, said these cursed words: "If my Lord had been a coward he had gone to sea no more: it may be then he might have been excused, and made an Embassador" (meaning my Lord Sandwich (age 40))1. This made me mad, and I believed she perceived my countenance change, and blushed herself very much. I was in hopes others had not minded it, but my Lord Bruncker (age 45), after we were come away, took notice of the words to me with displeasure.

Note 1. When Lord Sandwich (age 40) was away a new commander had to be chosen, and rank and long service pointed out Prince Rupert (age 45) for the office, it having been decided that the heir presumptive should be kept at home. It was thought, however, that the same confidence could not be placed in the prince's discretion as in his courage, and therefore the Duke of Albemarle (age 57) was induced to take a joint command with him, "and so make one admiral of two persons" (see Lister's "Life of Clarendon", vol. ii., pp. 360,361).

Pepy's Diary. 12 Dec 1665. Up, and to the office, where my Lord Bruncker (age 45) met, and among other things did finish a contract with Cocke (age 48) for hemp, by which I hope to get my money due from him paid presently.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Dec 1665. He being gone, comes Sir W. Warren, who advised with me about several things about getting money, and £100 I shall presently have of him. We advised about a business of insurance, wherein something may be saved to him and got to me, and to that end he and I did take a coach at night and to the Cocke (age 48)pitt, there to get the Duke of Albemarle's (age 57) advice for our insuring some of our Sounde goods coming home under Harman's (age 40) convoy, but he proved shy of doing it without knowledge of the Duke of Yorke (age 32), so we back again and calling at my house to see my wife, who is well; though my great trouble is that our poor little parish is the greatest number this weeke in all the city within the walls, having six, from one the last weeke; and so by water to Greenwich, Kent [Map] leaving Sir W. Warren at home, and I straight to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), it being late, and concluded upon insuring something and to send to that purpose to Sir W. Warren to come to us to-morrow morning. So I home and, my mind in great rest, to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Dec 1665. Up, and to the office a while with my Lord Bruncker (age 45), where we directed Sir W. Warren in the business of the insurance as I desired, and ended some other businesses of his, and so at noon I to London, but the 'Change [Map] was done before I got thither, so I to the Pope's Head Taverne, and there find Mr. Gawden and Captain Beckford and Nick Osborne going to dinner, and I dined with them and very exceeding merry we were as I had [not] been a great while, and dinner being done I to the East India House and there had an assignment on Mr. Temple for the £2,000 of Cocke's (age 48), which joyed my heart; so, having seen my wife in the way, I home by water and to write my letters and then home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1665. Up, and spent all the morning with my Surveyors of the Ports for the Victualling, and there read to them what instructions I had provided for them and discoursed largely much of our business and the business of the pursers. I left them to dine with my people, and to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) where I met with a great good dinner and Sir T. Teddiman, with whom my Lord and I were to discourse about the bringing of W. Howe to a tryall for his jewells, and there till almost night, and so away toward the office and in my way met with Sir James Bunce; and after asking what newes, he cried "Ah!" says he (I know [not] whether in earnest or jest), "this is the time for you", says he, "that were for Oliver heretofore; you are full of employment, and we poor Cavaliers sit still and can get nothing"; which was a pretty reproach, I thought, but answered nothing to it, for fear of making it worse.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Dec 1665. I walked to Greenwich, Kent [Map] first, to make a short visit to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), and next to Mrs. Penington and spent all the evening with her with the same freedom I used to have and very pleasant company. With her till one of the clock in the morning and past, and so to my lodging to bed, and

Pepy's Diary. 18 Dec 1665. After dinner Sir W. Warren and I alone in another room a little while talking about business, and so parted, and I hence, my mind full of content in my day's worke, home by water to Greenwich, Kent [Map], the river beginning to be very full of ice, so as I was a little frighted, but got home well, it being darke. So having no mind to do any business, went home to my lodgings, and there got little Mrs. Tooker, and Mrs. Daniel, the daughter, and Sarah to my chamber to cards and sup with me, when in comes Mr. Pierce to me, who tells me how W. Howe has been examined on shipboard by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) to-day, and others, and that he has charged him out of envy with sending goods under my Lord's seale and in my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) name, thereby to get them safe passage, which, he tells me, is false, but that he did use my name to that purpose, and hath acknowledged it to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), but do also confess to me that one parcel he thinks he did use my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) name, which do vexe me mightily that my name should be brought in question about such things, though I did not say much to him of my discontent till I have spoke with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) about it. So he being gone, being to go to Oxford to-morrow, we to cards again late, and so broke up, I having great pleasure with my little girle, Mrs. Tooker.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Dec 1665. He gone, I to Sir J. Minnes (age 66), and thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) on board the Bezan to examine W. Howe again, who I find upon this tryall one of much more wit and ingenuity in his answers than ever I expected, he being very cunning and discreet and well spoken in them. I said little to him or concerning him; but, Lord! to see how he writes to me a-days, and styles me "My Honour". So much is a man subjected and dejected under afflictions as to flatter me in that manner on this occasion.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Dec 1665. I was called by my Lord Bruncker (age 45) in his coach with his mistresse, and Mr. Cottle the lawyer, our acquaintance at Greenwich, Kent [Map], and so home to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and thence I to Mrs. Penington, and had a supper from the King's Head [Map] for her, and there mighty merry and free as I used to be with her, and at last, late, I did pray her to undress herself into her nightgowne, that I might see how to have her picture drawne carelessly (for she is mighty proud of that conceit), and I would walk without in the streete till she had done. So I did walk forth, and whether I made too many turns or no in the darke cold frosty night between the two walls up to the Parke gate I know not, but she was gone to bed when I come again to the house, upon pretence of leaving some papers there, which I did on purpose by her consent.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Dec 1665. Up, and was trimmed, but not time enough to save my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach or Sir J. Minnes's (age 66), and so was fain to walk to Lambeth, Surrey [Map] on foot, but it was a very fine frosty walke, and great pleasure in it, but troublesome getting over the River for ice. I to the Duke of Albemarle (age 57), whither my brethren were all come, but I was not too late. There we sat in discourse upon our Navy business an houre, and thence in my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) coach alone, he walking before (while I staid awhile talking with Sir G. Downing (age 40) about the Act, in which he is horrid troublesome) to the Old Exchange [Map].

Pepy's Diary. 20 Dec 1665. Thence I took Sir Ellis Layton to Captain Cocke's (age 48), where my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and Lady Williams dine, and we all mighty merry; but Sir Ellis Layton one of the best companions at a meale in the world.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Dec 1665. He gone, I to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45), and there spent the evening by my desire in seeing his Lordship open to pieces and make up again his watch, thereby being taught what I never knew before; and it is a thing very well worth my having seen, and am mightily pleased and satisfied with it. So I sat talking with him till late at night, somewhat vexed at a snappish answer Madam Williams did give me to herself, upon my speaking a free word to her in mirthe, calling her a mad jade. She answered, we were not so well acquainted yet.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Dec 1665. Up betimes and to my Lord Bruncker (age 45) to consider the late instructions sent us for the method of our signing bills hereafter and paying them.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Dec 1665. Then to church, and placed myself in the Parson's pew under the pulpit, to hear Mrs. Chamberlain in the next pew sing, who is daughter to Sir James Bunch, of whom I have heard much, and indeed she sings very finely, and from church met with Sir W. Warren and he and I walked together talking about his and my businesses, getting of money as fairly as we can, and, having set him part of his way home, I walked to my Lord Bruncker (age 45), whom I heard was at Alderman Hooker's (age 53), hoping to see and salute Mrs. Lethulier (age 22), whom I did see in passing, but no opportunity of beginning acquaintance, but a very noble lady she is, however the silly alderman got her. Here we sat talking a great while, Sir The. Biddulph (age 53) and Mr. Vaughan (age 62), a son-in-law of Alderman Hooker's (age 53). Hence with my Lord Bruncker (age 45) home and sat a little with him and so home to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Dec 1665. Thence to my Lord Bruncker's (age 45) by invitation and dined there, and so home to look over and settle my papers, both of my accounts private, and those of Tangier, which I have let go so long that it were impossible for any soul, had I died, to understand them, or ever come to any good end in them. I hope God will never suffer me to come to that disorder again.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Dec 1665. Up, and to the office, where Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and my Lord Bruncker (age 45) and I met, to give our directions to the Commanders of all the ships in the river to bring in lists of their ships' companies, with entries, discharges, &c., all the last voyage, where young Seymour, among 20 that stood bare, stood with his hat on, a proud, saucy young man.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Jan 1666. Up by candlelight again, and wrote the greatest part of my business fair, and then to the office, and so home to dinner, and after dinner up and made an end of my fair writing it, and that being done, set two entering while to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), and there find Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and all his company, and Mr. Boreman and Mrs. Turner (age 43), but, above all, my dear Mrs. Knipp, with whom I sang, and in perfect pleasure I was to hear her sing, and especially her little Scotch song of "Barbary Allen"1 and to make our mirthe the completer, Sir J. Minnes (age 66) was in the highest pitch of mirthe, and his mimicall tricks, that ever I saw, and most excellent pleasant company he is, and the best mimique that ever I saw, and certainly would have made an excellent actor, and now would be an excellent teacher of actors.

Note 1. The Scottish ballad is entitled, "Sir John Grehme and Barbara Allan", and the English version, "Barbara Allen's Cruelty". Both are printed in Percy's "Reliques", Series III.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1666. Up, and to the office, where my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I, against Sir W. Batten (age 65) and Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and the whole table, for Sir W. Warren in the business of his mast contract, and overcome them and got them to do what I had a mind to, for indeed my Lord being unconcerned in what I aimed at.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1666. He anon took leave and took Mrs. Barbary his niece home with him, and seems very thankful to me for the £10 I did give him for my wife's rent of his house, and I am sure I am beholding to him, for it was a great convenience to me, and then my wife home to London by water and I to the office till 8 at night, and so to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), thinking to have been merry, having appointed a meeting for Sir J. Minnes (age 66) and his company and Mrs. Knipp again, but whatever hindered I know not, but no company come, which vexed me because it disappointed me of the glut of mirthe I hoped for. However, good discourse with my Lord and merry, with Mrs. Williams's descants upon Sir J. Minnes's (age 66) and Mrs. Turner's (age 43) not coming. So home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1666. So my Lord and he and I much talke about the Act, what credit we find upon it, but no private talke between him and I So I to the 'Change [Map], and there met Mr. Povy (age 52), newly come to town, and he and I to Sir George Smith's (age 51) and there dined nobly. He tells me how my Lord Bellases (age 51) complains for want of money and of him and me therein, but I value it not, for I know I do all that can be done. We had no time to talk of particulars, but leave it to another day, and I away to Cornhill [Map] to expect my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) coming back again, and I staid at my stationer's house, and by and by comes my Lord, and did take me up and so to Greenwich, Kent [Map], and after sitting with them a while at their house, home, thinking to get Mrs. Knipp, but could not, she being busy with company, but sent me a pleasant letter, writing herself "Barbary Allen".

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1666. I with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Mrs. Williams by coach with four horses to London, to my Lord's house in Covent-Guarden [Map]. But, Lord! what staring to see a nobleman's coach come to town. And porters every where bow to us; and such begging of beggars! And a delightfull thing it is to see the towne full of people again as now it is; and shops begin to open, though in many places seven or eight together, and more, all shut; but yet the towne is full, compared with what it used to be. I mean the City end; for Covent-Guarden [Map] and Westminster are yet very empty of people, no Court nor gentry being there. Set Mrs. Williams down at my Lord's house and he and I to Sir G. Carteret (age 56), at his chamber at White Hall, he being come to town last night to stay one day.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jan 1666. Up, and by coach to Sir G. Downing (age 41), where Mr. Gawden met me by agreement to talke upon the Act. I do find Sir G. Downing (age 41) to be a mighty talker, more than is true, which I now know to be so, and suspected it before, but for all that I have good grounds to think it will succeed for goods and in time for money too, but not presently. Having done with him, I to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) house in Covent-Garden [Map], and, among other things, it was to acquaint him with my paper of Pursers, and read it to him, and had his good liking of it. Shewed him Mr. Coventry's (age 38) sense of it, which he sent me last post much to my satisfaction.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1666. So ended the matter, and back to my company, where staid a little, and thence away with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) for discourse sake, and he and I to Gresham College to have seen Mr. Hooke (age 30) and a new invented chariott of Dr. Wilkins, but met with nobody at home! So to Dr. Wilkins's, where I never was before, and very kindly received and met with Dr. Merritt, and fine discourse among them to my great joy, so sober and so ingenious. He is now upon finishing his discourse of a universal character. So away and I home to my office about my letters, and so home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jan 1666. Thence to the 'Change [Map] and there met Mr. Moore, newly come to towne, and took him home to dinner with me and after dinner to talke, and he and I do conclude my Lord's case to be very bad and may be worse, if he do not get a pardon for his doings about the prizes and his business at Bergen, and other things done by him at sea, before he goes for Spayne. I do use all the art I can to get him to get my Lord to pay my cozen Pepys, for it is a great burden to my mind my being bound for my Lord in £1000 to him. Having done discourse with him and directed him to go with my advice to my Lord expresse to-morrow to get his pardon perfected before his going, because of what I read the other night in Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) letter, I to the office, and there had an extraordinary meeting of Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Batten (age 65), and Sir W. Pen (age 44), and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I to hear my paper read about pursers, which they did all of them with great good will and great approbation of my method and pains in all, only Sir W. Pen (age 44), who must except against every thing and remedy nothing, did except against my proposal for some reasons, which I could not understand, I confess, nor my Lord Bruncker (age 46) neither, but he did detect indeed a failure or two of mine in my report about the ill condition of the present pursers, which I did magnify in one or two little things, to which, I think, he did with reason except, but at last with all respect did declare the best thing he ever heard of this kind, but when Sir W. Batten (age 65) did say, "Let us that do know the practical part of the Victualling meet Sir J. Minnes (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 44) and I and see what we can do to mend all", he was so far from offering or furthering it, that he declined it and said, he must be out of towne. So as I ever knew him never did in his life ever attempt to mend any thing, but suffer all things to go on in the way they are, though never so bad, rather than improve his experience to the King's advantage.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Jan 1666. So we broke up, however, they promising to meet to offer some thing in it of their opinions, and so we rose, and I and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) by coach a little way for discourse sake, till our coach broke, and tumbled me over him quite down the side of the coach, falling on the ground about the Stockes, but up again, and thinking it fit to have for my honour some thing reported in writing to the Duke in favour of my pains in this, lest it should be thought to be rejected as frivolous, I did move it to my Lord, and he will see it done to-morrow. So we parted, and I to the office and thence home to my poor wife, who works all day at home like a horse, at the making of her hangings for our chamber and the bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Jan 1666. At the office all the morning, where my Lord Bruncker (age 46) moved to have something wrote in my matter as I desired him last night, and it was ordered and will be done next sitting.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jan 1666. After dinner to the office. Anon comes to me thither my Lord Bruncker (age 46), Mrs. Williams, and Knipp. I brought down my wife in her night-gowne, she not being indeed very well, to the office to them and there by and by they parted all and my wife and I anon and Mercer, by coach, to Pierces; where mighty merry, and sing and dance with great pleasure; and I danced, who never did in company in my life, and Captain Cocke (age 49) come for a little while and danced, but went away, but we staid and had a pretty supper, and spent till two in the morning, but got home well by coach, though as dark as pitch, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jan 1666. To the office, where, among other things, vexed with Major Norwood's (age 52) coming, who takes it ill my not paying a bill of Exchange [Map] of his, but I have good reason for it, and so the less troubled, but yet troubled, so as at noon being carried by my Lord Bruncker (age 46) to Captain Cocke's (age 49) to dinner, where Mrs. Williams was, and Mrs. Knipp, I was not heartily merry, though a glasse of wine did a little cheer me.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1666. At noon my Lord Bruncker (age 46) did come, but left the keys of the chests we should open, at Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) lodgings, of my Lord Sandwich's (age 40), wherein Howe's supposed jewells are; so we could not, according to my Lord Arlington's (age 48) order, see them today; but we parted, resolving to meet here at night: my Lord Bruncker (age 46) being going with Dr. Wilkins, Mr. Hooke (age 30), and others, to Colonell Blunts, to consider again of the business of charriots, and to try their new invention. Which I saw here my Lord Bruncker (age 46) ride in; where the coachman sits astride upon a pole over the horse, but do not touch the horse, which is a pretty odde thing; but it seems it is most easy for the horse, and, as they say, for the man also.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1666. Up, and set my people to work in copying Tangier accounts, and I down the river to Greenwich, Kent [Map] to the office to fetch away some papers and thence to Deptford, Kent [Map], where by agreement my Lord Bruncker (age 46) was to come, but staid almost till noon, after I had spent an houre with W. Howe talking of my Lord Sandwich's (age 40) matters and his folly in minding his pleasures too much now-a-days, and permitting himself to be governed by Cuttance to the displeasing of all the Commanders almost of the fleete, and thence we may conceive indeed the rise of all my Lord's misfortunes of late.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1666. Thence by water in the darke down to Deptford, Kent [Map], and there find my Lord Bruncker (age 46) come and gone, having staid long for me.

1666 Great Storm

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jan 1666. By agreement my Lord Bruncker (age 46) called me up, and though it was a very foule, windy, and rainy morning, yet down to the waterside we went, but no boat could go, the storme continued so. So my Lord to stay till fairer weather carried me into the Tower [Map] to Mr. Hore's and there we staid talking an houre, but at last we found no boats yet could go, so we to the office, where we met upon an occasion extraordinary of examining abuses of our clerkes in taking money for examining of tickets, but nothing done in it.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jan 1666. And up again about six (Lord's day), and being dressed in my velvett coate and plain cravatte took a Hackney coach provided ready for me by eight o'clock, and so to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) with all my papers, and there took his coach with four horses and away toward Hampton Court [Map], having a great deale of good discourse with him, particularly about his coming to lie at the office, when I went further in inviting him to than I intended, having not yet considered whether it will be convenient for me or no to have him here so near us, and then of getting Mr. Evelyn (age 45) or Sir Robert Murray (age 58) into the Navy in the room of Sir Thomas Harvey (age 40).

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1666. Thither I went with Mr. Evelyn (age 45) (whom I met) in his coach going that way, but finding my company gone, but my Lord Bruncker (age 46) left his coach for me; so Mr. Evelyn (age 45) and I into my Lord's coach, and rode together with excellent discourse till we come to Clapham, Surrey, talking of the vanity and vices of the Court, which makes it a most contemptible thing; and indeed in all his discourse I find him a most worthy person. Particularly he entertained me with discourse of an Infirmary, which he hath projected for the sick and wounded seamen against the next year, which I mightily approve of; and will endeavour to promote it, being a worthy thing, and of use, and will save money.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Feb 1666. Up and to the office, where all the morning till late, and Mr. Coventry (age 38) with us, the first time since before the plague, then hearing my wife was gone abroad to buy things and see her mother and father, whom she hath not seen since before the plague, and no dinner provided for me ready, I walked to Captain Cocke's (age 49), knowing my Lord Bruncker (age 46) dined there, and there very merry, and a good dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Feb 1666. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 65) (at whose lodgings calling for him, I saw his Lady the first time since her coming to towne since the plague, having absented myself designedly to shew some discontent, and that I am not at all the more suppliant because of my Lord Sandwich's (age 40) fall), to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), to see whether he goes to the Duke's this morning or no. But it is put off, and so we parted. My Lord invited me to dinner to-day to dine with Sir W. Batten (age 65) and his Lady there, who were invited before, but lest he should thinke so little an invitation would serve my turne I refused and parted, and to Westminster about business, and so back to the 'Change [Map], and there met Mr. Hill (age 36), newly come to town, and with him the Houblands, preparing for their ship's and his going to Tangier, and agreed that I must sup with them to-night.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Feb 1666. Thence to Captain Cocke's (age 49), where Mr. Williamson (age 32), Wren (age 37), Boldell and Madam Williams, and by and by Lord Bruncker (age 46), he having been with the King (age 35) and Duke (age 32) upon the water to-day, to see Greenwich, Kent [Map] house, and the yacht Castle is building of, and much good discourse.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1666. Thence home with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) for discourse sake, and thence by Hackney coach home, and so my wife and I mighty pleasant discourse, supped and to bed. The great wound I had Wednesday last in my thumb having with once dressing by Mrs. Turner's (age 43) balsam been perfectly cured, whereas I did not hope to save my nail, whatever else ill it did give me. My wife and I are much thoughtfull now-a-days about Pall's coming up in order to a husband.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and put on a new black cloth suit to an old coate that I make to be in mourning at Court, where they are all, for the King of Spayne1. To church I, and at noon dined well, and then by water to White Hall, carrying a captain of the Tower (who desired his freight thither); there I to the Parke, and walked two or three turns of the Pell Mell [Map] with the company about the King (age 35) and Duke (age 32); the Duke speaking to me a good deal. There met Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Mr. Coventry (age 38), and discoursed about the Navy business; and all of us much at a loss that we yet can hear nothing of Sir Jeremy Smith's fleete, that went away to the Streights the middle of December, through all the storms that we have had since, that have driven back three or four of them with their masts by the board. Yesterday come out the King's Declaration of War against the French, but with such mild invitations of both them and the Dutch to come over hither with promise of their protection, that every body wonders at it.

Note 1. Philip IV., who died September 17th, 1665.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Feb 1666. So home, they set me down at the 'Change [Map], and I to the Crowne, where my Lord Bruncker (age 46) was come and several of the Virtuosi, and after a small supper and but little good discourse I with Sir W. Batten (age 65) (who was brought thither with my Lord Bruncker (age 46)) home, where I find my wife gone to Mrs. Mercer's to be merry, but presently come in with Mrs. Knipp, who, it seems, is in towne, and was gone thither with my wife and Mercer to dance, and after eating a little supper went thither again to spend the whole night there, being W. Howe there, at whose chamber they are, and Lawd Crisp by chance. I to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1666. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) to Gresham College, the first time after the sicknesse that I was there, and the second time any met. And here a good lecture of Mr. Hooke's (age 30) about the trade of felt-making, very pretty. And anon alone with me about the art of drawing pictures by Prince Rupert's (age 46) rule and machine, and another of Dr. Wren's (age 42)1 but he says nothing do like squares, or, which is the best in the world, like a darke roome, [The camera obscura.] which pleased me mightily.

Note 1. Afterwards the famous Sir Christopher Wren (age 42). He was one of the mainstays of the Royal Society.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Mar 1666. But blessed be God! a good Bill this week we have; being but 237 in all, and 42 of the plague, and of them but six in the City: though my Lord Bruneker (age 46) says, that these six are most of them in new parishes where they were not the last week. Here was with us also Mr. Williamson (age 32), who the more I know, the more I honour.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1666. In the evening being at Sir W. Batten's (age 65), stepped in (for I have not used to go thither a good while), I find my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Mrs. Williams, and they would of their own accord, though I had never obliged them (nor my wife neither) with one visit for many of theirs, go see my house and my wife; which I showed them and made them welcome with wine and China oranges (now a great rarity since the war, none to be had). There being also Captain Cocke (age 49) and Mrs. Turner (age 43), who had never been in my house since I come to the office before, and Mrs. Carcasse, wife of Mr. Carcasses. My house happened to be mighty clean, and did me great honour, and they mightily pleased with it.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Mar 1666. Thence by coach to the Temple [Map], and it being a holyday, a fast-day, there 'light, and took water, being invited, and down to Greenwich, Kent [Map], to Captain Cocke's (age 49), where dined, he and Lord Bruncker (age 46), and Matt. Wren (age 37), Boltele, and Major Cooper, who is also a very pretty companion; but they all drink hard, and, after dinner, to gaming at cards.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Mar 1666. Thence with Sir. W. Batten (age 65) and Lord Bruncker (age 46) to the White Horse in Lombard Street [Map] to dine with Captain Cocke (age 49), upon particular business of canvas to buy for the King (age 35), and here by chance I saw the mistresse of the house I have heard much of, and a very pretty woman she is indeed and her husband the simplest looked fellow and old that ever I saw.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Mar 1666. Thence by water down to Deptford, Kent [Map], where I met my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Sir W. Batten (age 65) by agreement, and to measuring Mr. Castle's (age 37) new third-rate ship, which is to be called the Defyance1. And here I had my end in saving the King (age 35) some money and getting myself some experience in knowing how they do measure ships.

Note 1. William Castell wrote to the Navy Commissioners on February 17th, 1665-66, to inform them that the "Defiance" had gone to Longreach, and again, on February 22nd, to say that Mr. Grey had no masts large enough for the new ship. Sir William Batten (age 65) on March 29th asked for the consent of the Board to bring the "Defiance" into dock (" Calendar of State Papers", Domestic, 1665-66, pp. 252, 262, 324).

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1666. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) towards London, and in our way called in Covent Garden [Map], and took in Sir John (formerly Dr.) Baber (age 40); who hath this humour that he will not enter into discourse while any stranger is in company, till he be told who he is that seems a stranger to him. This he did declare openly to me, and asked my Lord who I was, giving this reason, that he has been inconvenienced by being too free in discourse till he knew who all the company were.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1666. At noon to the 'Change [Map], and did several businesses, and thence to the Crowne behind the 'Change [Map] and dined with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Captain Cocke (age 49) and Fenn, and Madam Williams, who without question must be my Lord's wife, and else she could not follow him wherever he goes and kisse and use him publiquely as she do.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Mar 1666. Up betimes and upon a meeting extraordinary at the office most of the morning with Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir W. Coventry (age 38), and Sir W. Pen (age 44), upon the business of the accounts. Where now we have got almost as much as we would have we begin to lay all on the Controller, and I fear he will be run down with it, for he is every day less and less capable of doing business.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Mar 1666. Thence mightily satisfied with this good fortune of this discourse with him I home, and there walked in the darke till 10 o'clock at night in the garden with Sir W. Warren, talking of many things belonging to us particularly, and I hope to get something considerably by him before the year be over. He gives me good advice of circumspection in my place, which I am now in great mind to improve; for I think our office stands on very ticklish terms, the Parliament likely to sit shortly and likely to be asked more money, and we able to give a very bad account of the expence of what we have done with what they did give before. Besides, the turning out the prize officers may be an example for the King (age 35) giving us up to the Parliament's pleasure as easily, for we deserve it as much. Besides, Sir G. Carteret (age 56) did tell me tonight how my Lord Bruncker (age 46) himself, whose good-will I could have depended as much on as any, did himself to him take notice of the many places I have; and though I was a painful man, yet the Navy was enough for any man to go through with in his owne single place there, which much troubles me, and shall yet provoke me to more and more care and diligence than ever.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Mar 1666. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir W. Coventry (age 38) to the ticket office, to see in what little order things are there, and there it is a shame to see how the King (age 35) is served.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Mar 1666. Thence with Lord Bruncker (age 46) to Sir Robert Long (age 66), whom we found in his closett, and after some discourse of business he fell to discourse at large and pleasant, and among other things told us of the plenty of partridges in France, where he says the King of France (age 27) and his company killed with their guns, in the plain de Versailles, 300 and odd partridges at one bout.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1666. Our [meeting] being done, my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I to the Tower [Map], to see the famous engraver (age 34), to get him to grave a seale for the office. And did see some of the finest pieces of work in embossed work, that ever I did see in my life, for fineness and smallness of the images thereon, and I will carry my wife thither to shew them her. Here I also did see bars of gold melting, which was a fine sight.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1666. Up, and a meeting extraordinary there was of Sir W. Coventry (age 38), Lord Bruncker (age 46), and myself, about the business of settling the ticket office, where infinite room is left for abusing the King (age 35) in the wages of seamen.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Apr 1666. Thence, after doing our business with the Duke of Yorke (age 32), with Captain Cocke (age 49) home to the 'Change [Map] in his coach. He promises me presently a dozen of silver salts, and proposes a business for which he hath promised Mrs. Williams for my Lord Bruncker (age 46) a set of plate shall cost him £500 and me the like, which will be a good business indeed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Apr 1666. At noon would have avoided, but could not, dining with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and his mistresse with Captain Cocke (age 49) at the Sun Taverne [Map] in Fish Streete, where a good dinner, but the woman do tire me, and indeed how simply my Lord Bruncker (age 46), who is otherwise a wise man, do proceed at the table in serving of Cocke (age 49), without any means of understanding in his proposal, or defence when proposed, would make a man think him a foole.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Apr 1666. Up, and before office time to Lombard Street [Map], and there at Viner's (age 35) was shewn the silver plates, made for Captain Cocke (age 49) to present my Lord Bruncker (age 46); and I chose a dozen of the same weight to be bespoke for myself, which he told me yesterday he would give me on the same occasion.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Apr 1666. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) home by coach to Mrs. Williams's, where Bab. Allen and Dr. Charleton dined. Bab and I sang and were mighty merry as we could be there, where the rest of the company did not overplease.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Apr 1666. Thence home, and after dinner to Gresham College, where a great deal of do and formality in choosing of the Council and Officers. I had three votes to be of the Council, who am but a stranger, nor expected any. So my Lord Bruncker (age 46) being confirmed President I home, where I find to my great content my rails up upon my leads.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Apr 1666. Thence ashamed at myself for this losse of time, yet not able to leave it, I to the office, where my Lord Bruncker (age 46) come; and he and I had a little fray, he being, I find, a very peevish man, if he be denied what he expects, and very simple in his argument in this business (about signing a warrant for paying Sir Thos. Allen (age 54) £1000 out of the groats); but we were pretty good friends before we parted, and so we broke up and I to the writing my letters by the post, and so home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Apr 1666. So my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I down to walk in the garden [at White Hall], it being a mighty hot and pleasant day; and there was the King (age 35), who, among others, talked to us a little; and among other pretty things, he swore merrily that he believed the ketch that Sir W. Batten (age 65) bought the last year at Colchester was of his own getting, it was so thick to its length. Another pleasant thing he said of Christopher Pett (age 45), commending him that he will not alter his moulds of his ships upon any man's advice; "as", says he, "Commissioner Taylor I fear do of his New London, that he makes it differ, in hopes of mending the Old London, built by him". "For", says he, "he finds that God hath put him into the right, and so will keep in it while he is in". "And", says the King (age 35), "I am sure it must be God put him in, for no art of his owne ever could have done it"; for it seems he cannot give a good account of what he do as an artist.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Apr 1666. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) in his coach to Hide Parke, the first time I have been there this year. There the King (age 35) was; but I was sorry to see my Baroness Castlemaine's (age 25), for the mourning forceing all the ladies to go in black, with their hair plain and without any spots, I find her to be a much more ordinary woman than ever I durst have thought she was; and, indeed, is not so pretty as Mrs. Stewart (age 18), whom I saw there also.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Apr 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and put on my new black coate, long down to my knees, and with Sir W. Batten (age 65) to White Hall, where all in deep mourning for the Queene's (age 27) mother. There had great discourse, before the Duke (age 32) and Sir W. Coventry (age 38) begun the discourse of the day about the purser's business, which I seconded, and with great liking to the Duke (age 32), whom however afterward my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Sir W. Pen (age 44) did stop by some thing they said, though not much to the purpose, yet because our proposition had some appearance of certain charge to the King (age 35) it was ruled that for this year we should try another the same in every respect with ours, leaving out one circumstance of allowing the pursers the victuals of all men short of the complement. I was very well satisfied with it and am contented to try it, wishing it may prove effectual.

Pepy's Diary. 01 May 1666. Thence by water to Redriffe [Map], reading a new French book my Lord Bruncker (age 46) did give me to-day, "L'Histoire Amoureuse des Gaules"1, being a pretty libel against the amours of the Court of France. I walked up and down Deptford, Kent [Map] yarde, where I had not been since I come from living at Greenwich, Kent [Map], which is some months. There I met with Mr. Castle (age 37), and was forced against my will to have his company back with me. So we walked and drank at Halfway house and so to his house, where I drank a cupp of syder, and so home, where I find Mr. Norbury newly come to town to see us. After he gone my wife tells me the ill newes that our Susan is sicke and gone to bed, with great pain in her head and back, which troubles us all. However we to bed expecting what to-morrow would produce. She hath we conceive wrought a little too much, having neither maid nor girle to help her.

Note 1. This book, which has frequently been reprinted, was written by Roger de Rabutin, Comte de Bussy, for the amusement of his mistress, Madame de Montglas, and consists of sketches of the chief ladies of the court, in which he libelled friends and foes alike. These circulated in manuscript, and were printed at Liege in 1665. Louis XIV. was so much annoyed with the book that he sent the author to the Bastille for over a year.

Pepy's Diary. 02 May 1666. Thence with Captain Cocke (age 49), whom I met there, to London, to my office, to consult about serving him in getting him some money, he being already tired of his slavery to my Lord Bruncker (age 46), and the charge it costs him, and gets no manner of courtesy from him for it. He gone I home to dinner, find the girle yet better, so no fear of being forced to send her out of doors as we intended.

Pepy's Diary. 11 May 1666. So to the 'Change [Map], to speake with Captain Cocke (age 49), among other things about getting of the silver plates of him, which he promises to do; but in discourse he tells me that I should beware of my fellow-officers; and by name told me that my Lord Bruncker (age 46) should say in his hearing, before Sir W. Batten (age 65), of me, that he could undo the man, if he would; wherein I think he is a foole; but, however, it is requisite I be prepared against the man's friendship.

