Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire

Gloucestershire is in Welsh March.

577 Battle of Dyrham

946 Death of King Edmund

1051 Banishment of the Godwins

1495 Death of Jasper Tudor Duke Bedford

1643 Battle of Lansdowne

After 1603 Colonel Nathaniel Pope was born to William Pope 1st Earl Downe (age 29) and Anne Hopton Baroness Wentworth (age 42) at Gloucestershire.

Around 1630 Leonard Hoar was born to Charles Hoar in Gloucestershire.

Three Shires Stone [Map] is three blocks of limestone, each dated 1736 and with the initial of one of the three counties, with a large cap, mark where the historical counties of Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Somerset meet. Each stone is approximately 9-12 feet in height and weighs four to five tons, with the cap being of a similar size and weight.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Acton Turville [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Adlestrop

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Adlestrop, St Mary Magdalene's Church

On 17 Jan 1824 William Henry Leigh 2nd Baron Leigh was born to Chandos Leigh 1st Baron Leigh (age 32) and Margarette Willes Baroness Leigh (age 25). He was baptised at St Mary Magdalene's Church, Adlestrop, and for a second time, at Church of the Virgin Mary Stoneleigh [Map] on 10 Sep 1824. He was educated at Harrow School then Trinity College, Cambridge University [Map].

On 14 Apr 1905 Henry Pitt Cholmondeley (age 84) died. He was buried at St Mary Magdalene's Church, Adlestrop.

On 24 Aug 1906 Mary Leigh (age 78) died. She was buried at St Mary Magdalene's Church, Adlestrop.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Alveston

Around 1220 Fulk IV Fitzwarin was born to Fulk Fitzwarin (age 60) and Maud Vavasour (age 43) at Alveston, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Andoversford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Avonmouth [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bagpath

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bagpath, Symond's Hall Long Barrow [Map]

Symond's Hall Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Symond's Hall Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England 1002113

The monument includes a long cairn situated on the summit of a prominent Cotswold ridge between the heads of the valleys of the Marlees Brook and a tributary to the Little Avon River and close to the source of the former. The long cairn survives as a stony rectangular mound aligned from north east to south west measuring up to 82m long, 34m wide and 1.7m high with its side ditches preserved as buried features. A central hollow in the top of the mound is the result of partial excavation in c.1780.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bibury [Map]

On 28 May 1840 Frederick Dutton 5th Baron Sherborne was born to James Henry Legge Dutton 3rd Baron Sherborne (age 35) and Elizabeth Howard Baroness Sherborne (age 37) at Bibury, Gloucestershire [Map]. Coefficient of inbreeding 6.25%.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bibury, Lamborough Banks aka Ablington Barrow [Map]

Lamborough Banks aka Ablington Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Description of the Chambered Tumuli of Uley and Nympsfield. Ablington [Map]. — This tumulus stands north and south, and measures 270 ft. long, 100 ft. wide in the broadest part, and 12 ft. high. It was opened in 1854 by the Rev. S. Lysons, and was found to be surrounded at the base by a double concentric range of dry walling faced only outwards. This, at the broad end, makes the usual double curve inwards, and exactly at the point where <| the two walls meet was found a large upright flat oval stone, G feet high, 5 feet wide, and 3 inches thick, standing upon a rough perforated oolitic stone, such as is often found on the Cotteswolds (see fig. 15) Beneath the soil were found in several places wood ashes, and several pebbles of a geological character different from the stone of the district, which Mr. Fosbroke considered were sling-stones, stones of which character, he says, are often found upon the Cotteswolds.

Only one interment was discovered in this barrow, which was deposited in a grave formed of rough stones at the small end of the barrow, but both the grave and the skeleton found therein had been much damaged by the roots of the trees growing on the barrow. This barrow does not seem to have been adequately explored.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Lamborough Banks aka Ablington Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bisley

In 1251 Margery Bohun Lady Verdun was born to Humphrey Bohun (age 30) and Eleanor de Braose (age 23) at Bisley, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bisley Long Barrow [Map]

Bisley Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

4 Bisley Barrow. Bisley Long Barrow [Map]

A long barrow was opened in 1863 a little to the south of Bisley. A short account of it appeared in the local papers at the time, but I have been unable to find it. The barrow has since been entirely destroyed.

See "Archaeologia," vol. XLII, p201.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bisley, Giant's Stone Long Barrow [Map]

Giant's Stone Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Giant's Stone Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bisley, Througham

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bisley, Througham Long Barrow [Map]

Througham Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

32 Througham Barrow. Througham Long Barrow [Map]

This barrow lies in Througham Field, one mile north of the village of Bisley. It is 100 feet long, its greatest width being 50 feet, and height five feet; its direction is east and west, the highest portion being towards the east. The mound was cut in two about fifty years ago to make room for a cottage and some pigstyes; the latter now occupy the centre of the barrow! During the excavation one human skeleton was found. Probably this is the only instance in the county of a prehistoric burial place being turned into a pigstye!

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Blockley

On 15 Jan 1750 Elizabeth Rushout Countess Northampton died. She was buried in Blockley, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Northwick Park Blockley

In 1683 James Rushout 1st Baronet (age 38) bought Northwick Park Blockley, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bourton-on-the-Water [Map]

Icknield Street, aka Ryknild Street, is a Roman Road from Bourton-on-the-Water [Map] to Templeborough [Map]. Icknield Street is road RM18 in Ivan Margary's book 'Roman Roads in Britain'.

The River Windrush rises near Taddington [Map] in Gloucestershire. It travels broadly south-west through Bourton-on-the-Water [Map], Burford, Oxfordshire [Map], Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire [Map], Witney, Oxfordshire [Map] joining the River Thames at Nebridge.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bourton-on-the-Water Fosse Way [Map]

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge, Gloucestershire [Map] where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach [Map] where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water [Map] after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester [Map] and Lichfield, Staffordshire [Map]. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire [Map], Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire [Map], Halford [Map], past Fosse Way Compton Verney [Map], Princethorpe [Map], then Bretford [Map] where it crosses the Warwickshire River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae [Map] aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Bourton-on-the-Water, Slaughter Pike [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Brockhampton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Cassey Compton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Chedworth

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Chedworth, Pinkwell Long Barrow [Map]

Pinkwell Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Chedworth, Woodbarrow [Map]

Woodbarrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Cheltenham

On 03 Dec 1817 Gwendoline Catherine Talbot was born to John "Good Earl" Talbot 16th Earl of Shrewsbury (age 26) and Maria Theresa Talbot Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford at Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.

On 25 Jul 1821 Frances Twysden (age 68) died in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. She was buried in the Villiers Vault, All Saints' Church, Middleton Stoney.

On 17 Nov 1845 Salusbury Pryce Davenport (age 66) died at Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. He was buried at Leckhampton Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Cheltenham, All Saints Church

On 19 Jun 1877 Major Rupert Chabbert Meyricke was born to Edward Meyricke (age 33) and Evelyn Maria Richardson. He was baptised at All Saints Church, Cheltenham on 30 May 1877.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Imperial Square Cheltenham

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, 6 Imperial Square Cheltenham

On 25 Apr 1879 Charles Tennyson Turner (age 70) died at 6 Imperial Square Cheltenham.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Leckhampton Cheltenham

On 17 Nov 1845 Salusbury Pryce Davenport (age 66) died at Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. He was buried at Leckhampton Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Chipping Campden

In 1337 William Greville was born at Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

On 01 Oct 1401 William Greville (age 64) died at Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

In 1504 Christopher Savage was born to Christopher Savage in Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

In 1546 Christopher Savage (age 42) died in Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Chipping Sodbury [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Clearwell

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Clearwell Court Clearwell

In 1727 Thomas Wyndham (age 41) commissioned the building of Clearwell Court Clearwell, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Coberley

In 1427 Thomas Brugge 5th Baron Chandos was born to Giles Brugge 4th Baron Chandos (age 30) at Coberley, Gloucestershire.

Around 1462 Giles Brugge 6th Baron Chandos was born to Thomas Brugge 5th Baron Chandos (age 35) and Florence Darell Baroness Chandos (age 37) at Coberley, Gloucestershire.

On 13 Apr 1466 Giles Brugge 4th Baron Chandos (age 69) died at Coberley, Gloucestershire. His son Thomas Brugge 5th Baron Chandos (age 39) succeeded 5th Baron Chandos. Florence Darell Baroness Chandos (age 41) by marriage Baroness Chandos.

On 09 Mar 1492 John Brydges 1st Baron Chandos was born to Giles Brugge 6th Baron Chandos (age 30) and Isabel Baynham Baroness Chandos (age 17) at Coberley, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Coberley Long Barrow [Map]

Coberley Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Coberley Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England

This monument includes a long barrow situated on the east facing slopes of a ridge overlooking the confluence of two tributaries of the River Churn. The barrow survives as a rectangular mound of uneven profile which measures up to 38m long, 12m wide and 3.2m high, with its side ditches preserved as entirely buried features. Partial early excavations allegedly produced the skeleton of a small male.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Coberley, Crippets Barrow [Map]

Crippets Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Cold Ashton

On 05 Jul 1643 the Battle of Lansdowne was an inconclusive battle between a Royalist army commanded by Ralph Hopton 1st Baron Hopton (age 47) and a Parliamentary Army commanded by William Waller (age 46) at Lansdown Hill, Bath. The two commanders being old friends.

Edward Leke was killed.

Bevil Grenville (age 48) was killed at the at the head of the Cornish infantry as it reached the top of Lansdown Hill. He received a blow to the head with a pole-axe and was taken to the rectory at nearby Cold Ashton, Gloucestershire where he died.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Cold Aston

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Cold Aston Long Barrow [Map]

Cold Aston Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

39 Cold Aston Long Barrow. Cold Aston Long Barrow [Map]

This is situated in the parish of Cold Aston or Aston Blank, one mile north-west of the village, and one and a half miles from Bourton-on‑the‑Water. Its length is 120 feet; greatest width 48 feet, and height about seven feet. Its direction is south-south‑east and north-north‑west, the highest portion being at the south-south‑east end. A great number of flint arrow-heads have been found at various times in the immediate vicinity.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Cold Aston Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Coln Rogers [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Coln Rogers, Colnpen Barrow [Map]

Colnpen Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Coln St Aldwyns [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Colne St Denis [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Colne St Denis, Crickley Barrow [Map]

Crickley Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

9 and 10 Crickley Barrows. Crickley Barrows [Map]

There are two long barrows at Crickley Barrow, two miles south of Northleach, adjoining the ancient Salt Way, but as far as I know they have never been examined or described, and, without a thorough exploration with pick-axe and shovel, it would be impossible to say anything definite about them.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Condicote [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Cotswold Airport [Map]

Fosse Way. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road [Map] where it curves around Solsbury Hill, Somerset [Map] to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone [Map], Fosse Gate, Wiltshire [Map], crossing the Gloucestershire River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey [Map] before reaching the Cotswold Airport, Gloucestershire [Map] after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Deerhurst

John of Worcester. 1053. In the month of October died Wulfsige, bishop of Litchfield, Godwin (age 52), abbot of Winchcombe, and Ethelward, abbot of Glastonbury. Leofwine, abbot of Coventry, succeeded Wulfsige; and Ethelnoth, a monk of the same monastery, succeeded Ethelward. But Aldred, bishop of Worcester, kept the abbey of Winchcombe in his own hands until such tune as he appointed Godric, the son of Goodman, the king's chaplain, to be abbot. Ælfric, brother of earl Odda (age 60), died at Deerhurst on the eleventh of the calends of January [22nd December], but he was buried in the monastery at Pershore [Map].

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1053. About this time was the great wind, on the mass-night of St. Thomas; which did much harm everywhere. And all the midwinter also was much wind. It was this year resolved to slay Rees, the Welsh king's brother, because he did harm; and they brought his head to Gloucester on the eve of Twelfth-day. In this same year, before Allhallowmas, died Wulfsy, Bishop of Lichfield; and Godwin, Abbot of Winchcomb; and Aylward, Abbot of Glastonbury; all within one month. And Leofwine, Abbot of Coventry, took to the bishopric at Lichfield; Bishop Aldred to the abbacy at Winchcomb; and Aylnoth took to the abbacy at Glastonbury. The same year died Elfric, brother of Odda (age 60), at Deerhurst, Gloucestershire; and his body resteth at Pershore [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Dodington Park [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Duntisborne Abbas

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Duntisborne Abbas, Hoar Stone Long Barrow [Map]

Hoar Stone Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Archaeologia Volume 16 Appendix. November 20, 1806. An account of a Tumulus [Hoar Stone Long Barrow [Map]], opened on an estate of Matthew Baillie, M. D. in the parish of Duntesbourne Abbots, in Gloucestershire, communicated to Samuel Lysons, Esq. Director, by the Rev. Anthony Freston, Rector of Edgeworth, in the same county.

