Biography of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533

Paternal Family Tree: Tudor

Maternal Family Tree: Jeanne Sabran

1485 Battle of Bosworth

1486 Marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth York

1503 Death of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

1509 Death of Henry VII

1509 Funeral of Henry VII

1514 Marriage of Mary Tudor and Louis XII of France

1515 Louis XII King France succeeded by Francis I

1518 Betrothal of Mary Tudor and the Dauphin

1525 Knighting of Henry Fitzroy

1527 Visit of the French Ambassadors

1532 Coronation of Anne Boleyn

1533 Funeral of Mary Tudor

1536 Death of Catherine of Aragon

1562 News Years Day Gift Giving

On 03 Nov 1456 [her grandfather] Edmund Tudor 1st Earl Richmond (age 26) died of plague at Carmarthen Castle [Map] leaving his twelve year old wife [her grandmother] Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond (age 13) pregnant with their child [her father] Henry Tudor, the future King Henry VII. His son Henry Tudor succeeded 2nd Earl Richmond.

In 1476 [her future husband] Louis XII King France (age 13) and Joan Valois Queen Consort France (age 11) were married. She by marriage Queen Consort of France. She the daughter of Louis "Father of the People" XI King France (age 52) and Charlotte Savoy Queen Consort France (age 34). He the son of Charles Valois Duke Orléans and Mary La Marck Duchess Orléans. They were second cousin once removed.

Battle of Bosworth

On 22 Aug 1485 King Richard III of England (age 32) was killed during the Battle of Bosworth. His second cousin once removed [her father] Henry Tudor  (age 28) succeeded VII King England. Earl Richmond forfeit.

Those supporting Henry Tudor included:

John Blount 3rd Baron Mountjoy (age 35).

John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne (age 43).

Richard Guildford (age 35).

Walter Hungerford (age 21).

Thomas Stanley 1st Earl of Derby (age 50).

John Wingfield.

Edward Woodville Lord Scales (age 29).

Edward Courtenay 1st Earl Devon (age 26).

Rhys ap Thomas Deheubarth (age 36).

Jasper Tudor 1st Duke Bedford (age 53).

William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont (age 47).

Giles Daubeney 1st Baron Daubeney (age 34).

William Stanley (age 50).

Roger Kynaston of Myddle and Hordley (age 52).

Henry Marney 1st Baron Marney (age 38).

William Brandon (age 29) was killed.

James Harrington (age 55) was killed.

John Howard 1st Duke of Norfolk (age 60) was killed and attainted. He was buried firstly at Thetford Priory, Norfolk [Map] and therafter at Church of St Michael the Archangel, Framlingham [Map]. Duke Norfolk, Baron Mowbray, Baron Segrave forfeit.

John Sacheverell (age 85) was killed.

Philibert Chandee 1st Earl Bath

William Norreys (age 44), Gilbert Talbot (age 33), John de Vere 13th Earl of Oxford (age 42) and John Savage (age 41) commanded,.

Robert Poyntz (age 35) was knighted.

Those who fought for Richard III included:

John Bourchier 6th Baron Ferrers of Groby (age 47).

John Conyers (age 74).

Thomas Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland (age 17).

William Berkeley 1st Marquess Berkeley (age 59).

Richard Fitzhugh 6th Baron Fitzhugh (age 28).

John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton (age 48).

Thomas Scrope 6th Baron Scrope Masham (age 26).

Henry Grey 4th or 7th Baron Grey of Codnor (age 50).

Edmund Grey 1st Earl Kent (age 68).

Ralph Neville 3rd Earl of Westmoreland (age 29).

John de la Pole 1st Earl Lincoln (age 23).

Humphrey Stafford (age 59).

George Talbot 4th Earl of Shrewsbury (age 17).

Thomas Howard 2nd Duke of Norfolk (age 42) was wounded, captured and imprisoned in the Tower of London [Map] for three years. He was attainted; Earl Surrey forfeit.

Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell (age 29) fought and escaped.