Pepy's Diary. 23 May 1666. After dinner Creed and I and wife and Mercer out by coach, leaving them at the New Exchange, while I to White Hall, and there staid at Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) chamber till the Council rose, and then he and I, by agreement this morning, went forth in his coach by Tiburne [Map], to the Parke; discoursing of the state of the Navy as to money, and the state of the Kingdom too, how ill able to raise more: and of our office as to the condition of the officers; he giving me caution as to myself, that there are those that are my enemies as well as his, and by name my Lord Bruncker (age 46), who hath said some odd speeches against me. So that he advises me to stand on my guard; which I shall do, and unless my too-much addiction to pleasure undo me, will be acute enough for any of them. We rode to and again in the Parke a good while, and at last home and set me down at Charing Crosse [Map], and thence I to Mrs. Pierce's to take up my wife and Mercer, where I find her new picture by Hales do not please her, nor me indeed, it making no show, nor is very like, nor no good painting.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1666. So home about four o'clock to dinner, and was followed by several people to be told the newes, and good newes it is. God send we may hear a good issue of this day's business! After I had eat something I walked to Gresham College, where I heard my Lord Bruncker (age 46) was, and there got a promise of the receipt of the fine varnish, which I shall be glad to have.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1666. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Creed by coach to White Hall, where fresh letters are come from Harwich [Map], where the Gloucester, Captain Clerke, is come in, and says that on Sunday night upon coming in of the Prince (age 46), the Duke did fly; but all this day they have been fighting; therefore they did face again, to be sure. Captain Bacon of The Bristoll is killed. They cry up Jenings of The Ruby, and Saunders of The Sweepstakes. They condemn mightily Sir Thomas Teddiman for a coward, but with what reason time must shew. Having heard all this Creed and I walked into the Parke till 9 or 10 at night, it being fine moonshine, discoursing of the unhappinesse of our fleete, what it would have been if the Prince (age 46) had not come in, how much the Duke hath failed of what he was so presumptuous of, how little we deserve of God Almighty to give us better fortune, how much this excuses all that was imputed to my Lord Sandwich (age 40), and how much more he is a man fit to be trusted with all those matters than those that now command, who act by nor with any advice, but rashly and without any order. How bad we are at intelligence that should give the Prince (age 46) no sooner notice of any thing but let him come to Dover without notice of any fight, or where the fleete were, or any thing else, nor give the Duke any notice that he might depend upon the Prince's (age 46) reserve; and lastly, of how good use all may be to checke our pride and presumption in adventuring upon hazards upon unequal force against a people that can fight, it seems now, as well as we, and that will not be discouraged by any losses, but that they will rise again.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1666. Thence, he being gone, to the Crown, behind the 'Change, and there supped at the club with my Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir G. Ent, and others of Gresham College; and all our discourse is of this fight at sea, and all are doubtful of the successe, and conclude all had been lost if the Prince had not come in, they having chased us the greatest part of Saturday and Sunday.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Jun 1666. Up betimes, and vexed with my people for having a key taken out of the chamber doors and nobody knew where it was, as also with my boy for not being ready as soon as I, though I called him, whereupon I boxed him soundly, and then to my business at the office and on the Victualling Office, and thence by water to St. James's, whither he [the Duke of York (age 32)] is now gone, it being a monthly fast-day for the plague. There we all met, and did our business as usual with the Duke (age 32), and among other things had Captain Cocke's (age 49) proposal of East country goods read, brought by my Lord Bruncker (age 46), which I make use of as a Monkey do the cat's foot. Sir W. Coventry (age 38) did much oppose it, and it's likely it will not do; so away goes my hopes of £500.

Four Days' Battle

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jun 1666. Up betimes, and to my office about business (Sir W. Coventry (age 38) having sent me word that he is gone down to the fleete to see how matters stand, and to be back again speedily); and with the same expectation of congratulating ourselves with the victory that I had yesterday. But my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Sir T. H. (age 41) that come from Court, tell me quite contrary newes, which astonishes me: that is to say, that we are beaten, lost many ships and good commanders; have not taken one ship of the enemy's; and so can only report ourselves a victory; nor is it certain that we were left masters of the field. But, above all, that The Prince run on shore upon the Galloper, and there stuck; was endeavoured to be fetched off by the Dutch, but could not; and so they burned her; and Sir G. Ascue (age 50) is taken prisoner, and carried into Holland. This newes do much trouble me, and the thoughts of the ill consequences of it, and the pride and presumption that brought us to it.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jun 1666. Up, and to my office awhile, and then down the river a little way to see vessels ready for the carrying down of 400 land soldiers to the fleete. Then back to the office for my papers, and so to St. James's, where we did our usual attendance on the Duke (age 32). Having done with him, we all of us down to Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) chamber (where I saw his father my Lord Coventry's picture hung up, done by Stone, who then brought it home. It is a good picture, drawn in his judge's robes, and the great seale by him. And while it was hanging up, "This", says Sir W. Coventry (age 38), merrily, "is the use we make of our fathers",) to discourse about the proposition of serving us with hempe, delivered in by my Lord Brouncker (age 46) as from an unknown person, though I know it to be Captain Cocke's (age 49). My Lord and Sir William Coventry had some earnest words about it, the one promoting it for his private ends, being, as Cocke (age 49) tells me himself, to have £500 if the bargain goes on, and I am to have as much, and the other opposing it for the unseasonableness of it, not knowing at all whose the proposition is, which seems the more ingenious of the two. I sat by and said nothing, being no great friend to the proposition, though Cocke (age 49) intends me a convenience by it. But what I observed most from the discourse was this of Sir W. Coventry (age 38), that he do look upon ourselves in a desperate condition. The issue of all standing upon this one point, that by the next fight, if we beat, the Dutch will certainly be content to take eggs for their money (that was his expression); or if we be beaten, we must be contented to make peace, and glad if we can have it without paying too dear for it. And withall we do rely wholly upon the Parliament's giving us more money the next sitting, or else we are undone.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jul 1666. Up betimes to the office, to write fair a laborious letter I wrote as from the Board to the Duke of Yorke (age 32), laying out our want of money again; and particularly the business of Captain Cocke's (age 49) tenders of hemp, which my Lord Bruncker (age 46) brought in under an unknown hand without name. Wherein his Lordship will have no great successe, I doubt.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jul 1666. At noon dined at home and then to the office again, and there walking in the garden with Captain Cocke (age 49) till 5 o'clock. No newes yet of the fleete. His great bargaine of Hempe with us by his unknown proposition is disliked by the King (age 36), and so is quite off; of which he is glad, by this means being rid of his obligation to my Lord Bruncker (age 46), which he was tired with, and especially his mistresse, Mrs. Williams, and so will fall into another way about it, wherein he will advise only with myself, which do not displease me, and will be better for him and the King (age 36) too. Much common talke of publique business, the want of money, the uneasinesse that Parliament will find in raising any, and the ill condition we shall be in if they do not, and his confidence that the Swede is true to us, but poor, but would be glad to do us all manner of service in the world.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jul 1666. Up, and to the office, where no more newes of the fleete than was yesterday. Here we sat and at noon to dinner to the Pope's Head, where my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and his mistresse dined and Commissioner Pett (age 55), Dr. Charleton, and myself, entertained with a venison pasty by Sir W. Warren. Here very pretty discourse of Dr. Charleton's, concerning Nature's fashioning every creature's teeth according to the food she intends them; and that men's, it is plain, was not for flesh, but for fruit, and that he can at any time tell the food of a beast unknown by the teeth. My Lord Bruncker (age 46) made one or two objections to it that creatures find their food proper for their teeth rather than that the teeth were fitted for the food, but the Doctor, I think, did well observe that creatures do naturally and from the first, before they have had experience to try, do love such a food rather than another, and that all children love fruit, and none brought to flesh, but against their wills at first.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jul 1666. Thence with my Lord to his coach-house, and there put in his six horses into his coach, and he and I alone to Highgate. All the way going and coming I learning of him the principles of Optickes, and what it is that makes an object seem less or bigger and how much distance do lessen an object, and that it is not the eye at all, or any rule in optiques, that can tell distance, but it is only an act of reason comparing of one mark with another, which did both please and inform me mightily. Being come thither we went to my Lord Lauderdale's (age 50) house to speake with him, about getting a man at Leith to joyne with one we employ to buy some prize goods for the King (age 36); we find (him) and his lady (age 54) and some Scotch people at supper. Pretty odd company; though my Lord Bruncker (age 46) tells me, my Lord Lauderdale (age 50) is a man of mighty good reason and judgement. But at supper there played one of their servants upon the viallin some Scotch tunes only; several, and the best of their country, as they seemed to esteem them, by their praising and admiring them: but, Lord! the strangest ayre that ever I heard in my life, and all of one cast. But strange to hear my Lord Lauderdale (age 50) say himself that he had rather hear a cat mew, than the best musique in the world; and the better the musique, the more sicke it makes him; and that of all instruments, he hates the lute most, and next to that, the baggpipe.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jul 1666. Thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) to White Hall, where no news.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Jul 1666. Good friends in the morning and up to the office, where sitting all the morning, and while at table we were mightily joyed with newes brought by Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and Sir W. Batten (age 65) of the death of De Ruyter (age 59), but when Sir W. Coventry (age 38) come, he told us there was no such thing, which quite dashed me again, though, God forgive me! I was a little sorry in my heart before lest it might give occasion of too much glory to the Duke of Albemarle (age 57). Great bandying this day between Sir W. Coventry (age 38) and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) about Captain Cocke (age 49), which I am well pleased with, while I keepe from any open relyance on either side, but rather on Sir W. Coventry's (age 38).

Pepy's Diary. 02 Aug 1666. Thence to the office, and thither comes to me Creed, and he and I walked a good while, and then to the Victualling Office together, and there with Mr. Gawden I did much business, and so away with Creed again, and by coach to see my Lord Bruncker (age 46), who it seems was not well yesterday, but being come thither, I find his coach ready to carry him abroad, but Tom, his footman, whatever the matter was, was lothe to desire me to come in, but I walked a great while in the Piatza till I was going away, but by and by my Lord himself comes down and coldly received me.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Aug 1666. By and by comes Mr. Pierce and his wife, the first time she also hath been here since her lying-in, both having been brought to bed of boys, and both of them dead. And here we talked, and were pleasant, only my wife in a chagrin humour, she not being pleased with my kindnesse to either of them, and by and by she fell into some silly discourse wherein I checked her, which made her mighty pettish, and discoursed mighty offensively to Mrs. Pierce, which did displease me, but I would make no words, but put the discourse by as much as I could (it being about a report that my wife said was made of herself and meant by Mrs. Pierce, that she was grown a gallant, when she had but so few suits of clothes these two or three years, and a great deale of that silly discourse), and by and by Mrs. Pierce did tell her that such discourses should not trouble her, for there went as bad on other people, and particularly of herself at this end of the towne, meaning my wife, that she was crooked, which was quite false, which my wife had the wit not to acknowledge herself to be the speaker of, though she has said it twenty times. But by this means we had little pleasure in their visit; however, Knipp and I sang, and then I offered them to carry them home, and to take my wife with me, but she would not go: so I with them, leaving my wife in a very ill humour, and very slighting to them, which vexed me. However, I would not be removed from my civility to them, but sent for a coach, and went with them; and, in our way, Knipp saying that she come out of doors without a dinner to us, I took them to Old Fish Streete, to the very house and woman where I kept my wedding dinner, where I never was since, and there I did give them a joie of Salmon, and what else was to be had. And here we talked of the ill-humour of my wife, which I did excuse as much as I could, and they seemed to admit of it, but did both confess they wondered at it; but from thence to other discourse, and among others to that of my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Mrs. Williams, who it seems do speake mighty hardly of me for my not treating them, and not giving her something to her closett, and do speake worse of my wife, and dishonourably, but it is what she do of all the world, though she be a whore herself; so I value it not. But they told me how poorly my Lord carried himself the other day to his kinswoman, Mrs. Howard, and was displeased because she called him uncle to a little gentlewoman that is there with him, which he will not admit of; for no relation is to be challenged from others to a lord, and did treat her thereupon very rudely and ungenteely.

Holme's Bonfire

Pepy's Diary. 16 Aug 1666. This day Sir W. Batten (age 65) did show us at the table a letter from Sir T. Allen (age 54), which says that we have taken ten or twelve' ships (since the late great expedition of burning their ships and towne), laden with hempe, flax, tarr, deales, &c. This was good newes; but by and by comes in Sir G. Carteret (age 56), and he asked us with full mouth what we would give for good newes. Says Sir W. Batten (age 65), "I have better than you, for a wager". They laid sixpence, and we that were by were to give sixpence to him that told the best newes. So Sir W. Batten (age 65) told his of the ten or twelve ships Sir G. Carteret (age 56) did then tell us that upon the newes of the burning of the ships and towne the common people a Amsterdam did besiege De Witt's house, and he was force to flee to the Prince of Orange (age 15), who is gone to Cleve to the marriage of his sister (age 23) [Notee. his aunt]. This we concluded all the best newest and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and myself did give Sir G. Carteret (age 56) our sixpence a-piece, which he did give Mr. Smith to give the poor. Thus we made ourselves mighty merry.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Aug 1666. All the morning at my office; then to the Exchange [Map] (with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) in his coach) at noon, but it was only to avoid Mr. Chr. Pett's (age 46) being invited by me to dinner.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Aug 1666. At the office all the morning, whither Sir W. Coventry (age 38) sent me word that the Dutch fleete is certainly abroad; and so we are to hasten all we have to send to our fleete with all speed. But, Lord! to see how my Lord Bruncker (age 46) undertakes the despatch of the fire-ships, when he is no more fit for it than a porter; and all the while Sir W. Pen (age 45), who is the most fit, is unwilling to displease him, and do not look after it; and so the King's work is like to be well done.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1666. Lord's Day. Up betimes, and to the finishing the setting things in order in my new closett out of my old, which I did thoroughly by the time sermon was done at church, to my exceeding joy, only I was a little disturbed with newes my Lord Bruncker (age 46) brought me, that we are to attend the King (age 36) at White Hall this afternoon, and that it is about a complaint from the Generalls against us. Sir W. Pen (age 45) dined by invitation with me, his Lady and daughter being gone into the country. We very merry.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Sep 1666. Thence to the Swan [Map], and there drank: and so home, and find all well. My Lord Bruncker (age 46), at Sir W. Batten's (age 65), and tells us the Generall is sent for up, to come to advise with the King (age 36) about business at this juncture, and to keep all quiet; which is great honour to him, but I am sure is but a piece of dissimulation.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Sep 1666. Lay there, and up betimes, and by water with my gold, and laid it with the rest in my office, where I find all well and safe. So with Sir W. Batten (age 65) to the New Exchange by water and to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) house, where Sir W. Coventry (age 38) and Sir G. Carteret (age 56) met. Little business before us but want of money. Broke up, and I home by coach round the town.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Sep 1666. Thence by coach over the ruines, down Fleete Streete [Map] and Cheapside [Map] to Broad Streete (age 36) to Sir G. Carteret (age 56), where Sir W. Batten (age 65) (and Sir J. Minnes (age 67), whom I had not seen a long time before, being his first coming abroad) and Lord Bruncker (age 46) passing his accounts.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1666. To the office, and there busy now for good and all about my accounts. My Lord Brunck (age 46) come thither, thinking to find an office, but we have not yet met. He do now give me a watch, a plain one, in the roome of my former watch with many motions which I did give him. If it goes well, I care not for the difference in worth, though believe there is above £5. He and I to Sir G. Carteret (age 56) to discourse about his account, but Mr. Waith not being there nothing could be done, and therefore I home again, and busy all day.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1666. Up betimes, with all my people to get the letter writ over, and other things done, which I did, and by coach to Lord Bruncker's (age 46), and got his hand to it; and then to the Parliament House and got it signed by the rest, and then delivered it at the House-door to Sir Philip Warwicke (age 56); Sir G. Carteret (age 56) being gone into the House with his book of accounts under his arme, to present to the House. I had brought my wife to White Hall, and leaving her with Mrs. Michell, where she sat in her shop and had burnt wine sent for her, I walked in the Hall, and among others with Ned Pickering (age 48), who continues still a lying, bragging coxcombe, telling me that my Lord Sandwich (age 41) may thank himself for all his misfortune; for not suffering him and two or three good honest fellows more to take them by the throats that spoke ill of him, and told me how basely Lionell Walden hath carried himself towards my Lord; by speaking slightly of him, which I shall remember.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Oct 1666. At noon with it to Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) chamber, and there dined with him and Sir W. Batten (age 65), and Sir W. Pen (age 45), and after dinner examined it and find it will do us much right in the number of men rising to near the expense we delivered to the Parliament. Sir W. Coventry (age 38) and I (the others going before the Committee) to Lord Bruncker's (age 46) for his hand, and find him simply mighty busy in a council of the Queen's (age 27). He come out and took in the papers to sign, and sent them mighty wisely out again. Sir W. Coventry (age 38) away to the Committee, and I to the Mercer's, and there took a bill of what I owe of late, which comes to about £17.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Oct 1666. By and by the Committee met, and I walked out, and anon they rose and called me in, and appointed me to attend a Committee of them to-morrow at the office to examine our lists. This put me into a mighty fear and trouble; they doing it in a very ill humour, methought. So I away and called on my Lord Bruncker (age 46) to desire him to be there to-morrow, and so home, having taken up my wife at Unthanke's, full of trouble in mind to think what I shall be obliged to answer, that am neither fully fit, nor in any measure concerned to take the shame and trouble of this office upon me, but only from the inability and folly of the Comptroller that occasions it.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1666. Waked betimes, mightily troubled in mind, and in the most true trouble that I ever was in my life, saving in the business last year of the East India prizes. So up, and with Mr. Hater and W. Hewer (age 24) and Griffin to consider of our business, and books and papers necessary for this examination; and by and by, by eight o'clock, comes Birch (age 51), the first, with the lists and books of accounts delivered in. He calls me to work, and there he and I begun, when, by and by, comes Garraway (age 49)1, the first time I ever saw him, and Sir W. Thompson (age 37) and Mr. Boscawen (age 38). They to it, and I did make shift to answer them better than I expected. Sir W. Batten (age 65), Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir W. Pen (age 45), come in, but presently went out; and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) come in, and said two or three words from the purpose, but to do hurt; and so away he went also, and left me all the morning with them alone to stand or fall.

Note 1. William Garway (age 49), elected M.P. for Chichester, March 26th, 1661, and in 1674 he was appointed by the House to confer with Lord Shaftesbury respecting the charge against Pepys being popishly affected. See note to the Life, vol. i., p, xxxii, and for his character, October 6th, 1666.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Oct 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and after visiting my father in his chamber, to church, and then home to dinner. Little Michell and his wife come to dine with us, which they did, and then presently after dinner I with Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to White Hall, where met by Sir W. Batten (age 65) and Lord Bruncker (age 46), to attend the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 32) at the Cabinet; but nobody had determined what to speak of, but only in general to ask for money. So I was forced immediately to prepare in my mind a method of discoursing. And anon we were called in to the Green Room, where the King (age 36), Duke of York (age 32), Prince Rupert (age 46), Chancellor (age 57), Lord Treasurer (age 59), Duke of Albemarle (age 57), [Sirs] G. Carteret (age 56), W. Coventry (age 38), Morrice (age 63). Nobody beginning, I did, and made a current, and I thought a good speech, laying open the ill state of the Navy: by the greatness of the debt; greatness of work to do against next yeare; the time and materials it would take; and our incapacity, through a total want of money. I had no sooner done, but Prince Rupert (age 46) rose up and told the King (age 36) in a heat, that whatever the gentleman had said, he had brought home his fleete in as good a condition as ever any fleete was brought home; that twenty boats would be as many as the fleete would want: and all the anchors and cables left in the storm might be taken up again. This arose from my saying, among other things we had to do, that the fleete was come in-the greatest fleete that ever his Majesty had yet together, and that in as bad condition as the enemy or weather could put it; and to use Sir W. Pen's (age 45) words, who is upon the place taking a survey, he dreads the reports he is to receive from the Surveyors of its defects. I therefore did only answer, that I was sorry for his Highness's offence, but that what I said was but the report we received from those entrusted in the fleete to inform us. He muttered and repeated what he had said; and so, after a long silence on all hands, nobody, not so much as the Duke of Albemarle (age 57), seconding the Prince, nor taking notice of what he said, we withdrew. I was not a little troubled at this passage, and the more when speaking with Jacke Fenn about it, he told me that the Prince (age 46) will be asking now who this Pepys is, and find him to be a creature of my Lord Sandwich's (age 41), and therefore this was done only to disparage him.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Oct 1666. At noon by coach with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and 'light at the Temple [Map], and so alone I to dinner at a cooke's, and thence to my Lord Bellasses (age 52), whom I find kind; but he had drawn some new proposal to deliver to the Lords Commissioners to-day, wherein one was, that the garrison would not be well paid without some goldsmith's undertaking the paying of the bills of exchange for Tallys. He professing so much kindness to me, and saying that he would not be concerned in the garrison without me; and that if he continued in the employment, no man should have to do with the money but myself. I did ask his Lordship's meaning of the proposition in his paper. He told me he had not much considered it, but that he meant no harm to me. I told him I thought it would render me useless; whereupon he did very frankly, after my seeming denials for a good while, cause it to be writ over again, and that clause left out, which did satisfy me abundantly.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Oct 1666. He tells me, what I wonder at, but that I find it confirmed by Mr. Pierce, whom I met by-and-by in the Hall, that Sir W. Coventry (age 38) is of the caball with the Duke of York (age 33), and Bruncker (age 46), with this Denham (age 26); which is a shame, and I am sorry for it, and that Sir W. Coventry (age 38) do make her visits; but yet I hope it is not so. Pierce tells me, that as little agreement as there is between the Prince (age 46) [Rupert] and Duke of Albemarle (age 57), yet they are likely to go to sea again; for the first will not be trusted alone, and nobody will go with him but this Duke of Albemarle (age 57).

Pepy's Diary. 18 Oct 1666. At noon with Lord Bruncker (age 46) to St. Ellen's, where the master of the late Pope's Head Taverne is now set up again, and there dined at Sir W. Warren's cost, a very good dinner. Here my Lord Bruncker (age 46) proffered to carry me and my wife into a play at Court to-night, and to lend me his coach home, which tempted me much; but I shall not do it.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Oct 1666. After a little more discourse, I left them, and to White Hall, where I met with Sir Robert Viner (age 35), who told me a little of what, in going home, I had seen; also a little of the disorder and mutiny among the seamen at the Treasurer's office, which did trouble me then and all day since, considering how many more seamen will come to towne every day, and no money for them. A Parliament sitting, and the Exchange [Map] close by, and an enemy to hear of, and laugh at it1. Viner (age 35) too, and Backewell, were sent for this afternoon; and was before the King (age 36) and his Cabinet about money; they declaring they would advance no more, it being discoursed of in the House of Parliament for the King (age 36) to issue out his privy-seals to them to command them to trust him, which gives them reason to decline trusting. But more money they are persuaded to lend, but so little that (with horrour I speake it), coming after the Council was up, with Sir G. Carteret (age 56), Sir W. Coventry (age 38), Lord Bruncker (age 46), and myself, I did lay the state of our condition before the Duke of York (age 33), that the fleete could not go out without several things it wanted, and we could not have without money, particularly rum and bread, which we have promised the man Swan to helpe him to £200 of his debt, and a few other small sums of £200 a piece to some others, and that I do foresee the Duke of York (age 33) would call us to an account why the fleete is not abroad, and we cannot answer otherwise than our want of money; and that indeed we do not do the King (age 36) any service now, but do rather abuse and betray his service by being there, and seeming to do something, while we do not. Sir G. Carteret (age 56) asked me (just in these words, for in this and all the rest I set down the very words for memory sake, if there should be occasion) whether £50 or £60 would do us any good; and when I told him the very rum man must have £200, he held up his eyes as if we had asked a million. Sir W. Coventry (age 38) told the Duke of York (age 33) plainly he did rather desire to have his commission called in than serve in so ill a place, where he cannot do the King (age 36) service, and I did concur in saying the same. This was all very plain, and the Duke of York (age 33) did confess that he did not see how we could do anything without a present supply of £20,000, and that he would speak to the King (age 36) next Council day, and I promised to wait on him to put him in mind of it. This I set down for my future justification, if need be, and so we broke up, and all parted, Sir W. Coventry (age 38) being not very well, but I believe made much worse by this night's sad discourse. So I home by coach, considering what the consequence of all this must be in a little time. Nothing but distraction and confusion; which makes me wish with all my heart that I were well and quietly settled with what little I have got at Brampton, where I might live peaceably, and study, and pray for the good of the King (age 36) and my country.

Note 1. The King of Denmark (age 57) was induced to conclude a treaty with the United Provinces, a secret article of which bound him to declare war against England. The order in council for the printing and publishing a declaration of war against Denmark is dated "Whitehall, Sept. 19, 1666"; annexed is "A True Declaration of all transactions between his Majesty of Great Britain and the King of Denmark, with a declaration of war against the said king, and the motives that obliged his Majesty thereunto" (Calendar of State Papers, 1666-67, p. 140).

Pepy's Diary. 25 Oct 1666. Thence with Lord Bruncker (age 46) to White Hall and there spoke with Sir W. Coventry (age 38) about some office business, and then I away to Mrs. Pierce's, and there saw her new closet, which is mighty rich and fine. Her daughter Betty grows mighty pretty.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Oct 1666. Thence I to my Lord Bruncker's (age 46), and with him to Mrs. Williams's where we met Knipp. I was glad to see the jade. Made her sing; and she told us they begin at both houses to act on Monday next. But I fear, after all this sorrow, their gains will be but little. Mrs. Williams says, the Duke's house will now be much the better of the two, because of their women; which I am glad to hear.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Nov 1666. Lord's Day. Comes my taylor's man in the morning, and brings my vest home, and coate to wear with it, and belt, and silver-hilted sword. So I rose and dressed myself, and I like myself mightily in it, and so do my wife. Then, being dressed, to church; and after church pulled my Lady Pen (age 42) and Mrs. Markham into my house to dinner, and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) he got Mrs. Pegg along with him. I had a good dinner for them, and very merry; and after dinner to the waterside, and so, it being very cold, to White Hall, and was mighty fearfull of an ague, my vest being new and thin, and the coat cut not to meet before upon my breast. Here I waited in the gallery till the Council was up, and among others did speak with Mr. Cooling, my Lord Camberlain's secretary, who tells me my Lord Generall is become mighty low in all people's opinion, and that he hath received several slurs from the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 33). The people at Court do see the difference between his and the Prince's (age 46) management, and my Lord Sandwich's (age 41). That this business which he is put upon of crying out against the Catholiques and turning them out of all employment, will undo him, when he comes to turn-out the officers out of the Army, and this is a thing of his own seeking. That he is grown a drunken sot, and drinks with nobody but Troutbecke, whom nobody else will keep company with. Of whom he told me this story: That once the Duke of Albemarle (age 57) in his drink taking notice as of a wonder that Nan Hide (age 29) should ever come to be Duchesse of York (age 29), "Nay", says Troutbecke, "ne'er wonder at that; for if you will give me another bottle of wine, I will tell you as great, if not greater, a miracle". And what was that, but that our dirty Besse (meaning his Duchesse (age 47)) should come to be Duchesse of Albemarle? Here we parted, and so by and by the Council rose, and out comes Sir G. Carteret (age 56) and Sir W. Coventry (age 38), and they and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and I went to Sir G. Carteret's (age 56) lodgings, there to discourse about some money demanded by Sir W. Warren, and having done that broke up. And Sir G. Carteret (age 56) and I alone together a while, where he shows a long letter, all in cipher, from my Lord Sandwich (age 41) to him. The contents he hath not yet found out, but he tells me that my Lord is not sent for home, as several people have enquired after of me. He spoke something reflecting upon me in the business of pursers, that their present bad behaviour is what he did foresee, and had convinced me of, and yet when it come last year to be argued before the Duke of York (age 33) I turned and said as the rest did. I answered nothing to it, but let it go, and so to other discourse of the ill state of things, of which all people are full of sorrow and observation, and so parted, and then by water, landing in Southwarke [Map], home to the Tower, and so home, and there began to read "Potter's Discourse upon 1666", which pleases me mightily, and then broke off and to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Nov 1666. So to the office, where much business all the morning, and the more by my brethren being all out of the way; Sir W. Pen (age 45) this night taken so ill cannot stir; Sir W. Batten (age 65) ill at Walthamstow [Map]; Sir J. Minnes (age 67) the like at Chatham, Kent [Map], and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) there also upon business. Horrible trouble with the backwardness of the merchants to let us have their ships, and seamen's running away, and not to be got or kept without money. It is worth turning to our letters this day to Sir W. Coventry (age 38) about these matters.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Nov 1666. So to White Hall to Sir W. Coventry (age 38), and there would fain have carried Captain Cocke's (age 49) business for his bargain of hemp, but am defeated and disappointed, and know hardly how to carry myself in it between my interest and desire not to offend Sir W. Coventry (age 38). Sir W. Coventry (age 38) did this night tell me how the business is about Sir J. Minnes (age 67); that he is to be a Commissioner, and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) are to be Controller joyntly, which I am very glad of, and better than if they were either of them alone; and do hope truly that the King's business will be better done thereby, and infinitely better than now it is.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Nov 1666. At noon with my Lord Bruncker (age 46) and Sir Thomas Harvy (age 41), to Cocke's (age 49) house, and there Mrs. Williams and other company, and an excellent dinner. Mr. Temple's wife, after dinner, fell to play on the harpsicon, till she tired everybody, that I left the house without taking leave, and no creature left standing by her to hear her.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1666. Back home in my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) coach, and there W. Hewer (age 24) and I to write it over fair; dined at noon, and Mercer with us, and mighty merry, and then to finish my letter; and it being three o'clock ere we had done, when I come to Sir W. Batten (age 65); he was in a huffe, which I made light of, but he signed the letter, though he would not go, and liked the letter well. Sir W. Pen (age 45), it seems, he would not stay for it: so, making slight of Sir W. Pen's (age 45) putting so much weight upon his hand to Sir W. Batten (age 65), I down to the Tower Wharfe [Map], and there got a sculler, and to White Hall, and there met Lord Bruncker (age 46), and he signed it, and so I delivered it to Mr. Cheving (age 64)1, and he to Sir W. Coventry (age 38), in the cabinet, the King (age 36) and councill being sitting, where I leave it to its fortune, and I by water home again, and to my chamber, to even my Journall; and then comes Captain Cocke (age 49) to me, and he and I a great deal of melancholy discourse of the times, giving all over for gone, though now the Parliament will soon finish the Bill for money. But we fear, if we had it, as matters are now managed, we shall never make the best of it, but consume it all to no purpose or a bad one. He being gone, I again to my Journall and finished it, and so to supper and to bed.

Note 1. William Chiffinch (age 64), pimp to Charles II and receiver of the secret pensions paid by the French Court. He succeeded his brother, Thomas Chiffinch (who died in April, 1666), as Keeper of the King's Private Closet (see note, vol. v., p. 265). He is introduced by Scott into his "Peveril of the Peak"..

Pepy's Diary. 18 Nov 1666. Lord's Day. Up by candle-light and on foote to White Hall, where by appointment I met Lord Bruncker (age 46) at Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) chamber, and there I read over my great letter, and they approved it: and as I do do our business in defence of the Board, so I think it is as good a letter in the manner, and believe it is the worst in the matter of it, as ever come from any office to a Prince.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Nov 1666. Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) did show me Hollar's (age 59) new print of the City, with a pretty representation of that part which is burnt, very fine indeed; and tells me that he was yesterday sworn the King's servant, and that the King (age 36) hath commanded him to go on with his great map of the City, which he was upon before the City was burned, like Gombout of Paris, which I am glad of.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Nov 1666. So I home to the office, my people all busy to get a good dinner to-morrow again. I late at the office, and all the newes I hear I put into a letter this night to my Lord Bruncker (age 46) at Chatham, Kent [Map], thus:-

Pepy's Diary. 15 Dec 1666. Up and to the office, where my Lord Bruncker (age 46) newly come to town, from his being at Chatham, Kent [Map] and Harwich [Map] to spy enormities: and at noon I with him and his lady Williams, to Captain Cocke's (age 49), where a good dinner, and very merry.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1666. So we parted, and I with Lord Bruncker (age 46) to Sir P. Neale's (age 53) chamber, and there sat and talked awhile, Sir Edward Walker being there, and telling us how he hath lost many fine rowles of antiquity in heraldry by the late fire, but hath saved the most of his papers. Here was also Dr. Wallis (age 50), the famous scholar and mathematician; but he promises little.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1666. Anon to chapel, by the King's closet, and heard a very good anthemne. Then with Lord Bruncker (age 46) to Sir W. Coventry's (age 38) chamber; and there we sat with him and talked. He is weary of anything to do, he says, in the Navy. He tells us this Committee of Accounts will enquire sharply into our office. And, speaking of Sir J. Minnes (age 67), he says he will not bear any body's faults but his own. He discoursed as bad of Sir W. Batten (age 65) almost, and cries out upon the discipline of the fleete, which is lost, and that there is not in any of the fourth rates and under scarce left one Sea Commander, but all young gentlemen; and what troubles him, he hears that the gentlemen give out that in two or three years a Tarpaulin shall not dare to look after being better than a Boatswain. Which he is troubled at, and with good reason, and at this day Sir Robert Holmes (age 44) is mighty troubled that his brother do not command in chief, but is commanded by Captain Hannum, who, Sir W. Coventry (age 38) says, he believes to be at least of as good blood, is a longer bred seaman, an elder officer, and an elder commander, but such is Sir R. Holmes's (age 44) pride as never to be stopt, he being greatly troubled at my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) late discharging all his men and officers but the standing officers at Chatham, Kent [Map], and so are all other Commanders, and a very great cry hath been to the King (age 36) from them all in my Lord's absence. But Sir W. Coventry (age 38) do undertake to defend it, and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) got ground I believe by it, who is angry at Sir W. Batten's (age 65) and Sir W. Pen's (age 45) bad words concerning it, and I have made it worse by telling him that they refuse to sign to a paper which he and I signed on Saturday to declare the reason of his actions, which Sir W. Coventry (age 38) likes and would have it sent him and he will sign it, which pleases me well.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Dec 1666. Left them, and in the dark and cold home by water, and so to supper and to read and so to bed, my eyes being better to-day, and I cannot impute it to anything but by my being much in the dark to-night, for I plainly find that it is only excess of light that makes my eyes sore. This after noon I walked with Lord Bruncker (age 46) into the Park and there talked of the times, and he do think that the King (age 36) sees that he cannot never have much more money or good from this Parliament, and that therefore he may hereafter dissolve them, that as soon as he has the money settled he believes a peace will be clapped up, and that there are overtures of a peace, which if such as the Chancellor (age 57) can excuse he will take. For it is the Chancellor's (age 57) interest, he says, to bring peace again, for in peace he can do all and command all, but in war he cannot, because he understands not the nature of the war as to the management thereof. He tells me he do not believe the Duke of York (age 33) will go to sea again, though there are a great many about the King (age 36) that would be glad of any occasion to take him out of the world, he standing in their ways; and seemed to mean the Duke of Monmouth (age 17), who spends his time the most viciously and idly of any man, nor will be fit for any thing; yet bespeaks as if it were not impossible but the King (age 36) would own him for his son, and that there was a marriage between his mother and him; which God forbid should be if it be not true, nor will the Duke of York (age 33) easily be gulled in it. But this put to our other distractions makes things appear very sad, and likely to be the occasion of much confusion in a little time, and my Lord Bruncker (age 46) seems to say that nothing can help us but the King's making a peace soon as he hath this money; and thereby putting himself out of debt, and so becoming a good husband, and then he will neither need this nor any other Parliament, till he can have one to his mind: for no Parliament can, as he says, be kept long good, but they will spoil one another, and that therefore it hath been the practice of kings to tell Parliaments what he hath for them to do, and give them so long time to do it in, and no longer. Harry Kembe, one of our messengers, is lately dead.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Dec 1666. Up, and to the office, where Lord Bruncker (age 46), Sir J. Mennes (age 67), Sir W. Penn (age 45), and myself met, and there I did use my notes I took on Saturday night about tickets, and did come to a good settlement in the business of that office, if it be kept to, this morning being a meeting on purpose.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Dec 1666. At noon to prevent my Lord Bruncker's (age 46) dining here I walked as if upon business with him, it being frost and dry, as far as Paul's, and so back again through the City by Guildhall [Map], observing the ruines thereabouts, till I did truly lose myself, and so home to dinner. I do truly find that I have overwrought my eyes, so that now they are become weak and apt to be tired, and all excess of light makes them sore, so that now to the candlelight I am forced to sit by, adding, the snow upon the ground all day, my eyes are very bad, and will be worse if not helped, so my Lord Bruncker (age 46) do advise as a certain cure to use greene spectacles, which I will do.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jan 1667. At noon by invitation to dinner to Sir W. Pen's (age 45), where my Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Batten (age 66), and his lady, myself, and wife, Sir J. Minnes (age 67), and Mr. Turner and his wife. Indifferent merry, to which I contributed the most, but a mean dinner, and in a mean manner.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1667. Up, and seeing things put in order for a dinner at my house to-day, I to the office awhile, and about noon home, and there saw all things in good order. Anon comes our company; my Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Pen (age 45), his lady (age 43), and Pegg (age 16), and her servant, Mr. Lowther (age 26), my Lady Batten (Sir W. Batten (age 66) being forced to dine at Sir R. Ford's (age 53), being invited), Mr. Turner and his wife. Here I had good room for ten, and no more would my table have held well, had Sir J. Minnes (age 67), who was fallen lame, and his sister, and niece, and Sir W. Batten (age 66) come, which was a great content to me to be without them. I did make them all gaze to see themselves served so nobly in plate, and a neat dinner, indeed, though but of seven dishes. Mighty merry I was and made them all, and they mightily pleased. My Lord Bruncker (age 47) went away after dinner to the ticket-office, the rest staid, only my Lady Batten home, her ague-fit coming on her at table. The rest merry, and to cards, and then to sing and talk, and at night to sup, and then to cards; and, last of all, to have a flaggon of ale and apples, drunk out of a wood cupp1, as a Christmas draught, made all merry; and they full of admiration at my plate, particularly my flaggons (which, indeed, are noble), and so late home, all with great mirth and satisfaction to them, as I thought, and to myself to see all I have and do so much outdo for neatness and plenty anything done by any of them.