The length of the Barrow was about forty yards, and the width thirty; it contained about eight or nine bodies of different ages; it was composed of loose quarry stones; the largest stone, at the east end, has been long known, in that County, by the name of the Hoar Stone. It is of the calcareous kind, twelve feet high, fifteen in circumference, and weighs probably about five or six tons. All that part under the dotted line was below the surface of the ground.

See Plate LV.

N° 1. South east view before it was opened. 2. The Hoar Stone.

Plate LVI. 3. The Kistvaen before it was opened. 4. The same, after it was opened.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Hoar Stone Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Duntisbourne Rouse

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Duntisbourne Rouse, College Plantation Barrow [Map]

College Plantation Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

12 Duntisbourne Barrow. Duntisborne aka College Plantation Barrow [Map]

There are two high circular mounds in Cherry Wood, near Duntisbourne Heath, five miles north-west of Cirencester, which have always been considered round barrows. Through the kindness of Lord Bathurst I superintended some excavations there this year (1882), and discovered that the two mounds formed the ends of a huge long barrow, having a total length of 210 feet. The central portion of the tumulus must have been removed ages back. The circumscribing wall is in a good state of preservation on the south side. The direction of the barrow is nearly east and west. Further examination will, I hope, enable me to give a fuller description of this very interesting pre-historic monument at a future time. During the late excavation one very perfectly formed flint scraper was found, and several small bones. Part of the outside wall at the west end was removed a few years back, but no interments have yet been found. There are several round barrows in the immediate neighbourhood, and Pinbury Camp is only one mile distant on the south.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. College Plantation Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Dyrham

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hinton Hill Dyrham

In 577 Ceawlin King Wessex and his son Cuthwine (age 12) won a major victory over the Britons at the Battle of Dyrham at Hinton Hill Dyrham, Gloucestershire. The victory of resulted in the capture of Gloucester, Gloucestershire [Map], Cirencester, Gloucestershire [Map] and Bath, Somerset [Map].

Coinmail Briton, Condidan Briton and Farinmail Briton were killed.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Eastington

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Eastington, Farmington Long Barrow [Map]

Farmington Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

It is a curious fact that Five Wells Chambered Tomb [Map] is, within 0.2 of a degree of longitude, north of Stonehenge [Map] - see Five Wells Chambered Tomb and Stonehenge Alignment. Moreover, this line of longitude, give or take 500m, has the highest number of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Monuments on it when compared to other lines of longitude. North to South:

Five Wells Chambered Tomb [Map]

Long Low Barrow [Map]

Willersey Barrow [Map]

Farmington Long Barrow [Map]

Monkton Fields Long Barrow [Map]

East Kennet Long Barrow [Map]

Adam's Grave [Map]

Knap Hill [Map]

Netheravon 6 Long Barrow [Map]

Knighton Long Barrow [Map]

Larkhill Long Barrow [Map]

Amesbury Barrow 14 G1 [Map]

Normanton Barrow 151 G13 [Map]

Stonehenge.

40 Farmington Long Barrow. Farmington Long Barrow [Map]

This lies inside the intrenchments of Norbury Camp, in the parish of Farmington, one mile north-east of Northleach. It is 200 feet in length, 100 feet wide, and five feet high, its direction being south-east and north-west. There is a large stone lying flat on the surface which may probably belong to one of the chambers. The barrow has never been examined.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Farmington Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Eastington, Lodge Park Barrow [Map]

Lodge Park Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

23 Lodge Park Barrow. Lodge Park Barrow [Map]

There is a fine long barrow in Sherborne Lodge Park, two miles south-east of Northleach; its length is about 150 feet, greatest width 70 feet. Some of the stones forming the chambers are visible on the surface. Its direction is south-east and north-west, the highest portion lying towards the south-east. No examination has ever been made of the mound.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Edgeworth

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Juniper Hill aka Edgeworth Long Barrow [Map]

Juniper Hill aka Edgeworth Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

13 Edgworth Barrow. Juniper Hill aka Edgeworth Long Barrow [Map]

This barrow lies three-quarters of a mile north-west of the village of Edgworth, and two miles east of Bisley. I have not heard of any excavation or exploration having been made, but I mention it here as one of the Gloucestershire long barrows.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Juniper Hill aka Edgeworth Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Edgeworth, Westwood Long Barrow [Map]

Westwood Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Elmore

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Elmore, St John the Baptist's Church

In Nov 1695 John Guise 2nd Baronet (age 41) died of smallpox. He was buried in St John the Baptist's Church, Elmore. His son John Guise 3rd Baronet (age 18) succeeded 3rd Baronet Guise of Elmore in Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Eyford

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Eyford Barrow [Map]

Eyford Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Description of the Chambered Tumuli of Uley and Nympsfield. Eyford [Map]. — Not quite a mile distant from the last mentioned barrow, and which, like it, has round barrows in its immediate neighbourhood, is a Long barrow which was opened under the direction of Professor Rolleston, who has communicated a description of it to the Journal of the Anthropological Institute.2 The barrow had been previously very much disturbed and the bones were found scattered and confused. The ruins of four chambers Wei'e discovered with lateral entrances from the exterior. In one was found parts of two adult human skeletons, one belonging to a strong man and the other to an aged woman, also of two or three children from seven to eight years of age, and one of two or three years old, also the skeleton of a dog lying in situ close to the bones of the woman and scattered bones of ox and sheep. In another chamber, with the remains of a woman was found an oval bead of Kimmeridge shale, or similar substance, the perforations being wide at both ends, having evidently been made with a flint borer. This discovery is considered the most remarkable "find" in the barrow, for it is the fh-st known instance in which any personal ornament has been found in connection with a primary interment in a long barrow. "It is a remarkable circumstance," Canon Greenwell says, "and one not easy to account for, that ornaments should be almost entirely wanting in association with long barrow burials, and this becomes more difficult to explain when it is considered that in the Chambers of the Stone Age (corresponding, in that respect, with our long barrows) of Scandinavia and France, beads of various materials and shapes are by no means unfrequent. On the other hand it must be remembered that weapons, implements, and pottery are also of very rare occurrence in the same class of British burial mounds, whilst they are common in those of the countries just referred to." The type of the skulls with which the bead was found was emphatically dolicho-cephalic.1

The direction of the axis of this barrow was E,N.E., and W.S.W.

Note 1. British Barrows, p. 520.

14 Eyford Barrow. Eyford Barrow [Map]

This lies in the parish of Eyford, three miles from Stow-on‑the‑Wold. Its length is 108 feet, its greatest width being 41 feet, and greatest height three feet six inches, though it was probably much higher. Its direction is east-north‑east and west-south‑west. The interior of the barrow consisted of oolitic rubble and slabs, and it was surrounded by a wall of thin Stonefield slates. At the east end it assumed the "horned" form, the north-eastern horn being narrower and longer than the other. Four chambers were discovered, one of which contained six human skeletons and one dog's skeleton lying in situ, also scattered bones of the ox and sheep. This chamber was situated eighty feet from the east end, and measured five feet six inches by four feet. In another chamber, seven feet eight inches in length, were found the remains of ten bodies, and close in front of the neck of one of the bodies — that of a woman — was a bead or amulet, composed of kimmeridge shale or similar substance. The bead is slightly oval in outline and much flattened; the perforation has been made from both ends and is very wide, having, no doubt, been made with a flint borer. I call especial attention to this bead, as it was the first ornament ever discovered in connection with a primary interment in a long barrow; and it is a remarkable fact that the only ornament I have discovered in a long barrow is of precisely the same character (see Notgrove Barrow). Other skeletons were found and various portions of pottery.

See "British Barrows," p514.

Also "Jour. Anthrop. Inst.," vol. V, p120.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Eyford, Newclose Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Fairford [Map]

On 30 May 1718 Wills Hill 1st Marquess Downshire was born to Trevor Hill 1st Viscount Hillsborough (age 25) at Fairford, Gloucestershire [Map].

On 19 May 1793 John Chetwynd-Talbot 1st Earl Talbot (age 44) died at Fairford, Gloucestershire [Map]. His son Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot (age 16) succeeded 2nd Earl Talbot, 2nd Viscount Ingestre.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Fossbridge [Map]

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge, Gloucestershire [Map] where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach [Map] where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water [Map] after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester [Map] and Lichfield, Staffordshire [Map]. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire [Map], Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire [Map], Halford [Map], past Fosse Way Compton Verney [Map], Princethorpe [Map], then Bretford [Map] where it crosses the Warwickshire River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae [Map] aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Frampton Cotterel [Map]

In 1458 Thomas Poyntz (age 77) died at Frampton Cotterel, Gloucestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Frampton on Severn

In 1353 James Boteville was born to John Clifford (age 43) at Frampton on Severn, Gloucestershire.

Around 1401 Katherine Boteville Baroness Chandos was born to James Boteville (age 48) at Frampton on Severn, Gloucestershire.

Around 1419 James Boteville (age 66) died at Frampton on Severn, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Gatcombe

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Gatcombe Lodge Long Barrow [Map]

Gatcombe Lodge Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Gatcombe Lodge Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England: The monument includes a long barrow situated on level ground 400m east of Gatcombe Farm. It overlooks a valley to the south and west and is set in the Cotswold Hills. The barrow, which is sometimes known as the Gatcombe Lodge long barrow, has a mound composed of small stones, is trapezoidal in plan, and orientated north east to south west with maximum dimensions of 62m in length and 25m in width. The long barrow has a height of c.2m at the eastern end and 1.5m at the western end. Flanking the mound on each side is a ditch from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument. These have become infilled over the years, but survive as buried features c.5m wide. The long barrow was partially excavated by S Lyons in 1870 and was found to have a forecourt or recess which was flanked by extensions of the barrow mound. Within this was a 'false entrance' or blocked doorway set into the mound, but which could not have provided physical access into the monument. Within the blocking associated with the 'false entrance', a human skull, animal bones and potsherds were found. The mound was also found to have a dry stone revetment wall and this is thought to have enclosed the entire barrow mound. The revetment wall remains visible as a stoney outcrop on the southern side of the monument. In 1871 workmen discovered a burial chamber on the north eastern side of the monument about 9.75m from the false entrance. The chamber was composed of drystone walling and had five upright slabs, with an entrance defined by two additional upright slabs and a large slab as a roof; it was found to contain an inhumation burial. This chamber remains visible as a group of three large stones protruding from a deep depression on the north eastern side of the monument. This monument forms one of at least three long barrows which occur as a dispersed group in the vicinity.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Gatcombe Lodge Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Goodrich

Goodrich Castle, Gloucestershire

On 27 Nov 1245 Walter Marshal 5th Earl Pembroke (age 46) died at Goodrich Castle, Gloucestershire [Map]. He was buried at Tintern Abbey [Map] next to his mother Isabel Clare Countess Pembroke His brother Anselm Marshal 6th Earl Pembroke (age 37) succeeded 6th Earl Pembroke although he only enjoyed the title for one month dying on 23 Dec 1245.

In 1332 Gilbert Talbot 3rd Baron Talbot was born to Richard Talbot 2nd Baron Talbot (age 27) and Elizabeth Comyn Baroness Talbot at Goodrich Castle, Gloucestershire [Map].

Baderon Monmouth Lord Monmouth undertook building works at Goodrich Castle, Gloucestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Great Barrington

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Great Barrington, St Mary Church

1787. Joseph Nollekens (age 49). Design for monument to Mary Cardonnel Countess Talbot (age 68) at St Mary Church, Great Barrington.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hatherop

Around 1655 John Webb 3rd Baronet was born to John Webb 2nd Baronet and Mary Blomer Lady Webb in Hatherop, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hatherop, Saint Nicholas' Church

On 29 May 1709 Mary Blomer Lady Webb died. She was buried at Saint Nicholas' Church, Hatherop.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hawkesbury Upton

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hawkesbury Upton, Starveall Bowl Barrow [Map]

Starveall Bowl Barrow is also in Cotswolds Bronze Age Barrows.