John Zouche 7th Baron Zouche Harringworth (age 26) was captured.

John Babington (age 62), William Alington (age 65), Robert Mortimer (age 43), Robert Brackenbury, Richard Ratclyffe (age 55) and Richard Bagot (age 73) were killed

Walter Devereux Baron Ferrers of Chartley (age 53) was killed.

William Catesby (age 35) was executed at Leicester, Leicestershire [Map] after the battle.

George Stanley 9th Baron Strange Knockin 5th Baron Mohun Dunster (age 25) held as a hostage by Richard III before the Battle of Bosworth.

Henry Percy 4th Earl of Northumberland (age 36) betrayed King Richard III of England (age 32) by not committing his forces at the Battle of Bosworth.

John Iwardby (age 35) was killed.

Marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth York

On 18 Jan 1486 [her father] King Henry VII of England and Ireland (age 28) and [her mother] Elizabeth, Edward IV's eldest daughter (age 19) were married at Westminster Abbey [Map]. She by marriage Queen Consort England. She the daughter of King Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England (age 49). He the son of Edmund Tudor 1st Earl Richmond and Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond (age 42). They were third cousins. He a great x 3 grandson of King Edward III of England.

On 18 Mar 1496 Mary Tudor Queen Consort France was born to King Henry VII of England and Ireland (age 39) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England (age 30).

On 07 Apr 1498 Charles VIII King France (age 27) died after he hit his head on a door lintel at Château d'Amboise, Amboise. His second cousin once removed [her future husband] Louis XII King France (age 35) succeeded XII King France: Capet Valois.

In 1499 [her future husband] Louis XII King France (age 36) and Anne of Brittany Queen Consort France (age 21) were married. She by marriage Queen Consort of France. He the son of Charles Valois Duke Orléans and Mary La Marck Duchess Orléans. They were first cousin once removed. She a great x 5 granddaughter of King Henry III of England.

Death of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

On 02 Feb 1503 [her sister] Katherine Tudor was born to [her father] King Henry VII of England and Ireland (age 46) and [her mother] Elizabeth York Queen Consort England (age 36) at the Tower of London [Map]. She died eight days later on 10 Feb 1503.

On 11 Feb 1503 (her birthday) Elizabeth York Queen Consort England (age 36) died from childbirth.

Before 07 Feb 1507 [her future husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 23) and Margaret Neville (age 41) were married. She the daughter of John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu and Isabel Ingaldsthorpe. They were half fourth cousins. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III of England.

After 07 Feb 1507 [her future husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 23) and Margaret Neville (age 41) were divorced. The marriage was declared void, the reason is unknown, by the Archdeaconry Court of London, and later by papal bull dated 12 May 1528.

In 1508 [her future husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 24) and Anne Browne were married secretly at Stepney [Map]. She, Anne, being the step-daughter of his first wife's (age 42) sister Lucy Neville (age 40). They, Charles and Anne, had possibly been betrothed before his marriage to Margaret Neville (age 42).

Letters and Papers 1509. Apr 1509. Will of [her father] Henry VII (age 52):

At his manor of Richmond, Surrey [Map] March 24 Henry VII., the King (age 52) makes his last will, commending his soul to the Redeemer with the words he has used since his first "years of discretion," Domine Jesu Christe, qui me ex nichilo creasti, fecisti, redemisti et predestinasti ad hoc quod sum, Tu scis quid de me facere vis, fac de me secundum voluntatem Tuam cum misericordia, trusting in the grace of His Blessed Mother in whom, after Him, has been all his (testator's) trust, by whom in all his adversities he has had special comfort, and to whom he now makes his prayer (recited), as also to all the company of Heaven and especially his "accustumed avoures" St. Michael, St. John Baptist, St. John Evangelist, St. George, St. Anthony, St. Edward, St. Vincent, St. Anne, St. Mary Magdalene and St. Barbara, to defend him at the hour of death and be intercessors for the remission of his sins and salvation of his soul.