Note 1. A mazer or drinking-bowl turned out of some kind of wood, by preference of maple, and especially the spotted or speckled variety called "bird's-eye maple" (see W. H. St. John Hope's paper, "On the English Mediaeval Drinking-bowls called Mazers", "Archaeologia", vol. 50, pp. 129,93).

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1667. At the office all the morning, thinking at noon to have been taken home, and my wife (according to appointment yesterday), by my Lord Bruncker (age 47), to dinner and then to a play, but he had forgot it, at which I was glad, being glad of avoyding the occasion of inviting him again, and being forced to invite his doxy, Mrs. Williams.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Jan 1667. At noon (my wife being gone to Westminster) I with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) by coach as far as the Temple [Map], in the way he telling me that my Lady Denham (deceased) is at last dead. Some suspect her poisoned, but it will be best known when her body is opened, which will be to-day, she dying yesterday morning. The Duke of York (age 33) is troubled for her; but hath declared he will never have another public mistress again; which I shall be glad of, and would the King (age 36) would do the like.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jan 1667. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) in a Hackney-coach to White Hall, the way being most horribly bad upon the breaking up of the frost, so as not to be passed almost. There did our usual [business] with the Duke of York (age 33), and here I do hear, by my Lord Bruncker (age 47), that for certain Sir W. Coventry (age 39) hath resigned his place of Commissioner; which I believe he hath done upon good grounds of security to himself, from all the blame which must attend our office this next year; but I fear the King (age 36) will suffer by it.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jan 1667. Thence to Faythorne (age 51), and bought a head or two; one of them my Lord of Ormond's (age 56), the best I ever saw, and then to Arundell House [Map], where first the Royall Society meet, by the favour of Mr. Harry Howard (age 38), who was there, and has given us his grandfather's library, a noble gift, and a noble favour and undertaking it is for him to make his house the seat for this college. Here was an experiment shown about improving the use of powder for creating of force in winding up of springs and other uses of great worth. And here was a great meeting of worthy noble persons; but my Lord Bruncker (age 47), who pretended to make a congratulatory speech upon their coming hither, and in thanks to Mr. Howard (age 38), do it in the worst manner in the world, being the worst speaker, so as I do wonder at his parts and the unhappiness of his speaking.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jan 1667. Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon home and, there being business to do in the afternoon, took my Lord Bruncker (age 47) home with me, who dined with me. His discourse and mine about the bad performances of the Controller's and Surveyor's places by the hands they are now in, and the shame to the service and loss the King (age 36) suffers by it.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1667. Then to the office, there busy all the morning, and among other things comes Sir W. Warren and walked with me awhile, whose discourse I love, he being a very wise man and full of good counsel, and his own practices for wisdom much to be observed, and among other things he tells me how he is fallen in with my Lord Bruncker (age 47), who has promised him most particular inward friendship and yet not to appear at the board to do so, and he tells me how my Lord Bruncker (age 47) should take notice of the two flaggons he saw at my house at dinner, at my late feast, and merrily, yet I know enviously, said, I could not come honestly by them. This I am glad to hear, though vexed to see his ignoble soul, but I shall beware of him, and yet it is fit he should see I am no mean fellow, but can live in the world, and have something.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jan 1667. Up, and to the office, where busy all the morning. Here my Lord Bruncker (age 47) would have made me promise to go with him to a play this afternoon, where Knipp acts Mrs. Weaver's great part in "The Indian Emperour", and he says is coming on to be a great actor. But I am so fell to my business, that I, though against my inclination, will not go.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Jan 1667. Lord's Day. Up betimes and down to the Old Swan [Map], there called on Michell and his wife, which in her night linen appeared as pretty almost as ever to my thinking I saw woman. Here I drank some burnt brandy. They shewed me their house, which, poor people, they have built, and is very pretty. I invited them to dine with me, and so away to White Hall to Sir W. Coventry (age 39), with whom I have not been alone a good while, and very kind he is, and tells me how the business is now ordered by order of council for my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to assist Sir J. Minnes (age 67) in all matters of accounts relating to the Treasurer, and Sir W. Pen (age 45) in all matters relating to the victuallers' and pursers' accounts, which I am very glad of, and the more for that I think it will not do me any hurt at all. Other discourse, much especially about the heat the House was in yesterday about the ill management of the Navy, which I was sorry to hear; though I think they were well answered, both by Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and Sir W. Coventry (age 39), as he informs me the substance of their speeches.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1667. She gone, we to bed all. This night, at supper, comes from Sir W. Coventry (age 39) the Order of Councill for my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to do all the Comptroller's part relating to the Treasurer's accounts, and Sir W. Pen (age 45), all relating to the Victualler's, and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) to do the rest. This, I hope, will do much better for the King (age 36) than now, and, I think, will give neither of them ground to over-top me, as I feared they would; which pleases me mightily. This evening, Mr. Wren and Captain Cocke (age 50) called upon me at the office, and there told me how the House was in better temper to-day, and hath passed the Bill for the remainder of the money, but not to be passed finally till they have done some other things which they will have passed with it; wherein they are very open, what their meaning is, which was but doubted before, for they do in all respects doubt the King's pleasing them.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Jan 1667. Thence to the office a little while longer, and so home, where W. Hewer's (age 25) mother was, and Mrs. Turner (age 44), our neighbour, and supped with us. His mother a well-favoured old little woman, and a good woman, I believe. After we had supped, and merry, we parted late, Mrs. Turner (age 44) having staid behind to talk a little about her lodgings, which now my Lord Bruncker (age 47) upon Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) surrendering do claim, but I cannot think he will come to live in them so as to need to put them out.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1667. So to the office, where among other things I read the Councill's order about my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) to be assistants to the Comptroller, which quietly went down with Sir J. Minnes (age 67), poor man, seeming a little as if he would be thought to have desired it, but yet apparently to his discontent; and, I fear, as the order runs, it will hardly do much good.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1667. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) to White Hall, and there to the Duke of York (age 33), and did our usual business. Having done there, I to St. James's, to see the organ Mrs. Turner (age 44) told me of the other night, of my late Lord Aubigney's; and I took my Lord Bruncker (age 47) with me, he being acquainted with my present Lord Almoner, Mr. Howard (age 38), brother to the Duke of Norfolke (age 38); so he and I thither and did see the organ, but I do not like it, it being but a bauble, with a virginal! joining to it: so I shall not meddle with it.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jan 1667. Having done with the discourse, we away, and my Lord and I walking into the Park back again, I did observe the new buildings: and my Lord, seeing I had a desire to see them, they being the place for the priests and Fryers, he took me back to my Lord Almoner (age 38); and he took us quite through the whole house and chapel, and the new monastery, showing me most excellent pieces in wax-worke: a crucifix given by a Pope to Mary Queen of Scotts, where a piece of the Cross is1 two bits set in the manner of a cross in the foot of the crucifix: several fine pictures, but especially very good prints of holy pictures. I saw the dortoire [dormitory] and the cells of the priests, and we went into one; a very pretty little room, very clean, hung with pictures, set with books. The Priest was in his cell, with his hair clothes to his skin, bare-legged, with a sandal! only on, and his little bed without sheets, and no feather bed; but yet, I thought, soft enough. His cord about his middle; but in so good company, living with ease, I thought it a very good life. A pretty library they have. And I was in the refectoire, where every man his napkin, knife, cup of earth, and basin of the same; and a place for one to sit and read while the rest are at meals. And into the kitchen I went, where a good neck of mutton at the fire, and other victuals boiling. I do not think they fared very hard. Their windows all looking into a fine garden and the Park; and mighty pretty rooms all. I wished myself one of the Capuchins. Having seen what we could here, and all with mighty pleasure, so away with the Almoner (age 38) in his coach, talking merrily about the difference in our religions, to White Hall, and there we left him. I in my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) coach, he carried me to the Savoy, and there we parted. I to the Castle Tavern, where was and did come all our company, Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 45), Sir R. Ford (age 53), and our Counsel Sir Ellis Layton, Walt Walker, Dr. Budd, Mr. Holder, and several others, and here we had a bad dinner of our preparing, and did discourse something of our business of our prizes, which was the work of the day.

Note 1. Pieces of "the Cross" were formerly held in such veneration, and were so common, that it has been often said enough existed to build a ship. Most readers will remember the distinction which Sir W. Scott represents Louis XI (with great appreciation of that monarch's character), as drawing between an oath taken on a false piece and one taken on a piece of the true cross. Sir Thomas More, a very devout believer in relics, says ("Works", p. 119), that Luther wished, in a sermon of his, that he had in his hand all the pieces of the Holy Cross; and said that if he so had, he would throw them there as never sun should shine on them:-and for what worshipful reason would the wretch do such villainy to the cross of Christ? Because, as he saith, that there is so much gold now bestowed about the garnishing of the pieces of the Cross, that there is none left for poore folke. Is not this a high reason? As though all the gold that is now bestowed about the pieces of the Holy Cross would not have failed to have been given to poor men, if they had not been bestowed about the garnishing of the Cross! and as though there were nothing lost, but what is bestowed about Christ's Cross!" "Wolsey, says Cavendish, on his fall, gave to Norris, who brought him a ring of gold as a token of good will from Henry, "a little chaine of gold, made like a bottle chain, with a cross of gold, wherein was a piece of the Holy Cross, which he continually wore about his neck, next his body; and said, furthermore, 'Master Norris, I assure you, when I was in prosperity, although it seem but small in value, yet I would not gladly have departed with the same for a thousand pounds.'" Life, ed. 1852, p. 167. Evelyn mentions, "Diary", November 17th, 1664, that he saw in one of the chapels in St. Peter's a crucifix with a piece of the true cross in it. Amongst the jewels of Mary Queen (age 28) of Scots was a cross of gold, which had been pledged to Hume of Blackadder for £1000 (Chalmers's "Life", vol. i., p. 31 ). B.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jan 1667. Lay pretty long, then to the office, where Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and I did meet, and sat private all the morning about dividing the Controller's work according to the late order of Council, between them two and Sir W. Pen (age 45), and it troubled me to see the poor honest man, Sir J. Minnes (age 67), troubled at it, and yet the King's work cannot be done without it. It was at last friendlily ended, and so up and home to dinner with my wife.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Jan 1667. After dinner to the office again, where Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Batten (age 66), and Sir W. Pen (age 45) and I met to talk again about the Controller's office, and there Sir W. Pen (age 45) would have a piece of the great office cut out to make an office for him, which I opposed to the making him very angry, but I think I shall carry it against him, and then I care not.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jan 1667. Up, and at the office. Sat all the morning, where among other things I did the first unkind [thing] that ever I did design to Sir W. Warren, but I did it now to some purpose, to make him sensible how little any man's friendship shall avail him if he wants money. I perceive he do nowadays court much my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) favour, who never did any man much courtesy at the board, nor ever will be able, at least so much as myself. Besides, my Lord would do him a kindness in concurrence with me, but he would have the danger of the thing to be done lie upon me, if there be any danger in it (in drawing up a letter to Sir W. Warren's advantage), which I do not like, nor will endure. I was, I confess, very angry, and will venture the loss of Sir W. Warren's kindnesses rather than he shall have any man's friendship in greater esteem than mine.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Jan 1667. At noon home to dinner, and after dinner to the office again, and there all the afternoon, and at night poor Mrs. Turner (age 44) come and walked in the garden for my advice about her husband (age 54) and her relating to my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) late proceedings with them. I do give her the best I can, but yet can lay aside some ends of my own in what advice I do give her. So she being gone I to make an end of my letters, and so home to supper and to bed, Balty (age 27) lodging here with my brother, he being newly returned from mustering in the river.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Jan 1667. Lord's Day. Up betimes, and leaving my wife to go by coach to hear Mr. Frampton (age 44) preach, which I had a mighty desire she should, I down to the Old Swan [Map], and there to Michell and staid while he and she dressed themselves, and here had a 'baiser' or two of her, whom I love mightily; and then took them in a sculler (being by some means or other disappointed of my own boat) to White Hall, and so with them to Westminster, Sir W. Coventry (age 39), Bruncker (age 47) and I all the morning together discoursing of the office business, and glad of the Controller's business being likely to be put into better order than formerly, and did discourse of many good things, but especially of having something done to bringing the Surveyor's matters into order also.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Jan 1667. By and by comes Mrs. Turner (age 44) to me, to make her complaint of her sad usage she receives from my Lord Bruncker (age 47), that he thinks much she hath not already got another house, though he himself hath employed her night and day ever since his first mention of the matter, to make part of her house ready for him, as he ordered, and promised she should stay till she had fitted herself; by which and what discourse I do remember he had of the business before Sir W. Coventry (age 39) on Sunday last I perceive he is a rotten-hearted, false man as any else I know, even as Sir W. Pen (age 45) himself, and, therefore, I must beware of him accordingly, and I hope I shall. I did pity the woman with all my heart, and gave her the best council I could; and so, falling to other discourse, I made her laugh and merry, as sad as she came to me; so that I perceive no passion in a woman can be lasting long; and so parted and I home, and there teaching my girle Barker part of my song "It is decreed", which she will sing prettily, and so after supper to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Feb 1667. After something of that done, and dined, I to the office, where all the afternoon till night busy. At night, having done all my office matters, I home, and my brother and I to go on with my catalogue, and so to supper. Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to me this night again to condole her condition and the ill usage she receives from my Lord Bruncker (age 47), which I could never have expected from him, and shall be a good caution to me while I live.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Feb 1667. At noon Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 45), and myself to the Swan in Leadenhall Street to dinner, where an exceedingly good dinner and good discourse. Sir W. Batten (age 66) come this morning from the House, where the King (age 36) hath prorogued this Parliament to October next. I am glad they are up. The Bill for Accounts was not offered, the party being willing to let it fall; but the King (age 36) did tell them he expected it. They are parted with great heartburnings, one party against the other. Pray God bring them hereafter together in better temper!

Pepy's Diary. 08 Feb 1667. At last moved to have Lord Bruncker (age 47) desired to return, which he did, and I read the petty warrants all the day till late at night, that I was very weary, and troubled to have my private business of my office stopped to attend this, but mightily pleased at this falling out, and the truth is Sir W. Pen (age 45) do make so much noise in this business of his, and do it so little and so ill, that I think the King (age 36) will be little the better by changing the hand. So up and to my office a little, but being at it all day I could not do much there.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Feb 1667. Thence to the office, and there begun the account which Sir W. Pen (age 45) by his late employment hath examined, but begun to examine it in the old manner, a clerk to read the Petty warrants, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) upon very good ground did except against it, and would not suffer him to go on. This being Sir W. Pen's (age 45) clerk he took it in snuff, and so hot they grew upon it that my Lord Bruncker (age 47) left the office. He gone (Sir) W. Pen (age 45) ranted like a devil, saying that nothing but ignorance could do this. I was pleased at heart all this while.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Feb 1667. After dinner he went away, and awhile after them Michell and his wife, whom I love mightily, and then I to my chamber there to my Tangier accounts, which I had let run a little behind hand, but did settle them very well to my satisfaction, but it cost me sitting up till two in the morning, and the longer by reason that our neighbour, Mrs. Turner (age 44), poor woman, did come to take her leave of us, she being to quit her house to-morrow to my Lord Bruncker (age 47), who hath used her very unhandsomely. She is going to lodgings, and do tell me very odde stories how Mrs. Williams do receive the applications of people, and hath presents, and she is the hand that receives all, while my Lord Bruncker (age 47) do the business, which will shortly come to be loud talk if she continues here, I do foresee, and bring my Lord no great credit. So having done all my business, to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Feb 1667. My great wonder is, how this man do to keep in memory so perfectly the musique of the whole act, both for the voice and the instrument too. I confess I do admire it: but in recitativo the sense much helps him, for there is but one proper way of discoursing and giving the accents. Having done our discourse, we all took coaches, my Lord's and T. Killigrew's (age 55), and to Mrs. Knipp's chamber, where this Italian is to teach her to sing her part. And so we all thither, and there she did sing an Italian song or two very fine, while he played the bass upon a harpsicon there; and exceedingly taken I am with her singing, and believe that she will do miracles at that and acting. Her little girl is mighty pretty and witty. After being there an hour, and I mightily pleased with this evening's work, we all parted, and I took coach and home, where late at my office, and then home to enter my last three days' Journall; and so to supper and to bed, troubled at nothing, but that these pleasures do hinder me in my business, and the more by reason of our being to dine abroad to-morrow, and then Saturday next is appointed to meet again at my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) lodgings, and there to have the whole quire of Italians; but then I do consider that this is all the pleasure I live for in the world, and the greatest I can ever expect in the best of my life, and one thing more, that by hearing this man to-night, and I think Captain Cooke (age 51) to-morrow, and the quire of Italians on Saturday, I shall be truly able to distinguish which of them pleases me truly best, which I do much desire to know and have good reason and fresh occasion of judging.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Feb 1667. By and by with Lord Bruncker (age 47) by coach to his house, there to hear some Italian musique: and here we met Tom Killigrew (age 55), Sir Robert Murray (age 59), and the Italian Signor Baptista, who hath composed a play in Italian for the Opera, which T. Killigrew do intend to have up; and here he did sing one of the acts. He himself is the poet as well as the musician; which is very much, and did sing the whole from the words without any musique prickt, and played all along upon a harpsicon most admirably, and the composition most excellent. The words I did not understand, and so know not how they are fitted, but believe very well, and all in the recitativo very fine. But I perceive there is a proper accent in every country's discourse, and that do reach in their setting of notes to words, which, therefore, cannot be natural to any body else but them; so that I am not so much smitten with it as, it may be, I should be, if I were acquainted with their accent. But the whole composition is certainly most excellent; and the poetry, T. Killigrew and Sir R. Murray (age 59), who understood the words, did say was excellent. I confess I was mightily pleased with the musique. He pretends not to voice, though it be good, but not excellent.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Feb 1667. Thence away to my Lord Bruncker's (age 47), and there was Sir Robert Murray (age 59), whom I never understood so well as now by this opportunity of discourse with him, a most excellent man of reason and learning, and understands the doctrine of musique, and everything else I could discourse of, very finely. Here come Mr. Hooke (age 31), Sir George Ent, Dr. Wren (age 43), and many others; and by and by the musique, that is to say, Signor Vincentio, who is the master-composer, and six more, whereof two eunuches, so tall, that Sir T. Harvey (age 41) said well that he believes they do grow large by being gelt as our oxen do, and one woman very well dressed and handsome enough, but would not be kissed, as Mr. Killigrew (age 55), who brought the company in, did acquaint us. They sent two harpsicons before; and by and by, after tuning them, they begun; and, I confess, very good musique they made; that is, the composition exceeding good, but yet not at all more pleasing to me than what I have heard in English by Mrs. Knipp, Captain Cooke (age 51), and others. Nor do I dote on the eunuches; they sing, indeed, pretty high, and have a mellow kind of sound, but yet I have been as well satisfied with several women's voices and men also, as Crispe of the Wardrobe. The women sung well, but that which distinguishes all is this, that in singing, the words are to be considered, and how they are fitted with notes, and then the common accent of the country is to be known and understood by the hearer, or he will never be a good judge of the vocal musique of another country. So that I was not taken with this at all, neither understanding the first, nor by practice reconciled to the latter, so that their motions, and risings and fallings, though it may be pleasing to an Italian, or one that understands the tongue, yet to me it did not, but do from my heart believe that I could set words in English, and make musique of them more agreeable to any Englishman's eare (the most judicious) than any Italian musique set for the voice, and performed before the same man, unless he be acquainted with the Italian accent of speech. The composition as to the musique part was exceeding good, and their justness in keeping time by practice much before any that we have, unless it be a good band of practised fiddlers.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Feb 1667. So home and to the office a while, and then home to supper, where Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to us, and sat and talked. Poor woman, I pity her, but she is very cunning. She concurs with me in the falseness of Sir W. Pen's (age 45) friendship, and she tells pretty storms of my Lord Bruncker (age 47) since he come to our end of the town, of people's applications to Mrs. Williams.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1667. But it was done home, and I do believe true, though (Sir) W. Batten (age 66) denies all, but is cruel mad, and swore one of them, he or Carcasse, should not continue in the Office, which is said like a fool. He gone, for he would not stay, and Sir W. Pen (age 45) gone a good while before, Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir T. Harvy (age 41), and I, staid and examined the witnesses, though amounting to little more than a reproaching of Sir W. Batten (age 66).

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1667. I home, my head and mind vexed about the conflict between Sir W. Pen (age 45) and I, though I have got, nor lost any ground by it. At home was Mr. Daniel and wife and sister, and dined with us, and I disturbed at dinner, Colonell Fitzgerald coming to me about tallies, which I did go and give him, and then to the office, where did much business and walked an hour or two with Lord Bruncker (age 47), who is mightily concerned in this business for Carcasse and against Sir W. Batten (age 66), and I do hope it will come to a good height, for I think it will be good for the King (age 36) as well as for me, that they two do not agree, though I do, for ought I see yet, think that my Lord is for the most part in the right.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Feb 1667. At dinner all of us, that is to say, Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir J. Minnes (age 67), Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir T. Harvy (age 41), and myself, to Sir W. Pen's (age 45) house, where some other company. It is instead of a wedding dinner for his daughter (age 16), whom I saw in palterly clothes, nothing new but a bracelet that her servant had given her, and ugly she is, as heart can wish. A sorry dinner, not any thing handsome or clean, but some silver plates they borrowed of me. My wife was here too. So a great deal of talk, and I seemingly merry, but took no pleasure at all. We had favours given us all, and we put them in our hats, I against my will, but that my Lord and the rest did, I being displeased that he did carry Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) himself several days ago, and the people up and down the town long since, and we must have them but to-day.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Feb 1667. At noon home to dinner, and then to the office again very close at it all the day till midnight, making an end and writing fair this great letter and other things to my full content, it abundantly providing for the vindication of this office, whatever the success be of our wants of money. This evening Sir W. Batten (age 66) come to me to the office on purpose, out of spleen (of which he is full to Carcasse!), to tell me that he is now informed of many double tickets now found of Carcasses making which quite overthrows him. It is strange to see how, though I do believe this fellow to be a rogue, and could be contented to have him removed, yet to see him persecuted by Sir W. Batten (age 66), who is as bad himself, and that with so much rancour, I am almost the fellow's friend. But this good I shall have from it, that the differences between Sir W. Batten (age 66) and my Lord Bruncker (age 47) will do me no hurt.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Feb 1667. At my Lord Treasurer's (age 59) 'light and parted with them, they going into Council, and I walked with Captain Cocke (age 50), who takes mighty notice of the differences growing in our office between Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir W. Batten (age 66), and among others also, and I fear it may do us hurt, but I will keep out of them.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Feb 1667. Lord's Day. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66), by coach; he set me down at my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) (his feud there not suffering him to 'light himself), and I with my Lord by and by when ready to White Hall, and by and by up to the Duke of York (age 33), and there presented our great letter and other papers, and among the rest my report of the victualling, which is good, I think, and will continue my pretence to the place, which I am still afeard Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) employment may extinguish. We have discharged ourselves in this letter fully from blame in the bad success of the Navy, if money do not come soon to us, and so my heart is at pretty good rest in this point.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Feb 1667. After dinner to the office again, where by and by Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir J. Minnes (age 67) and I met about receiving Carcasses answers to the depositions against him. Wherein I did see so much favour from my Lord to him that I do again begin to see that my Lord is not right at the bottom, and did make me the more earnest against him, though said little. My Lord rising, declaring his judgement in his behalf, and going away, I did hinder our arguing it by ourselves, and so broke up the meeting, and myself went full of trouble to my office, there to write over the deposition and his answers side by side, and then home to supper and to bed with some trouble of mind to think of the issue of this, how it will breed ill blood among us here.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Feb 1667. Up, and there comes to me Drumbleby with a flageolet, made to suit with my former and brings me one Greeting, a master, to teach my wife. I agree by the whole with him to teach her to take out any lesson of herself for £4. She was not ready to begin to-day, but do to-morrow. So I to the office, where my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and I only all the morning, and did business.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Mar 1667. At noon home to dinner, and then to the office again, and there comes Martin my purser, and I walked with him awhile in the garden, I giving him good advice to beware of coming any more with high demands for supernumeraries or other things, for now Sir W. Pen (age 45) is come to mind the business, the passing of his accounts will not be so easy as the last. He tells me he will never need it again, it being as easy, and to as much purpose to do the same thing otherwise, and how he do keep his Captain's table, and by that means hath the command of his Captains, and do not fear in a 5th-rate ship constantly employed to get a £1000 in five years time, and this year, besides all his spendings, which are I fear high, he hath got at this day clear above £150 in a voyage of about five or six months, which is a brave trade. He gone I to the office, and there all the afternoon late doing much business, and then to see Sir W. Batten (age 66), whose leg is all but better than it was, and like to do well. I by discourse do perceive he and his Lady (age 43) are to their hearts out with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Mrs. Williams, to which I added something, but, I think, did not venture too far with them.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1667. Up, and with Sir W. Pen (age 45) to White Hall by coach, and by the way agreed to acquaint Sir W. Coventry (age 39) with the business of Mr. Carcasse, and he and I spoke to Sir W. Coventry (age 39) that we might move it to the Duke of York (age 33), which I did in a very indifferent, that is, impartial manner, but vexed I believe Lord Bruncker (age 47). Here the Duke of York (age 33) did acquaint us, and the King (age 36) did the like also, afterwards coming in, with his resolution of altering the manner of the war this year; that is, we shall keep what fleete we have abroad in several squadrons: so that now all is come out; but we are to keep it as close as we can, without hindering the work that is to be done in preparation to this. Great preparations there are to fortify Sheernesse [Map] and the yard at Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], and forces are drawing down to both those places, and elsewhere by the seaside; so that we have some fear of an invasion; and the Duke of York (age 33) himself did declare his expectation of the enemy's blocking us up here in the River, and therefore directed that we should send away all the ships that we have to fit out hence. Sir W. Pen (age 45) told me, going with me this morning to White Hall, that for certain the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) is brought into the Tower [Map], and that he hath had an hour's private conference with the King (age 36) before he was sent thither. To Westminster Hall [Map]. There bought some news books, and, as every where else, hear every body complain of the dearness of coals, being at £4 per chaldron, the weather, too, being become most bitter cold, the King (age 36) saying to-day that it was the coldest day he ever knew in England.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Mar 1667. So to the office again, not being able to stay, and there about noon my Lord Bruncker (age 47) did begin to talk of Carcasse's business. Only Commissioner Pett (age 56), my Lord, and I there, and it was pretty to see how Pett hugged the occasion of having anything against Sir W. Batten (age 66), which I am not much troubled at, for I love him not neither. Though I did really endeavour to quash it all I could, because I would prevent their malice taking effect. My Lord I see is fully resolved to vindicate Carcasse, though to the undoing of Sir W. Batten (age 66), but I believe he will find himself in a mistake, and do himself no good, and that I shall be glad of, for though I love the treason I hate the traitor. But he is vexed at my moving it to the Duke of York (age 33) yesterday, which I answered well, so as I think he could not answer. But, Lord! it is pretty to see how Pett hugs this business, and how he favours my Lord Bruncker (age 47); who to my knowledge hates him, and has said more to his disadvantage, in my presence, to the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 33) than any man in England, and so let them thrive one with another by cheating one another, for that is all I observe among them.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Mar 1667. So to the Swan [Map], and there had three or four baisers of the little ancilla there, and so to Westminster Hall [Map], where I saw Mr. Martin, the purser, come through with a picture in his hand, which he had bought, and observed how all the people of the Hall did fleer and laugh upon him, crying, "There is plenty grown upon a sudden"; and, the truth is, I was a little troubled that my favour should fall on so vain a fellow as he, and the more because, methought, the people do gaze upon me as the man that had raised him, and as if they guessed whence my kindness to him springs. So thence to White Hall, where I find all met at the Duke of York's (age 33) chamber; and, by and by, the Duke of York (age 33) comes, and Carcasse is called in, and I read the depositions and his answers, and he added with great confidence and good words, even almost to persuasion, what to say; and my Lord Bruncker (age 47), like a very silly solicitor, argued against me and us all for him; and, being asked first by the Duke of York (age 33) his opinion, did give it for his being excused. I next did answer the contrary very plainly, and had, in this dispute, which vexed and will never be forgot by my Lord, many occasions of speaking severely, and did, against his bad practices. Commissioner Pett (age 56), like a fawning rogue, sided with my Lord, but to no purpose; and Sir W. Pen (age 45), like a cunning rogue, spoke mighty indifferently, and said nothing in all the fray, like a knave as he is. But Sir W. Batten (age 66) spoke out, and did come off himself by the Duke's kindness very well; and then Sir G. Carteret (age 57), and Sir W. Coventry (age 39), and the Duke of York (age 33) himself, flatly as I said; and so he was declared unfit to continue in, and therefore to be presently discharged the office; which, among other good effects, I hope, will make my Lord Bruncker (age 47) not 'alloquer' so high, when he shall consider he hath had such a publick foyle as this is.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Mar 1667. So home with Sir W. Batten (age 66), and Sir W. Pen (age 45), by coach, and there met at the office, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47) presently after us, and there did give order to Mr. Stevens for securing the tickets in Carcasses hands, which my Lord against his will could not refuse to sign, and then home to dinner, and so away with my wife by coach, she to Mrs. Pierce's and I to my Lord Bellasses (age 52), and with him to [my] Lord Treasurer's (age 59), where by agreement we met with Sir H. Cholmly (age 34), and there sat and talked all the afternoon almost about one thing or other, expecting Sir Philip Warwicke's (age 57) coming, but he come not, so we away towards night, Sir H. Cholmly (age 34) and I to the Temple [Map], and there parted, telling me of my Lord Bellasses's (age 52) want of generosity, and that he [Bellasses] will certainly be turned out of his government, and he thinks himself stands fair for it.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Mar 1667. So to the office, where a meeting extraordinary about settling the number and wages of my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) clerks for his new work upon the Treasurer's accounts, but this did put us upon running into the business of yesterday about Carcasse, wherein I perceive he is most dissatisfied with me, and I am not sorry for it, having all the world but him of my side therein, for it will let him know another time that he is not to expect our submitting to him in every thing, as I think he did heretofore expect. He did speak many severe words to me, and I returned as many to him, so that I do think there cannot for a great while, be, any right peace between us, and I care not a fart for it; but however, I must look about me and mind my business, for I perceive by his threats and enquiries he is and will endeavour to find out something against me or mine. Breaking up here somewhat brokenly I home, and carried Mrs. Pierce and wife to the New Exchange, and there did give her and myself a pair of gloves, and then set her down at home, and so back again straight home and thereto do business, and then to Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where Sir W. Pen (age 45) and others, and mighty merry, only I have got a great cold, and the scolding this day at the office with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) hath made it worse, that I am not able to speak.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Mar 1667. Up, and with my cold still upon me and hoarseness, but I was forced to rise and to the office, where all the morning busy, and among other things Sir W. Warren come to me, to whom of late I have been very strange, partly from my indifference how more than heretofore to get money, but most from my finding that he is become great with my Lord Bruncker (age 47), and so I dare not trust him as I used to do, for I will not be inward with him that is open to another.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Mar 1667. Thence away to the office, where late busy, and then home to supper, mightily pleased with my wife's trill, and so to bed. This night Mr. Carcasse did come to me again to desire favour, and that I would mediate that he might be restored, but I did give him no kind answer at all, but was very angry, and I confess a good deal of it from my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) simplicity and passion.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Mar 1667. Up, and to the office, where all-the morning, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47) mighty quiet, and no words all day, which I wonder at, expecting that he would have fallen again upon the business of Carcasse, and the more for that here happened that Perkins, who was the greatest witness of all against him, was brought in by Sir W. Batten (age 66) to prove that he did really belong to The Prince, but being examined was found rather a fool than anything, as not being able to give any account when he come in nor when he come out of her, more than that he was taken by the Dutch in her, but did agree in earnest to Sir W. Pen's (age 45) saying that she lay up all, the winter before at Lambeth. This I confess did make me begin to doubt the truth of his evidence, but not to doubt the faults of Carcasse, for he was condemned by, many other better evidences than his, besides the whole world's report.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1667. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) to the Duke of York (age 33) to our usual attendance, where I did fear my Lord Bruncker (age 47) might move something in revenge that might trouble me, but he did not, but contrarily had the content to hear Sir G. Carteret (age 57) fall foul on him in the Duke of York's (age 33) bed chamber for his directing people with tickets and petitions to him, bidding him mind his Controller's place and not his, for if he did he should be too hard for him, and made high words, which I was glad of. Having done our usual business with the Duke of York (age 33), I away; and meeting Mr. Prince in the presence-chamber, he and I to talk; and among other things he tells me, and I do find every where else, also, that our masters do begin not to like of their councils in fitting out no fleete, but only squadrons, and are finding out excuses for it; and, among others, he tells me a Privy-Councillor did tell him that it was said in Council that a fleete could not be set out this year, for want of victuals, which gives him and me a great alarme, but me especially for had it been so, I ought to have represented it; and therefore it puts me in policy presently to prepare myself to answer this objection, if ever it should come about, by drawing up a state of the Victualler's stores, which I will presently do.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1667. By and by by coach, set down Mr. Holliard (age 58) near his house at Hatton Garden [Map] and myself to Lord Treasurer's (age 60), and sent my wife to the New Exchange. I staid not here, but to Westminster Hall [Map], and thence to Martin's, where he and she both within, and with them the little widow that was once there with her when I was there, that dissembled so well to be grieved at hearing a tune that her, late husband liked, but there being so much company, I had no pleasure here, and so away to the Hall again, and there met Doll Lane coming out, and 'par contrat did hazer bargain para aller to the cabaret de vin', called the Rose, and 'ibi' I staid two hours, 'sed' she did not 'venir', 'lequel' troubled me, and so away by coach and took up my wife, and away home, and so to Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where I am told that it is intended by Mr. Carcasse to pray me to be godfather with Lord Bruncker (age 47) to-morrow to his child, which I suppose they tell me in mirth, but if he should ask me I know not whether I should refuse it or no.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1667. By and by comes the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 33), and presently the officers of the Ordnance were called; my Lord Berkeley (age 65), Sir John Duncomb (age 44), and Mr. Chichly (age 52); then we, my Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 45), and myself; where we find only the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 33), and my Lord Treasurer (age 60), and Sir G. Carteret (age 57); where I only did speak, laying down the state of our wants, which the King (age 36) and Duke of York (age 33) seemed very well pleased with, and we did get what we asked, £500,000, assigned upon the eleven months' tax: but that is not so much ready money, or what will raise £40,000 per week, which we desired, and the business will want. Yet are we fain to come away answered, when, God knows, it will undo the King's business to have matters of this moment put off in this manner. The King (age 36) did prevent my offering anything by and by as Treasurer for Tangier, telling me that he had ordered us £30,000 on the same tax; but that is not what we would have to bring our payments to come within a year. So we gone out, in went others; viz., one after another, Sir Stephen Fox (age 39) for the army, Captain Cocke (age 50) for sick and wounded, Mr. Ashburnham (age 63) for the household.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1667. Thence Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir W. Pen (age 45), and I, back again; I mightily pleased with what I had said and done, and the success thereof. But, it being a fine clear day, I did, 'en gayete de coeur', propose going to Bow for ayre sake, and dine there, which they embraced, and so Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I (setting Sir W. Pen (age 45) down at Mark Lane [Map] end) straight to Bow, to the Queen's Head, and there bespoke our dinner, carrying meat with us from London; and anon comes Sir W. Pen (age 45) with my wife and Lady Batten, and then Mr. Lowder (age 26) with his mother and wife (age 16). While Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I were alone, we had much friendly discourse, though I will never trust him far; but we do propose getting "The Flying Greyhound", our privateer, to us and Sir W. Pen (age 45) at the end of the year when we call her home, by begging her of the King (age 36), and I do not think we shall be denied her. They being come, we to oysters and so to talk, very pleasant I was all day, and anon to dinner, and I made very good company. Here till the evening, so as it was dark almost before we got home (back again in the same method, I think, we went), and spent the night talking at Sir W. Batten's (age 66), only a little at my office, to look over the Victualler's contract, and draw up some arguments for him to plead for his charges in transportation of goods beyond the ports which the letter of one article in his contract do lay upon him. This done I home to supper and to bed. Troubled a little at my fear that my Lord Bruncker (age 47) should tell Sir W. Coventry (age 39) of our neglecting the office this afternoon (which was intended) to look after our pleasures, but nothing will fall upon me alone about this.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1667. Up, and with Sir W. Batten (age 66) and Sir W. Pen (age 45) to my Lord Treasurer's (age 60), where we met with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) an hour before the King (age 36) come, and had time to talk a little of our business. Then come much company, among others Sir H. Cholmly (age 34), who tells me that undoubtedly my Lord Bellasses (age 52) will go no more as Governor to Tangier, and that he do put in fair for it, and believes he shall have it, and proposes how it may conduce to his account and mine in the business of money. Here we fell into talk with Sir Stephen Fox (age 39), and, among other things, of the Spanish manner of walking, when three together, and shewed me how, which was pretty, to prevent differences.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Mar 1667. This evening, having done my letters, I did write out the heads of what I had prepared to speak to the King (age 36) the other day at my Lord Treasurer's (age 60), which I do think convenient to keep by me for future use. The weather is now grown warm again, after much cold; and it is observable that within these eight days I did see smoke remaining, coming out of some cellars, from the late great fire, now above six months since. There was this day at the office (as he is most days) Sir W. Warren, against whom I did manifestly plead, and heartily too, God forgive me! But the reason is because I do find that he do now wholly rely almost upon my Lord Bruncker (age 47), though I confess I have no greater ground of my leaving him than the confidence which I perceive he hath got in my Lord Bruncker (age 47), whose seeming favours only do obtain of him as much compensation as, I believe (for he do know well the way of using his bounties), as mine more real. Besides, my Lord and I being become antagonistic, I do not think it safe for me to trust myself in the hands of one whom I know to be a knave, and using all means to become gracious there.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Mar 1667. Lord's Day. With Sir W. Batten (age 66) to White Hall, and there I to Sir G. Carteret (age 57), who is mighty cheerful, which makes me think and by some discourse that there is expectation of a peace, but I did not ask (him). Here was Sir J. Minnes (age 68) also: and they did talk of my Lord Bruncker (age 47), whose father, it seems, did give Mr. Ashburnham (age 63) and the present Lord Digby (age 54) £1200 to be made an Irish lord, and swore the same day that he had not 12d. left to pay for his dinner: they make great mirth at this, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) having lately given great matter of offence both to them and us all, that we are at present mightily displeased with him.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Mar 1667. Sir W. Pen (age 45) and I to White Hall, and in the coach did begin our discourse again about Balty (age 27), and he promises me to move it this very day. He and I met my Lord Bruncker (age 47) at Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) by appointment, there to discourse a little business, all being likely to go to rack for lack of money still.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Apr 1667. Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and strange how the false fellow Commissioner. Pett (age 56) was eager to have had Carcasses business brought on to-day that he might give my Lord Bruncker (age 47) (who hates him, I am sure, and hath spoke as much against him to the King (age 36) in my hearing as any man) a cast of his office in pleading for his man Carcasse, but I did prevent its being brought on to-day, and so broke up, and I home to dinner, and after dinner with a little singing with some pleasure alone with my poor wife, and then to the office, where sat all the afternoon till late at night, and then home to supper and to bed, my eyes troubling me still after candle-light, which troubles me. Wrote to my father, who, I am glad to hear, is at some ease again, and I long to have him in town, that I may see what can be done for him here; for I would fain do all I can that I may have him live, and take pleasure in my doing well in the world.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Apr 1667. St. George's Day. The feast being kept at White Hall, out of design, as it is thought, to make the best countenance we can to the Swede's Embassadors, before their leaving us to go to the treaty abroad, to shew some jollity. We sat at the office all the morning. Word is brought me that young Michell is come to call my wife to his wife's labour, and she went, and I at the office full of expectation what to hear from poor Betty Michell. This morning much to do with Sir W. Warren, all whose applications now are to Lord Bruncker (age 47), and I am against him now, not professedly, but apparently in discourse, and will be.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Apr 1667. Thence by coach to my Lord Treasurer's (age 60), and there being come too soon to the New Exchange, but did nothing, and back again, and there found my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and T. Harvy, and walked in a room very merrily discoursing.