Starveall Bowl Barrow [Map]. Historic England 1002472

The monument includes a bowl barrow, situated on the upper north-facing slopes of a ridge, overlooking the head of a valley of a tributary to the Little Avon River. The barrow survives as a circular mound measuring up to 16m in diameter and 1.6m high. It is surrounded by a buried quarry ditch, from which the material for its construction was derived. Further archaeological remains in the vicinity are the subject of a separate scheduling.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hawkesbury Upton, Starveall Long Barrow [Map]

Starveall Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Starveall Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England 10024734

The monument includes a long barrow, situated on the upper north facing slopes of a ridge, overlooking the head of a valley of a tributary to the Little Avon River. The long barrow survives as a roughly rectangular mound aligned north to south which measures approximately 23m long and up to 7.5m wide. It stands from 1.7m up to 2m high with the side ditches preserved as entirely buried features. At one time it was surrounded by a retaining wal,l although there is now little surviving trace of this feature. Further archaeological remains survive in the vicinity some of which are the subject of a separate schedulings.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hazleton

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hazleton North Long Barrow [Map]

Hazleton North Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Hazleton North Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hazleton South Long Barrow [Map]

Hazleton South Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

16 Hasleton Barrow. Hasleton Barrow [Map]

This lies on top of the Cotteswold hills, in the parish of Hasleton, four miles north-west of Northleach, in a field known as the Barrow Ground, and close to the ancient Salt Way. Its length is 150 feet, greatest width 70 feet, and present height about five feet; but originally it must have been more than double this height. Its direction is north-west and south-east, the highest part being towards the south-east. The top of two upright stones, evidently forming sides of a chamber, are visible on the surface of the ground near the south-east end; they lie parallel to each other and ten feet apart. One stone measures on the top one foot six inches by five inches; the other, two feet by five inches; but it is impossible to say what height they are without excavation. I found several worked flakes on the surface of the barrow, and I have heard of others being found since. The barrow has evidently been much damaged by the plough, but has not, I think, ever been examined. The interior is composed of oolitic slabs and Stonesfield slate.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Hazleton South Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Hinchwich [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Keynsham [Map]

Around 1492 John Hussey 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford (age 27) and Margaret Blount (age 17) were married at Keynsham, Gloucestershire [Map].

In 1617 Thomas Brydges was born to Edward Brydges (age 27) at Keynsham, Gloucestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Keynsham, St John the Baptist's Church

On 25 Dec 1744 Henry Brydges 2nd Duke Chandos (age 36) and Anne Wells Duchess Chandos were married at Keith's Chapel, Mayfair. She by marriage Duchess Chandos. Two versions of their meeting are related... He the son of James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos and Mary Lake.

Notes & Queries 1870 4th Series, Vol. 6, p.179: Lord Omery remarked, on 15th January 1745, "Of her person & character people speak variously, but all agree that both are very bad." He was speaking of Anne, Duchess of Chandos. She was the daughter of one John Wells of Newbury (& St. Marylebone) whose arms appear as azure, three fountains proper, on her hatchment at Keynsham Church. She was chambermaid at the Pelican Inn Newbury, and married to Jeffries the Ostler there. There is a story about the Duchess told by an old lady of Newbury, who was ten years old at the time. Henry Bridges, 2nd Duke of Chandos (age 36), while on his way to London, dined at the Pelican Inn in Newbury, with a companion (it has been claimed that the Inn was the Marlborough Castle, but this is incorrect). After dinner there was a stir and a bustle in the Inn Yard. The explanation came that "A man is going to sell his wife and they are leading her up the yard with a halter round her neck". "We will go and see the sale, " said the Duke. On entering the yard, however, he was so smitten with the woman's beauty and the patient way she waited to be set free from her ill‑conditioned husband, the Inn's ostler, that he bought her himself. She was his mistress for some years. In August 1738 his wife died, and by 1744 the ostler was dead also, and the two were finally married at Mr. Keith's Chapel, Mayfair on 25th December 1744.

The Gentleman's Magazine 1832. The Duke of Chandos (age 36), while staying at a small country inn, saw the ostler beating his wife in a most cruel manner; he interfered and literally bought her for half a crown. She was a young and pretty woman; the Duke had her educated; and on the husband's death he married her. On her death-bed, she had her whole household assembled, told them her history, and drew from it a touching moral of reliance on Providence; as from the most wretched situation, she had been suddenly raised to one of the greatest prosperity; she entreated their forgiveness if at any time she had given needless offence, and then dismissed them with gifts; dying almost in the very act.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Kings Weston

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, King's Weston House Kings Weston

On 11 Sep 1702 Robert Southwell (age 66) died at King's Weston House Kings Weston, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Kingswood

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Kingswood Abbey [Map]

In 1139 Kingswood Abbey, Gloucestershire [Map] was founded by William of Berkeley, provost of Berkeley, in accordance with the wishes of his late uncle, Roger II of Berkeley, and colonised from the Cistercian house at Tintern, Monmouthshire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Langtree

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1051. This year came Archbishop Robert hither over sea with his pall from Rome, one day before St. Peter's eve: and he took his archiepiscopal seat at Christ-church on St. Peter's day, and soon after this went to the king. Then came Abbot Sparhawk to him with the king's writ and seal, to the intent that he should consecrate him Bishop o[oe] London; but the archbishop refused, saying that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to the archbishop again for the same purpose, and there demanded episcopal consecration; but the archbishop obstinately refused, repeating that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to London, and sat at the bishopric which the king had before given him, with his full leave, all the summer and the autumn. Then during the same year came Eustace (age 36), who had the sister of King Edward (age 48) to wife, from beyond sea, soon after the bishop, and went to the king; and having spoken with him whatever he chose, he then went homeward. When he came to Canterbury eastward, there took he a repast, and his men; whence he proceeded to Dover, Kent [Map]. When he was about a mile or more on this side Dover, Kent [Map], he put on his breast-plate; and so did all his companions: and they proceeded to Dover. When they came thither, they resolved to quarter themselves wherever they lived. Then came one of his men, and would lodge at the house of a master of a family against his will; but having wounded the master of the house, he was slain by the other. Then was Eustace (age 36) quickly upon his horse, and his companions upon theirs; and having gone to the master of the family, they slew him on his own hearth; then going up to the boroughward, they slew both within and without more than twenty men. The townsmen slew nineteen men on the other side, and wounded more, but they knew not how many. Eustace (age 36) escaped with a few men, and went again to the king (age 48), telling him partially how they had fared. The king (age 48) was very wroth with the townsmen, and sent off Earl Godwin (age 50), bidding him go into Kent with hostility to Dover, Kent [Map]. For Eustace (age 36) had told the king that the guilt of the townsmen was greater than his. But it was not so: and the earl (age 50) would not consent to the expedition, because he was loth to destroy his own people. Then sent the king after all his council, and bade them come to Gloucester nigh the after-mass of St. Mary. Meanwhile Godwin (age 50) took it much to heart, that in his earldom such a thing should happen. Whereupon be began to gather forces over all his earldom, and Earl Sweyne (age 30), his son, over his; and Harold (age 29), his other son, over his earldom: and they assembled all in Gloucestershire, at Langtree, Gloucestershire, a large and innumerable army, all ready for battle against the king; unless Eustace (age 36) and his men were delivered to them handcuffed, and also the Frenchmen that were in the castle. This was done seven nights before the latter mass of St. Mary, when King Edward (age 48) was sitting at Gloucester. Whereupon he sent after Earl Leofric, and north after Earl Siward (age 41), and summoned their retinues. At first they came to him with moderate aid; but when they found how it was in the south, then sent they north over all their earldom, and ordered a large force to the help of their lord. So did Ralph also over his earldom. Then came they all to Gloucester to the aid of the king (age 48), though it was late. So unanimous were they all in defence of the king (age 48), that they would seek Godwin's (age 50) army if the king (age 48) desired it. But some prevented that; because it was very unwise that they should come together; for in the two armies was there almost all that was noblest in England. They therefore prevented this, that they might not leave the land at the mercy of our foes, whilst engaged in a destructive conflict betwixt ourselves. Then it was advised that they should exchange hostages between them. And they issued proclamations throughout to London, whither all the people were summoned over all this north end in Siward's (age 41) earldom, and in Leofric's, and also elsewhere; and Earl Godwin (age 50) was to come thither with his sons to a conference; They came as far as Southwark, Surrey [Map], and very many with them from Wessex; but his army continually diminished more and more; for they bound over to the king (age 48) all the thanes that belonged to Earl Harold (age 29) his son, and outlawed Earl Sweyne (age 30) his other son. When therefore it could not serve his purpose to come to a conference against the king (age 48) and against the army that was with him, he went in the night away. In the morning the king (age 48) held a council, and proclaimed him an outlaw, with his whole army; himself (age 50) and his wife, and all his three sons - Sweyne (age 30) and Tosty (age 25) and Grith (age 19). And he went south to Thorney67, with his wife, and Sweyne (age 30) his son, and Tosty (age 25) and his wife (age 18), a cousin of Baldwin of Bruges (age 38) [Note. Judith Flanders Duchess Bavaria (age 18) was a sister of Baldwin "The Good" V Count Flanders (age 38)], and his son Grith (age 19). Earl Harold (age 29) with Leofwine (age 16) went to Bristol, Gloucestershire [Map] in the ship that Earl Sweyne (age 30) had before prepared and provisioned for himself; and the king (age 48) sent Bishop Aldred from London with his retinue, with orders to overtake him ere he came to ship. But they either could not or would not: and he then went out from the mouth of the Avon; but he encountered such adverse weather, that he got off with difficulty, and suffered great loss. He then went forth to Ireland, as soon as the weather permitted. In the meantime the Welshmen had wrought a castle in Herefordshire, in the territory of Earl Sweyne (age 30), and brought as much injury and disgrace on the king's (age 48) men thereabout as they could. Then came Earl Godwin (age 50), and Earl Sweyne (age 30), and Earl Harold (age 29), together at Beverstone [Map], and many men with them; to the intent that they might go to their natural lord, and to all the peers that were assembled with him; to have the king's (age 48) counsel and assistance, and that of all the peers, how they might avenge the insult offered to the king (age 48), and to all the nation. But the Welshmen were before with the king (age 48), and betrayed the earls, so that they were not permitted to come within the sight of his eyes; for they declared that they intended to come thither to betray the king (age 48). There was now assembled before the king (age 48)68 Earl Siward (age 41), and Earl Leofric, and much people with them from the north: and it was told Earl Godwin (age 50) and his sons, that the king (age 48) and the men who were with him would take counsel against them; but they prepared themselves firmly to resist, though they were loth to proceed against their natural lord. Then advised the peers on either side, that they should abstain from all hostility: and the king (age 48) gave God's peace and his full friendship to each party. Then advised the king (age 48) and his council, that there should be a second time a general assembly of all the nobles in London, at the autumnal equinox: and the king (age 48) ordered out an army both south and north of the Thames, the best that ever was. Then was Earl Sweyne (age 30) proclaimed an outlaw; and Earl Godwin (age 50) and Earl Harold (age 29) were summoned to the council as early as they could come. When they came thither and were cited to the council, then required they security and hostages, that they might come into the council and go out without treachery. The king (age 48) then demanded all the thanes that the earls had; and they put them all into his hands. Then sent the king (age 48) again to them, and commanded them to come with twelve men to the king's (age 48) council. Then desired the earl again security and hostages, that he might answer singly to each of the things that were laid to his charge. But the hostages were refused; and a truce of five nights was allowed him to depart from the land. Then went Earl Godwin (age 50) and Earl Sweyne (age 30) to Bosham [Map], and drew out their ships, and went beyond sea, seeking the protection of Baldwin (age 38); and there they abode all the winter. Earl Harold (age 29) went westward to Ireland, and was there all the winter on the king's (age 48) security.

It was from Thorney69 that Godwin (age 50) and those that were with him went to Bruges [Map], to Baldwin's (age 38) land, in one ship, with as much treasure as they could lodge therein for each man. Wonderful would it have been thought by every man that was then in England, if any person had said before this that it would end thus! For he was before raised to such a height, that he ruled the king (age 48) and all England; his sons were earls, and the king's (age 48) darlings; and his daughter (age 25) wedded and united to the king (age 48). Soon after this took place, the king (age 48) dismissed the lady (age 25) who had been consecrated his queen, and ordered to be taken from her all that she had in land, and in gold, and in silver, and in all things; and committed her to the care of his sister at Wherwell [Map]. Soon after came Earl William (age 23) from beyond sea with a large retinue of Frenchmen; and the king (age 48) entertained him and as many of his companions as were convenient to him, and let him depart again. Then was Abbot Sparhawk driven from his bishopric at London; and William (age 23) the king's priest was invested therewith. Then was Oddy appointed earl over Devonshire, and over Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales; and Algar, the son of Earl Leofric, was promoted to the earldom which Harold (age 29) before possessed.

Note 67. The ancient name of Westminster; which came into disuse because there was another Thorney in Cambridgeshire.

Note 68. i.e. at Gloucester, according to the printed Chronicle; which omits all that took place in the meantime at London and Southwark.

Note 69. Now Westminster.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lechlade [Map]

Calendars. 06 Aug 1307 King Edward II (age 23). Dumfries [Map]. To the treasurer and the barons of the Exchequer. Order to discharge the Abbot of Hayles of £50Yearly, which he used to pay for the town of Leechelade [Map] to the late Edmund Earl of Cornwall, and, after his death, to the late King, the king having granted the earldom of Cornwall and all the lands of the said Edmund to Peter de Gavaston (age 23), knight.