Poll Bill

Pepy's Diary. 29 Apr 1667. Up, being visited very early by Creed newly come from Hinchingbrooke, who went thither without my knowledge, and I believe only to save his being taxed by the Poll Bill. I did give him no very good countenance nor welcome, but took occasion to go forth and walked (he with me) to St. Dunstan's, and thence I to Sir W. Coventry's (age 39), where a good while with him, and I think he pretty kind, but that the nature of our present condition affords not matter for either of us to be pleased with any thing. We discoursed of Carcasse, whose Lord, he tells me, do make complaints that his clerk should be singled out, and my Lord Berkeley (age 65) do take his part. So he advises we would sum up all we have against him and lay it before the Duke of York (age 33); he condemned my Lord Bruncker (age 47).

Pepy's Diary. 06 May 1667. Thence by coach home with Captain Cocke (age 50), in our way talking of my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and his Lady, who are mighty angry with us all of the office, about Carcasse's business, but especially with me, and in great confidence he bids me have a care of him, for he hath said that he would wound me with the person where my greatest interest is. I suppose he means Sir W. Coventry (age 39), and therefore I will beware of him, and am glad, though vexed to hear it.

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1667. Thence to the office, and did business, and then by coach to St. James's again, but Sir W. Coventry (age 39) not within, so I wrote something to him, and then straight back again and to Sir W. Batten's (age 66), and there talked with him and Sir J. Minnes (age 68), who are mighty hot in Carcasses business, but their judgment's not to be trusted. However, I will go through with it, or otherwise we shall be all slaves to my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and his man's impudence.

Pepy's Diary. 07 May 1667. Then home to dinner, where W. Hewer (age 25) dined with us, and he and I after dinner to discourse of Carcasses business, wherein I apparently now do manage it wholly against my Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir W. Pen (age 46), like a false rogue, shrinking out of the collar, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), afoot, being easily led either way, and Sir W. Batten (age 66), a malicious fellow that is not able to defend any thing, so that the whole odium must fall on me, which I will therefore beware how I manage that I may not get enemies to no purpose. It vexes me to see with what a company I am mixed, but then it pleases me to see that I am reckoned the chief mover among them, as they do, confess and esteem me in every thing.

Pepy's Diary. 13 May 1667. So finding no business likely to be done here for Tangier, I having a warrant for tallies to be signed, I away to the New Exchange, and there staid a little, and then to a looking-glass shop to consult about covering the wall in my closet over my chimney, which is darkish, with looking-glasses, and then to my wife's tailor's, but find her not ready to go home, but got to buy things, and so I away home to look after my business and finish my report of Carcasse, and then did get Sir W. Batten (age 66), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and Sir W. Pen (age 46) together, and read it over with all the many papers relating to the business, which they do wonder at, and the trouble I have taken about it, and like the report, so as that they do unanimously resolve to sign it, and stand by it, and after a great deal of discourse of the strange deportment of my Lord Bruncker (age 47) in this business to withstand the whole board in behalf of such an impudent rogue as this is, I parted, and home to my wife, and supped and talked with her, and then to bed, resolving to rise betimes to-morrow to write fair the report.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1667. Being come, we up to the Duke of York's (age 33) chamber, who, when ready, we to our usual business, and being very glad, we all that signed it, that is, Sir J. Minnes (age 68), W. Batten (age 66), W. Pen (age 46), and myself, and then Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and Sir W. Coventry (age 39), Bruncker (age 47), and T. Harvy (age 41), and the officers of the Ordnance, Sir J. Duncombe (age 44), and Mr. Cholmely (age 34) presented our report about Carcasse, and did afterwards read it with that success that the Duke of York (age 33) was for punishing him, not only with turning him out of the office, but with what other punishment he could, which nobody did forward, and so he escaped, only with giving security to secure the King (age 36) against double tickets of his and other things that he might have wronged the King (age 36) or subject in before his dismission.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1667. Yet, Lord! to see how our silly Lord Bruncker (age 47) would have stood to have justified this rogue, though to the reproach of all us who have signed, which I shall never forget to have been a most malicious or a most silly act, and I do think it is as much the latter as the other, for none but a fool could have done as this silly Lord hath done in this business. So the Duke of York (age 33) did like our report, and ordered his being secured till he did give his security, which did fully content me, and will I hope vindicate the office. It happened that my Lord Arlington (age 49) coming in by chance was at the hearing of all this, which I was not sorry for, for he did move or did second the Duke of York (age 33) that this roguery of his might be put in the News-book that it might be made publique to satisfy for the wrong the credit of this office hath received by this rogue's occasion.

Pepy's Diary. 16 May 1667. Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and, among other things, comes in Mr. Carcasse, and after many arguings against it, did offer security as was desired, but who should this be but Mr. Powell, that is one other of my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) clerks; and I hope good use will be made of it. But then he began to fall foul upon the injustice of the Board, which when I heard I threatened him with being laid by the heels, which my Lord Bruncker (age 47) took up as a thing that I could not do upon the occasion he had given, but yet did own that it was ill said of him. I made not many words of it, but have let him see that I can say what I will without fear of him, and so we broke off, leaving the bond to be drawn by me, which I will do in the best manner I can.

Pepy's Diary. 17 May 1667. Up, and to the office, where all the morning upon some accounts of Mr. Gawden's, and at noon to the Three Tuns [Map] to dinner with Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), W. Batten (age 66), W. Pen (age 46), and T. Harvy (age 41), where very merry, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47) in appearance as good friends as ever, though I know he has a hatred to me in heart.

Pepy's Diary. 21 May 1667. This morning the Captain come from Holland did tell us at the board what I have said he reported yesterday. This evening after I come from the office Mrs. Turner (age 44) come to see my wife and me, and sit and talk with us, and so, my wife not being well and going to bed, Mrs. Turner (age 44) and I sat up till 12 at night talking alone in my chamber, and most of our discourse was of our neighbours. As to my Lord Bruncker (age 47), she says how Mrs. Griffin, our housekeeper's wife, hath it from his maid, that comes to her house often, that they are very poor; that the other day Mrs. Williams was fain to send a jewell to pawn; that their maid hath said herself that she hath got £50 since she come thither, and £17 by the payment of one bill; that they have a most lewd and nasty family here in the office, but Mrs. Turner (age 44) do tell me that my Lord hath put the King (age 36) to infinite charge since his coming thither in alterations, and particularly that Mr. Harper at Deptford, Kent [Map] did himself tell her that my Lord hath had of Foly, the ironmonger, £50 worth in locks and keys for his house, and that it is from the fineness of them, having some of £4 and £5 a lock, such as is in the Duke's closet; that he hath several of these; that he do keep many of her things from her of her own goods, and would have her bring a bill into the office for them; that Mrs. Griffin do say that he do not keep Mrs. Williams now for love, but need, he having another whore that he keeps in Covent Garden [Map]; that they do owe money everywhere almost for every thing, even Mrs. Shipman for her butter and cheese about £3, and after many demands cannot get it.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jun 1667. Up, and more letters still from Sir W. Coventry (age 39) about more fire-ships, and so Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I to the office, where Bruncker (age 47) come to us, who is just now going to Chatham, Kent [Map] upon a desire of Commissioner Pett's (age 56), who is in a very fearful stink for fear of the Dutch, and desires help for God and the King (age 37) and kingdom's sake. So Bruncker (age 47) goes down, and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) also, from Gravesend, Kent [Map]. This morning Pett writes us word that Sheernesse [Map] is lost last night, after two or three hours' dispute. The enemy hath possessed himself of that place; which is very sad, and puts us into great fears of Chatham, Kent [Map]. Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I down by water to Deptford, Kent [Map], and there Sir W. Pen (age 46) and we did consider of several matters relating to the dispatch of the fire-ships, and so Sir W. Batten (age 66) and I home again, and there to dinner, my wife and father having dined, and after dinner, by W. Hewer's (age 25) lucky advice, went to Mr. Fenn, and did get him to pay me above £400 of my wages, and W. Hewer (age 25) received it for me, and brought it home this night.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jun 1667. The City is troubled at their being put upon duty: summoned one hour, and discharged two hours after; and then again summoned two hours after that; to their great charge as well as trouble. And Pelling, the Potticary, tells me the world says all over, that less charge than what the Kingdom is put to, of one kind or other, by this business, would have set out all our great ships. It is said they did in open streets yesterday, at Westminster, cry, "A Parliament! a Parliament!" and I do believe it will cost blood to answer for these miscarriages. We do not hear that the Dutch are come to Gravesend, Kent [Map]; which is a wonder. But a wonderful thing it is that to this day we have not one word yet from Bruncker (age 47), or Peter Pett (age 56), or J. Minnes (age 68), of any thing at Chatham, Kent [Map]. The people that come hither to hear how things go, make me ashamed to be found unable to answer them: for I am left alone here at the office; and the truth is, I am glad my station is to be here, near my own home and out of danger, yet in a place of doing the King (age 37) good service.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Jun 1667. This evening having sent a messenger to Chatham, Kent [Map] on purpose, we have received a dull letter from my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Peter Pett (age 56), how matters have gone there this week; but not so much, or so particularly, as we knew it by common talk before, and as true. I doubt they will be found to have been but slow men in this business; and they say the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) did tell my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to his face that his discharging of the great ships there was the cause of all this; and I am told that it is become common talk against my Lord Bruncker (age 47). But in that he is to be justified, for he did it by verbal order from Sir W. Coventry (age 39), and with good intent; and it was to good purpose, whatever the success be, for the men would have but spent the King (age 37) so much the more in wages, and yet not attended on board to have done the King (age 37) any service; and as an evidence of that, just now, being the 15th day in the morning that I am writing yesterday's passages, one is with me, Jacob Bryan, Purser of "The Princesse", who confesses to me that he hath about 180 men borne at this day in victuals and wages on that ship lying at Chatham, Kent [Map], being lately brought in thither; of which 180 there was not above five appeared to do the King (age 37) any service at this late business. And this morning also, some of the Cambridge's men come up from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], by order from Sir Fretcheville Hollis (age 25), who boasted to us the other day that he had sent for 50, and would be hanged if 100 did not come up that would do as much as twice the number of other men: I say some of them, instead of being at work at Deptford, Kent [Map], where they were intended, do come to the office this morning to demand the payment of their tickets; for otherwise they would, they said, do no more work; and are, as I understand from every body that has to do with them, the most debauched, damning, swearing rogues that ever were in the Navy, just like their prophane commander.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jun 1667. All the morning at the office. No newes more than last night; only Purser Tyler comes and tells me that he being at all the passages in this business at Chatham, Kent [Map], he says there have been horrible miscarriages, such as we shall shortly hear of: that the want of boats hath undone us; and it is commonly said, and Sir J. Minnes (age 68) under his hand tells us, that they were employed by the men of the Yard to carry away their goods; and I hear that Commissioner Pett (age 56) will be found the first man that began to remove; he is much spoken against, and Bruncker (age 47) is complained of and reproached for discharging the men of the great ships heretofore.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Jun 1667. After he had done there, he and I into the garden, and walked; and the greatest of our discourse is, his sense of the requisiteness of his parting with his being Treasurer of the Navy, if he can, on any good terms. He do harp upon getting my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to take it on half profit, but that he is not able to secure him in paying him so much. But the thing I do advise him to do by all means, and he resolves on it, being but the same counsel which I intend to take myself.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Jun 1667. In the evening comes Mr. Povy (age 53) about business; and he and I to walk in the garden an hour or two, and to talk of State matters. He tells me his opinion that it is out of possibility for us to escape being undone, there being nothing in our power to do that is necessary for the saving us: a lazy Prince (age 47), no Council, no money, no reputation at home or abroad. He says that to this day the King (age 37) do follow the women as much as ever he did; that the Duke of York (age 33) hath not got Mrs. Middleton (age 22), as I was told the other day: but says that he wants not her, for he hath others, and hath always had, and that he [Povy (age 53)] hath known them brought through the Matted Gallery at White Hall into his [the Duke's] closet; nay, he hath come out of his wife's (age 30) bed, and gone to others laid in bed for him: that Mr. Bruncker (age 47) is not the only pimp, but that the whole family is of the same strain, and will do anything to please him: that, besides the death of the two Princes lately, the family is in horrible disorder by being in debt by spending above £60,000 per. annum, when he hath not £40,000: that the Duchesse (age 30) is not only the proudest woman in the world, but the most expensefull; and that the Duke of York's (age 33) marriage with her hath undone the Kingdom, by making the Chancellor (age 58) so great above reach, who otherwise would have been but an ordinary man, to have been dealt with by other people; and he would have been careful of managing things well, for fear of being called to account; whereas, now he is secure, and hath let things run to rack, as they now appear.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Jun 1667. He told me also how he hears by somebody that my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) maid hath told that her lady Mrs. Williams had sold her jewels and clothes to raise money for something or other; and indeed the last night a letter was sent from her to me, to send to my Lord, with about five pieces of gold in it, which methought at the time was but a poor supply.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1667. Thence to the Castle [Map], and viewed it with Creed, and had good satisfaction from him that showed it us touching the history of it. Then into the fields, a fine walk, and there saw Sir Francis Clerke's house, which is a pretty seat, and then back to our inne and bespoke supper, and so back to the fields and into the Cherry garden, where we had them fresh gathered, and here met with a young, plain, silly shopkeeper, and his wife, a pretty young woman, the man's name Hawkins, and I did kiss her, and we talked (and the woman of the house is a very talking bawdy jade), and eat cherries together, and then to walk in the fields till it was late, and did kiss her, and I believe had I had a fit time and place I might have done what I would with her. Walked back and left them at their house near our inne, and then to our inne, where, I hear, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) hath sent for me to speak with me before I go: so I took his coach, which stands there with two horses, and to him and to his bedside, where he was in bed, and hath a watchman with a halbert at his door; and to him, and did talk a little, and find him a very weak man for this business that he is upon; and do pity the King's service, that is no better handled, and his folly to call away Pett before we could have found a better man to have staid in his stead; so took leave of him, and with Creed back again, it being now about 10 at night, and to our inne to supper, and then to bed, being both sleepy, but could get no sheets to our bed, only linen to our mouths, and so to sleep, merrily talking of Hawkins and his wife, and troubled that Creed did see so much of my dalliance, though very little.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1667. At the foot of Rochester, Kent [Map] bridge, at the landing-place, I met my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and my Lord Douglas (age 21), and all the officers of the soldiers in the town, waiting there for the Duke of York (age 33), whom they heard was coming thither this day; by and by comes my Lord Middleton (age 59), the first time I remember to have seen him, well mounted, who had been to meet him, but come back without him; he seems a fine soldier, and so every body says he is; and a man, like my Lord Teviott, and indeed most of the Scotch gentry, as I observe, of few words. After staying here by the water-side and seeing the boats come up from Chatham, Kent [Map], with them that rowed with bandeleeres about their shoulders, and muskets in their boats, they being the workmen of the Yard, who have promised to redeem their credit, lost by their deserting the service when the Dutch were there, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) went with Lord Middleton to his inne, the Crowne, to dinner, which I took unkindly, but he was slightly invited.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1667. Several complaints, I hear, of the Monmouth's coming away too soon from the chaine, where she was placed with the two guard-ships to secure it; and Captain Robert Clerke, my friend, is blamed for so doing there, but I hear nothing of him at London about it; but Captain Brookes's running aground with the "Sancta Maria", which was one of the three ships that were ordered to be sunk to have dammed up the River at the chaine, is mightily cried against, and with reason, he being the chief man to approve of the abilities of other men, and the other two slips did get safe thither and he run aground; but yet I do hear that though he be blameable, yet if she had been there, she nor two more to them three would have been able to have commanded the river all over. I find that here, as it hath been in our river, fire-ships, when fitted, have been sunk afterwards, and particularly those here at the Mussle, where they did no good at all. Our great ships that were run aground and sunk are all well raised but the "Vanguard", which they go about to raise to-morrow. "the Henery", being let loose to drive up the river of herself, did run up as high as the bridge, and broke down some of the rails of the bridge, and so back again with the tide, and up again, and then berthed himself so well as no pilot could ever have done better; and Punnet says he would not, for his life, have undertaken to have done it, with all his skill. I find it is true that the Dutch did heele "The Charles" to get her down, and yet run aground twice or thrice, and yet got her safe away, and have her, with a great many good guns in her, which none of our pilots would ever have undertaken. It is very considerable the quantity of goods, which the making of these platforms and batterys do take out of the King's stores: so that we shall have little left there, and, God knows! no credit to buy any; besides, the taking away and spending of (it is possible) several goods that would have been either rejected or abatement made for them before used. It is a strange thing to see that, while my Lords Douglas and Middleton do ride up and down upon single horses, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) do go up and down with his Hackney-coach and six horses at the King's charge, which will do, for all this time, and the time that he is likely to stay, must amount to a great deal. But I do not see that he hath any command over the seamen, he being affronted by three or four seamen before my very face, which he took sillily, methought; and is not able to do so much good as a good boatswain in this business. My Lord Bruncker (age 47), I perceive, do endeavour to speak well of Commissioner Pett (age 56), saying that he did exercise great care and pains while he was there, but do not undertake to answer for his not carrying up of the great ships. Back again to Rochester, Kent [Map], and there walked to the Cathedral as they were beginning of the service, but would not be seen to stay to church there, besides had no mind, but rather to go to our inne, the White Hart, where we drank and were fain (the towne being so full of soldiers) to have a bed corded for us to lie in, I being unwilling to lie at the Hill house for one night, being desirous to be near our coach to be gone betimes to-morrow morning. Here in the streets, I did hear the Scotch march beat by the drums before the soldiers, which is very odde.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Jun 1667. So I and Creed down by boat to Chatham-yard (our watermen having their bandeleeres about them all the way), and to Commissioner Pett's (age 56) house, where my Lord Bruncker (age 47) told me that I should meet with his dinner two dishes of meat, but did not, but however by the help of Mr. Wiles had some beer and ale brought me, and a good piece of roast beef from somebody's table, and eat well at two, and after dinner into the garden to shew Creed, and I must confess it must needs be thought a sorrowful thing for a man that hath taken so much pains to make a place neat to lose it as Commissioner Pett (age 56) must now this.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1667. Thence to the office, and did write to my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to give me a little satisfaction about the certainty of the chain's being broke, which I begin to doubt, and the more from Sir W. Pen's (age 46) discourse. It is worth while to read my letter to him entered in my letter book.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Jul 1667. Up betimes, about 9 o'clock, waked by a damned noise between a sow gelder and a cow and a dog, nobody after we were up being able to tell us what it was. After being ready we took coach, and, being very sleepy, droused most part of the way to Gravesend, Kent [Map], and there 'light, and down to the new batterys, which are like to be very fine, and there did hear a plain fellow cry out upon the folly of the King's officers above, to spend so much money in works at Woolwich, Kent [Map] and Deptford, Kent [Map], and sinking of good ships loaden with goods, when, if half the charge had been laid out here, it would have secured all that, and this place too, before now. And I think it is not only true in this, but that the best of the actions of us all are so silly, that the meanest people begin to see through them, and contemn them. Besides, says he, they spoil the river by it. Then informed ourselves where we might have some creame, and they guided us to one Goody Best's, a little out of the towne towards London road, and thither we went with the coach, and find it a mighty clean, plain house, and had a dish of very good creame to our liking, and so away presently very merry, and fell to reading of the several Advices to a Painter, which made us good sport, and indeed are very witty, and Creed did also repeat to me some of the substance of letters of old Burleigh in Queen (age 28) Elizabeth's time, which he hath of late read in the printed Cabbala, which is a very fine style at this day and fit to be imitated. With this, and talking and laughing at the folly of our masters in the management of things at this day, we got home by noon, where all well, and then to dinner, and after dinner both of us laid down upon the couch and chairs and to sleep, which I did for an hour or two, and then to the office, where I am sorry to hear that Sir J. Minnes (age 68) is likely to die this night, or to-morrow, I forgot to set down that we met this morning upon the road with Mrs. Williams going down to my Lord Bruncker (age 47); we bowed without speaking one to another, but I am ashamed at the folly of the man to have her down at this serious busy time, when the town and country is full of people and full of censure, and against him particularly. At Sir W. Batten's (age 66) my Lady tells me that she hears for certain that my Lord's maid of his lodging here do give out that Mrs. Williams hath been fain of late to sell her best clothes and jewels to get a little money upon, which is a sad condition.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Jul 1667. By and by comes an order from White Hall to send down one of our number to Chatham, Kent [Map], fearing that, as they did before, they may make a show first up hither, but then go to Chatham, Kent [Map]: so my Lord Bruncker (age 47) do go, and we here are ordered to give notice to the merchant men-of-war, gone below the barricado at Woolwich, Kent [Map], to come up again. So with much trouble to supper, home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Aug 1667. So home to dinner, where Mr. Hater with me and W. Hewer (age 25), because of their being in the way after dinner, and so to the office after dinner, where and with my Lord Bruneker (age 47) at his lodgings all the afternoon and evening making up our great account for the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, but not so as pleased me yet.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1667. Thence, with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to the Duke's Playhouse (telling my wife so at the 'Change [Map], where I left her), and there saw "Sir Martin Marr-all" again, which I have now seen three times, and it hath been acted but four times, and still find it a very ingenious play, and full of variety.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1667. By and by comes my Lord Bruncker (age 47), and then we up to the Duke of York (age 33), and there had a hearing of our usual business, but no money to be heard of-no, not £100 upon the most pressing service that can be imagined of bringing in the King's timber from Whittlewood, while we have the utmost want of it, and no credit to provide it elsewhere, and as soon as we had done with the Duke of York (age 33), Sir W. Coventry (age 39) did single [out] Sir W. Pen (age 46) and me, and desired us to lend the King (age 37) some money, out of the prizes we have taken by Hogg. He did not much press it, and we made but a merry answer thereto; but I perceive he did ask it seriously, and did tell us that there never was so much need of it in the world as now, we being brought to the lowest straits that can be in the world. This troubled me much.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Aug 1667. Then to the office, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and I all the morning answering petitions, which now by a new Council's order we are commanded to set a day in a week apart for, and we resolve to do it by turn, my Lord and I one week and two others another.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1667. Up, and to the office; whence Lord Bruncker (age 47), J. Minnes (age 68), W. Pen (age 46), and I, went to examine some men that are put in there, for rescuing of men that were pressed into the service: and we do plainly see that the desperate condition that we put men into for want of their pay, makes them mad, they being as good men as ever were in the world, and would as readily serve the King (age 37) again, were they but paid. Two men leapt overboard, among others, into the Thames, out of the vessel into which they were pressed, and were shot by the soldiers placed there to keep them, two days since; so much people do avoid the King's service! And then these men are pressed without money, and so we cannot punish them for any thing, so that we are forced only to make a show of severity by keeping them in prison, but are unable to punish them.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1667. After dinner with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and his mistress to the King's playhouse, and there saw "The Indian Emperour"; where I find Nell (age 17) come again, which I am glad of; but was most infinitely displeased with her being put to act the Emperour's daughter; which is a great and serious part, which she do most basely. The rest of the play, though pretty good, was not well acted by most of them, methought; so that I took no great content in it. But that, that troubled me most was, that Knipp sent by Moll to desire to speak to me after the play; and she beckoned to me at the end of the play, and I promised to come; but it was so late, and I forced to step to Mrs. Williams's lodgings with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and her, where I did not stay, however, for fear of her shewing me her closet, and thereby forcing me to give her something; and it was so late, that for fear of my wife's coming home before me, I was forced to go straight home, which troubled me.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Aug 1667. Returning to the office, did ask whether we might visit Commissioner Pett (age 57), to which, I confess, I have no great mind; and it was answered that he was close prisoner, and we could not; but the Lieutenant of the Tower would send for him to his lodgings, if we would: so we put it off to another time. Returned to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon to Captain Cocke's (age 50) to dinner; where Lord Bruncker (age 47) and his Lady, Matt. Wren (age 38), and Bulteale, and Sir Allen Apsly (age 51); the last of whom did make good sport, he being already fallen under the retrenchments of the new Committee, as he is Master Falconer1 which makes him mad, and swears that we are doing that the Parliament would have done-that is, that we are now endeavouring to destroy one another. But it was well observed by some at the table, that they do not think this retrenching of the King's charge will be so acceptable to the Parliament, they having given the King (age 37) a revenue of so many £100,000's a-year more than his predecessors had, that he might live in pomp, like a king.

Note 1. The post of Master Falconer was afterwards granted to Charles's son by Nell Gwyn (age 17), and it is still held by the Duke of St. Albans, as an hereditary office. B.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Aug 1667. Then to the office, where we sat upon a particular business all the morning: and my Lord Anglesey (age 53) with us: who, and my Lord Bruncker (age 47), do bring us news how my Chancellor's (age 58) seal is to be taken away from him to-day. The thing is so great and sudden to me, that it put me into a very great admiration what should be the meaning of it; and they do not own that they know what it should be: but this is certain, that the King (age 37) did resolve it on Saturday, and did yesterday send the Duke of Albemarle (age 58), the only man fit for those works, to him for his purse: to which the Chancellor (age 58) answered, that he received it from the King (age 37), and would deliver it to the King's own hand, and so civilly returned the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) without it; and this morning my Chancellor (age 58) is to be with the King (age 37), to come to an end in the business. After sitting, we rose, and my wife being gone abroad with Mrs. Turner (age 44) to her washing at the whitster's, I dined at Sir W. Batten's (age 66), where Mr. Boreman was, who come from White Hall; who tells us that he saw my Chancellor (age 58) come in his coach with some of his men, without his Seal, to White Hall to his chamber; and thither the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 33) come and staid together alone, an hour or more: and it is said that the King (age 37) do say that he will have the Parliament meet, and that it will prevent much trouble by having of him out of their enmity, by his place being taken away; for that all their enmity will be at him. It is said also that my Chancellor (age 58) answers, that he desires he may be brought to his trial, if he have done any thing to lose his office; and that he will be willing, and is most desirous, to lose that, and his head both together. Upon what terms they parted nobody knows but the Chancellor (age 58) looked sad, he says. Then in comes Sir Richard Ford (age 53), and says he hears that there is nobody more presses to reconcile the King (age 37) and Chancellor (age 58) than the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) and Duke of Buckingham (age 39): the latter of which is very strange, not only that he who was so lately his enemy should do it, but that this man, that but the other day was in danger of losing his own head, should so soon come to be a mediator for others: it shows a wise Government. They all say that he [Clarendon] is but a poor man, not worth above £3000 a-year in land; but this I cannot believe: and all do blame him for having built so great a house, till he had got a better estate. Having dined, Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and I to White Hall, where we could be informed in no more than we were told before, nobody knowing the result of the meeting, but that the matter is suspended. So I walked to the King's playhouse, there to meet Sir W. Pen (age 46), and saw "The Surprizall", a very mean play, I thought: or else it was because I was out of humour, and but very little company in the house. But there Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I had a great deal of discourse with Moll; who tells us that Nell (age 17) is already left by my Lord Buckhurst (age 24), and that he makes sport of her, and swears she hath had all she could get of him; and Hart1, her great admirer, now hates her; and that she is very poor, and hath lost my Baroness Castlemayne (age 26), who was her great friend also but she is come to the House, but is neglected by them all2. Thence with Sir W. Pen (age 46) home, and I to the office, where late about business, and then home to supper, and so to bed.

Note 1. Charles Hart, great-nephew of Shakespeare, a favourite actor. He is credited with being Nell Gwyn's (age 17) first lover (or Charles I, as the wits put it), and with having brought her on the stage. He died of stone, and was buried at Stanmore Magna, Middlesex, where he had a country house.

Note 2. Lord Buckhurst's (age 24) liaison with Nell Gwyn probably came to an end about this time. We learn from Pepys that in January, 1667-68, the King (age 37) sent several times for Nelly (age 17) (see January 11th, 1667-68). Nell's eldest son by Charles II, Charles Beauclerc, was not born till May 8th, 1670. He was created Earl of Burford in 1676 and Duke of St. Albans in 1684.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Aug 1667. When we arose I took a turn with Lord Bruncker (age 47) in the garden, and he tells me that he hath of late discoursed about this business with Sir W. Coventry (age 39), who he finds is the great man in the doing this business of the Chancellor's (age 58), and that he do persevere in it, though against the Duke of York's (age 33) opinion, to which he says that the Duke of York (age 33) was once of the same mind, and if he hath thought fit since, for any reason, to alter his mind, he hath not found any to alter his own, and so desires to be excused, for it is for the King's and kingdom's good.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Sep 1667. Lord's Day. Up, and walked to St. James's; but there I find Sir W. Coventry (age 39) gone from his chamber, and Mr. Wren (age 38) not yet come thither. But I up to the Duke of York (age 33), and there, after being ready, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and I had an audience, and thence with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to White Hall, and he told me, in discourse, how that, though it is true that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) did long since propose to the Duke of York (age 33) the leaving his service, as being unable to fulfill it, as he should do, now he hath so much public business, and that the Duke of York (age 33) did bid him to say nothing of it, but that he would take time to please himself in another to come in his place; yet the Duke's doing it at this time, declaring that he hath found out another, and this one of the Chancellor's (age 58) servants, he cannot but think was done with some displeasure, and that it could not well be otherwise, that the Duke of York (age 33) should keep one in that place, that had so eminently opposed him in the defence of his father-in-law, nor could the Duchesse ever endure the sight of him, to be sure. But he thinks that the Duke of York (age 33) and he are parted upon clear terms of friendship.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Sep 1667. At noon sent to by my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to speak with him, and it was to dine with him and his Lady Williams (which I have not now done in many months at their own table) and Mr. Wren (age 38), who is come to dine with them, the first time he hath been at the office since his being the Duke of York's (age 33) Secretary. Here we sat and eat and talked and of some matters of the office, but his discourse is as yet but weak in that matter, and no wonder, he being new in it, but I fear he will not go about understanding with the impatience that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) did.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Sep 1667. By and by to him, and he being ready, he and I out in his coach to my Chancellor's (age 58); there to Mr. Wren's (age 38) chamber, who did tell us the whole of Sir W. Pen's (age 46) having the order for this ship of ours, and we went with him to St. James's, and there I did see the copy of it, which is built upon a suggestion of his having given the King (age 37) a ship of his, "The Prosperous", wherein is such a cheat as I have the best advantage in the world over him, and will make him do reason, or lay him on his back. This I was very glad of, and having done as far as I could in it we returned, and I home, and there at the office all the morning, and at noon with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) to the Treasurer's office to look over the clerks who are there making up the books, but in such a manner as it is a shame to see.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1667. By and by my Lord come, and we did look over Yeabsly's business a little; and I find how prettily this cunning Lord can be partial and dissemble it in this case, being privy to the bribe he is to receive. This done; we away, and with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) to Westminster; who by the way told me how merry the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 33) and Court were the other day, when they were abroad a-hunting. They come to Sir G. Carteret's (age 57) house at Cranbourne, and there were entertained, and all made drunk; and that all being drunk, Armerer did come to the King (age 37), and swore to him, "By God, Sir", says he, "you are not so kind to the Duke of York (age 33) of late as you used to be".-"Not I?" says the King (age 37). "Why so?"-"Why", says he, "if you are, let us drink his health".-"Why, let us", says the King (age 37). Then he fell on his knees, and drank it; and having done, the King (age 37) began to drink it. "Nay, Sir", says Armerer, "by God you must do it on your knees!" So he did, and then all the company: and having done it, all fell a-crying for joy, being all maudlin and kissing one another, the King (age 37) the Duke of York (age 33), and the Duke of York (age 33) the King (age 37): and in such a maudlin pickle as never people were: and so passed the day. But Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) tells me, that the King (age 37) hath this good luck, that the next day he hates to have any body mention what he had done the day before, nor will suffer any body to gain upon him that way; which is a good quality. Parted with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) at White Hall, and there I took coach and took up my wife at Unthanke's, and so out for ayre, it being a mighty pleasant day, as far as Bow, and so drank by the way, and home, and there to my chamber till by and by comes Captain Cocke (age 50) about business; who tells me that Mr. Bruncker is lost for ever, notwithstanding my Lord Bruncker (age 47) hath advised with him, Cocke (age 50), how he might make a peace with the Duke of York (age 33) and Chancellor (age 58), upon promise of serving him in the Parliament but Cocke (age 50) says that is base to offer, and will have no success neither. He says that Mr. Wren hath refused a present of Tom Wilson's for his place of Store-keeper of Chatham, Kent [Map], and is resolved never to take any thing; which is both wise in him, and good to the King's service. He stayed with me very late, here being Mrs. Turner (age 44) and W. Batelier drinking and laughing, and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1667. Thence to the Excise office, and so to the Exchange [Map], and did a little business, and so home and took up my wife, and so carried her to the other end, where I 'light at my Lord Ashly's (age 46), by invitation, to dine there, which I did, and Sir H. Cholmly (age 35), Creed, and Yeabsly, upon occasion of the business of Yeabsly, who, God knows, do bribe him very well for it; and it is pretty to see how this great man do condescend to these things, and do all he can in his examining of his business to favour him, and yet with great cunning not to be discovered but by me that am privy to it. At table it is worth remembering that my Lord tells us that the House of Lords is the last appeal that a man can make, upon a poynt of interpretation of the law, and that therein they are above the judges; and that he did assert this in the Lords' House upon the late occasion of the quarrel between my Lord Bristoll (age 54) and the Chancellor (age 58), when the former did accuse the latter of treason, and the judges did bring it in not to be treason: my Lord Ashly (age 46) did declare that the judgment of the judges was nothing in the presence of their Lordships, but only as far as they were the properest men to bring precedents; but not to interpret the law to their Lordships, but only the inducements of their persuasions: and this the Lords did concur in. Another pretty thing was my Lady Ashly's speaking of the bad qualities of glass-coaches; among others, the flying open of the doors upon any great shake: but another was, that my Lady Peterborough (age 45) being in her glass-coach, with the glass up, and seeing a lady pass by in a coach whom she would salute, the glass was so clear, that she thought it had been open, and so ran her head through the glass, and cut all her forehead! After dinner, before we fell to the examination of Yeabsly's business, we were put into my Lord's room before he could come to us, and there had opportunity to look over his state of his accounts of the prizes; and there saw how bountiful the King (age 37) hath been to several people and hardly any man almost, Commander of the Navy of any note, but hath had some reward or other out of it; and many sums to the Privy-purse, but not so many, I see, as I thought there had been: but we could not look quite through it. But several Bedchamber-men and people about the Court had good sums; and, among others, Sir John Minnes (age 68) and Lord Bruncker (age 47) have £200 a-piece for looking to the East India prizes, while I did their work for them.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1667. Up as soon as I could see and to the office to write over fair with Mr. Hater my last night's work, which I did by nine o'clock, and got it signed, and so with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35), who come to me about his business, to White Hall: and thither come also my Lord Bruncker (age 47): and we by and by called in, and our paper read; and much discourse thereon by Sir G. Carteret (age 57), my Lord Anglesey (age 53), Sir W. Coventry (age 39), and my Lord Ashly (age 46), and myself: but I could easily discern that they none of them understood the business; and the King (age 37) at last ended it with saying lazily, "Why", says he, "after all this discourse, I now come to understand it; and that is, that there can nothing be done in this more than is possible", which was so silly as I never heard: "and therefore", says he, "I would have these gentlemen to do as much as possible to hasten the Treasurer's accounts; and that is all". And so we broke up: and I confess I went away ashamed, to see how slightly things are advised upon there. Here I saw the Duke of Buckingham (age 39) sit in Council again, where he was re-admitted, it seems, the last Council-day: and it is wonderful to see how this man is come again to his places, all of them, after the reproach and disgrace done him: so that things are done in a most foolish manner quite through. The Duke of Buckingham (age 39) did second Sir W. Coventry (age 39) in the advising the King (age 37) that he would not concern himself in the owning or not owning any man's accounts, or any thing else, wherein he had not the same satisfaction that would satisfy the Parliament; saying, that nothing would displease the Parliament more than to find him defending any thing that is not right, nor justifiable to the utmost degree but methought he spoke it but very poorly. After this, I walked up and down the Gallery till noon; and here I met with Bishop Fuller, who, to my great joy, is made, which I did not hear before, Bishop of Lincoln.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Oct 1667. He gone, I thence to my Lady Peterborough (age 45), who sent for me; and with her an hour talking about her husband's pension, and how she hath got an order for its being paid again; though, I believe, for all that order, it will hardly be; but of that I said nothing; but her design is to get it paid again: and how to raise money upon it, to clear it from the engagement which lies upon it to some citizens, who lent her husband money, without her knowledge, upon it, to vast loss. She intends to force them to take their money again, and release her husband (age 45) of those hard terms. The woman is a very wise woman, and is very plain in telling me how her plate and jewels are at pawne for money, and how they are forced to live beyond their estate, and do get nothing by his being a courtier. The lady I pity, and her family. Having done with her, and drunk two glasses of her meade, which she did give me, and so to the Treasurer's Office, and there find my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir W. Pen (age 46) at dinner with Sir G. Carteret (age 57) about his accounts, where I dined and talked and settled some business, and then home, and there took out my wife and Willet, thinking to have gone to a play, but both houses were begun, and so we to the 'Change [Map], and thence to my tailor's, and there, the coachman desiring to go home to change his horses, we went with him into a nasty end of all St. Giles's [Map], and there went into a nasty room, a chamber of his, where he hath a wife and child, and there staid, it growing dark too, and I angry thereat, till he shifted his horses, and then home apace, and there I to business late, and so home, to supper, and walk in the garden with my wife and girle, with whom we are mightily pleased, and after talking and supping, to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Oct 1667. Up, and to White Hall to attend the Council about Commissioner Pett's (age 57) business, along with my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir W. Pen (age 46), and in the Robe-chamber the Duke of York (age 33) come to us, the officers of the Navy, and there did meet together about Navy business, where Sir W. Coventry (age 39) was with us, and among other things did recommend his Royal Highness, now the prizes were disposing, to remember Sir John Harman (age 42) to the King (age 37), for some bounty, and also for my Lady Minnes, which was very nobly done of him.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Oct 1667. Lord's Day. Up, and dressed myself, and so walked out with the boy to Smithfield [Map] to Cow Lane [Map], to Lincolne's, and there spoke with him, and agreed upon the hour to-morrow, to set out towards Brampton [Map]; but vexed that he is not likely to go himself, but sends another for him. Here I took a Hackney coach, and to White Hall, and there met Sir W. Coventry (age 39), and discoursed with him, and then with my Lord Bruncker (age 47), and many others, to end my matters in order to my going into the country to-morrow for five or six days, which I have not done for above three years. Walked with Creed into the Park a little, and at last went into the Queen's (age 28) side, and there saw the King (age 37) and Queen (age 28), and saw the ladies, in order to my hearing any news stirring to carry into the country, but met with none, and so away home by coach, and there dined, and W. How come to see me, and after dinner parted, and I to my writing to my Lord Sandwich (age 42), which is the greatest business I have to do before my going into the country, and in the evening to my office to set matters to rights there, and being in the garden Sir W. Pen (age 46) did come to me, and fell to discourse about the business of "The Flying Greyhound", wherein I was plain to him and he to me, and at last concluded upon my writing a petition to the Duke of York (age 33) for a certain ship, The Maybolt Gallyott, and he offers to give me £300 for my success, which, however, I would not oblige him to, but will see the issue of it by fair play, and so I did presently draw a petition, which he undertakes to proffer to the Duke of York (age 33), and solicit for me, and will not seem to doubt of his success.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Oct 1667. Thence I to Mrs. Martin's, where by appointment comes to me Mrs. Howlett, which I was afraid was to have told me something of my freedom with her daughter, but it was not so, but only to complain to me of her son-in-law, how he abuses and makes a slave of her, and his mother is one that encourages him in it, so that they are at this time upon very bad terms one with another, and desires that I would take a time to advise him and tell him what it becomes him to do, which office I am very glad of, for some ends of my own also con sa fille, and there drank and parted, I mightily satisfied with this business, and so home by water with Sir W. Warren, who happened to be at Westminster, and there I pretty strange to him, and little discourse, and there at the office Lord Bruncker (age 47), W. Pen, T. Hater and I did some business, and so home to dinner, and thence I out to visit Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and ladies there; and from him do understand that the King (age 37) himself (but this he told me as a great secret) is satisfied that this thanks which he expects from the House, for the laying aside of my Chancellor (age 58), is a thing irregular; but, since it is come into the House, he do think it necessary to carry it on, and will have it, and hath made his mind known to be so, to some of the House. But Sir G. Carteret (age 57) do say he knows nothing of what my Lord Bruncker (age 47) told us to-day, that the King (age 37) was angry with the Duke of York (age 34) yesterday, and advised him not to hinder what he had a mind to have done, touching this business; which is news very bad, if true. Here I visited my Baroness Carteret (age 65), who hath been sick some time, but now pretty well, but laid on her bed.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Oct 1667. At noon to Broad Street to Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and Lord Bruncker (age 47), and there dined with them, and thence after dinner with Bruncker to White Hall, where the Duke of York (age 34) is now newly come for this winter, and there did our usual business, which is but little, and so I away to the Duke of York's house, thinking as we appointed, to meet my wife there, but she was not; and more, I was vexed to see Young (who is but a bad actor at best) act Macbeth in the room of Betterton (age 32), who, poor man! is sick: but, Lord! what a prejudice it wrought in me against the whole play, and everybody else agreed in disliking this fellow.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Oct 1667. None of my brethren said anything but me there, but only two or three silly words my Lord Bruncker (age 47) gave, in answer to one question about the number of men there were in the King's Yard at the time.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Oct 1667. Slept but ill all the last part of the night, for fear of this day's success in Parliament: therefore up, and all of us all the morning close, till almost two o'clock, collecting all we had to say and had done from the beginning, touching the safety of the River Medway and Chatham, Kent [Map]. And, having done this, and put it into order, we away, I not having time to eat my dinner; and so all in my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) coach, that is to say, Bruncker, W. Pen (age 46), T. Harvy (age 42), and myself, talking of the other great matter with which they charge us, that is, of discharging men by ticket, in order to our defence in case that should be asked. We come to the Parliament-door, and there, after a little waiting till the Committee was sat, we were, the House being very full, called in: Sir W. Pen (age 46) went in and sat as a Member; and my Lord Bruncker (age 47) would not at first go in, expecting to have a chair set for him, and his [his brother] brother (age 40) had bid him not go in, till he was called for; but, after a few words, I had occasion to mention him, and so he was called in, but without any more chair or respect paid him than myself: and so Bruncker, and T. Harvy, and I, were there to answer: and I had a chair brought me to lean my books upon: and so did give them such an account, in a series of the whole business that had passed the Office touching the matter, and so answered all questions given me about it, that I did not perceive but they were fully satisfied with me and the business as to our Office: and then Commissioner Pett (age 57) (who was by at all my discourse, and this held till within an hour after candlelight, for I had candles brought in to read my papers by) was to answer for himself, we having lodged all matters with him for execution. But, Lord! what a tumultuous thing this Committee is, for all the reputation they have of a great council, is a strange consideration; there being as impertinent questions, and as disorderly proposed, as any man could make. But Commissioner Pett (age 57), of all men living, did make the weakest defence for himself: nothing to the purpose, nor to satisfaction, nor certain; but sometimes one thing and sometimes another, sometimes for himself and sometimes against him; and his greatest failure was, that I observed, from his [not] considering whether the question propounded was his part to answer or no, and the thing to be done was his work to do: the want of which distinction will overthrow him; for he concerns himself in giving an account of the disposal of the boats, which he had no reason at all to do, or take any blame upon him for them. He charged the not carrying up of "The Charles" upon the Tuesday, to the Duke of Albemarle (age 58); but I see the House is mighty favourable to the Duke of Albemarle (age 58), and would give little weight to it. And something of want of armes he spoke, which Sir J. Duncomb (age 45) answered with great imperiousness and earnestness; but, for all that, I do see the House is resolved to be better satisfied in the business of the unreadiness of Sherenesse, and want of armes and ammunition there and every where: and all their officers were here to-day attending, but only one called in, about armes for boats, to answer Commissioner Pett (age 57).

Pepy's Diary. 25 Oct 1667. Another by Crispin, the waterman, who said he was upon "The Charles"; and spoke to Lord Bruncker (age 47) coming by in his boat, to know whether they should carry up "The Charles", they being a great many naked men without armes, and he told them she was well as she was. Both these have little in them indeed, but yet both did stick close against him; and he is the weakest man in the world to make his defence, and so is like to have much fault laid on him therefrom. Spragg (age 47) was in with them all the afternoon, and hath much fault laid on him for a man that minded his pleasure, and little else of his whole charge. I walked in the lobby, and there do hear from Mr. Chichly (age 53) that they were (the Commissioners of the Ordnance) shrewdly put to it yesterday, being examined with all severity and were hardly used by them, much otherwise than we, and did go away with mighty blame; and I am told by every body that it is likely to stick mighty hard upon them: at which every body is glad, because of Duncomb's pride, and their expecting to have the thanks of the House whereas they have deserved, as the Parliament apprehends, as bad as bad can be. Here is great talk of an impeachment brought in against my Lord Mordaunt (age 41), and that another will be brought in against my Chancellor (age 58) in a few days. Here I understand for certain that they have ordered that my Lord Arlington's (age 49) letters, and Secretary Morrice's (age 64) letters of intelligence, be consulted, about the business of the Dutch fleete's coming abroad, which is a very high point, but this they have done, but in what particular manner I cannot justly say, whether it was not with the King's leave first asked. Here late, as I have said, and at last they broke up, and we had our commissions again, and I do hear how Birch (age 52) is the high man that do examine and trouble every body with his questions, and they say that he do labour all he can to clear Pett, but it seems a witness has come in tonight, C. Millett, who do declare that he did deliver a message from the Duke of Albemarle (age 58) time enough for him to carry up "The Charles", and he neglected it, which will stick very hard, it seems, on him. So Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I in his coach home, and there to supper, a good supper, and so weary, and my eyes spent, to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Oct 1667. Thence with Sir W. Pen (age 46) to the Parliament Committee, and there we all met, and did shew, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and I, our commissions under the Great Seal in behalf of all the rest, to shew them our duties, and there I had no more matters asked me, but were bid to withdraw, and did there wait, I all the afternoon till eight at, night, while they were examining several about the business of Chatham, Kent [Map] again, and particularly my Lord Bruncker (age 47) did meet with two or three blurs that he did not think of. One from Spragg (age 47), who says that "The Unity" was ordered up contrary to his order, by my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Commissioner Pett (age 57).

Pepy's Diary. 27 Oct 1667. After dinner, I down to Deptford, Kent [Map], the first time that I went to look upon "The Maybolt", which the King (age 37) hath given me, and there she is; and I did meet with Mr. Uthwayte, who do tell me that there are new sails ordered to be delivered her, and a cable, which I did not speak of at all to him. So, thereupon, I told him I would not be my own hindrance so much as to take her into my custody before she had them, which was all I said to him, but desired him to take a strict inventory of her, that I might not be cheated by the master nor the company, when they come to understand that the vessel is gone away, which he hath promised me, and so away back again home, reading all the way the book of the collection of oaths in the several offices of this nation, which is worth a man's reading, and so away home, and there my boy and I to sing, and at it all the evening, and to supper, and so to bed. This evening come Sir J. Minnes (age 68) to me, to let me know that a Parliament-man hath been with him, to tell him that the Parliament intend to examine him particularly about Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) selling of places, and about my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) discharging the ships at Chatham, Kent [Map] by ticket: for the former of which I am more particularly sorry that that business of Sir W. Coventry (age 39) should come up again; though this old man tells me, and, I believe, that he can say nothing to it.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Oct 1667. Up, and at the office, my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and I close together till almost 3 after noon, never stirring, making up a report for the Committee this afternoon about the business of discharging men by ticket, which it seems the House is mighty earnest in, but is a foolery in itself, yet gives me a great deal of trouble to draw up a defence for the Board, as if it was a crime; but I think I have done it to very good purpose. Then to my Lady Williams's, with her and my Lord, and there did eat a snapp of good victuals, and so to Westminster Hall [Map], where we find the House not up, but sitting all this day about the method of bringing in the charge against my Chancellor (age 58); and at last resolved for a Committee to draw up the heads, and so rose, and no Committee to sit tonight. Here Sir W. Coventry (age 39) and Lord Bruncker (age 47) and I did in the Hall (between the two Courts at the top of the Hall) discourse about a letter of Sir W. Coventry's (age 39) to Bruncker, whereon Bruncker did justify his discharging men by ticket, and insists on one word which Sir W. Coventry (age 39) would not seem very earnest to have left out, but I did see him concerned, and did after labour to suppress the whole letter, the thing being in itself really impertinent, but yet so it is that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) do not desire to have his name used in this business, and I have prevailed with Bruncker for it.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Oct 1667. Thence to the Parliament-house; where, after the Committee was sat, I was called in; and the first thing was upon the complaint of a dirty slut that was there, about a ticket which she had lost, and had applied herself to me for another.... [Despite the .... there is no missing text here] I did give them a short and satisfactory answer to that; and so they sent her away, and were ashamed of their foolery, in giving occasion to 500 seamen and seamen's wives to come before them, as there was this afternoon. But then they fell to the business of tickets, and I did give them the best answer I could, but had not scope to do it in the methodical manner which I had prepared myself for, but they did ask a great many broken rude questions about it, and were mightily hot whether my Lord Bruncker (age 47) had any order to discharge whole ships by ticket, and because my answer was with distinction, and not direct, I did perceive they were not so fully satisfied therewith as I could wish they were.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Oct 1667. So my Lord Bruncker (age 47) was called in, and they could fasten nothing on him that I could see, nor indeed was there any proper matter for blame, but I do see, and it was said publicly in the House by Sir T. Clerges (age 49) that Sir W. Batten (deceased) had designed the business of discharging men by ticket and an order after the thing was done to justify my Lord Bruncker (age 47) for having done it. But this I did not owne at all, nor was it just so, though he did indeed do something like it, yet had contributed as much to it as any man of the board by sending down of tickets to do it. But, Lord! to see that we should be brought to justify ourselves in a thing of necessity and profit to the King (age 37), and of no profit or convenience to us, but the contrary. We being withdrawn, we heard no more of it, but there staid late and do hear no more, only my cozen Pepys do tell me that he did hear one or two whisper as if they thought that I do bogle at the business of my Lord Bruncker (age 47), which is a thing I neither did or have reason to do in his favour, but I do not think it fit to make him suffer for a thing that deserves well. But this do trouble me a little that anything should stick to my prejudice in any of them, and did trouble me so much that all the way home with Sir W. Pen (age 46) I was not at good ease, nor all night, though when I come home I did find my wife, and Betty Turner (age 14), the two Mercers, and Mrs. Parker, an ugly lass, but yet dances well, and speaks the best of them, and W. Batelier, and Pembleton dancing; and here I danced with them, and had a good supper, and as merry as I could be, and so they being gone we to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Nov 1667. Thence with him and Lord Bruncker (age 47) to Captain Cocke's (age 50) (he out of doors), and there drank their morning draught, and thence Sir G. Carteret (age 57) and I toward the Temple [Map] in coach together; and there he did tell me how the King (age 37) do all he can in the world to overthrow my Chancellor (age 58), and that notice is taken of every man about the King (age 37) that is not seen to promote the ruine of the Chancellor (age 58); and that this being another great day in his business, he dares not but be there. He tells me that as soon as Secretary Morrice (age 65) brought the Great Seale from my Chancellor (age 58), Bab. May (age 39) fell upon his knees, and catched the King (age 37) about the legs, and joyed him, and said that this was the first time that ever he could call him King of England, being freed from this great man: which was a most ridiculous saying. And he told me that, when first my Lord Gerard (age 49), a great while ago, come to the King (age 37), and told him that the Chancellor (age 58) did say openly that the King (age 37) was a lazy person and not fit to govern, which is now made one of the things in the people's mouths against the Chancellor (age 58), "Why", says the King (age 37), "that is no news, for he hath told me so twenty times, and but the other day he told me so"; and made matter of mirth at it: but yet this light discourse is likely to prove bad to him. I 'light at the Temple [Map], and went to my tailor's and mercer's about a cloake, to choose the stuff, and so to my bookseller's and bought some books, and so home to dinner, and Simpson my joyner with me, and after dinner, my wife, and I, and Willett, to the King's play-house, and there saw "The Indian Emperour", a good play, but not so good as people cry it up, I think, though above all things Nell's ill speaking of a great part made me mad.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Nov 1667. At the office all the morning, and at noon took my Lord Bruncker (age 47) into the garden, and there told him of his man Carcasses proceedings against the Office in the House of Commons. I did [not] desire nor advise him anything, but in general, that the end of this might be ruin to the Office, but that we shall be brought to fencing for ourselves, and that will be no profit to the office, but let it light where it would I thought I should be as well as any body. This I told him, and so he seeming to be ignorant of it, and not pleased with it, we broke off by Sir Thos. Harvy's (age 42) coming to us from the Pay Office, whither we had sent a smart letter we had writ to him this morning about keeping the clerks at work at the making up the books, which I did to place the fault somewhere, and now I let him defend himself. He was mighty angry, and particularly with me, but I do not care, but do rather desire it, for I will not spare him, that we shall bear the blame, and such an idle fellow as he have £500 a year for nothing.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Nov 1667. To the office, and thence before noon I, by the Board's direction, to the Parliament House to speak with Sir R. Brookes (age 30) about the meaning of an order come to us this day to bring all the books of the office to the Committee. I find by him that it is only about the business of an order of ours for paying off the ships by ticket, which they think I on behalf of my Lord Bruncker (age 47) do suppress, which vexes me, and more at its occasioning the bringing them our books.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Nov 1667. So home and to dinner, where Mr. Shepley with me, newly come out of the country, but I was at little liberty to talk to him, but after dinner with two contracts to the Committee, with Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Sir T. Harvy (age 42), and there did deliver them, and promised at their command more, but much against my will. And here Sir R. Brookes (age 30) did take me alone, and pray me to prevent their trouble, by discovering the order he would have. I told him I would suppress none, nor could, but this did not satisfy him, and so we parted, I vexed that I should bring on myself this suspicion. Here I did stand by unseen, and did hear their impertinent yet malicious examinations of some rogues about the business of Bergen, wherein they would wind in something against my Lord Sandwich (age 42) (it was plain by their manner of examining, as Sir Thomas Crew (age 43) did afterwards observe to me, who was there), but all amounted to little I think. But here Sir Thomas Crew (age 43) and W. Hewer (age 25), who was there also, did tell me that they did hear Captain Downing give a cruel testimony against my Lord Bruncker (age 47), for his neglect, and doing nothing, in the time of straits at Chatham, Kent [Map], when he was spoke to, and did tell the Committee that he, Downing, did presently after, in Lord Bruncker's (age 47) hearing, tell the Duke of Albemarle (age 58), that if he might advise the King (age 37), he should hang both my Lord Bruncker (age 47) and Pett (age 57). This is very hard.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Nov 1667. Up, and all the morning at my Lord Bruncker's (age 47) lodgings with Sir J. Minnes (age 68) and Sir W. Pen (age 46) about Sir W. Warren's accounts, wherein I do not see that they are ever very likely to come to an understanding of them, as Sir J. Minnes (age 68) hath not yet handled them. Here till noon, and then home to dinner, where Mr. Pierce comes to me, and there, in general, tells me how the King (age 37) is now fallen in and become a slave to the Duke of Buckingham (age 39), led by none but him, whom he, Mr. Pierce, swears he knows do hate the very person of the King (age 37), and would, as well as will, certainly ruin him. He do say, and I think with right, that the King (age 37) do in this do the most ungrateful part of a master to a servant that ever was done, in this carriage of his to my Chancellor (age 58): that, it may be, the Chancellor (age 58) may have faults, but none such as these they speak of; that he do now really fear that all is going to ruin, for he says he hears that Sir W. Coventry (age 39) hath been, just before his sickness, with the Duke of York (age 34), to ask his forgiveness and peace for what he had done; for that he never could foresee that what he meant so well, in the councilling to lay by the Chancellor (age 58), should come to this. As soon as dined, I with my boy Tom to my bookbinder's, where all the afternoon long till 8 or 9 at night seeing him binding up two or three collections of letters and papers that I had of him, but above all things my little abstract pocket book of contracts, which he will do very neatly. Then home to read, sup, and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Nov 1667. Up, and at the office all this morning, and then home to dinner, and then by coach sent my wife to the King's playhouse, and I to White Hall, there intending, with Lord Bruncker (age 47), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), and Sir T. Harvy (age 42) to have seen the Duke of York (age 34), whom it seems the King (age 37) and Queen (age 29) have visited, and so we may now well go to see him. But there was nobody could speak with him, and so we parted, leaving a note in Mr. Wren's (age 38) chamber that we had been there, he being at the free conference of the two Houses about this great business of my Chancellor's (age 58), at which they were at this hour, three in the afternoon, and there they say my Lord Anglesey (age 53) do his part admirablyably, and each of us taking a copy of the Guinny company's defence to a petition against them to the Parliament the other day.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1667. Up before day, and by coach to Sir W. Coventry's (age 39), and with him to White Hall, and there walked a great while with him in the garden till the Commissioners of the Treasury met, and there talked over many businesses, and particularly he tells me that by my desire he hath moved the Duke of York (age 34) that Sir J. Minnes (age 68) might be removed from the Navy, at least the Controller's place, and his business put on my Lord Brouncker (age 47) and Sir W. Pen (age 46); that the Committee for Accounts are good sober men, and such as he thinks we shall have fair play from; that he hopes that the Kingdom will escape ruin in general, notwithstanding all our fears, and yet I find he do seem not very confident in it.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Dec 1667. Up, and by water to White Hall, and there walked with Creed in the Matted Gallery till by and by a Committee for Tangier met: the Duke of York (age 34) there; and there I did discourse over to them their condition as to money, which they were all mightily, as I could desire, satisfied with, but the Duke of Albemarle (age 59), who takes the part of the Guards against us in our supplies of money, which is an odd consideration for a dull, heavy blockhead as he is, understanding no more of either than a goose: but the ability and integrity of Sir W. Coventry (age 39), in all the King's concernments, I do and must admire. After the Committee up, I and Sir W. Coventry (age 39) walked an hour in the gallery, talking over many businesses, and he tells me that there are so many things concur to make him and his Fellow Commissioners unable to go through the King's work that he do despair of it, every body becoming an enemy to them in their retrenchments, and the King (age 37) unstable, the debts great and the King's present occasions for money great and many and pressing, the bankers broke and every body keeping in their money, while the times are doubtful what will stand. But he says had they come in two years ago they doubt not to have done what the King (age 37) would by this time, or were the King (age 37) in the condition as heretofore, when the Chancellor (age 58) was great, to be able to have what sums of money they pleased of the Parliament, and then the ill administration was such that instead of making good use of this power and money he suffered all to go to ruin. But one such sum now would put all upon their legs, and now the King (age 37) would have the Parliament give him money when they are in an ill humour and will not be willing to give any, nor are very able, and besides every body distrusts what they give the King (age 37) will be lost; whereas six months hence, when they see that the King (age 37) can live without them, and is become steady, and to manage what he has well, he doubts not but their doubts would be removed, and would be much more free as well as more able to give him money. He told me how some of his enemies at the Duke of York's (age 34) had got the Duke of York's (age 34) commission for the Commissioners of his estate changed, and he and Brouncker (age 47) and Povy (age 53) left out: that this they did do to disgrace and impose upon him at this time; but that he, though he values not the thing, did go and tell the Duke of York (age 34) what he heard, and that he did not think that he had given him any reason to do this, out of his belief that he would not be as faithful and serviceable to him as the best of those that have got him put out. Whereupon the Duke of York (age 34) did say that it arose only from his not knowing whether now he would have time to regard his affairs; and that, if he should, he would put him into the commission with his own hand, though the commission be passed. He answered that he had been faithful to him, and done him good service therein, so long as he could attend it; and if he had been able to have attended it more, he would not have enriched himself with such and such estates as my Chancellor (age 58) hath got, that did properly belong to his Royal Highness, as being forfeited to the King (age 37), and so by the King's gift given to the Duke of York (age 34). Hereupon the Duke of York (age 34) did call for the commission, and hath since put him in. This he tells me he did only to show his enemies that he is not so low as to be trod on by them, or the Duke hath any so bad opinion of him as they would think. Here we parted, and I with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) went and took a turn into the Park, and there talked of several things, and about Tangier particularly, and of his management of his business, and among other discourse about the method he will leave his accounts in if he should suddenly die, he says there is nothing but what is easily understood, but only a sum of £500 which he has entered given to E. E. S., which in great confidence he do discover to me to be my Lord Sandwich (age 42), at the beginning of their contract for the Mole, and I suppose the rest did the like, which was £1500, which would appear a very odd thing for my Lord to be a profiter by the getting of the contract made for them. But here it puts me into thoughts how I shall own my receiving of £200 a year from him, but it is his gift, I never asked of him, and which he did to Mr. Povy (age 53), and so there is no great matter in it.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Jan 1668. Thence after dinner away with Sir G. Carteret (age 58) to White Hall, setting down my Lord Brereton (age 36) at my Lord Brouncker's (age 48), and there up and down the house, and on the Queen's (age 29) side, to see the ladies, and there saw the Duchesse of York (age 30), whom few pay the respect they used, I think, to her; but she bears all out, with a very great deal of greatness; that is the truth of it. And so, it growing night, I away home by coach, and there set my wife to read, and then comes Pelling, and he and I to sing a little, and then sup and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jan 1668. Thence home to the office, and so with my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and his mistress, Williams, to Captain Cocke's (age 51) to dinner, where was Temple [Map] and Mr. Porter, and a very good dinner, and merry.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jan 1668. Thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48) to White Hall to the Commissioners of the Treasury at their sending for us to discourse about the paying of tickets, and so away, and I by coach to the 'Change [Map], and there took up my wife and Mercer and the girl by agreement, and so home, and there with Mercer to teach her more of "It is decreed", and to sing other songs and talk all the evening, and so after supper I to even my journall since Saturday last, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 10 Jan 1668. Up, and with Sir Denis Gawden, who called me, to White Hall, and there to wait on the Duke of York (age 34) with the rest of my brethren, which we did a little in the King's Greenroom, while the King (age 37) was in Council: and in this room we found my Lord Bristoll (age 55) walking alone; which, wondering at, while the Council was sitting, I was answered that, as being a Catholique, he could not be of the Council, which I did not consider before. After broke up and walked a turn or two with Lord Brouncker (age 48) talking about the times, and he tells me that he thinks, and so do every body else, that the great business of putting out some of the Council to make room for some of the Parliament men to gratify and wheedle them is over, thinking that it might do more hurt than good, and not obtain much upon the Parliament either. This morning there was a Persian in that country dress, with a turban, waiting to kiss the King's hand in the Vane-room, against he come out: it was a comely man as to features, and his dress, methinks, very comely.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jan 1668. At noon with Lord Brouncker (age 48) to Sir D. Gawden's, at the Victualling-Office, to dinner, where I have not dined since he was Sheriff: He expected us; and a good dinner, and much good company; and a fine house, and especially two rooms, very fine, he hath built there. His lady a good lady; but my Lord led himself and me to a great absurdity in kissing all the ladies, but the finest of all the company, leaving her out, I know not how; and I was loath to do it, since he omitted it. Here little Chaplin (age 41) dined, who is like to be Sheriff the next year; and a pretty humoured little man he is. I met here with Mr. Talents, the younger, of Magdalene College, Chaplain here to the Sheriff; which I was glad to see, though not much acquainted with him. This day come the first demand from the Commissioners of Accounts to us, and it contains more than we shall ever be able to answer while we live, and I do foresee we shall be put to much trouble and some shame, at least some of us.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Feb 1668. Having done here, my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and W. Pen (age 46), and I, and with us Sir Arnold Breames, to the King's playhouse, and there saw a piece of "Love in a Maze", a dull, silly play, I think; and after the play, home with W. Pen (age 46) and his son Lowther (age 27), whom we met there, and then home and sat most of the evening with my wife and Mr. Pelting, talking, my head being full of business of one kind or other, and most such as do not please me, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1668. Thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48), and set him down at Bow Streete, and so to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw the last act for nothing, where I never saw such good acting of any creature as Smith's part of Zanger; and I do also, though it was excellently acted by-----, do yet want Betterton (age 32) mightily.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Feb 1668. At noon home to dinner, where little pleasure, my head being split almost with the variety of troubles upon me at this time, and cares, and after dinner by coach to Westminster Hall [Map], and sent my wife and Deb. to see "Mustapha" acted. Here I brought a book to the Committee, and do find them; and particularly Sir Thomas Clarges (age 50), mighty hot in the business of tickets, which makes me mad to see them bite at the stone, and not at the hand that flings it, and here my Lord Brouncker (age 48) unnecessarily orders it that he is called in to give opportunity to present his report of the state of the business of paying by ticket, which I do not think will do him any right, though he was made believe that it did operate mightily, and that Sir Fresh. Hollis (age 25) did make a mighty harangue and to much purpose in his defence, but I believe no such effects of it, for going in afterward I did hear them speak with prejudice of it, and that his pleading of the Admiral's warrant for it now was only an evasion, if not an aspersion upon the Admirall, and therefore they would not admit of this his report, but go on with their report as they had resolved before. The orders they sent for this day was the first order that I have yet met with about this business, and was of my own single hand warranting, but I do think it will do me no harm, and therefore do not much trouble myself with it, more than to see how much trouble I am brought to who have best deported myself in all the King's business.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Feb 1668. Thence after dinner to White Hall, to attend the Duke of York (age 34), where I did let him know, too, the troublesome life we lead, and particularly myself, by being obliged to such attendances every day as I am, on one Committee or another. And I do find the Duke of York (age 34) himself troubled, and willing not to be troubled with occasions of having his name used among the Parliament, though he himself do declare that he did give directions to Lord Brouncker (age 48) to discharge the men at Chatham, Kent [Map] by ticket, and will own it, if the House call for it, but not else.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Feb 1668. Thence I attended the King (age 37) and Council, and some of the rest of us, in a business to be heard about the value of a ship of one Dorrington's:-and it was pretty to observe how Sir W. Pen (age 46) making use of this argument against the validity of an oath, against the King (age 37), being made by the master's mate of the ship, who was but a fellow of about 23 years of age-the master of the ship, against whom we pleaded, did say that he did think himself at that age capable of being master's mate of any ship; and do know that he, himself, Sir W. Pen (age 46), was so himself, and in no better degree at that age himself: which word did strike Sir W. Pen (age 46) dumb, and made him open his mouth no more; and I saw the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 34) wink at one another at it. This done, we into the gallery; and there I walked with several people, and among others my Lord Brouncker (age 48), who I do find under much trouble still about the business of the tickets, his very case being brought in; as is said, this day in the Report of the Miscarriages. And he seems to lay much of it on me, which I did clear and satisfy him in; and would be glad with all my heart to serve him in, and have done it more than he hath done for himself, he not deserving the least blame, but commendations, for this. I met with my cozen Roger Pepys (age 50) and Creed; and from them understand that the Report was read to-day of the Miscarriages, wherein my Lord Sandwich (age 42) is [named] about the business I mentioned this morning; but I will be at rest, for it can do him no hurt. Our business of tickets is soundly up, and many others: so they went over them again, and spent all the morning on the first, which is the dividing of the fleete; wherein hot work was, and that among great men, Privy-Councillors, and, they say, Sir W. Coventry (age 40); but I do not much fear it, but do hope that it will shew a little, of the Duke of Albemarle (age 59) and the Prince to have been advisers in it: but whereas they ordered that the King's Speech should be considered today, they took no notice of it at all, but are really come to despise the King (age 37) in all possible ways of chewing it. And it was the other day a strange saying, as I am told by my cozen Roger Pepys (age 50), in the House, when it was moved that the King's speech should be considered, that though the first part of the Speech, meaning the league that is there talked of, be the only good publick thing that hath been done since the King (age 37) come into England, yet it might bear with being put off to consider, till Friday next, which was this day. Secretary Morrice (age 65) did this day in the House, when they talked of intelligence, say that he was allowed but £70 a-year for intelligence, [Secret service money] whereas, in Cromwell's time, he [Cromwell] did allow £70,000 a-year for it; and was confirmed therein by Colonel Birch (age 52), who said that thereby Cromwell carried the secrets of all the Princes of Europe at his girdle. The House is in a most broken condition; nobody adhering to any thing, but reviling and finding fault: and now quite mad at the Undertakers, as they are commonly called, Littleton (age 47), Lord Vaughan (age 28), Sir R. Howard (age 42), and others that are brought over to the Court, and did undertake to get the King (age 37) money; but they despise, and would not hear them in the House; and the Court do do as much, seeing that they cannot be useful to them, as was expected. In short, it is plain that the King (age 37) will never be able to do any thing with this Parliament; and that the only likely way to do better, for it cannot do worse, is to break this and call another Parliament; and some do think that it is intended. I was told to-night that my Baroness Castlemayne (age 27) is so great a gamester as to have won £5000 in one night, and lost £25,000 in another night, at play, and hath played £1000 and £1500 at a cast.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Feb 1668. Thence walked over St. James's Park to White Hall, and thence to Westminster Hall [Map], and there walked all the morning, and did speak with several Parliament-men-among others, Birch (age 52), who is very kind to me, and calls me, with great respect and kindness, a man of business, and he thinks honest, and so long will stand by me, and every such man, to the death. My business was to instruct them to keep the House from falling into any mistaken vote about the business of tickets, before they were better informed. I walked in the Hall all the morning with my Lord Brouncker (age 48), who was in great pain there, and, the truth is, his business is, without reason, so ill resented by the generality of the House, that I was almost troubled to be seen to walk with him, and yet am able to justify him in all, that he is under so much scandal for. Here I did get a copy of the report itself, about our paying off men by tickets; and am mightily glad to see it, now knowing the state of our case, and what we have to answer to, and the more for that the House is like to be kept by other business to-day and to-morrow, so that, against Thursday, I shall be able to draw up some defence to put into some Member's hands, to inform them, and I think we may [make] a very good one, and therefore my mind is mightily at ease about it. This morning they are upon a Bill, brought in to-day by Sir Richard Temple (age 33), for obliging the King (age 37) to call Parliaments every three years; or, if he fail, for others to be obliged to do it, and to keep him from a power of dissolving any Parliament in less than forty days after their first day of sitting, which is such a Bill as do speak very high proceedings, to the lessening of the King (age 37); and this they will carry, and whatever else they desire, before they will give any money; and the King (age 37) must have money, whatever it cost him. I stepped to the Dog tavern [Map], and thither come to me Doll Lane, and there we did drink together, and she tells me she is my valentine...