To the like favour of Michael de Meldon for 4 marks annually for his lands in Worton.

Calendars. 16 Jan 1310 King Edward II of England (age 25). The Grove, Watford [Map]. To the Treasurer and the Barons of the Exchequer. Order to discharge the Abbot of Hayles of £100yearly, the rent of the manor of Lychelad [Map], as the King granted it to Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall (age 26) and Margaret his wife.

To the same. Order to discharge the men of Wallingford, Oxfordshire [Map] of the ferm of that town from August 5 last, to Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall (age 26) and Margaret his wife.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lechlade, Hospital of St John

Around 1246 Hospital of St John, Lechlade was founded by Isabel Ferrers.

Transactions of the Woolhope Club 1969 Page 413. 1246. Lady Isabelle de Ferrers led a good simple life, and after the death of her lord, she had built a religious house at Lechlade47 for the soul of her lord and her own, and endowed it generously with fine lands and rents for ever, and there she is buried.

Note 47. The date of foundation of this house is unclear. An early charter in the Black Book of Wigmore (B. M. Harl. MS 1240 f44v) terms it "the hospital of St. John" and records the endowment there by Isabel of a chantry priest in the episcopate of bishop Walter Cantelupe (age 55) (1237-66). VCH Gloucs. assigns its origins to 1246, RM Clay to 1228 in The Medieval Hospitals of England (1909) 292 but cites no authority for this.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lechlade Bridge [Map]

Lechlade Bridge [Map] is over the River Thames.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, St John's Bridge Lechlade [Map]

Around 1250. Newbridge, Oxfordshire [Map] is a 13th Century bridge over the River Thames one of three bridges built on the orders of King John to facilitate the wool trade; the other two being St John's Bridge Lechlade [Map] and Radcot Bridge [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Leighton

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Leighton, Boxwell Lodge aka West Long Barrow [Map]

Boxwell Lodge aka West Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Boxwell Lodge aka West Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England:

The monument includes a long barrow situated on level ground in an area of the Cotswold Hills. The barrow, known locally as West Barrow, has a mound composed of small stones; it is trapezoidal in plan and orientated east-west with maximum dimensions of 82m long, 50m wide and up to c.4m high. The mound is flanked on either side by a ditch from which material was quarried during the construction of the monument. The southern ditch has become infilled, but survives as a buried feature c.5m wide. On the northern side of the monument the ditch is visible as an earthwork 5m wide and c.0.4m deep. The barrow was partially excavated in around 1700 by Matthew Huntley who uncovered three burial chambers which he described as 'vaults arched over'. Each chamber had a separate entrance which was associated with an urn containing cremated human bones and ashes. The interior of each chamber was found to contain the remains of unburnt human skulls and long bones. The dry stone walls overlying the monument are excluded from the scheduling, although the underlying ground is included.

21 Leighterton Barrow. Leighterton aka Boxwell Lodge aka West Long Barrow [Map]

This is situated in the parish of Boxwell, six and a half miles west of Tetbury; it is locally known as "West Barrow," and was opened about the year 1700 by Matthew Huntley. It contained three vaults arched over like ovens, and at the entrance of each was found an earthen jar containing burnt human bones, but the skulls and thigh-bones were found unburnt.

See Atkyn's "History of Gloucestershire," p155.

Also Rudder's "History of Gloucestershire," p306.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Boxwell Lodge aka West Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Little Rissington

In 1095 Gilbert Basset was born to Ralph Basset (age 19) at Little Rissington, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Longborough

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Longborough, Ganborough Long Barrow [Map]

Ganborough Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Ganborough Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lower Swell [Map]

Minutes of the Society of Antiquaries. 13 Nov 1718. Mr Norroy (age 57) brought us an old roll in Parchment of the Blazon of the Coats of Aarms of all the County of Norfolk in the time of Henry VII said to be done by the Botton[?] herald to Sir John Falstaff. An old deed upon parchment of Edward the Confessor, a piece of great antiquity. Its a donation of a Mannor [Manor] in Great Swell [Map] in Gloucestershire to the Abby of Evesham [Map]. Likewise two curious old books of seals of the nobility, with many ancient deeds, &c.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lower Swell, Cow Common Long Barrow [Map]

Cow Common Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

The Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland Volume 5 1876 Pages 120 to 173. Continues Page 139 ...

Swell i. (Pl. iv.). — The first of the three barrows examined is situated in a field which has been under cultivation from 27 to 30 years, though it is still known as the "Cow Common [Map]." The other two barrows were found by us in 1874 to have the heart-shaped or "horned" eastward ends, which are so well known to us from Dr. Anderson's1 descriptions of the horned cairns of Caithness," as also from Dr. Thurnam's2 accounts of the tumuli at Uley and Belas Knap, in this very county of Gloucestershire. There is, as it appears to me, a great probability that the barrow, Swell i. , was originally constructed with the same outlines and contour as these other barrows ; but the eastward end had been much reduced in size by removal of the stones of which it was made up, to fill up an adjacent quarry, in the years 1867-1868 ; and in 1874 some indistinct traditions as to the existence in former years of curved walling at that end, were the only main specific basis—as distinct from the general likelihood arising out of its other still remaining points of resemblance to typical horned barrows—for holding that it probably had been one. Making allowances, however, for the demolitions which had taken place in the years 1867 and 1868, and, possibly enough, in years long before them, we shall not be far wrong in saying that the extreme length of the barrow from E.S.E. to W.N.W., the direction of its long axis, was from 150 to 155 feet; and that its breadth at its eastward end was 77 feet; at its highest point, a point very near to the line occupied by the chamber which, as will be seen, gives the chief interest to the barrow, 69 feet ; and at its westward end, 40 feet. The greatest height of the barrow, as at present existing, is about 5 feet. The ground occupied by the barrow falls slightly from the west eastwards.

Note 1. See Anderson, Ancient Remains of Caithness." Mem. Soc. Anth. Lond., vol. i. p. 474, 1865. Proc. Soc. Antiq. Scotland, 1866-1868.

Note 2. See Thurnam, Crania Britannica," Pl. v. Mem. Soc. Antho Lond., 1865. Archæologia," vol. xlii. p. 209.

Description of the Chambered Tumuli of Uley and Nympsfield. Nether Swell [Map]. — In other parts of the county have been explored chambered long barrows of the same type, in having small lateral chambers entered from the exterior sides instead of from a common approach by a long gallery from the eastern, or large end, through the centre of the barrow, as at Uley and Nympsfield. Of this class is a tumulus in a field in the parish of Nether Swell, called "Cow Common," in which same field are as many as nine round barrows, of a peculiar character. The eastern end of the long barrow was partially removed in 1867-8, when it was to some extent examined by the Rev. David Royce, vicar of the parish. No exact plan of it would seem to have been preserved, but, according to the recollection of the persons employed, it would appear to have been of the horned shape. It lay E.S.E. and W.N.W., and was about 150 feet long, 70 feet wide at the eastern and 10 feet at the western ends, and about 5 feet high at the highest point, which was where the sepulchral chamber was found. It was composed of limestone slabs and rubble and was surrounded by a wall, or facing, built of oolitic slates laid in horizontal courses about' 2 ft. high, but this had in some places been destroyed. The primary interments were found to have been made in, and near to, a chamber on the north side, which was explored by Mr. Eoyce, in 1867. It had a passage or entrance leading into it from the outside of the barrow, the enclosing wall being pierced and turning inwards at the place. The sides of the chamber were formed of upright slabs of stone, but the roof was destroyed before it was seen by any one acquainted with such structures. The chamber was said to be about 3 feet square and to contain three skeletons, whilst outside and to the south-west of it five other bodies were found in 18G7 and 1874, in which latter year it was examined by Canon Greenwell (age 59) and Prof. Rolleston ; but it would seem to be uncertain, according to Canon Greenwell, "whether these walls were intentionally made for the purpose of containing the interments," or were merely such as are often found in other barrows to enable the persons making the barrow to work with greater convenience and safety. Another remarkable chamber was found in this barrow in 1868, but it was destroyed before Canon Greenwell (age 59) saw it in 1874. It was of an oval form and very closely resembled a chamber met with in one of the round barrows above-mentioned near it. From the remains found in it, it would seem to be later than the time of the original construction of the barrow.1

Note 1. British Barrows, p. 513. See also Paper "On the People of the Long Barrow Period," by Prof, Kolleston.— Journal Anthropological Institute, Vol. V., p. 120.

29 Swell Barrow 1. Swell Barrow 1 [Map]

This barrow is situated in a field called "Cow Common," in the parish of lower Swell, two and a half miles from the village, and three miles from Stow-on‑the‑Wold. Its length was about 150 feet, greatest width 77 feet, and greatest height five feet; its direction is east-south‑east and west-north‑west. It is entirely composed of slabs and rubble, and is surrounded by a carefully constructed wall of Stonesfield slate; this wall was two feet three inches high on the south side. The chief chamber was on the north side, fifty-five feet from the east end, and was discovered by the Rev. David Royce in 1867. The sides of the chamber were constructed of large upright stones, one being three feet six inches by two feet four inches, the chamber itself being three feet square. It contained three skeletons, and to the south-west of it five other skeletons were found. The chamber had a passage leading to it from the surrounding wall. Another chamber was found thirty feet from the east end, measuring six feet by four feet eight inches, of an oval form; it contained bones of two adults and one infant, two flint flakes, several fragments of pottery, &c. This barrow assumed the "horned" shape at the east end. There are eight round barrows in the same field.

See "Jour. Anat. and Phys.," vol. III, p252.

Also "Jour. Anthrop. Inst.," vol. V, p120.

Also "British Barrows," p513.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Cow Common Long Barrow [Map].

Gloucestershire, 21 S.E. Parish of Lower Swell. 21 *.

Latitude 51° 56' 04*. Longitude 1° 48' 12". Height above O.D. about 620 feet.

This is WittsVNo. 29, Rolleston's "Swell," and Greenwell's 229. Witts' measurements are, length, 150 feet; greatest width, 77 feet; greatest height, 5 feet. It is oriented E.S.E. and W.N.W. He says: "It is entirely composed of slabs and rubble, and is surrounded by a carefully constructed wall of Stonesfield slate ; this wall was 2 ft. 3 ins. high on the south side. The chief chamber was on the north side, 55 feet from the east end, and was discovered by the Rev. David Royce in 1867. The sides of the chamber were constructed of large upright stones, one being 3 ft. 6 ins. by 2 ft. 4 ins., the chamber itself being 3 ft. square. It contained three skeletons, and to the S.W. of it five other skeletons were found. The chamber had a passage leading to it from the surrounding wall. Another chamber was found 30 ft. from the east end, measuring 6 ft. by 4 ft. 8 ins., of an oval form ; it contained bones of two adults and one infant, two flint flakes, several fragments of pottery, etc. This barrow assumed the 'homed' shape at the east end."

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lower Swell Barrow [Map]

Lower Swell Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lower Swell, Whittlestone aka Whistlestone Barrow [Map]

Whittlestone aka Whistlestone Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Whittlestone aka Whistlestone Barrow [Map]

Finds Near Stow on the Wold. Nether Swell. — Within a stone's throw from the north-west angle of the church, on the summit of the rising ground, in the allotments, stood, within the memory of the writer of this paper, a familiar, yet most venerable monolith. It was known as the Whistlestone [Map] (so called, perhaps, from this, the Wheat Hill, as the one beyond was the Oat Hill). This stone was the last, most probably, of a cist. Many bones were found at its base. A witticism, amongst the villagers, was this: — "When the Whistle-stone hears Stow clock (a mile off) strike twelve, it goes down to Lady-well (at the Hill's foot) to drink." Alas, poor Whistlestone! Farmer Illes, one of the olden time, one day picked up two of a perfect set of teeth, in plowing by the stone, but so harried was he by the weirdy teeth, that he replaced them speedily where he found them. But a later occupier did what the good folk of the village declared could not be done — for "All the King's horses and all the King's men" could not cast down nor carry away Whistlestone — but it was carried away — yet rescued from the roads or profane use. In the vicarage-paddock the pre-historic block now finds asylum.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Marshfield

On or before 23 May 1562 Ellis Crispe was born to Thomas Crispe and Elizabeth Steward at Marshfield, Gloucestershire. He was baptised on 23 May 1562.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Maston

On 19 Aug 1689 Henry Selwyn at Maston, Gloucestershire.

On 03 Sep 1734 Henry Selwyn died at Maston, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Moreton-in-Marsh [Map]

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge, Gloucestershire [Map] where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach [Map] where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water [Map] after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester [Map] and Lichfield, Staffordshire [Map]. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire [Map], Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire [Map], Halford [Map], past Fosse Way Compton Verney [Map], Princethorpe [Map], then Bretford [Map] where it crosses the Warwickshire River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae [Map] aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Batsford Park Moreton-in-Marsh

On 16 Jan 1830 John Freeman-Mitford 1st Baron Redesdale (age 81) died at Batsford Park Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire. His son John Freeman-Mitford 1st Earl Redesdale (age 24) succeeded 2nd Baron Redesdale of Redesdale in Northumberland.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, North Cerney

On 15 Dec 1588 Thomas Vyner 1st Baronet was born to Thomas Vyner (age 59) at North Cerney, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Northleach [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Northleach Fosse Way [Map]

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge, Gloucestershire [Map] where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach [Map] where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water [Map] after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester [Map] and Lichfield, Staffordshire [Map]. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire [Map], Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire [Map], Halford [Map], past Fosse Way Compton Verney [Map], Princethorpe [Map], then Bretford [Map] where it crosses the Warwickshire River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae [Map] aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Notgrove

Thomas Mitchell of Notgrove, Gloucestershire was appointed Rector of Notgrove, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Notgrove Long Barrow [Map]

Notgrove Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Notgrove Long Barrow [Map] is a Severn Cotswolds Tomb located on the crest of a ridge in the Cotswold Hills. The long barrow mound was trapezoidal in plan and orientated east-west.

Finds Near Stow on the Wold. Westfield Barrow [Note. Probably Notgrove Long Barrow [Map]]. — Sept. 10th, 1876. Tuesday — The excavators of the Banbury and Cheltenham Railroad reached the fine round tumulus in the centre of a large field near to the station, on the Bourton side. It was of the average dimensions, 80 feet in diameter. It was composed of fine mould, although raised on the brashy surface of these Wolds. First, there appeared a kind of slight roofing of slates carried up about one-third of the slope of the Barrow. On the east and north-east side, there was a considerable stratum, some 6 inches thick, of charcoal and decomposed animal matter, intermingled with tooth of horse, tusk of boar, and jaw of dog. This dark lower stratum seemed more or less co-extensive with the base of the tumulus. But, over and above this, the superincumbent earth was singularly and regularly striated with curved lines, or bands, of charcoal to the very surface. The following Friday revealed the desired object. The pick, in pursuing its onward career, struck on loose stones amongst the mould-harbingers of this "find." All carefully cleared off, there came to view a bee-hive-like capping of stones, in size about 2ft. by 10 in., but tapering off — these had sunk in at the apex, from smaller filling-stones having given way. These somewhat spiral coverers removed, all became manifest, viz: a cist, in the rough 4 ft. square, each side facing the cardinal points — two uprights east, two north, two west, and five south (PL X.). In the centre of the chamber, on a floor of carefully laid slates, was deposited a small heap of decomposed matter with small broken bones above it. There were two portions of skulls, perhaps of a mother and her child. To the west of this little heap, a small triangular bronze instrument, much corroded, perforated at the base with two holes. This instrument was sent to Dr. Rolleston, and is probably in the Oxford Museum. This burial was, of course, after cremation. These scanty remains were committed to this cist, erected on the very site of the burning. The charcoal from the pyre seems to have been scattered over the mould as they heaped it up, at intervals. Two Roman bodies were found some 50 yards to the east, edged round with stones, the head and feet covered with planks. Many sherds were scattered about — one, a goodly piece of the white Roman flint-roughed mortar. Here, then, are cremation and inhumation, side by side, as elsewhere in this district — not contemporaneous, judging from the bronze instrument and the cist itself. Yet there were fragments of Roman-like pottery in the barrow. In this discovery the excavators displayed great interest. The archaeological world owes a debt of gratitude to Mr. Knox, the engineer, for offering every facility, and for drawings which perpetuate what the Banbury and Cheltenham Railway at once revealed and obliterated. The stones of this cist were conveyed to Copse Hill, and set up there on the site of another burial ground: but not after their original position or arrangement. It may here be noticed that the ancient name of Westfield was Caldecot. Query: Is there any connexion between the old, and not uncommon, name and these interments?

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Nympsfield

In 1613 John Bridgeman (age 76) purchased the manor of Nympsfield, Gloucestershire with Luke Garnon.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Nympsfield Long Barrow [Map]

Nympsfield Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

2800BC. Nympsfield Long Barrow [Map] is a chambered tomb of the Severn Cotswolds type.

In 1862 Buckman and the Cotteswold Naturalist's Field Club excavated the site.

In 1937 by E. M. Clifford excavated the site.

Nympsfield Skulls. Report on the Skulls from the Tumulus at Nympsfield [Map]. By John Thurnam (age 54), M.D., F.S.A.

Nympsfield. Notes on an Ancient British Tumulus at Nympsfield [Map], opened by the Cotteswold Club. By James Buckman, F.G.S., F.L.S., F.S.A., &c., Professor of Botany and Geology.

Description of the Chambered Tumuli of Uley and Nympsfield. Description Of The Chambered Tumuli Of Uley [Map] and Nympsfield [Map], Visited by the Society on 22nd July, 1880, with remarks on other Tumuli in Gloucestershire, Wiltshire, and Somersetshire. By Sir John Maclean, F.S.A., Vice-President of the Royal Archaeological Institute, Hon. Member of the Royal Institution of Cornwall, &c.

25 Nympsfield Barrow. Nympsfield Long Barrow [Map]

This is situated on the escarpment of the Cotteswold Hills, in the parish of Nympsfield, on an eminence known as Crawley Hill, half a mile north of the barrow at Uley, and two miles north-east of Dursley. It was examined by the Cotteswold Field Club in 1862. Its length was 120 feet, and greatest breadth 85 feet; its direction was east and west, the highest part being towards the east. Twenty-four upright stones were discovered forming a central passage, with a double set of cruciform chambers on either side almost identical in dimensions to those at Uley and Notgrove; in one of these was partitioned off a smaller chamber or cistern, probably for the remains of an infant found therein. In some parts the spaces between the upright stones were filled up with dry walling. The remains of sixteen human skeletons were found, also some bones of the ox, hog, dog, and birds, a few fragments of pottery, and some flint flakes. All the skulls were of pronounced dolicho-cephalic type.

See "Journal Anthrop. Soc.," vol. III, p66.

Also "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. III, p184.

Also "Transactions Bristol and Glou. Archae. Soc.," vol. V, p95.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Nympsfield Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Oldbury on the Hill

In 1667 Bishop Philip Bisse was born at Oldbury on the Hill, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Painswick

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Painswick, St Mary's Church

On 12 Sep 1826 Robert Lowe and Charlotte Atwell were married at St Mary's Church, Painswick, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Pegglesworth

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Pegglesworth, Lineover Long Barrow [Map]

Lineover Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Lineover Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England

The monument includes a long barrow situated immediately below a crest on the north eastern edge of the Cotswolds, on level ground which falls sharply away to the north. The barrow mound, which is orientated east-west, has been reduced by cultivation. The western part survives as a slight rise, 0.3m high, in the ploughsoil but reaches a maximum height of 1.8m, at the eastern end. A circular depression in this end of the mound is probably the result of an unrecorded antiquarian excavation. Although no longer visible on the surface, side ditches will flank either side of the mound and will survive as buried features 3m wide.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Prescott

On 05 May 1957 Robert Grosvenor 5th Baron Ebury (age 43) died in a car accident at Prescott, Gloucestershire whilst driving a Jaguar C-type. His son Francis Grosvenor 8th Earl Wilton (age 23) succeeded 6th Baron Ebury.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Pucklechurch

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 26 May 946. This year King Edmund (age 25) died, on St. Augustine's mass day. That was widely known, how he ended his days: that Leof stabbed him at Pucklechurch. And Ethelfleda of Damerham, daughter of Alderman Elgar, was then his queen. And he reigned six years and a half: and then succeeded to the kingdom Edred Atheling his brother, who soon after reduced all the land of the Northumbrians to his dominion; and the Scots gave him oaths, that they would do all that he desired.

On 26 May 946 King Edmund I of England (age 25) was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, whilst attending mass at Pucklechurch, Gloucestershire. He was buried at Glastonbury Abbey [Map]. His brother King Eadred I of England succeeded I King England.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Randwick

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Randwick Barrow [Map]

Randwick Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

26 Randwick Barrow. Randwick Barrow [Map]

This lies on the top of Randwick Hill, a quarter of a mile from the village of Randwick, and two miles north-west of Stroud; it is 150 feet long, its greatest width being 86 feet, and greatest height 13 feet; its direction is east and west, the highest part being towards the east. It is composed of oolitic rubble and slabs, and is enclosed by a well-built wall formed of thin stones; this wall is exposed in two places on the west side, where a portion of the barrow has been destroyed by quarrying operations. The stones of the interior are for the most part laid at an angle of 45 degrees, overlapping one another. At the east end it appears to have two well-developed "horns." On visiting the barrow in March, 1881, I found a portion of a human tibia, much stained with manganic oxide and black fungus. There are two round barrows within a few hundred yards, and some earthworks cutting off the neck of the hill, thus forming a camping ground. The three barrows are within the defended area.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Rodmarton

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Windmill Tump aka Rodmarton Long Barrow [Map]

Windmill Tump aka Rodmarton Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Archaeologia Volume 9 Appendix. Nov. 22, 1787.

Mr. Lyson's exhibited an urn taken out of a tumulus or barrow [Windmill Tump aka Rodmarton Long Barrow [Map]], in a field called Inlands, near Hazleden, in the parish of Rodmarton and county of Gloucester, in the year 1779. It was deposited in the centre of the tumulus, in a pentagonal cell about two feet five inches in depth, formed by five large hewn stones, over which was placed another very large stone to secure it.

The tumulus from the top of it to the level of the field in which it stood was somewhat more than ten feet in depth, and consisted of fine black earth mixed with wood ashes, except a stratum of rubbish twenty inches in depth from the top. In the urn was a considerable quantity of ashes and burnt bones.

Another smaller tumulus adjoining to the one above mentioned was also opened at the same time, in which the urn was not deposited in a cell, but buried in the earth, so that it could not be taken out entire. Such parts as could be preserved of it were exhibited, from which it appears to have been of the same kind as the preceding.

27 Rodmarton Barrow. Windmill Tump aka Rodmarton Long Barrow [Map]

This was opened by Mr. Lysons in 1863; it lies within half a mile of the village of Rodmarton, and was known by the popular name of "Windmill Tump." It is 176 feet long, 71 feet wide, and ten feet high; its direction was east and west, the widest end being towards the east. A few feet below the surface of the east end two very large stones were found standing upright, each of them eight feet six inches in height; against these was leaning a third stone of vast size, in a slanting position. A chamber was found on the north side formed of seven large upright stones, with a paved floor, covered at the top by a single stone measuring nine feet by eight feet, and eighteen inches thick. The chamber was approached by a narrow passage, with walls on either side. Within the chamber were fortified no less than thirteen skeletons, also five flint arrow-heads, a large piece of natural flint, and some coarse black pottery. Another chamber was discovered on the southern side, much of the same character, but composed of nine stones instead of seven.

See "Archaeologia," vol. IX, p367.

Also "Our British Ancestors" (Lysons), p137.

Also "Relig. Brit. Rom.," vol. II, p8.

Also "Relig. Brit. Rom.," vol. III, p7.

Also "Proc. Soc. Ant.," 2nd ser., vol. II, p275.

Also "Crania Brit.," vol. II.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Windmill Tump aka Rodmarton Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Sandywell

On 13 Feb 1716 Jane Bowden died at Sandywell, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Sapperton

On 31 Aug 1616 Henry Poole of Sapperton (age 75) died. He was buried in Sapperton, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Selsey Common

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Selsey Common, The Toots Long Barrow [Map]

The Toots Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

The Toots Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England 1002131

The monument includes a long barrow situated on the north western summit of an extremely prominent ridge forming the watershed between numerous tributaries to the Nailsworth Stream and River Frome. The long barrow survives as a roughly rectangular mound with an undulating profile which measures up to 73.1m long, 27.4m wide and 3.5m high. Aligned ENE to WSW it has been the subject of numerous partial early excavations leaving a profile resembling two smaller mounds and at least one excavation in 1880 produced part of a stone built chamber and an interment.

Proceedings of the Cotteswold Naturalists' Field Club Volume 5 Page 277. The largest tumulus of this district stands on Selsley Hill ; it is known as "The Toots [Map]," and has been opened in three places, but I am not aware that any record has been preserved of the results of this disturbance. The Bown Hill Tumulus [Map] (Fig. 2) was opened by the Club in May, 1863, and found to have been formed over stone chambers ; particulars of this examination are given in the " Proceedings of the Club," Yol. III., page 199. The tumulus on Minchinhampton Common, popularly known as "Whitfield's Tump [Map]," has been so thoroughly distiirbed as to render it difficult to ascertain its original form and dimensions.