Pepy's Diary. 19 Feb 1668. After dinner my wife out with Deb., to buy some things against my sister's wedding, and I to the office to write fair my business I did in the morning, and in the evening to White Hall, where I find Sir W. Coventry (age 40) all alone, a great while with the Duke of York (age 34), in the King's drawing-room, they two talking together all alone, which did mightily please me. Then I did get Sir W. Coventry (age 40) (the Duke of York (age 34) being gone) aside, and there read over my paper, which he liked and corrected, and tells me it will be hard to escape, though the thing be never so fair, to have it voted a miscarriage; but did advise me and my Lord Brouncker (age 48), who coming by did join with us, to prepare some members in it, which we shall do. Here I do hear how La Roche (age 47), a French captain, who was once prisoner here, being with his ship at Plymouth, Devon [Map], hath played some freakes there, for which his men being beat out of the town, he hath put up his flag of defiance, and also, somewhere thereabout, did land with his men, and go a mile into the country, and did some pranks, which sounds pretty odd, to our disgrace, but we are in condition now to bear any thing. But, blessed be God! all the Court is full of the good news of my Lord Sandwich's (age 42) having made a peace between Spain and Portugall, which is mighty great news, and, above all, to my Lord's honour, more than any thing he ever did; and yet I do fear it will not prevail to secure him in Parliament against incivilities there.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Feb 1668. Up, and to the office a while, and thence to White Hall by coach with Mr. Batelier with me, whom I took up in the street. I thence by water to Westminster Hall [Map], and there with Lord Brouncker (age 48), Sir T. Harvy (age 42), Sir J. Minnes (age 68), did wait all the morning to speak to members about our business, thinking our business of tickets would come before the House to-day, but we did alter our minds about the petition to the House, sending in the paper to them. But the truth is we were in a great hurry, but it fell out that they were most of the morning upon the business of not prosecuting the first victory; which they have voted one of the greatest miscarriages of the whole war, though they cannot lay the fault anywhere yet, because Harman (age 43) is not come home. This kept them all the morning, which I was glad of. So down to the Hall, where my wife by agreement stayed for me at Mrs. Michell's, and there was Mercer and the girl, and I took them to Wilkinson's the cook's in King Street (where I find the master of the house hath been dead for some time), and there dined, and thence by one o'clock to the King's house: a new play, "The Duke of Lerma", of Sir Robert Howard's (age 42): where the King (age 37) and Court was; and Knepp and Nell (age 18) spoke the prologue most excellently, especially Knepp, who spoke beyond any creature I ever, heard. The play designed to reproach our King with his mistresses, that I was troubled for it, and expected it should be interrupted; but it ended all well, which salved all. The play a well-writ and good play, only its design I did not like of reproaching the King (age 37), but altogether a very good and most serious play.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1668. Thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48) and T. Harvey as far as the New Exchange, and there at a draper's shop drawing up a short note of what they are to desire of the House for our having a hearing before they determine any thing against us, which paper is for them to show to what friends they meet against to-morrow, I away home to the office, and there busy pretty late, and here comes my wife to me, who hath been at Pegg Pen's (age 17) christening, which, she says, hath made a flutter and noise; but was as mean as could be, and but little company, just like all the rest that that family do.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Feb 1668. At noon by coach towards Westminster, and met my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and W. Pen, and Sir T. Harvey, in King's Street, coming away from the Parliament House; and so I to them, and to the French ordinary, at the Blue Bells, in Lincolne's Inn Fields, and there dined and talked. And, among other things, they tell me how the House this day is still as backward for giving any money as ever, and do declare they will first have an account of the disposals of the last Poll-bill, and eleven months' tax: and it is pretty odde that the very first sum mentioned in the account brought in by Sir Robert Long (age 68), of the disposal of the Poll-bill money, is £5000 to my Lord Arlington (age 50) for intelligence; which was mighty unseasonable, so soon after they had so much cried out against his want of intelligence. The King (age 37) do also own but £250,000, or thereabouts, yet paid on the Poll-bill, and that he hath charged £350,000 upon it. This makes them mad; for that the former Poll-bill, that was so much less in its extent than the last, which took in all sexes and qualities, did come to £350,000. Upon the whole, I perceive they are like to do nothing in this matter to please the King (age 37), or relieve the State, be the case never so pressing; and, therefore, it is thought by a great many that the King (age 37) cannot be worse if he should dissolve them: but there is nobody dares advise it, nor do he consider any thing himself.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Mar 1668. At noon rose and to dinner. My wife abroad with Mercer and Deb. buying of things, but I with my clerks home to dinner, and thence presently down with Lord Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen, T. Harvy (age 42), T. Middleton, and Mr. Tippets, who first took his place this day at the table, as a Commissioner, in the room of Commissioner Pett (age 57). Down by water to Deptford, Kent [Map], where the King (age 37), Queene (age 58), and Court are to see launched the new ship built by Mr. Shish (age 63), called "The Charles 2". God send her better luck than the former! Here some of our brethren, who went in a boat a little before my boat, did by appointment take opportunity of asking the King's leave that we might make full use of the want of money, in our excuse to the Parliament for the business of tickets, and other things they will lay to our charge, all which arose from nothing else: and this the King (age 37) did readily agree to, and did give us leave to make our full use of it. The ship being well launched, I back again by boat, setting Sir T. Middleton and Mr. Tippets on shore at Ratcliffe, I home and there to my chamber with Mr. Gibson, and late up till midnight preparing more things against our defence on Thursday next to my content, though vexed that all this trouble should be on me.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Mar 1668. Up betimes to work again, and then met at the Office, where to our great business of this answer to the Parliament; where to my great vexation I find my Lord Brouncker (age 48) prepared only to excuse himself, while I, that have least reason to trouble myself, am preparing with great pains to defend them all: and more, I perceive, he would lodge the beginning of discharging ships by ticket upon me; but I care not, for I believe I shall get more honour by it when the Parliament, against my will, shall see how the whole business of the Office was done by me.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Mar 1668. Thence, it being a cold wet day, I home with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) in his coach, and called by the way at my bookseller's and took home with me Kercher's Musurgia-very well bound, but I had no comfort to look upon them, but as soon as I come home fell to my work at the office, shutting the doors, that we, I and my clerks, might not be interrupted, and so, only with room for a little dinner, we very busy all the day till night that the officers met for me to give them the heads of what I intended to say, which I did with great discontent to see them all rely on me that have no reason at all to trouble myself about it, nor have any thanks from them for my labour, but contrarily Brouncker (age 48) looked mighty dogged, as thinking that I did not intend to do it so as to save him. This troubled me so much as, together with the shortness of the time and muchness of the business, did let me be at it till but about ten at night, and then quite weary, and dull, and vexed, I could go no further, but resolved to leave the rest to to-morrow morning, and so in full discontent and weariness did give over and went home, with[out] supper vexed and sickish to bed, and there slept about three hours, but then waked, and never in so much trouble in all my life of mind, thinking of the task I have upon me, and upon what dissatisfactory grounds, and what the issue of it may be to me.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Mar 1668. With these thoughts I lay troubling myself till six o'clock, restless, and at last getting my wife to talk to me to comfort me, which she at last did, and made me resolve to quit my hands of this Office, and endure the trouble of it no longer than till I can clear myself of it. So with great trouble, but yet with some ease, from this discourse with my wife, I up, and to my Office, whither come my clerks, and so I did huddle the best I could some more notes for my discourse to-day, and by nine o'clock was ready, and did go down to the Old Swan [Map], and there by boat, with T. H[ater] and W. H[ewer] with me, to Westminster, where I found myself come time enough, and my brethren all ready. But I full of thoughts and trouble touching the issue of this day; and, to comfort myself, did go to the Dog [Map] and drink half-a-pint of mulled sack, and in the Hall [Westminster] did drink a dram of brandy at Mrs. Hewlett's; and with the warmth of this did find myself in better order as to courage, truly. So we all up to the lobby; and between eleven and twelve o'clock, were called in, with the mace before us, into the House, where a mighty full House; and we stood at the bar, namely, Brouncker (age 48), Sir J. Minnes (age 69), Sir T. Harvey (age 42), and myself, W. Pen (age 46) being in the House, as a Member. I perceive the whole House was full, and full of expectation of our defence what it would be, and with great prejudice. After the Speaker had told us the dissatisfaction of the House, and read the Report of the Committee, I began our defence most acceptably and smoothly, and continued at it without any hesitation or losse, but with full scope, and all my reason free about me, as if it had been at my own table, from that time till past three in the afternoon; and so ended, without any interruption from the Speaker; but we withdrew. And there all my Fellow-Officers, and all the world that was within hearing, did congratulate me, and cry up my speech as the best thing they ever heard; and my Fellow-Officers overjoyed in it; we were called in again by and by to answer only one question, touching our paying tickets to ticket-mongers; and so out; and we were in hopes to have had a vote this day in our favour, and so the generality of the House was; but my speech, being so long, many had gone out to dinner and come in again half drunk; and then there are two or three that are professed enemies to us and every body else; among others, Sir T. Littleton (age 47), Sir Thomas Lee (age 32), Mr. Wiles, the coxcomb whom I saw heretofore at the cock-fighting, and a few others; I say, these did rise up and speak against the coming to a vote now, the House not being full, by reason of several being at dinner, but most because that the House was to attend the King (age 37) this afternoon, about the business of religion, wherein they pray him to put in force all the laws against Nonconformists and Papists; and this prevented it, so that they put it off to to-morrow come se'nnight. However, it is plain we have got great ground; and everybody says I have got the most honour that any could have had opportunity of getting; and so with our hearts mightily overjoyed at this success, we all to dinner to Lord Brouncker's (age 48)-that is to say, myself, T. Harvey (age 42), and W. Pen (age 46), and there dined; and thence with Sir Anthony Morgan, who is an acquaintance of Brouncker's (age 48), a very wise man, we after dinner to the King's house, and there saw part of "The Discontented Colonel", but could take no great pleasure in it, because of our coming in in the middle of it. After the play, home with W. Pen (age 46), and there to my wife, whom W. Hewer (age 26) had told of my success, and she overjoyed, and I also as to my particular; and, after talking awhile, I betimes to bed, having had no quiet rest a good while.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1668. Up betimes, and with Sir Prince to Sir W. Coventry's (age 40) chamber: where the first word he said to me was, "Good-morrow, Mr. Pepys, that must be Speaker of the Parliament-house:" and did protest I had got honour for ever in Parliament. He said that his brother (age 49), that sat by him, admires me; and another gentleman said that I could not get less than £1000 a-year if I would put on a gown and plead at the Chancery-bar; but, what pleases me most, he tells me that the Sollicitor-Generall did protest that he thought I spoke the best of any man in England. After several talks with him alone, touching his own businesses, he carried me to White Hall, and there parted; and I to the Duke of York's (age 34) lodgings, and find him going to the Park, it being a very fine morning, and I after him; and, as soon as he saw me, he told me, with great satisfaction, that I had converted a great many yesterday, and did, with great praise of me, go on with the discourse with me. And, by and by, overtaking the King (age 37), the King (age 37) and Duke of York (age 34) come to me both; and he [the King (age 37)] said, "Mr. Pepys, I am very glad of your success yesterday"; and fell to talk of my well speaking; and many of the Lords there. My Lord Barkeley (age 66) did cry the up for what they had heard of it; and others, Parliament-men there, about the King (age 37), did say that they never heard such a speech in their lives delivered in that manner. Progers, of the Bedchamber, swore to me afterwards before Brouncker (age 48), in the afternoon, that he did tell the King (age 37) that he thought I might teach the Sollicitor-Generall. Every body that saw me almost come to me, as Joseph Williamson (age 34) and others, with such eulogys as cannot be expressed. From thence I went to Westminster Hall [Map], where I met Mr. G. Montagu (age 45), who come to me and kissed me, and told me that he had often heretofore kissed my hands, but now he would kiss my lips: protesting that I was another Cicero, and said, all the world said the same of me. Mr. Ashburnham (age 64), and every creature I met there of the Parliament, or that knew anything of the Parliament's actings, did salute me with this honour:-Mr. Godolphin (age 33);-Mr. Sands, who swore he would go twenty mile, at any time, to hear the like again, and that he never saw so many sit four hours together to hear any man in his life, as there did to hear me; Mr. Chichly (age 53),-Sir John Duncomb,-and everybody do say that the Kingdom will ring of my abilities, and that I have done myself right for my whole life: and so Captain Cocke (age 51), and others of my friends, say that no man had ever such an opportunity of making his abilities known; and, that I may cite all at once, Mr. Lieutenant of the Tower did tell me that Mr. Vaughan (age 64) did protest to him, and that, in his hearing it, said so to the Duke of Albemarle (age 59), and afterwards to W. Coventry, that he had sat twenty-six years in Parliament and never heard such a speech there before: for which the Lord God make me thankful! and that I may make use of it not to pride and vain-glory, but that, now I have this esteem, I may do nothing that may lessen it! I spent the morning thus walking in the Hall, being complimented by everybody with admiration: and at noon stepped into the Legg with Sir William Warren, who was in the Hall, and there talked about a little of his business, and thence into the Hall a little more, and so with him by coach as far as the Temple [Map] almost, and there 'light, to follow my Lord Brouncker's (age 48) coach, which I spied, and so to Madam Williams's, where I overtook him, and agreed upon meeting this afternoon, and so home to dinner, and after dinner with W. Pen (age 46), who come to my house to call me, to White Hall, to wait on the Duke of York (age 34), where he again and all the company magnified me, and several in the Gallery: among others, my Lord Gerard (age 50), who never knew me before nor spoke to me, desires his being better acquainted with me; and [said] that, at table where he was, he never heard so much said of any man as of me, in his whole life. We waited on the Duke of York (age 34), and thence into the Gallery, where the House of Lords waited the King's coming out of the Park, which he did by and by; and there, in the Vane-room, my Lord Keeper delivered a message to the King (age 37), the Lords being about him, wherein the Barons of England, from many good arguments, very well expressed in the part he read out of, do demand precedence in England of all noblemen of either of the King's other two kingdoms, be their title what it will; and did shew that they were in England reputed but as Commoners, and sat in the House of Commons, and at conferences with the Lords did stand bare. It was mighty worth my hearing: but the King (age 37) did only say that he would consider of it, and so dismissed them.

Pepy's Diary. 06 Mar 1668. Thence Brouncker (age 48) and I to the Committee of Miscarriages sitting in the Court of Wards, expecting with Sir Prince to have been heard against Prince Rupert's (age 48) complaints for want of victuals. But the business of Holmes's charge against Sir Jer. Smith, which is a most shameful scandalous thing for Flag officers to accuse one another of, and that this should be heard here before men that understand it not at all, and after it hath been examined and judged in before the King (age 37) and Lord High Admirall and other able seamen to judge, it is very hard. But this business did keep them all the afternoon, so we not heard but put off to another day.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Mar 1668. Thence I with Lord Brouncker (age 48), and did take up his mistress, Williams, and so to the 'Change [Map], only to shew myself, and did a little business there, and so home to dinner, and then to the office busy till the evening, and then to the Excize Office, where I find Mr. Ball in a mighty trouble that he is to be put out of his place at Midsummer, the whole Commission being to cease, and the truth is I think they are very fair dealing men, all of them. Here I did do a little business, and then to rights home, and there dispatched many papers, and so home late to supper and to bed, being eased of a great many thoughts, and yet have a great many more to remove as fast as I can, my mind being burdened with them, having been so much employed upon the public business of the office in their defence before the Parliament of late, and the further cases that do attend it.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Mar 1668. Up, and to the office, where all the morning, at noon home, and after dinner with wife and Deb., carried them to Unthanke's, and I to Westminster Hall [Map] expecting our being with the Committee this afternoon about Victualling business, but once more waited in vain. So after a turn or two with Lord Brouncker (age 48), I took my wife up and left her at the 'Change [Map] while I to Gresham College, there to shew myself; and was there greeted by Dr. Wilkins (age 54), Whistler, and others, as the patron of the Navy Office, and one that got great fame by my late speech to the Parliament. Here I saw a great trial of the goodness of a burning glass, made of a new figure, not spherical (by one Smithys, I think, they call him), that did burn a glove of my Lord Brouncker's (age 48) from the heat of a very little fire, which a burning glass of the old form, or much bigger, could not do, which was mighty pretty. Here I heard Sir Robert Southwell (age 32) give an account of some things committed to him by the Society at his going to Portugall, which he did deliver in a mighty handsome manner1. Thence went away home, and there at my office as long as my eyes would endure, and then home to supper, and to talk with Mr. Pelling, who tells me what a fame I have in the City for my late performance; and upon the whole I bless God for it. I think I have, if I can keep it, done myself a great deal of repute. So by and by to bed.

Note 1. At the meeting of the Royal Society on March 12th, 1668, "Mr. Smethwick's glasses were tried again; and his telescope being compared with another longer telescope, and the object-glasses exchanged, was still found to exceed the other in goodness; and his burning concave being compared with a spherical burning-glass of almost twice the diameter, and held to the fire, it burnt gloves, whereas the other spherical ones would not burn at all".-"Sir Robert Southwell (age 32) being lately returned from Portugal, where he had been ambassador from the King (age 37), and being desired to acquaint the society with what he had done with respect to the instructions, which he had received from them before his departure from England, related, that he had lodged the astronomical quadrant, which the society had sent to Portugal to make observations with there, with a body of men at Lisbon, who had applied themselves among other kinds of literature to mathematics" (Birch's "History of the Royal Society", vol. ii., p. 256).

Pepy's Diary. 13 Mar 1668. Thence he to the House, and I to the Hall, where my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and the rest waiting till noon and not called for by the House, they being upon the business of money again, and at noon all of us to Chatelin's, the French house in Covent Garden [Map], to dinner-Brouncker (age 48), J. Minnes (age 69), W. Pen (age 46), T. Harvey (age 42), and myself-and there had a dinner cost us 8s. 6d. a-piece, a damned base dinner, which did not please us at all, so that I am not fond of this house at all, but do rather choose the Beare.

Pepy's Diary. 14 Mar 1668. Up very betimes, and with Jane to Levett's, there to conclude upon our dinner; and thence to the pewterer's, to buy a pewter sesterne1, which I have ever hitherto been without, and so up and down upon several occasions to set matters in order, and that being done I out of doors to Westminster Hall [Map], and there met my Lord Brouncker (age 48), who tells me that our business is put off till Monday, and so I was mighty glad that I was eased of my attendance here, and of any occasion that might put me out of humour, as it is likely if we had been called before the Parliament. Therefore, after having spoke with Mr. Godolphin (age 33) and cozen Roger (age 50), I away home, and there do find everything in mighty good order, only my wife not dressed, which troubles me. Anon comes my company, viz., my Lord Hinchingbrooke (age 20) and his lady, Sir Philip Carteret (age 27) and his, lady, GoDolphin and my cozen Roger (age 50), and Creed: and mighty merry; and by and by to dinner, which was very good and plentifull: (I should have said, and Mr. George Montagu (age 45)), who come at a very little warning, which was exceeding kind of him. And there, among other things, my Lord had Sir Samuel Morland's (age 43) late invention for casting up of sums of L. s. d.2 which is very pretty, but not very useful. Most of our discourse was of my Lord Sandwich (age 42) and his family, as being all of us of the family; and with extraordinary pleasure all the afternoon, thus together eating and looking over my closet: and my Lady Hinchingbroke [Map] I find a very sweet-natured and well-disposed lady, a lover of books and pictures, and of good understanding. About five o'clock they went; and then my wife and I abroad by coach into Moorefields [Map], only for a little ayre, and so home again, staying no where, and then up to her chamber, there to talk with pleasure of this day's passages, and so to bed. This day I had the welcome news of our prize being come safe from Holland, so as I shall have hopes, I hope, of getting my money of my Lady Batten, or good part of it.

Note 1. A pewter cistern was formerly part of the furniture of a well- appointed dining-room; the plates were rinsed in it, when necessary, during the meal. A magnificent silver cistern is still preserved in the dining-room at Burghley House, the seat of the Marquis of Exeter. It is said to be the largest piece of plate in England, and was once the subject of a curious wager. B.

Note 2. The same as Morland's (age 43) so-called calculating machine. Sir Samuel (age 43) published in 1673 "The Description and Use of two Arithmetick Instruments, together with a short Treatise of Arithmetic, as likewise a Perpetual Almanack and severall useful tables"..

Pepy's Diary. 18 Mar 1668. Thence away by coach to my bookseller's, and to several places to pay my debts, and to Ducke Lane [Map], and there bought Montaigne's Essays, in English, and so away home to dinner, and after dinner with W. Pen (age 46) to White Hall, where we and my Lord Brouncker (age 48) attended the Council, to discourse about the fitness of entering of men presently for the manning of the fleete, before one ship is in condition to receive them. W. Coventry (age 40) did argue against it: I was wholly silent, because I saw the King (age 37), upon the earnestness of the Prince, was willing to it, crying very sillily, "If ever you intend to man the fleete, without being cheated by the captains and pursers, you may go to bed, and resolve never to have it manned"; and so it was, like other things, over-ruled that all volunteers should be presently entered. Then there was another great business about our signing of certificates to the Exchequer for [prize] goods, upon the £1,20,000 Act, which the Commissioners of the Treasury did all oppose, and to the laying fault upon us. But I did then speak to the justifying what we had done, even to the angering of Duncomb and Clifford, which I was vexed at: but, for all that, I did set the Office and myself right, and went away with the victory, my Lord Keeper saying that he would not advise the Council to order us to sign no more certificates. But, before I began to say anything in this matter, the King (age 37) and the Duke of York (age 34) talking at the Council-table, before all the Lords, of the Committee of Miscarriages, how this entering of men before the ships could be ready would be reckoned a miscarriage; "Why", says the King (age 37), "it is then but Mr. Pepys making of another speech to them"; which made all the Lords, and there were by also the Atturny and Sollicitor-Generall, look upon me.

1668 Bawdy House Riots

Pepy's Diary. 24 Mar 1668. Thence up and down Westminster by Mrs. Burroughes her mother's shop, thinking to have seen her, but could not, and therefore back to White Hall, where great talk of the tumult at the other end of the town, about Moore-fields [Map], among the 'prentices, taking the liberty of these holydays to pull down bawdy-houses1. And, Lord! to see the apprehensions which this did give to all people at Court, that presently order was given for all the soldiers, horse and foot, to be in armes! and forthwith alarmes were beat by drum and Trumpet through Westminster, and all to their colours, and to horse, as if the French were coming into the town! So Creed, whom I met here, and I to Lincolne's Inn-fields, thinking to have gone into the fields to have seen the 'prentices; but here we found these fields full of soldiers all in a body, and my Lord Craven (age 59) commanding of them, and riding up and down to give orders, like a madman. And some young men we saw brought by soldiers to the Guard at White Hall, and overheard others that stood by say, that it was only for pulling down the bawdy-houses; and none of the bystanders finding fault with them, but rather of the soldiers for hindering them. And we heard a justice of the Peace this morning say to the King (age 37), that he had been endeavouring to suppress this tumult, but could not; and that, imprisoning some [of them] in the new prison at Clerkenwell, the rest did come and break open the prison and release them; and that they do give out that they are for pulling down the bawdy-houses, which is one of the greatest grievances of the nation. To which the King (age 37) made a very poor, cold, insipid answer: "Why, why do they go to them, then?" and that was all, and had no mind to go on with the discourse. Mr. Creed and I to dinner to my Lord Crew (age 70), where little discourse, there being none but us at the table, and my Lord and my Lady Jemimah, and so after dinner away, Creed and I to White Hall, expecting a Committee of Tangier, but come too late. So I to attend the Council, and by and by were called in with Lord Brouncker (age 48) and Sir W. Pen (age 46) to advise how to pay away a little money to most advantage to the men of the yards, to make them dispatch the ships going out, and there did make a little speech, which was well liked, and after all it was found most satisfactory to the men, and best for the King's dispatch, that what money we had should be paid weekly to the men for their week's work until a greater sum could be got to pay them their arrears and then discharge them. But, Lord! to see what shifts and what cares and thoughts there was employed in this matter how to do the King's work and please the men and stop clamours would make a man think the King (age 37) should not eat a bit of good meat till he has got money to pay the men, but I do not see the least print of care or thoughts in him about it at all. Having done here, I out and there met Sir Fr. Hollis (age 25), who do still tell me that, above all things in the world, he wishes he had my tongue in his mouth, meaning since my speech in Parliament. He took Lord Brouncker (age 48) and me down to the guards, he and his company being upon the guards to-day; and there he did, in a handsome room to that purpose, make us drink, and did call for his bagpipes, which, with pipes of ebony, tipt with silver, he did play beyond anything of that kind that ever I heard in my life; and with great pains he must have obtained it, but with pains that the instrument do not deserve at all; for, at the best, it is mighty barbarous musick.

Note 1. It was customary for the apprentices of the metropolis to avail themselves of their holidays, especially on Shrove Tuesday, to search after women of ill fame, and to confine them during the season of Lent. See a "Satyre against Separatists", 1642. "Stand forth, Shrove Tuesday, one a' the silenc'st bricklayers; 'Tis in your charge to pull down bawdy-houses". Middleton's Inner Temple Masque, 1619, Works, ed. Bullen, vii., 209.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1668. Up betimes to the office, where by and by my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and I met and made an end of our business betimes. So I away with him to Mrs. Williams's, and there dined, and thence I alone to the Duke of York's (age 34) house, to see the new play, called "The Man is the Master", where the house was, it being not above one o'clock, very full. But my wife and Deb. being there before, with Mrs. Pierce and Corbet and Betty Turner (age 15), whom my wife carried with her, they made me room; and there I sat, it costing me 8s. upon them in oranges, at 6d. a-piece.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Mar 1668. Thence, by agreement, we all of us to the Blue Balls, hard by, whither Mr. Pierce also goes with us, who met us at the play, and anon comes Manuel, and his wife, and Knepp, and Harris (age 34), who brings with him Mr. Banister (age 38), the great master of musique; and after much difficulty in getting of musique, we to dancing, and then to a supper of some French dishes, which yet did not please me, and then to dance and sing; and mighty merry we were till about eleven or twelve at night, with mighty great content in all my company, and I did, as I love to do, enjoy myself in my pleasure as being the height of what we take pains for and can hope for in this world, and therefore to be enjoyed while we are young and capable of these joys. My wife extraordinary fine to-day, in her flower tabby suit, bought a year and more ago, before my mother's death put her into mourning, and so not worn till this day: and every body in love with it; and indeed she is very fine and handsome in it. I having paid the reckoning, which come to almost £4., we parted: my company and William Batelier, who was also with us, home in a coach, round by the Wall, where we met so many stops by the Watches, that it cost us much time and some trouble, and more money, to every Watch, to them to drink; this being encreased by the trouble the 'prentices did lately give the City, so that the Militia and Watches are very strict at this time; and we had like to have met with a stop for all night at the Constable's watch, at Mooregate, by a pragmatical Constable; but we come well home at about two in the morning, and so to bed. This noon, from Mrs. Williams's, my Lord Brouncker (age 48) sent to Somersett House [Map] to hear how the Duchess of Richmond (age 20) do; and word was brought him that she is pretty well, but mighty full of the smallpox, by which all do conclude she will be wholly spoiled, which is the greatest instance of the uncertainty of beauty that could be in this age; but then she hath had the benefit of it to be first married, and to have kept it so long, under the greatest temptations in the world from a King, and yet without the least imputation. This afternoon, at the play, Sir Fr. Hollis (age 25) spoke to me as a secret, and matter of confidence in me, and friendship to Sir W. Pen (age 46), who is now out of town, that it were well he were made acquainted that he finds in the House of Commons, which met this day, several motions made for the calling strictly again upon the Miscarriages, and particularly in the business of the Prises, and the not prosecuting of the first victory, only to give an affront to Sir W. Pen (age 46), whose going to sea this year do give them matter of great dislike. So though I do not much trouble myself for him, yet I am sorry that he should have this fall so unhappily without any fault, but rather merit of his own that made him fitter for this command than any body else, and the more for that this business of his may haply occasion their more eager pursuit against the whole body of the office.