28 Selsley Hill Barrow. Selsey Hill aka The Toots Barrow [Map]

This barrow is generally known as "The Toots," and is situated high up on Selsley Hill, two miles south-west of Stroud. Its length is 210 feet, its greatest width 90 feet, and height 11 feet; its direction is east-north‑east and west-south‑west, the highest part lying towards the east-north‑east. From these dimensions it will be seen that this is one of the largest long barrows in Gloucestershire. It has been opened in three places, but, unfortunately, no record has been preserved of the results of these excavations.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p279.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Seven Springs [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Seven Springs, Source of the River Churn [Map]

The River Churn is a tributary of the River Thames that rises at Seven Springs [Map] in Gloucestershire. Some consider this to be the source of the River Thames since its is further from the mouth of the Thames than the official source Thameshead. The River Churn joins the River Thames near Cricklade.

Thameshead, Gloucestershire [Map] is considered to the source of the River Thames although the head of the River Churn at Seven Springs [Map] is further away from the mouth of the Thames than Thameshead, Gloucestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Sheepscombe [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Sheepscombe, Camp Down North Barrow [Map]

Camp Down North Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Camp Down North Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Sherborne

Around 1507 Thomas Dutton was born to William Dutton (age 25) at Sherborne, Gloucestershire.

In 1581 Thomas Dutton (age 74) died at Sherborne, Gloucestershire. He was buried at Saint Mary Magdalene's Church, Sherborne [Map].

On 26 Nov 1638 Thomas Pope 2nd Earl Downe (age 15) and Lucy Dutton Countess Downe were married in Sherborne, Gloucestershire. She by marriage Countess Downe.

Around 1645 Ralph Dutton 1st Baronet was born to Ralph Dutton (age 70) and Mary Duncombe at Sherborne, Gloucestershire.

In 1721 Ralph Dutton 1st Baronet (age 76) died at midnight in Sherborne, Gloucestershire. His son John Dutton 2nd Baronet (age 36) succeeded 2nd Baronet Dutton of Sherborne in Gloucestershire.

On 29 Nov 1753 Jane Dutton was born to James Lenox Dutton (age 40) and Jane Bond at Sherborne, Gloucestershire.

On 25 Oct 1775 Thomas Coke 1st Earl of Leicester (age 21) and Jane Dutton (age 21) were married at Sherborne, Gloucestershire.

On 05 Aug 1821 Ralph Heneage Dutton was born to John Dutton 2nd Baron Sherborne (age 42) at Sherborne, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Springhill [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, St Briavels

St Briavels Castle

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Stanway

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Stanway, St Peter's Church

On or before 11 Jun 1715 John Webb of Church Stanway in Gloucestershire was born. He was baptised on 11 Jun 1715 at St Peter's Church, Stanway.

On or before 26 Mar 1749 Francis Webb was born to John Webb of Church Stanway in Gloucestershire (age 33). He was baptised at St Peter's Church, Stanway on 26 Mar 1749.

On 18 Dec 1769 Francis Webb (age 20) and Mary Garritt were married at St Peter's Church, Stanway.

On 15 Apr 1790 Frances Skey (deceased) was buried at St Peter's Church, Stanway.

On 21 Aug 1791 John Webb of Church Stanway in Gloucestershire (deceased) was buried at St Peter's Church, Stanway.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Stoke

Around 1319 Margaret Despencer was born to Hugh "Younger" Despencer 1st Baron Despencer (age 33) and Eleanor Clare Baroness Zouche Mortimer (age 26) at Stoke, Gloucestershire. She a great granddaughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Stow-on-the-Wold [Map]

On or before 03 Dec 1633 Anthony Deane was born. On 03 Dec 1633 he was baptised at Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire [Map].

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum [Map] aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge, Gloucestershire [Map] where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach [Map] where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water [Map] after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester [Map] and Lichfield, Staffordshire [Map]. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire [Map], Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire [Map], Halford [Map], past Fosse Way Compton Verney [Map], Princethorpe [Map], then Bretford [Map] where it crosses the Warwickshire River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae [Map] aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Stow-on-the-Wold, Broadwell House

Chapter. On a failure of heirs male, in a not very diftant branch, Thomas Stothard ftood as the heir-at-law to an old family manfion and a large landed property, I believe, in Gloucefterfhire. Many years ago that failure took place, and he was advifed to assert his claims, and take the ufual legal meafures in such a cafe. But he not only felt a great repugnance to difturb the tranquillity of his own mind, and the delightful indulgence of his imagination at the easel, with the turmoil and hazard and vexatious delays of a lawfuit, but a generous motive alfo prevailed with him; as, at the time he was so much urged to proceed in the affair, he remarked, with the accuftomed Simplicity of his character, "that he mould not like to difturb with law the three maiden ladies who had the property in pofTeffion." Burke would not have faid that a fpirit of chivalry was dead in England, could he have heard this anecdote of Stothard. To return from this digreffion.

Chapter. [Note. Thomas Stothard's mother was Mary, one of three nieces and heiresses of Danvers Hodges who owned Broadwell House, Gloucestershire]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Stowell

In 1541 Robert Atkins was born in Stowell, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Stowell Park Stowell

Around 10 Jun 1722 John Grubyham Howe (age 65) died at Stowell Park Stowell, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Taddington

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Taddington, Source of the River Windrush [Map]

The River Windrush rises near Taddington [Map] in Gloucestershire. It travels broadly south-west through Bourton-on-the-Water [Map], Burford, Oxfordshire [Map], Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire [Map], Witney, Oxfordshire [Map] joining the River Thames at Nebridge.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Taddington, Stanway House

Stanway House is a Jacobean house constructed in the late 16th and early 17th century for the Tracy family after the land was leased to Richard Tracy.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Tetbury

On 06 Feb 1312 Peter Brewes (age 39) died at Tetbury, Gloucestershire.

In 1510 Thomas Berkeley (age 40) died at Tetbury, Gloucestershire. His death year if usually reported as after 1500 but since his daughter Elizabeth was born in 1510 we have adjusted his death date to her birth date.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Tetbury, Beverstone

Before 20 Mar 1413 John Berkeley (age 52) died at Beverstone, Tetbury.

Around Apr 1421 Richard Poynings (age 21) and Eleanor Berkeley Countess Arundel (age 39) were married at Beverstone, Tetbury. He a great x 5 grandson of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England. She a great x 5 granddaughter of King John "Lackland" of England.

Beverstone Castle

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1051. This year came Archbishop Robert hither over sea with his pall from Rome, one day before St. Peter's eve: and he took his archiepiscopal seat at Christ-church on St. Peter's day, and soon after this went to the king. Then came Abbot Sparhawk to him with the king's writ and seal, to the intent that he should consecrate him Bishop o[oe] London; but the archbishop refused, saying that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to the archbishop again for the same purpose, and there demanded episcopal consecration; but the archbishop obstinately refused, repeating that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to London, and sat at the bishopric which the king had before given him, with his full leave, all the summer and the autumn. Then during the same year came Eustace (age 36), who had the sister of King Edward (age 48) to wife, from beyond sea, soon after the bishop, and went to the king; and having spoken with him whatever he chose, he then went homeward. When he came to Canterbury eastward, there took he a repast, and his men; whence he proceeded to Dover, Kent [Map]. When he was about a mile or more on this side Dover, Kent [Map], he put on his breast-plate; and so did all his companions: and they proceeded to Dover. When they came thither, they resolved to quarter themselves wherever they lived. Then came one of his men, and would lodge at the house of a master of a family against his will; but having wounded the master of the house, he was slain by the other. Then was Eustace (age 36) quickly upon his horse, and his companions upon theirs; and having gone to the master of the family, they slew him on his own hearth; then going up to the boroughward, they slew both within and without more than twenty men. The townsmen slew nineteen men on the other side, and wounded more, but they knew not how many. Eustace (age 36) escaped with a few men, and went again to the king (age 48), telling him partially how they had fared. The king (age 48) was very wroth with the townsmen, and sent off Earl Godwin (age 50), bidding him go into Kent with hostility to Dover, Kent [Map]. For Eustace (age 36) had told the king that the guilt of the townsmen was greater than his. But it was not so: and the earl (age 50) would not consent to the expedition, because he was loth to destroy his own people. Then sent the king after all his council, and bade them come to Gloucester nigh the after-mass of St. Mary. Meanwhile Godwin (age 50) took it much to heart, that in his earldom such a thing should happen. Whereupon be began to gather forces over all his earldom, and Earl Sweyne (age 30), his son, over his; and Harold (age 29), his other son, over his earldom: and they assembled all in Gloucestershire, at Langtree, Gloucestershire, a large and innumerable army, all ready for battle against the king; unless Eustace (age 36) and his men were delivered to them handcuffed, and also the Frenchmen that were in the castle. This was done seven nights before the latter mass of St. Mary, when King Edward (age 48) was sitting at Gloucester. Whereupon he sent after Earl Leofric, and north after Earl Siward (age 41), and summoned their retinues. At first they came to him with moderate aid; but when they found how it was in the south, then sent they north over all their earldom, and ordered a large force to the help of their lord. So did Ralph also over his earldom. Then came they all to Gloucester to the aid of the king (age 48), though it was late. So unanimous were they all in defence of the king (age 48), that they would seek Godwin's (age 50) army if the king (age 48) desired it. But some prevented that; because it was very unwise that they should come together; for in the two armies was there almost all that was noblest in England. They therefore prevented this, that they might not leave the land at the mercy of our foes, whilst engaged in a destructive conflict betwixt ourselves. Then it was advised that they should exchange hostages between them. And they issued proclamations throughout to London, whither all the people were summoned over all this north end in Siward's (age 41) earldom, and in Leofric's, and also elsewhere; and Earl Godwin (age 50) was to come thither with his sons to a conference; They came as far as Southwark, Surrey [Map], and very many with them from Wessex; but his army continually diminished more and more; for they bound over to the king (age 48) all the thanes that belonged to Earl Harold (age 29) his son, and outlawed Earl Sweyne (age 30) his other son. When therefore it could not serve his purpose to come to a conference against the king (age 48) and against the army that was with him, he went in the night away. In the morning the king (age 48) held a council, and proclaimed him an outlaw, with his whole army; himself (age 50) and his wife, and all his three sons - Sweyne (age 30) and Tosty (age 25) and Grith (age 19). And he went south to Thorney67, with his wife, and Sweyne (age 30) his son, and Tosty (age 25) and his wife (age 18), a cousin of Baldwin of Bruges (age 38) [Note. Judith Flanders Duchess Bavaria (age 18) was a sister of Baldwin "The Good" V Count Flanders (age 38)], and his son Grith (age 19). Earl Harold (age 29) with Leofwine (age 16) went to Bristol, Gloucestershire [Map] in the ship that Earl Sweyne (age 30) had before prepared and provisioned for himself; and the king (age 48) sent Bishop Aldred from London with his retinue, with orders to overtake him ere he came to ship. But they either could not or would not: and he then went out from the mouth of the Avon; but he encountered such adverse weather, that he got off with difficulty, and suffered great loss. He then went forth to Ireland, as soon as the weather permitted. In the meantime the Welshmen had wrought a castle in Herefordshire, in the territory of Earl Sweyne (age 30), and brought as much injury and disgrace on the king's (age 48) men thereabout as they could. Then came Earl Godwin (age 50), and Earl Sweyne (age 30), and Earl Harold (age 29), together at Beverstone [Map], and many men with them; to the intent that they might go to their natural lord, and to all the peers that were assembled with him; to have the king's (age 48) counsel and assistance, and that of all the peers, how they might avenge the insult offered to the king (age 48), and to all the nation. But the Welshmen were before with the king (age 48), and betrayed the earls, so that they were not permitted to come within the sight of his eyes; for they declared that they intended to come thither to betray the king (age 48). There was now assembled before the king (age 48)68 Earl Siward (age 41), and Earl Leofric, and much people with them from the north: and it was told Earl Godwin (age 50) and his sons, that the king (age 48) and the men who were with him would take counsel against them; but they prepared themselves firmly to resist, though they were loth to proceed against their natural lord. Then advised the peers on either side, that they should abstain from all hostility: and the king (age 48) gave God's peace and his full friendship to each party. Then advised the king (age 48) and his council, that there should be a second time a general assembly of all the nobles in London, at the autumnal equinox: and the king (age 48) ordered out an army both south and north of the Thames, the best that ever was. Then was Earl Sweyne (age 30) proclaimed an outlaw; and Earl Godwin (age 50) and Earl Harold (age 29) were summoned to the council as early as they could come. When they came thither and were cited to the council, then required they security and hostages, that they might come into the council and go out without treachery. The king (age 48) then demanded all the thanes that the earls had; and they put them all into his hands. Then sent the king (age 48) again to them, and commanded them to come with twelve men to the king's (age 48) council. Then desired the earl again security and hostages, that he might answer singly to each of the things that were laid to his charge. But the hostages were refused; and a truce of five nights was allowed him to depart from the land. Then went Earl Godwin (age 50) and Earl Sweyne (age 30) to Bosham [Map], and drew out their ships, and went beyond sea, seeking the protection of Baldwin (age 38); and there they abode all the winter. Earl Harold (age 29) went westward to Ireland, and was there all the winter on the king's (age 48) security.

It was from Thorney69 that Godwin (age 50) and those that were with him went to Bruges [Map], to Baldwin's (age 38) land, in one ship, with as much treasure as they could lodge therein for each man. Wonderful would it have been thought by every man that was then in England, if any person had said before this that it would end thus! For he was before raised to such a height, that he ruled the king (age 48) and all England; his sons were earls, and the king's (age 48) darlings; and his daughter (age 25) wedded and united to the king (age 48). Soon after this took place, the king (age 48) dismissed the lady (age 25) who had been consecrated his queen, and ordered to be taken from her all that she had in land, and in gold, and in silver, and in all things; and committed her to the care of his sister at Wherwell [Map]. Soon after came Earl William (age 23) from beyond sea with a large retinue of Frenchmen; and the king (age 48) entertained him and as many of his companions as were convenient to him, and let him depart again. Then was Abbot Sparhawk driven from his bishopric at London; and William (age 23) the king's priest was invested therewith. Then was Oddy appointed earl over Devonshire, and over Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales; and Algar, the son of Earl Leofric, was promoted to the earldom which Harold (age 29) before possessed.

Note 67. The ancient name of Westminster; which came into disuse because there was another Thorney in Cambridgeshire.

Note 68. i.e. at Gloucester, according to the printed Chronicle; which omits all that took place in the meantime at London and Southwark.

Note 69. Now Westminster.

In 1434 Edward Berkeley was born to Maurice Berkeley (age 37) and Lora Fitzhugh at Beverstone Castle [Map].

On 04 Feb 1506 Edward Berkeley (age 72) died at Beverstone Castle [Map].

In 1598 Elizabeth Hicks Lady Armine was born to Michael Hicks (age 54) and Elizabeth Colston (age 42) in Beverstone Castle [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Thameshead [Map]

Thameshead, Gloucestershire [Map] is considered to the source of the River Thames although the head of the River Churn at Seven Springs [Map] is further away from the mouth of the Thames than Thameshead, Gloucestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Thornbury

On 04 Apr 1281 Maurice Berkeley 5th Baron Berkeley (age 63) died at Thornbury, Gloucestershire. He was buried at St Augustine's Abbey, Bristol [Map]. His son Thomas Berkeley 6th and 1st Baron Berkeley (age 35) succeeded 6th Baron Berkeley Feudal. Joan Ferrers Baroness Berkeley by marriage Baroness Berkeley Feudal.

Around 1310 Katherine Clivedon Baroness Berkeley was born to John Clivedon (age 26) at Thornbury, Gloucestershire.

In 1322 John Clivedon was born to John Clivedon (age 38) at Thornbury, Gloucestershire.

On 18 Nov 1341 Eleanor Beauchamp Baroness Fitzwarin (age 63) died at Thornbury, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Alveston Thornbury

On 11 Feb 1266 Constance Tosny (age 32) died at Alveston Thornbury, Gloucestershire.

Guillaume Fitzwarin died at Alveston Thornbury, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Thornbury Manor Thornbury

In 1066 Beorhtric son of Aelfgar held the manor of Thornbury Manor Thornbury, Gloucestershire.

On 21 Dec 1495 Jasper Tudor 1st Duke Bedford (age 64) died at Thornbury Manor without legitimate issue. Duke Bedford, Earl Pembroke extinct.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Toddington

Around 1501 William Tracy was born to William Tracy (age 41) at Toddington, Gloucestershire.

On 20 Sep 1688 Elizabeth Leigh Viscountess Tracy died. She was buried at Toddington, Gloucestershire.

On 25 Jan 1708 Jane Leigh Viscountess Tracy (age 43) died. She was buried at Toddington, Gloucestershire.

On 18 Apr 1712 William Tracy 4th Viscount Tracy (age 55) died. He was buried at Toddington, Gloucestershire. His son Charles Tracy 5th Viscount Tracy (age 21) succeeded 5th Viscount Tracy of Rathcoole in Dublin.

On 04 Jun 1756 Charles Tracy 5th Viscount Tracy (age 65) died. He was buried at Toddington, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Toddington, St George of England Church

On 23 Apr 1686 Henrietta Marie Wentworth 6th Baroness Wentworth (age 25) died. She was buried at St George of England Church, Toddington. Her aunt Anne Wentworth 7th Baroness Wentworth Baroness Lovelace (age 62) succeeded 7th Baroness Wentworth.

On 20 Mar 1688 Frances Devereux (age 29) died. She was buried at St George of England Church, Toddington.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Todenham

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Lemington Todenham

In 1431 Richard Greville was born at Lemington Todenham, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Tortworth

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Tortworth, St Leonard's Church [Map]

On 07 Aug 1924 Berkeley Reynolds-Moreton 4th Earl of Ducie (age 90) died. He was buried at St Leonard's Church, Tortworth [Map]. His son Capel Moreton 5th Earl of Ducie (age 49) succeeded 5th Earl Ducie.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Uley

On 24 Sep 1361 Thomas Berkeley 3rd Baron Berkeley (age 29) died at Uley, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Uley Barrow aka Hetty Pegler's Tump [Map]

Uley Barrow aka Hetty Pegler's Tump is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

3000BC or before. Uley Barrow aka Hetty Pegler's Tump [Map] is a Severn-Cotswolds Tomb with a transepted gallery grave with a stone-built central passage with two chambers on each side and another at the end.

John Thurnam 1854. Description Of A Chambered Tumulus, Near Uley [Uley Barrow aka Hetty Pegler's Tump [Map]], Gloucestershire by John Thurnam (age 43). 1854.

Llewellynn Jewitt 1870. Another extremely important mound of this description is the one at Uley, in Gloucestershire [Map], of which an able account has been written by Dr. Thurnham.1 The mound is about 120 feet in length, 85 feet in its greatest breadth, and about 10 feet in height. It is higher and broader at its east end than elsewhere. The entrance at the east end is a trilithon, formed by a large flat stone upwards of eight feet in length, and four and a half in depth, and supported by two upright stones which face each other, so as to leave a space of about two and a half feet between the lower edge of the large stone and the natural ground. Entering this, a gallery appears, running from east to west, about twenty-two feet in length, four and a half in average width, and five in height; the sides formed of large slabs of stone, set edgeways, the spaces between being filled in with smaller stones. The roof is formed, as usual, of flat slabs, laid across and resting on the side-slabs. There are two smaller chambers on one side, and there is evidence of two others having existed on the other side. Several skeletons were found in this fine tumulus when it was opened, many years ago.

Note 1. Archaeological Journal, vol xi., p. 315.

Description of the Chambered Tumuli of Uley and Nympsfield. Description Of The Chambered Tumuli Of Uley [Map] and Nympsfield [Map], Visited by the Society on 22nd July, 1880, with remarks on other Tumuli in Gloucestershire, Wiltshire, and Somersetshire. By Sir John Maclean, F.S.A., Vice-President of the Royal Archaeological Institute, Hon. Member of the Royal Institution of Cornwall, &c.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Uley Barrow aka Hetty Pegler's Tump [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Upper Slaughter

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Upper Slaughter, St Peter's Church

Before 1854 Francis Edward Witts (age 71) was appointed Rector of St Peter's Church, Upper Slaughter.

Reverend Edward Francis Witts was appointed Rector of St Peter's Church, Upper Slaughter.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Upper Swell

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Upper Swell, Pole's Wood East Barrow [Map]

Pole's Wood East Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

31 Swell Barrow 3. Swell Barrow 3 aka Pole's Wood East Barrow [Map]

This is in the parish of Upper Swell, half a mile west-south‑west of the village, and the same distance north of Lower Swell. The extreme length was 120 feet, and extreme width 40 feet; its direction was north-north‑east and south-south‑west, its horned end being at the north-north‑east end; its greatest height was five feet. It was surrounded by a wall which measured four feet in height at the north end. The principal interment was in a trench about twenty-eight feet long, six feet four inches wide, and two feet deep, and this was sunk below the original surface of the ground, similar to the trench described under the "West Tump." In this trench-chamber were found nineteen skeletons, also bones of the roe deer, red deer, ox, wild board, goat, pig, &c., bone implements, one vessel of coarse pottery, and a considerable number of worked flints. Three Saxon skeletons were found near the surface of the barrow.

See "Jour. Anthrop. Inst.," vol. V, p120.

Also "British Barrows," p524.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Pole's Wood East Barrow [Map]

Finds Near Stow on the Wold. Upper Swell Barrows. — [Pole's Wood East Barrow [Map] or Pole's Wood West Barrow [Map]] Had the programme been adhered to, the road from Upper to Nether Swell would have taken our party under the two horned barrows, described in "British Barrows," which, it was hoped, the Society would have inspected. A detail or two of "finds," subsequent, and too late for insertion in the above work, may be worth recording, viz: secondary Saxon interment, on that favourite spot, the horned end of Long Barrows. Two Saxons were interred, after their wont, in pure earth, on a barrow of sheer stones. No 1, a young man, arms bent ; left, on breast ; right, on stomach — clavicle, scapula, tibia, fibula wanting ; only half of right femur; under right pelvis, a small iron knife ; spear on right side. The bones were "mashed" by heavy stones over them. No. 2, spear-head, like that of No. 1, only horizontal over head ; left arm down by side ; a large knife below. This skeleton more perfect, was that of a strong tall man ; yet tibia, fibula, feet and finger bones were not found with the body ; but bones that might have belonged to it were found on the top of the barrow, lower down. The bones of both were, in part, decayed and weatherworn. Both lay on their backs in line with the harrow, a foot to 18 inches below the surface and 17 ft. from the curve in the horns.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Upper Swell, Pole's Wood South Barrow [Map]

Pole's Wood South Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

30 Swell Barrow 2. Swell Barrow 2 aka Pole's Wood South [Map]

This is in the parish of Upper Swell, half a mile from the village, and one and a half miles from Stow-on‑the‑Wold. Its length was 173 feet, its greatest width 57 feet, and greatest height eight feet six inches; its direction was east by north and west by south, the highest portion lying towards the east. Like the others in this neighbourhood it is composed of oolitic rubble and slabs, and is surrounded by a wall, which at the east end reached to a height of five feet, and here it assumed the "horned" shape. Only one chamber was found in the whole of this mound; this was twenty-four feet from the west end, and on the north side of the barrow; it had a passage leading to it similar to the last. The chamber was seven feet long, four feet wide, and three feet eight inches high. At least nine skeletons were found here, together with bones of the goat or sheep, ox, pig, and two pieces of pottery. In the passage were found three other skeletons. Near the surface of the barrow three bodies were discovered, evidently Saxons, as proved by the articles found with them, viz., two bronze buckles, an iron knife, and an amber bead.

See "Jour. Anthrop. Inst.," vol. V, p120.

Also "British Barrows," p521.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Pole's Wood South Barrow [Map]

Finds Near Stow on the Wold. Barrow 2 [Pole's Wood South Barrow [Map]] — seen at times, by those gifted with second sight, swathed in unearthly flame. On its surface, at the horned end, with her head south, broken, and her bones displaced, lay a lady — between her knees, a small iron knife ; below her breast, an amber bead, whilst two circular cabled fibulae fastened her shroud, one on each shoulder.

But, "place aux dames !" as Dr. Rolleston exclaimed, on further removal of the soil, the remains of other bodies appeared. The frame of a man, lying north-east by south-west, had been displaced to receive the lady's body. Skulls and bones of two infants were found. A Saxon family, prematurely cut ofi", would seem to have been committed to this particular spot, on the, even then, revered and ancient cairn. A singular circumstance attending this "find," was the arrival of a telegram, at a British barrow, summoning Dr. Rolleston, from the grave of the Saxon lady, to the sick bed of his sister. Progress indeed!