Pepy's Diary. 31 Mar 1668. Up pretty betimes and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon I home to dinner, where uncle Thomas dined with me, as he do every quarter, and I paid him his pension; and also comes Mr. Hollier (age 59) a little fuddled, and so did talk nothing but Latin, and laugh, that it was very good sport to see a sober man in such a humour, though he was not drunk to scandal. At dinner comes a summons for this office and the Victualler to attend a Committee of Parliament this afternoon, with Sir Prince, which I accordingly did, with my papers relating to the sending of victuals to Sir John Harman's (age 43) fleete; and there, Sir R. Brookes (age 31) in the chair, we did give them a full account, but, Lord! to see how full they are and immoveable in their jealousy that some means are used to keep Harman (age 43) from coming home, for they have an implacable desire to know the bottom of the not improving the first victory, and would lay it upon Brouncker (age 48). Having given them good satisfaction I away thence, up and down, wanting a little to see whether I could get Mrs. Burroughes out, but elle being in the shop ego did speak con her much, she could not then go far, and so I took coach and away to Unthanke's, and there took up my wife and Deb., and to the Park, where, being in a Hackney, and they undressed, was ashamed to go into the tour, but went round the park, and so with pleasure home, where Mr. Pelting come and sat and talked late with us, and he being gone, I called Deb. to take pen, ink, and paper and write down what things come into my head for my wife to do in order to her going into the country, and the girl, writing not so well as she would do, cried, and her mistress construed it to be sullenness, and so away angry with her too, but going to bed she undressed me, and there I did give her good advice and baiser la, elle weeping still.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1668. Thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48) to the Royall Society, where they were just done; but there I was forced to subscribe to the building of a College, and did give £40; and several others did subscribe, some greater and some less sums; but several I saw hang off: and I doubt it will spoil the Society, for it breeds faction and ill-will, and becomes burdensome to some that cannot, or would not, do it. Here, to my great content, I did try the use of the Otacousticon, [Ear trumpet.] which was only a great glass bottle broke at the bottom, putting the neck to my eare, and there I did plainly hear the dashing of the oares of the boats in the Thames to Arundell gallery window, which, without it, I could not in the least do, and may, I believe, be improved to a great height, which I am mighty glad of.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1668. Up, after much pleasant talk with my wife, and upon some alterations I will make in my house in her absence, and I do intend to lay out some money thereon. So she and I up, and she got her ready to be gone, and by and by comes Betty Turner (age 15) and her mother, and W. Batelier, and they and Deb., to whom I did give 10s. this morning, to oblige her to please her mistress (and ego did baiser her mouche), and also Jane, and so in two coaches set out about eight o'clock towards the carrier, there for to take coach for my father's, that is to say, my wife and Betty Turner (age 15), Deb., and Jane; but I meeting my Lord Anglesey (age 53) going to the Office, was forced to 'light in Cheapside, and there took my leave of them (not baisado Deb., which je had a great mind to), left them to go to their coach, and I to the office, where all the morning busy, and so at noon with my other clerks (W. Hewer (age 26) being a day's journey with my wife) to dinner, where Mr. Pierce come and dined with me, and then with Lord Brouncker (age 48) (carrying his little kinswoman on my knee, his coach being full), to the Temple [Map], where my Lord and I 'light and to Mr. Porter's chamber, where Cocke (age 51) and his counsel, and so to the attorney's, whither the Sollicitor-Generall (age 46) come, and there, their cause about their assignments on the £1,250,000 Act was argued, where all that was to be said for them was said, and so answered by the Sollicitor-Generall (age 46) beyond what I expected, that I said not one word all my time, rather choosing to hold my tongue, and so mind my reputation with the Sollicitor-Generall (age 46), who did mightily approve of my speech in Parliament, than say anything against him to no purpose. This I believe did trouble Cocke (age 51) and these gentlemen, but I do think this best for me, and so I do think that the business will go against them, though it is against my judgment, and I am sure against all justice to the men to be invited to part with their goods and be deceived afterward of their security for payment.

Pepy's Diary. 02 Apr 1668. Thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48) and several of them to the King's Head Taverne by Chancery Lane, and there did drink and eat and talk, and, above the rest, I did hear of Mr. Hooke (age 32) and my Lord an account of the reason of concords and discords in musique, which they say is from the equality of vibrations; but I am not satisfied in it, but will at my leisure think of it more, and see how far that do go to explain it. So late at night home with Mr. Colwell, and parted, and I to the office, and then to Sir W. Pen (age 46) to confer with him, and Sir R. Ford (age 54) and Young, about our St. John Baptist prize, and so home, without more supper to bed, my family being now little by the departure of my wife and two maids.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Apr 1668. Thence my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and I to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw the latter part of "The Master and the Man", and thence by coach to Duck Lane [Map], to look out for Marsanne, in French, a man that has wrote well of musique, but it is not to be had, but I have given order for its being sent for over, and I did here buy Des Cartes his little treatise of musique, and so home, and there to read a little, and eat a little, though I find that my having so little taste do make me so far neglect eating that, unless company invite, I do not love to spend time upon eating, and so bring emptiness and the Cholique.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Apr 1668. Thence home to the office by water, where we sat till noon, and then I moved we might go to the Duke of York (age 34) and the King (age 37) presently to get out their order in writing that was ordered us yesterday about the business of certificates, that we might be secure against the tradesmen who (Sir John Banks (age 41) by name) have told me this day that they will complain in Parliament against us for denying to do them right. So we rose of a sudden, being mighty sensible of this inconvenience we are liable to should we delay to give them longer, and yet have no order for our indemnity. I did dine with Sir W. Pen (age 46), where my Lady Batten did come with desire of meeting me there, and speaking with me about the business of the £500 we demand of her for the Chest. She do protest, before God, she never did see the account, but that it was as her husband in his life-time made it, and he did often declare to her his expecting £500, and that we could not deny it him for his pains in that business, and that he hath left her worth nothing of his own in the world, and that therefore she could pay nothing of it, come what will come, but that he hath left her a beggar, which I am sorry truly for, though it is a just judgment upon people that do live so much beyond themselves in housekeeping and vanity, as they did. I did give her little answer, but generally words that might not trouble her, and so to dinner, and after dinner Sir W. Pen (age 46) and I away by water to White Hall, and there did attend the Duke of York (age 34), and he did carry us to the King's lodgings: but he was asleep in his closet; so we stayed in the Green-Roome, where the Duke of York (age 34) did tell us what rules he had, of knowing the weather, and did now tell us we should have rain before to-morrow, it having been a dry season for some time, and so it did rain all night almost; and pretty rules he hath, and told Brouncker (age 48) and me some of them, which were such as no reason seems ready to be given.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Apr 1668. Thence my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and I into the Park in his coach, and there took a great deal of ayre, saving that it was mighty dusty, and so a little unpleasant.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Apr 1668. Up, and at my office all the morning, doing business, and then at noon home to dinner all alone. Then to White Hall with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) in his coach to attend the Duke of York (age 34) upon our usual business, which was this day but little, and thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48) to the Duke of York's playhouse, where we saw "The Unfortunate Lovers", no extraordinary play, methinks, and thence I to Drumbleby's, and there did talk a great deal about pipes; and did buy a recorder, which I do intend to learn to play on, the sound of it being, of all sounds in the world, most pleasing to me.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Apr 1668. Up, and to the office, where all the morning sitting, then at noon home to dinner with my people, and so to the office again writing of my letters, and then abroad to my bookseller's, and up and down to the Duke of York's playhouse, there to see, which I did, Sir W. Davenant's corpse carried out towards Westminster, there to be buried. Here were many coaches and six horses, and many hacknies, that made it look, methought, as if it were the buriall of a poor poet. He seemed to have many children, by five or six in the first mourning-coach, all boys. And there I left them coming forth, and I to the New Exchange, there to meet Mrs. Burroughs, and did take her in a carosse and carry elle towards the Park, kissing her..., but did not go into any house, but come back and set her down at White Hall, and did give her wrapt in paper for my Valentine's gift for the last year before this, which I never did yet give her anything for, twelve half-crowns, and so back home and there to my office, where come a packet from the Downes from my brother Balty (age 28), who, with Harman (age 43), is arrived there, of which this day come the first news. And now the Parliament will be satisfied, I suppose, about the business they have so long desired between Brouncker (age 48) and Harman (age 43) about not prosecuting the first victory. Balty (age 28) is very well, and I hope hath performed his work well, that I may get him into future employment. I wrote to him this night, and so home, and there to the perfecting my getting the scale of musique without book, which I have done to perfection backward and forward, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Apr 1668. After playing a little upon my new little flageolet, that is so soft that pleases me mightily, betimes to my office, where most of the morning. Then by coach, 1s., and meeting Lord Brouncker (age 48), 'light at the Exchange [Map], and thence by water to White Hall, 1s., and there to the Chapel, expecting wind musick and to the Harp-and-Ball, and drank all alone, 2d. Back, and to the fiddling concert, and heard a practice mighty good of Grebus, and thence to Westminster Hall [Map], where all cry out that the House will be severe with Pen; but do hope well concerning the buyers, that we shall have no difficulty, which God grant! Here met Creed, and, about noon, he and I, and Sir P. Neale (age 55) to the Quaker's, and there dined with a silly Executor of Bishop Juxon's, and cozen Roger Pepys (age 50). Business of money goes on slowly in the House.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Apr 1668. Thence, with Brouncker (age 48), to the King's house, and saw "The Surprizall", where base singing, only Knepp,' who come, after her song in the clouds, to me in the pit, and there, oranges, 2s. After the play, she, and I, and Rolt, by coach, 6s. 6d., to Kensington, and there to the Grotto, and had admirable pleasure with their singing, and fine ladies listening to us: with infinite pleasure, I enjoyed myself: so to the tavern there, and did spend 16s. 6d., and the gardener 2s. Mighty merry, and sang all the way to the town, a most pleasant evening, moonshine, and set them at her house in Covent Garden [Map], and I home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Apr 1668. Thence to Lord Brouncker (age 48) and sat and talked with him, who thinks the Parliament will, by their violence and delay in money matters, force the King (age 37) to run any hazard, and dissolve them.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Apr 1668. Up, and with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) to my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and with him all of us to my Lord Ashly (age 46) to satisfy him about the reason of what we do or have done in the business of the tradesmen's certificates, which he seems satisfied with, but is not, but I believe we have done what we can justify, and he hath done what he cannot in stopping us to grant them, and I believe it will come into Parliament and make trouble.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Apr 1668. At noon dined at home, and my clerks with me, and thence I to White Hall, and there do hear how Sir W. Pen (age 47) hath delivered in his answer; and the Lords have sent it down to the Commons, but they have not yet read it, nor taken notice of it, so as, I believe, they will by design defer it till they rise, that so he, by lying under an impeachment, may be prevented in his going to sea, which will vex him, and trouble the Duke of York (age 34). Did little business with the Duke of York (age 34), and then Lord Brouncker (age 48) and I to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there saw "Love in a Tubb"; and, after the play done, I stepped up to Harris's (age 34) dressing-room, where I never was, and there I observe much company come to him, and the Witts, to talk, after the play is done, and to assign meetings. Mine was to talk about going down to see "The Resolution", and so away, and thence to Westminster Hall [Map], and there met with Mr. G. Montagu (age 45), and walked and talked; who tells me that the best fence against the Parliament's present fury is delay, and recommended it to me, in my friends' business and my own, if I have any; and is that, that Sir W. Coventry (age 40) do take, and will secure himself; that the King (age 37) will deliver up all to the Parliament; and being petitioned the other day by Mr. Brouncker (age 48) to protect him, with teares in his eyes, the King (age 37) did say he could not, and bid him shift for himself, at least till the House is up.

Pepy's Diary. 02 May 1668. Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon with Lord Brouncker (age 48) in his coach as far as the Temple [Map], and there 'light and to Hercules Pillars, and there dined, and thence to the Duke of York's playhouse, at a little past twelve, to get a good place in the pit, against the new play, and there setting a poor man to keep my place, I out, and spent an hour at Martin's, my bookseller's, and so back again, where I find the house quite full. But I had my place, and by and by the King (age 37) comes and the Duke of York (age 34); and then the play begins, called "The Sullen Lovers; or, The Impertinents", having many good humours in it, but the play tedious, and no design at all in it. But a little boy, for a farce, do dance Polichinelli, the best that ever anything was done in the world, by all men's report: most pleased with that, beyond anything in the world, and much beyond all the play.

Pepy's Diary. 08 May 1668. Thence I to White Hall, where the Duke of York (age 34) gone to the Lords' House, where there is to be a conference on the Lords' side to the Commons this afternoon, giving in their Reasons, which I would have been at, but could not; for, going by direction to the D. Gawden's chamber, there Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen (age 47), and Mr. Wren (age 39), and I, met, and did our business with the Duke of York (age 34). But, Lord! to see how this play of Sir Positive At-all, ["The Impertinents".] in abuse of Sir Robert Howard (age 42), do take, all the Duke's and every body's talk being of that, and telling more stories of him, of the like nature, that it is now the town and country talk, and, they say, is most exactly true. The Duke of York (age 34) himself said that of his playing at trap-ball is true, and told several other stories of him. This being done, Brouncker (age 48), Pen, and I to Brouncker's house, and there sat and talked, I asking many questions in mathematics to my Lord, which he do me the pleasure to satisfy me in, and here we drank and so spent an hour, and so W. Pen (age 47) and I home, and after being with W. Pen (age 47) at his house an hour, I home and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 May 1668. Thence, at noon, to Hercules Pillars, and there dined all alone, and so to White Hall, some of us attended the Duke of York (age 34) as usual, and so to attend the Council about the business of Hemskirke's project of building a ship that sails two feet for one of any other ship, which the Council did agree to be put in practice, the King (age 37) to give him, if it proves good, £5000 in hand, and £15,000 more in seven years, which, for my part, I think a piece of folly for them to meddle with, because the secret cannot be long kept. So thence, after Council, having drunk some of the King's wine and water with Mr. Chevins (age 66), my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and some others, I by water to the Old Swan [Map], and there to Michell's, and did see her and drink there, but he being there je ne baiser la; and so back again by water to Spring Garden all alone, and walked a little, and so back again home, and there a little to my viall, and so to bed, Mrs. Turner (age 45) having sat and supped with me. This morning I hear that last night Sir Thomas Teddiman, poor man! did die by a thrush in his mouth: a good man, and stout and able, and much lamented; though people do make a little mirth, and say, as I believe it did in good part, that the business of the Parliament did break his heart, or, at least, put him into this fever and disorder, that caused his death.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1668. By and by the corpse went; and I, with my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and Dr. Clerke, and Mr. Pierce, as far as the foot of London-bridge; and there we struck off into Thames Street, the rest going to Redriffe [Map], where he is to be buried. And we 'light at the Temple [Map], and there parted; and I to the King's house, and there saw the last act of "The Committee", thinking to have seen Knepp there, but she did not act. And so to my bookseller's, and there carried home some books-among others, "Dr. Wilkins's Reall Character", and thence to Mrs. Turner's (age 45), and there went and sat, and she showed me her house from top to bottom, which I had not seen before, very handsome, and here supped, and so home, and got Mercer, and she and I in the garden singing till ten at night, and so home to a little supper, and then parted, with great content, and to bed. The Duchesse of Monmouth's hip is, I hear, now set again, after much pain. I am told also that the Countess of Shrewsbury is brought home by the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) to his house, where his Duchess saying that it was not for her and the other to live together in a house, he answered, Why, Madam, I did think so, and, therefore, have ordered your coach to be ready, to carry you to your father's, which was a devilish speech, but, they say, true; and my Lady Shrewsbury is there, it seems.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1668. Thence with Lord Brouncker (age 48) to Loriners'-hall1, by Mooregate, a hall I never heard of before, to Sir Thomas Teddiman's burial, where most people belonging to the sea were. And here we had rings: and here I do hear that some of the last words that he said were, that he had a very good King, God bless him! but that the Parliament had very ill rewarded him for all the service he had endeavoured to do them and his country; so that, for certain, this did go far towards his death. But, Lord! to see among [the company] the young commanders, and Thomas Killigrew (age 56) and others that come, how unlike a burial this was, O'Brian taking out some ballads out of his pocket, which I read, and the rest come about me to hear! and there very merry we were all, they being new ballets.

Note 1. The Loriners, or Lorimers (bit-makers), of London are by reputation an ancient mistery, but they were first incorporated by letters patent of 10 Queen Anne (December 3rd, 1711). Their small hall was at the corner of Basinghall Street in London Wall. The company has no hall now.

Pepy's Diary. 15 May 1668. Thence I to my Lord Brouncker's (age 48), at Mrs. Williams's, and there dined, and she did shew me her closet, which I was sorry to see, for fear of her expecting something from me; and here she took notice of my wife's not once coming to see her, which I am glad of; for she shall not-a prating, vain, idle woman.

Pepy's Diary. 27 May 1668. Thence by coach to the Exchange [Map], and there met with Sir H. Cholmly (age 35) at Colvill's; and there did give him some orders, and so home, and there to the office again, where busy till two o'clock, and then with Sir Prince to his house, with my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and Sir J. Minnes (age 69), to dinner, where we dined very well, and much good company, among others, a Dr., a fat man, whom by face I know, as one that uses to sit in our church, that after dinner did take me out, and walked together, who told me that he had now newly entered himself into Orders, in the decay of the Church, and did think it his duty so to do, thereby to do his part toward the support and reformation thereof; and spoke very soberly, and said that just about the same age Dr. Donne did enter into Orders. I find him a sober gentleman, and a man that hath seen much of the world, and I think may do good.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jun 1668. Thence with him home, and there to the office till noon, and then with Lord Brouncker (age 48), Sir J. Minnes (age 69), and Sir G. Carteret (age 58), upon whose accounts they have been this day to the Three Tuns [Map] to dinner, and thence back again home, and after doing a little business I by coach to the King's house, and there saw good, part of "The Scornful Lady", and that done, would have takn out Knepp, but she was engaged, and so to my Lord Crew's (age 70) to visit him; from whom I learn nothing but that there hath been some controversy at the Council-table, about my Lord Sandwich's (age 42) signing, where some would not have had him, in the treaty with Portugall; but all, I think, is over in it.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jun 1668. Thence home, and all the evening to set matters in order against my going to Brampton [Map] to-morrow, being resolved upon my journey, and having the Duke of York's (age 34) leave again to-day; though I do plainly see that I can very ill be spared now, there being much business, especially about this, which I have attended the Council about, and I the man that am alone consulted with; and, besides, my Lord Brouncker (age 48) is at this time ill, and Sir W. Pen (age 47). So things being put in order at the Office, I home to do the like there; and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Jun 1668. Thence with him to my Lord Brouncker's (age 48), where a Council of the Royall Society; and there heard Mr. Harry Howard's (age 39) noble offers about ground for our College, and his intentions of building his own house there most nobly. My business was to meet Mr. Boyle (age 41), which I did, and discoursed about my eyes; and he did give me the best advice he could, but refers me to one Turberville (age 56), of Salsbury, lately come to town, which I will go to1. Thence home, where the streets full, at our end of the town, removing their wine against the Act begins, which will be two days hence, to raise the price. I did get my store in of Batelier this night. So home to supper and to bed.

Note 1. Daubigny Turberville (age 56), of Oriel College; created M.D. at Oxford,1660. He was a physician of some eminence, and, dying at Salisbury on the 21st April, 1696, aged eighty-five, he was buried in the cathedral, where his monument remains. Cassan, in his "Lives of the Bishops of Sarum", part iii., p. 103, has reprinted an interesting account of Turberville, from the "Memoir of Bishop Seth Ward", published in 1697, by Dr. Walter Pope. Turberville (age 56) was born at Wayford, co. Somerset, in 1612, and became an expert oculist; and probably Pepys received great benefit from his advice, as his vision does not appear to have failed during the many years that he lived after discontinuing the Diary. The doctor died rich, and subsequently to his decease his sister Mary, inheriting all his prescriptions, and knowing how to use them, practised as an oculist in London with good reputation. B.

Pepy's Diary. 16 Jul 1668. Up, and to the office, where Yeabsly and Lanyon come to town and to speak with me about a matter wherein they are accused of cheating the King (age 38) before the Lords' Commissioners of Tangier, and I doubt it true, but I have no hand in it, but will serve them what I can. All the morning at the office, and at noon dined at home, and then to the office again, where we met to finish the draft of the Victualler's contract, and so I by water with my Lord Brouncker (age 48) to Arundel House [Map], to the Royall Society, and there saw an experiment of a dog's being tied through the back, about the spinal artery, and thereby made void of all motion; and the artery being loosened again, the dog recovers.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Aug 1668. Thence to White Hall, and thence to visit Lord Brouncker (age 48), and back to White Hall, where saw the Queen (age 29) and ladies; and so, with Mr. Slingsby (age 47), to Mrs. Williams's, thinking to dine with Lord Brouncker (age 48) there, but did not, having promised my wife to come home, though here I met Knepp, to my great content.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Aug 1668. Betimes at my business again, and so to the office, and dined with Brouncker (age 48) and J. Minnes (age 69), at Sir W. Pen's (age 47) at a bad pasty of venison, and so to work again, and at it till past twelve at night, that I might get my great letter1 to the Duke of York (age 34) ready against to-morrow, which I shall do, to my great content. So to bed.

Note 1. In the Pepysian Library is a MS. (No. 2242), entitled, "Papers conteyning my addresse to his Royall Highnesse James Duke of Yorke (age 34), Lord High Admirall of England, &c., by letter dated the 20th of August, 1668, humbly tendering him my advice touching the present State of the Office of the Navy, with his Royall Highness's proceedings upon the same, and their result"..

Pepy's Diary. 25 Aug 1668. Thence I, mightily pleased with this success, away to the Office, where all the morning, my head full of this business. And it is pretty how Lord Brouncker (age 48) this day did tell me how he hears that a design is on foot to remove us out of the Office: and proposes that we two do agree to draw up a form of a new constitution of the Office, there to provide remedies for the evils we are now under, so that we may be beforehand with the world, which I agreed to, saying nothing of my design; and, the truth is, he is the best man of them all, and I would be glad, next myself, to save him; for, as he deserves best, so I doubt he needs his place most.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Aug 1668. Knepp home with us, and I to bed, and rose about six, mightily pleased with last night's mirth, and away by water to St. James's, and there, with Mr. Wren (age 39), did correct his copy of my letter, which the Duke of York (age 34) hath signed in my very words, without alteration of a syllable1. And so pleased therewith, I to my Lord Brouncker (age 48), who I find within, but hath business, and so comes not to the Office to-day. And so I by water to the Office, where we sat all the morning; and, just as the Board rises, comes the Duke of York's (age 34) letter, which I knowing, and the Board not being full, and desiring rather to have the Duke of York (age 34) deliver it himself to us, I suppressed it for this day, my heart beginning to falsify in this business, as being doubtful of the trouble it may give me by provoking them; but, however, I am resolved to go through it, and it is too late to help it now.

Note 1. A copy of this letter is in the British Museum, Harl. MS. 6003. See July 24th, ante, and August 29th, Post. In the Pepysian Collection are the following: An Inquisition, by his Royal Highness the Duke of York (age 34), when Lord High Admiral of England, into the Management of the Navy, 1668, with his Regulations thereon, fol. Also Mr. Pepys's Defence of the same upon an Inquisition thereunto by Parliament, 1669, fol. B.

Pepy's Diary. 28 Aug 1668. Busy at the office till toward 10 o'clock, and then by water to White Hall, where attending the Council's call all the morning with Lord Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen (age 47), and the rest, about the business of supernumeraries in the fleete, but were not called in. But here the Duke of York (age 34) did call me aside, and told me that he must speak with me in the afternoon, with Mr. Wren (age 39), for that now he hath got the paper from my Lord Keeper about the exceptions taken against the management of the Navy; and so we are to debate upon answering them.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Aug 1668. So by water home, and did spend the evening with W. Hewer (age 26), telling him how we are all like to be turned out, Lord Brouncker (age 48) telling me this evening that the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) did, within few hours, say that he had enough to turn us all out which I am not sorry for at all, for I know the world will judge me to go for company; and my eyes are such as I am not able to do the business of my Office as I used, and would desire to do, while I am in it. So with full content, declaring all our content in being released of my employment, my wife and I to bed, and W. Hewer (age 26) home, and so all to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Aug 1668. So to White Hall in the evening, to the Queen's (age 29) side, and there met the Duke of York (age 34); and he did tell me and W. Coventry (age 40), who was with me, how that Lord Anglesey (age 54) did take notice of our reading his long and sharp letter to the Board; but that it was the better, at least he said so. The Duke of York (age 34), I perceive, is earnest in it, and will have good effects of it; telling W. Coventry (age 40) that it was a letter that might have come from the Commissioners of Accounts, but it was better it should come first from him. I met Lord Brouncker (age 48), who, I perceive, and the rest, do smell that it comes from me, but dare not find fault with it; and I am glad of it, it being my glory and defence that I did occasion and write it.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Sep 1668. Up, and to the Office, where busy till it was time to go to the Commissioners of Accounts, which I did about noon, and there was received with all possible respect, their business being only to explain the meaning of one of their late demands to us, which we had not answered in our answer to them, and, this being done, I away with great content, my mind being troubled before, and so to the Exchequer and several places, calling on several businesses, and particularly my bookseller's, among others, for "Hobbs's Leviathan"1, which is now mightily called for; and what was heretofore sold for 8s. I now give 24s. for, at the second hand, and is sold for 30s., it being a book the Bishops will not let be printed again, and so home to dinner, and then to the office all the afternoon, and towards evening by water to the Commissioners of the Treasury, and presently back again, and there met a little with W. Pen (age 47) and the rest about our Prize accounts, and so W. Pen (age 47) and Lord Brouncker (age 48) and I at the lodging of the latter to read over our new draft of the victualler's contract, and so broke up and home to supper and to bed.

Note 1. "Leviathan: or the matter, forme and power of a Commonwealth ecclesiasticall and civill", by Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, first published in 1651. It was reprinted in 1680, with its old date. Hobbes's complete works, English and Latin, were published by Sir William Molesworth in sixteen volumes 8vo. between 1839 and 1845.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Sep 1668. At the office all the morning, we met, and at noon dined at home, and after dinner carried my wife and Deb. to Unthanke's, and I to White Hall with Mr. Gibson, where the rest of our officers met us, and to the Commissioners of the Treasury about the Victualling contract, but staid not long, but thence, sending Gibson to my wife, I with Lord Brouncker (age 48) (who was this day in an unusual manner merry, I believe with drink), J. Minnes (age 69), and W. Pen (age 47) to Bartholomew-Fair; and there saw the dancing mare again, which, to-day, I find to act much worse than the other day, she forgetting many things, which her master beat her for, and was mightily vexed; and then the dancing of the ropes, and also the little stage-play, which is very ridiculous, and so home to the office with Lord Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen (age 47), and myself (J. Minnes (age 69) being gone home before not well), and so, after a little talk together, I home to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 09 Sep 1668. Thence by water home and to dinner, and after dinner by water again to White Hall, where Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen (age 47), and I attended the Commissioners of the Treasury about the victualling-contract, where high words between Sir Thomas Clifford (age 38) and us, and myself more particularly, who told him that something, that he said was told him about this business, was a flat untruth. However, we went on to our business in, the examination of the draught, and so parted, and I vexed at what happened, and Brouncker (age 48) and W. Pen (age 47) and I home in a Hackney coach. And I all that night so vexed that I did not sleep almost all night, which shows how unfit I am for trouble. So, after a little supper, vexed, and spending a little time melancholy in making a base to the Lark's song, I to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 13 Sep 1668. Lord's Day. The like all this morning and afternoon, and finished it to my mind. So about four o'clock walked to the Temple [Map], and there by coach to St. James's, and met, to my wish, the Duke of York (age 34) and Mr. Wren; and understand the Duke of York (age 34) hath received answers from Brouncker (age 48), W. Pen (age 47), and J. Minnes (age 69); and as soon as he saw me, he bid Mr. Wren (age 39) read them over with me. So having no opportunity of talk with the Duke of York (age 34), and Mr. Wren (age 39) some business to do, he put them into my hands like an idle companion, to, take home with me before himself had read them, which do give me great opportunity of altering my answer, if there was cause.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Sep 1668. Up, and all the morning sitting at the office, where every body grown mighty cautious in what they do, or omit to do, and at noon comes Knepp, with design to dine with Lord Brouncker (age 48), but she being undressed, and there being: much company, dined with me; and after dinner I out with her, and carried her to the playhouse; and in the way did give her five guineas as a fairing, I having given her nothing a great while, and her coming hither sometimes having been matter of cost to her, and so I to St. James's, but missed of the Duke of York (age 34), and so went back to the King's playhouse, and saw "Rollo, Duke of Normandy", which, for old acquaintance, pleased me pretty well, and so home and to my business,. and to read again, and to bed. This evening Batelier comes to tell me that he was going down to Cambridge to my company, to see the Fair, which vexed me, and the more because I fear he do know that Knepp did dine with me to-day1.

Note 1. And that he might tell Mrs. Pepys. B.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Sep 1668. Up, and to the office, where all the morning busy, and so dined with my people at home, and then to the King's playhouse, and there saw "The Silent Woman"; the best comedy, I think, that ever was wrote; and sitting by Shadwell the poet, he was big with admiration of it. Here was my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and W. Pen (age 47) and their ladies in the box, being grown mighty kind of a sudden; but, God knows, it will last but a little while, I dare swear. Knepp did her part mighty well. And so home straight, and to work, and particularly to my cozen Roger (age 51), who, W. Hewer (age 26) and my wife writes me, do use them with mighty plenty and noble entertainment: so home to supper, and to bed. All the news now is, that Mr. Trevor (age 44) is for certain now to be Secretary, in Morrice's (age 65) place, which the Duke of York (age 34) did himself tell me yesterday; and also that Parliament is to be adjourned to the 1st of March, which do please me well, hoping thereby to get my things in a little better order than I should have done; and the less attendances at that end of the town in winter.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Sep 1668. So to the 'Change [Map] a little, and then home to dinner, and then by water to White Hall, to attend the Commissioners of the Treasury with Alderman Backewell (age 50), about £10,000 he is to lend us for Tangier, and then up to a Committee of the Council, where was the Duke of York (age 34), and they did give us, the Officers of the Navy, the proposals of the several bidders for the victualling of the Navy, for us to give our answer to, which is the best, and whether it be better to victual by commission or contract, and to bring them our answer by Friday afternoon, which is a great deal of work. So thence back with Sir J. Minnes (age 69) home, and come after us Sir W. Pen (age 47) and Lord Brouncker (age 48), and we fell to the business, and I late when they were gone to digest something of it, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Sep 1668. Up betimes and Sir D. Gauden with me, and I told him all, being very desirous for the King's sake, as well as my own, that he may be kept in it, and after consulting him I to the Office, where we met again and spent most of the morning about this business, and no other, and so at noon home to dinner, and then close with Mr. Gibson till night, drawing up our answer, which I did the most part by seven at night, and so to Lord Brouncker (age 48) and the rest at his lodgings to read it, and they approved of it. So back home to supper, and made my boy read to me awhile, and then to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Sep 1668. Up, and Sir D. Gauden with me betimes to confer again about this business, and he gone I all the morning finishing our answer, which I did by noon, and so to dinner, and W. Batelier with me, who is lately come from Impington, beyond which I perceive he went not, whatever his pretence at first was; and so he tells me how well and merry all are there, and how nobly used by my cozen. He gone, after dinner I to work again, and Gibson having wrote our answer fair and got Brouncker (age 48) and the rest to sign it, I by coach to White Hall to the Committee of the Council, which met late, and Brouncker (age 48) and J. Minnes (age 69) with me, and there the Duke of York (age 34) present (but not W. Coventry (age 40), who I perceive do wholly avoid to have to do publickly in this business, being shy of appearing in any Navy business, which I telling him the other day that I thought the King (age 38) might suffer by it, he told me that the occasion is now so small that it cannot be fatal to the service, and for the present it is better for him not to appear, saying that it may fare the worse for his appearing in it as things are now governed), where our answer was read and debated, and some hot words between the Duke of York (age 34) and Sir T. Clifford, the first for and the latter against Gawden, but the whole put off to to-morrow's Council, for till the King (age 38) goes out of town the next week the Council sits every day. So with the Duke of York (age 34) and some others to his closet, and Alderman Backewell (age 50) about a Committee of Tangier, and there did agree upon a price for pieces of eight at 4s. 6d. Present the Duke of York (age 34), Arlington (age 50), Berkeley, Sir J. Minnes (age 69), and myself. They gone, the Duke of York (age 34) did tell me how hot Clifford is for Child (age 37), and for removing of old Officers, he saying plainly to-night, that though Prince was a man that had done the best service that he believed any man, or any ten men, could have done, yet that it was for the King's interest not to let it lie too long in one hand, lest nobody should be able to serve him but one. But the Duke of York (age 34) did openly tell him that he was not for removing of old servants that have done well, neither in this place, nor in any other place, which is very nobly said. It being 7 or 8 at night, I home with Backewell by coach, and so walked to D. Gawden's, but he not at home, and so back to my chamber, the boy to read to me, and so to supper and to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 27 Sep 1668. Thence spent all the afternoon walking in the Park, and then in the evening at Court, on the Queen's (age 29) side; and there met Mr. Godolphin (age 33), who tells me that the news, is true we heard yesterday, of my Lord Sandwich's (age 43) being come to Mount's Bay, in Cornwall, and so I heard this afternoon at Mrs. Pierce's, whom I went to make a short visit to. This night, in the Queen's drawing-room, my Lord Brouncker (age 48) told me the difference that is now between the three Embassadors here, the Venetian, French, and Spaniard; the third not being willing to make a visit to the first, because he would not receive him at the door; who is willing to give him as much respect as he did to the French, who was used no otherwise, and who refuses now to take more of him, upon being desired thereto, in order to the making an accommodation in this matter, which is very pretty. So a boat staying for me all this evening, I home in the dark about eight at night, and so over the ruins from the Old Swan [Map] home with great trouble, and so to hear my boy read a little, and supper and to bed. This evening I found at home Pelling and Wallington and one Aldrige, and we supped and sung.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Oct 1668. Up, and with Mr. Turner by water to White Hall, there to think to enquire when the Duke of York (age 34) will be in town, in order to Mr. Turner's going down to Audley Ends [Map] about his place; and here I met in St. James's Park with one that told us that the Duke of York (age 34) would be in town to-morrow, and so Turner parted and went home, and I also did stop my intentions of going to the Court, also this day, about securing Mr. Turner's place of Petty-purveyor to Mr. Hater. So I to my Lord Brouncker's (age 48), thinking to have gone and spoke to him about it, but he is gone out to town till night, and so, meeting a gentleman of my Lord Middleton's (age 60) looking for me about the payment of the £1000 lately ordered to his Lord, in advance of his pay, which shall arise upon his going Governor to Tangier, I did go to his Lord's lodgings, and there spoke the first time with him, and find him a shrewd man, but a drinking man, I think, as the world says; but a man that hath seen much of the world, and is a Scot. I offered him my service, though I can do him little; but he sends his man home with me, where I made him stay, till I had gone to Sir W. Pen (age 47), to bespeak him about Mr. Hater, who, contrary to my fears, did appear very friendly, to my great content; for I was afraid of his appearing for his man Burroughs. But he did not; but did declare to me afterwards his intentions to desire an excuse in his own business, to be eased of the business of the Comptroller, his health not giving him power to stay always in town, but he must go into the country. I did say little to him but compliment, having no leisure to think of his business, or any man's but my own, and so away and home, where I find Sir H. Cholmly (age 36) come to town; and is come hither to see me: and he is a man that I love mightily, as being, of a gentleman, the most industrious that ever I saw. He staid with me awhile talking, and telling me his obligations to my Lord Sandwich (age 43), which I was glad of; and that the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) is now chief of all men in this kingdom, which I knew before; and that he do think the Parliament will hardly ever meet again; which is a great many men's thoughts, and I shall not be sorry for it. He being gone, I with my Lord Middleton's (age 60) servant to Mr. Colvill's, but he was not in town, and so he parted, and I home, and there to dinner, and Mr. Pelling with us; and thence my wife and Mercer, and W. Hewer (age 26) and Deb., to the King's playhouse, and I afterwards by water with them, and there we did hear the Eunuch (who, it seems, is a Frenchman, but long bred in Italy) sing, which I seemed to take as new to me, though I saw him on Saturday last, but said nothing of it; but such action and singing I could never have imagined to have heard, and do make good whatever Tom Hill used to tell me. Here we met with Mr. Batelier and his sister, and so they home with us in two coaches, and there at my house staid and supped, and this night my bookseller Shrewsbury comes, and brings my books of Martyrs, and I did pay him for them, and did this night make the young women before supper to open all the volumes for me.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Oct 1668. So to supper, and after supper to read a ridiculous nonsensical book set out by Will. Pen (age 23), for the Quakers; but so full of nothing but nonsense, that I was ashamed to read in it. So they gone, we to bed1. 13th. Up, and to the office, and before the office did speak with my Lord Brouncker (age 48), and there did get his ready assent to T. Hater's having of Mr. Turner's place, and so Sir J. Minnes's (age 69) also: but when we come to sit down at the Board, comes to us Mr. Wren (age 39) this day to town, and tells me that James Southern do petition the Duke of York (age 34) for the Storekeeper's place of Deptford, Kent [Map], which did trouble me much, and also the Board, though, upon discourse, after he was gone, we did resolve to move hard for our Clerks, and that places of preferment may go according to seniority and merit. So, the Board up, I home with my people to dinner, and so to the office again, and there, after doing some business, I with Mr. Turner to the Duke of Albemarle's (age 59) at night; and there did speak to him about his appearing to Mr. Wren (age 39) a friend to Mr. Turner, which he did take kindly from me; and so away thence, well pleased with what we had now done, and so I with him home, stopping at my Lord Brouncker's (age 48), and getting his hand to a letter I wrote to the Duke of York (age 34) for T. Hater, and also at my Lord Middleton's (age 60), to give him an account of what I had done this day, with his man, at Alderman Backewell's (age 50), about the getting of his £1000 paid2 and here he did take occasion to discourse about the business of the Dutch war, which, he says, he was always an enemy to; and did discourse very well of it, I saying little, but pleased to hear him talk; and to see how some men may by age come to know much, and yet by their drinking and other pleasures render themselves not very considerable. I did this day find by discourse with somebody, that this nobleman was the great Major-General Middleton; that was of the Scots army, in the beginning of the late war against the King (age 38). Thence home and to the office to finish my letters, and so home and did get my wife to read to me, and then Deb to comb my head....