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Upper Swell, Pole's Wood West Barrow [Map]

Pole's Wood West Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Pole's Wood West Barrow [Map]

Finds Near Stow on the Wold. Upper Swell Barrows. — [Pole's Wood East Barrow [Map] or Pole's Wood West Barrow [Map]] Had the programme been adhered to, the road from Upper to Nether Swell would have taken our party under the two horned barrows, described in "British Barrows," which, it was hoped, the Society would have inspected. A detail or two of "finds," subsequent, and too late for insertion in the above work, may be worth recording, viz: secondary Saxon interment, on that favourite spot, the horned end of Long Barrows. Two Saxons were interred, after their wont, in pure earth, on a barrow of sheer stones. No 1, a young man, arms bent ; left, on breast ; right, on stomach — clavicle, scapula, tibia, fibula wanting ; only half of right femur; under right pelvis, a small iron knife ; spear on right side. The bones were "mashed" by heavy stones over them. No. 2, spear-head, like that of No. 1, only horizontal over head ; left arm down by side ; a large knife below. This skeleton more perfect, was that of a strong tall man ; yet tibia, fibula, feet and finger bones were not found with the body ; but bones that might have belonged to it were found on the top of the barrow, lower down. The bones of both were, in part, decayed and weatherworn. Both lay on their backs in line with the harrow, a foot to 18 inches below the surface and 17 ft. from the curve in the horns.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Upton

Around 1528 Francis Savage was born to Christopher Savage (age 24) at Upton, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Weston-sub-Edge [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Whittington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Willersey

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Willersey Barrow [Map]

Willersey Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Volume 9 1876. At the close of this address the journey was resumed, and Willersey Camp was next reached. It is the site of a British Camp, on property now belonging to Mr. R. N. Chadwick, who had obligingly given permission for its inspection, and also for the exploration of the barrow adjacent. Mr. George B. Witts (age 29) here acted as cicerone, and by his concise and graphic description of the remains gave his auditory clear ideas of their ancient form and uses. The camp, Mr. Witts stated, was 68 acres in extent, and after describing how it was originally constructed, pointed out the number of British camps which were visible from it. Amongst them were those as distant as Shenboro', Cleeve Hill (Cheltenham), Oxenton Hill, May Hill, Welshboro', Malvern, Bredon (2), Meon, Chastleton, and the Rollright stones [Map], to all which, with others, Mr. Witts directed attention. He also described the situation of the camp in relation to the Roman roads and its connection with Saintbury (Swains'-bury) camp. From the camp a short walk brought the party to the barrow [Willersey Barrow [Map]], which with praiseworthy zeal Mr. Witts had on the previous day, with a willing party of workers, partially excavated. The face of the outer wall of the barrow was exposed for some distance, also the walls of some of the chambers, though displaced probably by previous explorers. Here the bones of the ox were found, and also many fragments of human bones and of pottery, with some flint chips. After an explanation of the form and extent of the barrow, a hearty vote of thanks was given to Mr. Chadwick for his permission to explore the barrow, and to those who had so well done the work. The carriages were resumed, and on arriving at Kiftsgate Stone the President pointed it out to the party as their carriages arrived in succession at the spot, and thence they were conveyed to the summit of "Dover's Hill." From this hill is a most magnificent panorame, which was seen to great advantage, the atmosphere being just at that time particularly favorable for views of distant scenery. From the hill associated with the historic name of Mr. Dover, the great patron of the Coteswold games, the travellers proceeded to the picturesque town of Chipping Campden, where at the ancient hostelry of the Noel Arms the party alighted to lunch, to which they had been kindly invited by the President. Having partaken of the President's hospitality

Volume 9 1876. I should mention here that the old Salt-way from Droitwich to the coast of Hampshire climbs the Coteswold Hills in the parish of Hailes. In the church of the adjoining parish of Didbrook, some Lancastrians are said to have sought refuge after the battle of Tewkesbury, A.D. 1471, but were brought out and shot down at the west end. The door is perforated with bullet holes. I give the tradition as it was narrated to me. Passing along the side of the hill, in the hundred of Kiftsgate, of which I shall say more presently, we come to the village of Stanway. There is here a large and handsome manor house, in the Tudor style. The banquetting hall is a fine room, and the lodge was built by Inigo Jones, about 1630. Dover, who instituted the Coteswold games, is said to have been buried here, but I think this is a mistake, for the registers of Uarton-on-the-Heath, give a long list of the Dover family, amongst others Mr. Robert Dover, who was buried in 1652. In the adjoining parish of Stanton there are the remains of a large camp, but I have been quite unable to glean any particulars about it beyond the fact that it is sometimes called "Shenborough Camp," sometimes "Lidcombe," sometimes "Stanton," and is supposed to be the connecting link between Beckbury Camp and WiUersey Camp, both of which are visible from it. There is some old glass in the church of the 15th century. Still keeping under the brow of the hill, we come to Buckland, or "Bocland," because the tenure of the land was by deed in opposition to "Folkland" that held by hearsay of the folk. There is an interesting little church with some curious glass in the windows. Mr. Gambier Tarry, a former president, remarks: — "There are some Hue old seats and tiles, the unusual feature, too, of testers projecting over the seats against the wall, frescoes, and a beautiful Kancte-belle cot." These are described in the Archaeological Transactions of this Society, Tart I., 1879-80, pp. 10 and 11. The manor belonged to the Abbey of Gloucester, and I do not find mention made of any other property in the neighbourhood in the possession of that house. The counties of Gloucester and Worcester are in this district very much intermixed, and we shall enter the latter in the parish of Broadway. The ancient road to London passed by the old church; but now the village is so far distant that a new church, in a more convenient situation, has been built, and the venerable old building of the latter part of the 12th century is only used daring the summer months for service. A paper will be read on our visit to the church. In contrast to the care which is bestowed upon this sacred edifice, let me call attention to the almost ruinous state of the building called "the Grange." Alas, this once cosy retreat of the Abbots of Pershore is falling to decay, and unless some means are speedily taken to preserve it this relic of the 14th century will soon be a ruin and a building of the past. The drive up Broadway Hill is rather steep. On the top is a small Inn, with the sign of "The Fish" — either "lucus a non lucendo" — or to keep up the old saying "as thirsty as a fish," which you certainly will he after walking up. The Downs on the top, before enclosure, must have been very extensive. Here both Cavalier and Roundhead were often alternately encamped, and there is a despatch in existence from Lord Digby, dated Broadway Downs, 17th of June, 1644. On the top of the hill, but in the parish of Willersey, and consequently in the county of Gloucester, looking over the Vale of Evesham, are the remains of a very large camp. In extent it is more than 60 acres, and is said by Rudder to have been formed during the Danish ravages. On two sides the camp is naturally defended, on the other two it must have been strongly fortified, for there are evidences of double entrenchments. It is said that here the Mercians were encamped before the battle which took place between them and the West Saxons, at a spot which still retains the name of Battle Bridge, in the parish of Chipping Campden, in the hamlet of Berrington, which probably takes its name from the barrows or "tumuli" [Willersey Barrow [Map]] raised over the bodies of the slain. Guthrum, the Danish King, spent a whole year in Gloucestershire, and it may be that the record of one of the engagements with Alfred about A.D. 877 has thus been traditionally preserved. Within the camp is a large long-barrow running east and west. Through the kindness and liberality of Mr. Chadwiok, the owner of the property, tins barrow was in some measure opened ten days ago. The outside walls on the north and south sides were clearly traced, and some very large stones were found at the east end. A few bones were discovered under the largest stone. These have been carefully preserved, and the opening, so far as it went, has been left for your inspection. In the adjoining parish of Saintbury (or as it is called in the Doomsday book Swineberie, that is Swine's camp) there is a smaller camp, probably an outlying work, as it is connected with the larger one in Willersey. Fosbroke calls it Danish. But by the side of these two camps runs the ancient road of Buckle Street, or Buggilde Street. Mr. Witta has traced this road from Ryknield Street, which runs near Bidford to its junction with the Kossway, near Bourton-on-the-Water, and says it is first mentioned in a Saxon charter dated 709. Rudder attributes all these entrenchments to the Danish locusts, who for many years desolated the country, but I think there can be no doubt that both here and on Meon Hill these camps may have been British, were undoubtedly Roman, and were afterwards occupied by both Saxons and Danes. Driving on, now on the top of the hill we come to the parish of Weston Suhcdge, with which I am more immediately connected, and by the route I hope we shall take to-morrow it will be entered near to a very celebrated locality — namely, Kifts-gate, from which the Hundred takes its name. The position was formerly called "The Narrows," and the meaning of the word may be derived from the old Celtic word "Cefn" — a ridge — as this accurately describes the tongue of land ou which it stood. Alas ! the gate lias gone, the post alone remains. I believe it is the intention of hold Gainsborough, on whose property it stands, carefully to preserve this ancient relic. In former days the court of the hundred or Wapentake was assembled here for the administration of justice, as well as for military purposes, and evidently the place of assembly for such business must have been of considerable importance. I have reason to believe that

37 Willersey Barrow. Willersey Barrow [Map]

There is a mound in Willersey Camp, on the top of the Cotteswold Hills, one and a half miles from Broadway, very much like a long barrow, though without excavation it would be impossible to be certain as to its nature. Its length is 160 feet, greatest width 66 feet, and greatest height four feet six inches. Its direction is east and west, the highest portion being at the east end. The interior seems to be composed of oolitic rubble and slabs, similar to that found in other Gloucestershire barrows.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Winterbourne Down [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Withington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Withington Barrow [Map]

Withington Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Woodchester

On 17 Jun 1858 Edward Housman and Sarah Jane Williams were married at Woodchester, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Woodchester, Bown Hill Long Barrow [Map]

Bown Hill Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Bown Hill Long Barrow [Map]. Historic England:

The monument includes a long barrow orientated approximately east-west on the crest of a hill in the Cotswolds. It is visible as a barrow mound 56m long by 22m wide and ranging between 2m high at its western end to 4.5m high at its eastern end. At the east end of the mound is a large depression measuring approximately 12m by 9m, while in the centre of the mound is a second depression about 8m wide, both of which are thought to have been due to the partial excavation of the barrow in 1863. Two parallel ditches, from which material was excavated during the construction of the barrow, lie on either side of the barrow mound to the north and south. These ditches are no longer visible at ground level, having become infilled over the years, but survive as buried features about 3m wide. The barrow was partially excavated by Dr Paine and Mr Witchell in 1863. At the east end, between dry stone wall horns, was a megalithic portal which lead straight into a rectangular burial chamber measuring 2.6m by 1.2m. The chamber contained the remains of at least six individuals, animal bones and some Neolithic pottery. Some Romano-British pottery and a coin of Germanicus (struck approximately AD19) were also recovered. The dry stone walls and wire fences which run immediately to the west and north of the mound are excluded from the scheduling, although the ground beneath them is included.

Proceedings of the Cotteswold Naturalists' Field Club Volume 5 Page 277. The largest tumulus of this district stands on Selsley Hill ; it is known as "The Toots [Map]," and has been opened in three places, but I am not aware that any record has been preserved of the results of this disturbance. The Bown Hill Tumulus [Map] (Fig. 2) was opened by the Club in May, 1863, and found to have been formed over stone chambers ; particulars of this examination are given in the " Proceedings of the Club," Yol. III., page 199. The tumulus on Minchinhampton Common, popularly known as "Whitfield's Tump [Map]," has been so thoroughly distiirbed as to render it difficult to ascertain its original form and dimensions.

5 Bown Hill Barrow. Bown Hill Long Barrow [Map]

This lies on Bown Hill, above Woodchester, three miles south-west of Stroud, and two miles north-west of Nailsworth. It is 180 feet long, its greatest width being 50 feet. Its direction is east-north‑east and west-south‑west, the highest end being towards the east-north‑east. It was opened by the Cotteswold Naturalists' Field Club in May, 1863. The interior of the barrow was constructed of angular masses of stone, heaped together without any order, amongst which were scattered blocks of considerable size. Only one chamber was found; this was formed of five large stones, two on each side and one placed transversely, measuring eight feet six inches by four feet. The remains of six skeletons were found, and several bones of cattle, teeth of the horse and ox, several boars' tusks, a small flint flake, and some pieces of rude pottery. The barrow had evidently been previously disturbed, and this fact will probably account for the presence of a brass coin of the Roman Emperor Germanicus.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. III, p199.

Also "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p279.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Wotton under Edge

On 20 Mar 1391 Margaret Lisle Baroness Berkeley 3rd Baroness Lisle (age 29) died at Wotton under Edge, Gloucestershire. Thomas Berkeley 10th and 5th Baron Berkeley, Baron Lisle (age 39) continued to hold Baron Lisle of Kingston Lisle in Oxfordshire by courtesy.

On 09 Sep 1836 Kenelm Edward Digby was born to Reverend Kenelm Henry Digby (age 30) at Wotton under Edge, Gloucestershire.

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Wotton under Edge, Blackquarries Hill Long Barrow [Map]

Blackquarries Hill Long Barrow is also in Cotswolds Neolithic Tombs.

Long Barrows of the Cotswolds. Blackquarries Hill Long Barrow [Map]

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Wotton under Edge, St Mary the Virgin

Europe, British Isles, England, Welsh March, Gloucestershire, Yate [Map]