Note 1. Penn's (age 23) first work, entitled, "Truth exalted, in a short but sure testimony against all those religions, faiths, and worships, that have been formed and followed, in the darkness of apostacy; and for that glorious light which is now risen, and shines forth, in the life and doctrine of the despised Quakers.... by W. Penn (age 23), whom divine love constrains, in holy contempt, to trample on Egypt's glory, not fearing the King's wrath, having beheld the Majesty of Him who is invisible:" London, 1668. B.

Note 2. It was probably for this payment that the tally was obtained, the loss of which caused Pepys so much anxiety. See November 26th, 1668.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Oct 1668. Lord's Day. Up, and with my boy Tom all the morning altering the places of my pictures with great pleasure, and at noon to dinner, and then comes Mr. Shales to see me, and I with him to recommend him to my Lord Brouncker's (age 48) service, which I did at Madam Williams's, and my Lord receives him.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Oct 1668. Thence with Brouncker (age 48) to Lincolne's Inn, and Mr. Ball, to visit Dr. Wilkins (age 54), now newly Bishop of Chester: and he received us mighty kindly; and had most excellent discourse from him about his Book of Reall Character: and so I with Lord Brouncker (age 48) to White Hall, and there saw the Queen (age 29) and some ladies, and with Lord Brouncker (age 48) back, it again being a rainy evening, and so my Lord forced to lend me his coach till I got a Hackney which I did, and so home and to supper, and got my wife to read to me, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 21 Oct 1668. At noon to dinner to Mr. Batelier's, his mother coming this day a-housewarming to him, and several friends of his, to which he invited us. Here mighty merry, and his mother the same; I heretofore took her for a gentlewoman, and understanding. I rose from table before the rest, because under an obligation to go to my Lord Brouncker's (age 48), where to meet several gentlemen of the Royal Society, to go and make a visit to the French Embassador Colbert (age 43), at Leicester House, he having endeavoured to make one or two to my Lord Brouncker (age 48), as our President, but he was not within, but I come too late, they being gone before: but I followed to Leicester House; but they are gore in and up before me; and so I away to the New Exchange, and there staid for my wife, and she come, we to Cow Lane [Map], and there I shewed her the coach which I pitch on, and she is out of herself for joy almost. But the man not within, so did nothing more towards an agreement, but to Crow's (age 51) about a bed, to have his advice, and so home, and there had my wife to read to me, and so to supper and to bed. Memorandum: that from Crow's, we went back to Charing Cross [Map], and there left my people at their tailor's, while I to my Lord Sandwich's (age 43) lodgings, who come to town the last night, and is come thither to lye: and met with him within: and among others my new cozen Creed, who looks mighty soberly; and he and I saluted one another with mighty gravity, till we come to a little more freedom of talk about it. But here I hear that Sir Gilbert Pickering is lately dead, about three days since, which makes some sorrow there, though not much, because of his being long expected to die, having been in a lethargy long. So waited on my Lord to Court, and there staid and saw the ladies awhile: and thence to my wife, and took them up; and so home, and to supper and bed.

Pepy's Diary. 24 Oct 1668. So to the office, where all the morning, and then to dinner, and so all the afternoon late at the office, and so home; and my wife to read to me, and then with much content to bed. This day Lord Brouncker (age 48) tells me that the making Sir J. Minnes (age 69) a bare Commissioner is now in doing, which I am glad of; but he speaks of two new Commissioners, which I do not believe.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Oct 1668. At the office all the morning, where Mr. Wren (age 39) first tells us of the order from the King (age 38), came last night to the Duke of York (age 35), for signifying his pleasure to the Sollicitor-General (age 46) for drawing up a Commission for suspending of my Lord Anglesey (age 54), and putting in Sir Thomas Littleton (age 47) and Sir Thomas Osborne, the former a creature of Arlington's (age 50), and the latter of the Duke of Buckingham's (age 40), during the suspension. The Duke of York (age 35) was forced to obey, and did grant it, he being to go to Newmarket, Suffolk this day with the King (age 38), and so the King (age 38) pressed for it. But Mr. Wren (age 39) do own that the Duke of York (age 35) is the most wounded in this, in the world, for it is done and concluded without his privity, after his appearing for Lord Anglesey (age 54), and that it is plain that they do ayme to bring the Admiralty into Commission too, and lessen the Duke of York (age 35). This do put strange apprehensions into all our Board; only I think I am the least troubled at it, for I care not at all for it: but my Lord Brouncker (age 48) and Pen do seem to think much of it.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Nov 1668. So home, and there to supper, and I observed my wife to eye my eyes whether I did ever look upon Deb., which I could not but do now and then (and to my grief did see the poor wretch look on me and see me look on her, and then let drop a tear or two, which do make my heart relent at this minute that I am writing this with great trouble of mind, for she is indeed my sacrifice, poor girle); and my wife did tell me in bed by the by of my looking on other people, and that the only way is to put things out of sight, and this I know she means by Deb., for she tells me that her Aunt was here on Monday, and she did tell her of her desire of parting with Deb., but in such kind terms on both sides that my wife is mightily taken with her. I see it will be, and it is but necessary, and therefore, though it cannot but grieve me, yet I must bring my mind to give way to it. We had a great deal of do this day at the Office about Clutterbucke1, I declaring my dissent against the whole Board's proceedings, and I believe I shall go near to shew W. Pen (age 47) a very knave in it, whatever I find my Lord Brouncker (age 48).

Note 1. See note to February 4th, 1663-64.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Nov 1668. Up, and to the Office all the morning, where the new Treasurers come, their second time, and before they sat down, did discourse with the Board, and particularly my Lord Brouncker (age 48), about their place, which they challenge, as having been heretofore due, and given to their predecessor; which, at last, my Lord did own hath been given him only out of courtesy to his quality, and that he did not take it as a right at the Board: so they, for the present, sat down, and did give him the place, but, I think, with an intent to have the Duke of York's (age 35) directions about it. My wife and maids busy now, to make clean the house above stairs, the upholsters having done there, in her closet and the blue room, and they are mighty pretty.

Pepy's Diary. 26 Nov 1668. Up, and at the Office all the morning, where I was to have delivered the Duke of York's (age 35) letter of advice to the Board, in answer to our several answers to his great letter; but Lord Brouncker (age 48) not being there, and doubtful to deliver it before the new Treasurers, I forbore it to next sitting.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Dec 1668. By and by comes my uncle, and then to dinner, where a venison pasty and very merry, and after dinner I carried my wife and her to Smithfield [Map], where they sit in the coach, while Mr. Pickering (age 50), who meets me there, and I, and W. Hewer (age 26), and a friend of his, a jockey, did go about to see several pairs of horses, for my coach; but it was late, and we agreed on none, but left it to another time: but here I do see instances of a piece of craft and cunning that I never dreamed of, concerning the buying and choosing of horses. So Mr. Pickering (age 50), to whom I am much beholden for his kindness herein, and I parted; and I with my people home, where I left them, and I to the office, to meet about some business of Sir W. Warren's accounts, where I vexed to see how ill all the Comptroller's business is likely to go on, so long as ever Sir J. Minnes (age 69) lives; and so troubled I was, that I thought it a good occasion for me to give my thoughts of it in writing, and therefore wrote a letter at the Board, by the help of a tube, to Lord Brouncker (age 48), and did give it him, which I kept a copy of, and it may be of use to me hereafter to shew, in this matter. This being done, I home to my aunt, who supped with us, and my uncle also: and a good-humoured woman she is, so that I think we shall keep her acquaintance; but mighty proud she is of her wedding-ring, being lately set with diamonds; cost her about £12: and I did commend it mightily to her, but do not think it very suitable for one of our quality. After supper they home, and we to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Dec 1668. Up, and with W. Hewer (age 26) by water to White Hall, and there did wait as usual upon the Duke of York (age 35), where, upon discoursing something touching the Ticket-Office, which by letter the Board did give the Duke of York (age 35) their advice, to be put upon Lord Brouncker (age 48), Sir J. Minnes (age 69) did foolishly rise up and complain of the Office, and his being made nothing of; and this before Sir Thomas Littleton (age 47), who would be glad of this difference among us, which did trouble me mightily; and therefore I did forbear to say what I otherwise would have thought fit for me to say on this occasion, upon so impertinent a speech as this doting fool made-but, I say, I let it alone, and contented myself that it went as I advised, as to the Duke of York's (age 35) judgment, in the thing disputed. And so thence away, my coach meeting me there and carrying me to several places to do little jobs, which is a mighty convenience, and so home, where by invitation I find my aunt Wight (age 49), who looked over all our house, and is mighty pleased with it, and indeed it is now mighty handsome, and rich in furniture.

Pepy's Diary. 07 Dec 1668. So to talk of general things: and telling him that, with all these doings, he, I thanked God, stood yet; he told me, Yes, but that he thought his continuing in, did arise from his enemies my Lord of Buckingham (age 40) and Arlington's (age 50) seeing that he cared so little if he was out; and he do protest to me that he is as weary of the Treasury, as ever he was of the Navy. He tells me that he do believe that their heat is over almost, as to the Navy, there being now none left of the old stock but my Lord Brouncker (age 48), J. Minnes (age 69), who is ready to leave the world, and myself. But he tells me that he do foresee very great wants and great disorders by reason thereof; insomuch, as he is represented to the King (age 38) by his enemies as a melancholy man, and one that is still prophesying ill events, so as the King (age 38) called him Visionaire, which being told him, he said he answered the party, that, whatever he foresaw, he was not afeard as to himself of any thing, nor particularly of my Lord Arlington (age 50), so much as the Duke of Buckingham (age 40) hath been, nor of the Duke of Buckingham (age 40), so much as my Lord Arlington (age 50) at this time is. But he tells me that he hath been always looked upon as a melancholy man; whereas, others that would please the King (age 38) do make him believe that all is safe: and so he hath heard my Chancellor (age 59) openly say to the King (age 38), that he was now a glorious Prince, and in a glorious condition, because of some one accident that hath happened, or some one rub that hath been removed; "when", says W. Coventry (age 40), "they reckoned their one good meal, without considering that there was nothing left in the cup board for to-morrow". After this and other discourse of this kind, I away, and walked to my Lord Sandwich's (age 43), and walked with him to White Hall, and took a quarter of an hour's walk in the garden with him, which I had not done for so much time with him since his coming into England; and talking of his own condition, and particularly of the world's talk of his going to Tangier. I find, if his conditions can be made profitable and safe as to money, he would go, but not else; but, however, will seem not averse to it, because of facilitating his other accounts now depending, which he finds hard to get through, but yet hath some hopes, the King (age 38), he says, speaking very kindly to him.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Dec 1668. Up, and with W. Hewer (age 26) by water to Somerset House [Map]; and there I to my Lord Brouncker (age 48), before he went forth to the Duke of York (age 35), and there told him my confidence that I should make Middleton appear a fool, and that it was, I thought, best for me to complain of the wrong he hath done; but brought it about, that my Lord desired me I would forbear, and promised that he would prevent Middleton till I had given in my answer to the Board, which I desired: and so away to White Hall, and there did our usual attendance and no word spoke before the Duke of York (age 35) by Middleton at all; at which I was glad to my heart, because by this means I have time to draw up my answer to my mind. So with W. Hewer (age 26) by coach to Smithfield [Map], but met not Mr. Dickering (age 50), he being not come, and so he [Will] and I to a cook's shop, in Aldersgate Street; and dined well for 19 1/2 d., upon roast beef, pleasing ourselves with the infinite strength we have to prove Middleton a coxcomb; and so, having dined, we back to Smithfield [Map], and there met Pickering, and up and down all the afternoon about horses, and did see the knaveries and tricks of jockeys. Here I met W. Joyce, who troubled me with his impertinencies a great while, and the like Mr. Knepp who, it seems, is a kind of a jockey, and would fain have been doing something for me, but I avoided him, and the more for fear of being troubled thereby with his wife, whom I desire but dare not see, for my vow to my wife. At last went away and did nothing, only concluded upon giving £50 for a fine pair of black horses we saw this day se'nnight; and so set Mr. Dickering (age 50) down near his house, whom I am much beholden to, for his care herein, and he hath admirable skill, I perceive, in this business, and so home, and spent the evening talking and merry, my mind at good ease, and so to bed.

Pepy's Diary. 18 Dec 1668. All the morning at the office about Sir W. Warren's accounts, my mind full of my business, having before we met gone to Lord Brouncker (age 48), and got him to read over my paper, who owns most absolute content in it, and the advantage I have in it, and the folly of the Surveyor.

Pepy's Diary. 23 Dec 1668. So home to dinner, and then with my wife alone abroad, with our new horses, the beautifullest almost that ever I saw, and the first time they ever carried her, and me but once; but we are mighty proud of them. To her tailor's, and so to the 'Change [Map], and laid out three or four pounds in lace, for her and me; and so home, and there I up to my Lord Brouncker (age 48), at his lodgings, and sat with him an hour, on purpose to talk over the wretched state of this Office at present, according to the present hands it is made up of; wherein he do fully concur with me, and that it is our part not only to prepare for defending it and ourselves, against the consequences of it, but to take the best ways we can, to make it known to the Duke of York (age 35); for, till Sir J. Minnes (age 69) be removed, and a sufficient man brought into W. Pen's (age 47) place, when he is gone, it is impossible for this Office ever to support itself.

Pepy's Diary. 25 Dec 1668. So home, and to dinner alone with my wife, who, poor wretch! sat undressed all day, till ten at night, altering and lacing of a noble petticoat: while I by her, making the boy read to me the Life of Julius Caesar, and Des Cartes' book of Musick1 -the latter of which I understand not, nor think he did well that writ it, though a most learned man. Then, after supper, I made the boy play upon his lute, which I have not done twice before since he come to me; and so, my mind in mighty content, we to bed.

Note 1. "Musicae Compendium". By Rene Des Cartes, Amsterdam, 1617; rendered into English, London, 1653, 4to. The translator, whose name did not appear on the title, was William, Viscount Brouncker (age 48), Pepys's colleague, who proved his knowledge of music by the performance.

Pepy's Diary. 03 Jan 1669. Lord's Day. Up, and busy all the morning, getting rooms and dinner ready for my guests, which were my uncle and aunt Wight (age 50), and two of their cousins, and an old woman, and Mr. Mills and his wife; and a good dinner, and all our plate out, and mighty fine and merry, only I a little vexed at burning a new table-cloth myself, with one of my trencher-salts. Dinner done, I out with W. Hewer (age 27) and Mr. Spong, who by accident come to dine with me, and good talk with him: to White Hall by coach, and there left him, and I with my Lord Brouncker (age 49) to attend the Duke of York (age 35), and then up and down the House till the evening, hearing how the King (age 38) do intend this frosty weather, it being this day the first, and very hard frost, that hath come this year, and very cold it is.

Pepy's Diary. 04 Jan 1669. By and by I met my Lord Brouncker (age 49); and he and I to the Duke of York (age 35) alone, and discoursed over the carriage of the present Treasurers, in opposition to, or at least independency of, the Duke of York (age 35), or our Board, which the Duke of York (age 35) is sensible of, and all remember, I believe; for they do carry themselves very respectlessly of him and us. We also declared our minds together to the Duke of York (age 35) about Sir John Minnes's (age 69) incapacity to do any service in the Office, and that it is but to betray the King (age 38) to have any business of trust committed to his weakness. So the Duke of York (age 35) was very sensible of it and promised to speak to the King (age 38) about it. That done, I with W. Hewer (age 27) took up my wife at Unthank's, and so home, and there with pleasure to read and talk, and so to supper, and put into writing, in merry terms, our agreement between my wife and me, about £30 a-year, and so to bed. This was done under both our hands merrily, and put into W. Hewer's (age 27) to keep.

Pepy's Diary. 08 Jan 1669. Up, and with Colonel Middleton, in his coach, and Mr. Tippets to White Hall; and there attended the Duke of York (age 35) with the rest, where the Duke was mighty plain with the Treasurers, according to the advice my Lord Brouncker (age 49) and I did give him the other night, and he did it fully; and so as, I believe, will make the Treasurers carefull of themselves, unless they do resolve upon defying the Duke of York (age 35).

Pepy's Diary. 09 Jan 1669. Up, and at the office all the morning, and at noon, my Lord Brouncker (age 49), Mr. Wren (age 40), Joseph Williamson (age 35), and Captain Cocke (age 52), dined with me; and, being newly sat down, comes in, by invitation of Williamson's (age 35), the Lieutenant of the Tower, and he brings in with him young Mr. Whore, whose father, of the Tower, I know.-And here I had a neat dinner, and all in so good manner and fashion, and with so good company, and everything to my mind, as I never had more in my life-the company being to my heart's content, and they all well pleased. So continued, looking over my books and closet till the evening, and so I to the Office and did a good deal of business, and so home to supper and to bed with my mind mightily pleased with this day's management, as one of the days of my life of fullest content.

Pepy's Diary. 15 Jan 1669. Thence he and I out of doors, but he to Sir J. Duncomb (age 46), and I to White Hall through the Park, where I met the King (age 38) and the Duke of York (age 35), and so walked with them, and so to White Hall, where the Duke of York (age 35) met the office and did a little business; and I did give him thanks for his favour to me yesterday, at the Committee of Tangier, in my absence, Mr. Povy (age 55) having given me advice of it, of the discourse there of doing something as to the putting the payment of the garrison into some undertaker's hand, Alderman Backewell (age 51), which the Duke of York (age 35) would not suffer to go on, without my presence at the debate. And he answered me just thus: that he ought to have a care of him that do the King's business in the manner that I do, and words of more force than that. Then down with Lord Brouncker (age 49) to Sir R. Murray (age 61), into the King's little elaboratory, under his closet, a pretty place; and there saw a great many chymical glasses and things, but understood none of them. So I home and to dinner, and then out again and stop with my wife at my cozen Turner's where I staid and sat a while, and carried The. (age 17) and my wife to the Duke of York's (age 35) house, to "Macbeth", and myself to White Hall, to the Lords of the Treasury, about Tangier business; and there was by at much merry discourse between them and my Lord Anglesey (age 54), who made sport of our new Treasurers, and called them his deputys, and much of that kind. And having done my own business, I away back, and carried my cozen Turner and sister Dyke to a friend's house, where they were to sup, in Lincoln's Inn Fields; and I to the Duke of York's (age 35) house and saw the last two acts, and so carried The. (age 17) thither, and so home with my wife, who read to me late, and so to supper and to bed. This day The. Turner (age 17) shewed me at the play my Baroness Portman (age 29), who has grown out of my knowledge.

Pepy's Diary. 12 Feb 1669. Thence to the Treasurer's; and I and Sir J. Minnes (age 69) and Mr. Tippets down to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, and there had a hot debate from Sir Thomas Clifford (age 38) and my Lord Ashly (age 47) (the latter of which, I hear, is turning about as fast as he can to the Duke of Buckingham's (age 41) side, being in danger, it seems, of being otherwise out of play, which would not be convenient for him), against Sir W. Coventry (age 41) and Sir J. Duncomb, who did uphold our Office against an accusation of our Treasurers, who told the Lords that they found that we had run the King (age 38) in debt £50,000 or more, more than the money appointed for the year would defray, which they declared like fools, and with design to hurt us, though the thing is in itself ridiculous. But my Lord Ashly (age 47) and Clifford did most horribly cry out against the want of method in the Office. At last it come that it should be put in writing what they had to object; but I was devilish mad at it, to see us thus wounded by our own members, and so away vexed, and called my wife, and to Hercules Pillars, Tom and I, there dined; and here there coming a Frenchman by with his Shew, we did make him shew it us, which he did just as Lacy (age 54) acts it, which made it mighty pleasant to me. So after dinner we away and to Dancre's (age 44), and there saw our picture of Greenwich, Kent [Map] in doing, which is mighty pretty, and so to White Hall, my wife to Unthank's, and I attended with Lord Brouncker (age 49) the King (age 38) and Council, about the proposition of balancing Storekeeper's accounts and there presented Hosier's book, and it was mighty well resented and approved of. So the Council being up, we to the Queen's (age 30) side with the King (age 38) and Duke of York (age 35): and the Duke of York (age 35) did take me out to talk of our Treasurers, whom he is mighty angry with: and I perceive he is mighty desirous to bring in as many good motions of profit and reformation in the Navy as he can, before the Treasurers do light upon them, they being desirous, it seems, to be thought the great reformers: and the Duke of York (age 35) do well. But to my great joy he is mighty open to me in every thing; and by this means I know his whole mind, and shall be able to secure myself, if he stands. Here to-night I understand, by my Lord Brouncker (age 49), that at last it is concluded on by the King (age 38) and Buckingham that my Lord of Ormond (age 58) shall not hold his government of Ireland, which is a great stroke, to shew the power of Buckingham and the poor spirit of the King (age 38), and little hold that any man can have of him.

Pepy's Diary. 17 Feb 1669. Up, and with W. Hewer (age 27) with me to Lincoln's Inn, by appointment, to have spoke with Mr. Pedley about Mr. Goldsborough's business and Mr. Weaver's, but he was gone out, and so I with Mr. Castle (age 40), the son-in-law of Weaver, to White Hall to look for him, but did not find him, but here I did meet with several and talked, and do hear only that the King (age 38) dining yesterday at the Dutch Embassador's, after dinner they drank, and were pretty merry; and, among the rest of the King's company, there was that worthy fellow my Lord of Rochester (age 21), and Tom Killigrew (age 57), whose mirth and raillery offended the former so much, that he did give Tom Killigrew (age 57) a box on the ear in the King's presence, which do much give offence to the people here at Court, to see how cheap the King (age 38) makes himself, and the more, for that the King (age 38) hath not only passed by the thing, and pardoned it to Rochester, Kent [Map] already, but this very morning the King (age 38) did publickly walk up and down, and Rochester, Kent [Map] I saw with him as free as ever, to the King's everlasting shame, to have so idle a rogue his companion. How Tom Killigrew (age 57) takes it, I do not hear. I do also this day hear that my Lord Privy Seale do accept to go Lieutenant into Ireland; but whether it be true or no, I cannot tell. So calling at my shoemaker's, and paying him to this day, I home to dinner, and in the afternoon to Colonel Middleton's house, to the burial of his wife, where we are all invited, and much more company, and had each of us a ring: and so towards evening to our church, where there was a sermon preached by Mills, and so home. At church there was my Lord Brouncker (age 49) and Mrs. Williams in our pew, the first time they were ever there or that I knew that either of them would go to church. At home comes Castle to me, to desire me to go to Mr. Pedly, this night, he being to go out of town to-morrow morning, which I, therefore, did, by Hackney-coach, first going to White Hall to meet with Sir W. Coventry (age 41), but missed him. But here I had a pleasant rencontre of a lady in mourning, that, by the little light I had, seemed handsome. I passing by her, I did observe she looked back again and again upon me, I suffering her to go before, and it being now duske. I observed she went into the little passage towards the Privy Water-Gate, and I followed, but missed her; but coming back again, I observed she returned, and went to go out of the Court. I followed her, and took occasion, in the new passage now built, where the walke is to be, to take her by the hand, to lead her through, which she willingly accepted, and I led her to the Great Gate, and there left her, she telling me, of her own accord, that she was going as far as, Charing Cross [Map]; but my boy was at the gate, and so je durst not go out con her, which vexed me, and my mind (God forgive me) did run apres her toute that night, though I have reason to thank God, and so I do now, that I was not tempted to go further.

Pepy's Diary. 19 Feb 1669. Up, and after seeing the girls [Barbara Pepys and Elizabeth Pepys], who lodged in our bed, with their maid Martha, who hath been their father's maid these twenty years and more, I with Lord Brouncker (age 49) to White Hall, where all of us waited on the Duke of York (age 35); and after our usual business done, W. Hewer (age 27) and I to look my wife at the Black Lion, Mercer's, but she is gone home, and so I home and there dined, and W. Batelierand W. Hewer (age 27) with us. All the afternoon I at the Office, while the young people went to see Bedlam, and at night home to them and to supper, and pretty merry, only troubled with a great cold at this time, and my eyes very bad ever since Monday night last that the light of the candles spoiled me.

Pepy's Diary. 05 Mar 1669. Up, and by water to White Hall, where did a little business with the Duke of York (age 35) at our usual attending him, and thence to my wife, who was with my coach at Unthanke's, though not very well of those upon her, and so home to dinner, and after dinner I to the Tower, where I find Sir W. Coventry (age 41) with abundance of company with him; and after sitting awhile, and hearing some merry discourse, and, among others, of Mr. Brouncker's being this day summoned to Sir William Morton, one of the judges, to give in security for his good behaviour, upon his words the other day to Sir John Morton, a Parliament-man, at White Hall, who had heretofore spoke very highly against Brouncker (age 49) in the House, I away, and to Aldgate, and walked forward towards White Chapel, till my wife overtook me with the coach, it being a mighty fine afternoon; and there we went the first time out of town with our coach and horses, and went as far as Bow, the spring beginning a little now to appear, though the way be dirty; and so, with great pleasure, with the fore-part of our coach up, we spent the afternoon. And so in the evening home, and there busy at the Office awhile, and so to bed, mightily pleased with being at peace with my poor wife, and with the pleasure we may hope to have with our coach this summer, when the weather comes to be good.

Pepy's Diary. 29 Mar 1669. Up, and by water to White Hall; and there to the Duke of York (age 35), to shew myself, after my journey to Chatham, Kent [Map], but did no business to-day with him: only after gone from him, I to Sir T. Clifford's (age 38); and there, after an hour's waiting, he being alone in his closet, I did speak with him, and give him the account he gave me to draw up, and he did like it very well: and then fell to talk of the business of the Navy and giving me good words, did fall foul of the constitution [of the Board], and did then discover his thoughts, that Sir J. Minnes (age 70) was too old, and so was Colonel Middleton, and that my Lord Brouncker (age 49) did mind his mathematics too much. I did not give much encouragement to that of finding fault with my fellow-officers; but did stand up for the constitution, and did say that what faults there were in our Office would be found not to arise from the constitution, but from the failures of the officers in whose hands it was. This he did seem to give good ear to; but did give me of myself very good words, which pleased me well, though I shall not build upon them any thing.

Pepy's Diary. 30 Mar 1669. Up, and to Sir W. Coventry (age 41), to see and discourse with him; and he tells me that he hath lately been with my Lord Keeper, and had much discourse about the Navy; and particularly he tells me that he finds they are divided touching me and my Lord Brouncker (age 49); some are for removing; and some for keeping us. He told my Lord Keeper that it would cost the King (age 38) £10,000 before he hath made another as fit to serve him in the Navy as I am; which, though I believe it is true, yet I am much pleased to have that character given me by W. Coventry (age 41), whatever be the success of it. But I perceive they do think that I know too much, and shall impose upon whomever shall come next, and therefore must be removed, though he tells me that Sir T. Clifford (age 38) is inclined well enough to me, and Sir T. Osborne (age 37); by what I have lately done, I suppose. This news do a little trouble me, but yet, when I consider it, it is but what I ought not to be much troubled for, considering my incapacity, in regard to my eyes, to continue long at this work, and this when I think of and talk with my wife do make me the less troubled for it. After some talk of the business of the navy more with him, I away and to the Office, where all the morning; and Sir W. Pen (age 47), the first time that he hath been here since his being last sick, which, I think, is two or three months; and I think will be the last that he will be here as one of the Board, he now inviting us all to dine with him, as a parting dinner, on Thursday next, which I am glad of, I am sure; for he is a very villain.

Pepy's Diary. 01 Apr 1669. Up, and with Colonel Middleton, at the desire of Rear-Admiral Kempthorne (age 49), the President, for our assisting them, to the Court-martiall on board a yacht in the River here, to try the business of the Purser's complaints, Baker against Trevanion, his Commander, of "The Dartmouth". But, Lord! to see what wretched doings there were among all the Commanders to ruin the Purser, and defend the Captain in all his rogueries, be it to the prejudice of the King (age 38) or Purser, no good man could bear! I confess I was pretty high, which did not at least the young gentlemen Commander like; and Middleton did the like. But could not bring it to any issue this day, sitting till two o'clock; and therefore we being sent for, went to Sir W. Pen's (age 47) by invitation to dine; where my wife was, and my Lord Brouncker (age 49) and his mistress, and Sir J. Minnes (age 70) and his niece; and here a bad dinner, and little mirth, I being little pleased with my host. However, I made myself sociable; and so, after dinner, my wife and I, with my Lord Brouncker (age 49) and his mistress, they set us down at my cozen Turner's, and there we staid awhile and talked; and particularly here we met with Dr. Ball, the Parson of the Temple [Map], who did tell me a great many pretty stories about the manner of the Parsons being paid for their preaching at Paul's heretofore, and now, and the ground of the Lecture, and heretofore the names of the founders thereof, which were many, at some 5s., some 6s. per annum towards it: and had their names read in the pulpit every sermon among those holy persons that the Church do order a collect for, giving God thanks for.

Pepy's Diary. 03 May 1669. Up, and by coach to my Lord Brouncker's (age 49), where Sir G. Carteret (age 59) did meet Sir J. Minnes (age 70) and me, to discourse upon Mr. Deering's business, who was directed, in the time of the war, to provide provisions at Hamburgh, by Sir G. Carteret's (age 59) direction; and now G. Carteret (age 59) is afeard to own it, it being done without written order. But by our meeting we do all begin to recollect enough to preserve Mr. Deering, I think, which, poor silly man! I shall be glad of, it being too much he should suffer for endeavouring to serve us.

Pepy's Diary. 04 May 1669. Up, and to the office, and then my wife being gone to see her mother at Deptford, Kent [Map], I before the office sat went to the Excise Office, and thence being alone stepped into Duck Lane [Map], and thence tried to have sent a porter to Deb.'s, but durst not trust him, and therefore having bought a book to satisfy the bookseller for my stay there, a 12d. book, Andronicus of Tom Fuller, I took coach, and at the end of Jewen Street next Red Cross Street I sent the coachman to her lodging, and understand she is gone for Greenwich, Kent [Map] to one Marys's, a tanner's, at which I, was glad, hoping to have opportunity to find her out; and so, in great fear of being seen, I to the office, and there all the morning, dined at home, and presently after dinner comes home my wife, who I believe is jealous of my spending the day, and I had very good fortune in being at home, for if Deb. had been to have been found it is forty to one but I had been abroad, God forgive me. So the afternoon at the office, and at night walked with my wife in the garden, and my Lord Brouncker