Desires to be buried at Westminster [Map], where he was crowned, where lie buried many of his progenitors, especially his granddame Catharine wife to Henry V and daughter to Charles of France, and whereto he means shortly to translate the remains of Henry IV in the chapel [Map] which he has begun to build (giving full directions for the placing and making of his tomb and finishing of the said chapel according to the plan which he has "in picture delivered" to the prior of St. Bartholomew's beside Smithfield, master of the works for the same); and he has delivered beforehand to the abbot, &c., of Westminster, £5,000, by indenture dated Richmond, 13 April 23 Hen VII, towards the cost.

His executors shall cause 10,000 masses in honor of the Trinity, the Five Wounds, the Five Joys of Our Lady, the Nine Orders of Angels, the Patriarchs, the Twelve Apostles and All Saints (numbers to each object specified) to be said within one month after his decease, at 6d. each, making in all £250 and shall distribute 2,£000 in alms; and to ensure payment he has left 2,£250 with the abbot, &c., of West-minster, by indenture dated (blank) day of (blank) in the (blank) year of his reign.

His debts are then to be paid and reparation for wrongs made by his executors at the discretion of the following persons, by whom all complaints shall be tenderly weighed, viz, the abp of Canterbury (age 59), Richard bp of Winchester (age 61), the bps of London and Rochester (age 39), Thomas Earl of Surrey (age 66), Treasurer General, George Earl of Shrewsbury (age 41), Steward of the House, Sir Charles Somerset Lord Herbert (age 49), Chamberlain, the two Chief Justices, Mr. John Yong (age 44), Master of the Rolls, Sir Thomas Lovell, Treasurer of the House, Mr. Thomas Routhall, secretary, Sir Ric Emson (age 59), Chancellor of the Duchy, Edm. Dudley (age 47), the King's attorney at the time of his decease, and his confessor, the Provincial of the Friars Observants, and Mr. William Atwater, dean of the Chapel, or at least six of them and three of his executors.

His executors shall see that the officers of the Household and Wardrobe discharge any debts which may be due for charges of the same.

Lands to the yearly value of above 1,000 mks have been "amortised" for fulfilment of certain covenants (described) with the abbey of Westminster.

For the completion of the hospital which he has begun to build at the Savoie place beside Charingcrosse, and towards which 10,000 mks in ready money has been delivered to the dean and chapter of St. Paul's, by indenture dated (blank), his executors shall deliver any more money which may be necessary; and they shall also make (if he has not done it in his lifetime) two similar hospitals in the suburbs of York and Coventry.

Certain cathedrals, abbeys, &c., named in a schedule hereto annexed [not annexed now] have undertaken to make for him orisons, prayers and suffrages "while the world shall endure," in return for which he has made them large confirmations, licences and other grants; and he now wishes 6s. 8d. each to be delivered soon after his decease to the rulers of such cathedrals, &c., 3s. 4d. to every canon and monk, being priest, within the same and 20d. to every canon, monk, vicar and minister not being priest. His executors shall bestow 2,£000 upon the repair of the highways and bridges from Windsor to Richmond manor and thence to St. George's church beside Southwark [Map], and thence to Greenwich manor, and thence to Canterbury.

To divers lords, as well of his blood as other, and also to knights, squires and other subjects, he has, for their good service, made grants of lands, offices and annuities, which he straitly charges his son, the [her brother] Prince (age 17), and other heirs to respect; as also the enfeoffments of the Duchy of Lancaster made by Parliaments of 7 and 19 Henry VII. for the fulfilment of his will.

Bequests for finishing of the church of the New College in Cambridge and the church of Westminster, for the houses of Friars Observants, for the altar within the King's grate (i.e. of his tomb), for the high altar within the King's chapel, for the image of the King to be made and set upon St. Edward's shrine, for the College of Windsor, for the monastery of Westminster, for the image of the King to be set at St. Thomas's shrine at Canterbury, and for chalices and pixes of a certain fashion to be given to all the houses of Friars and every parish church not suitably provided with such.

Bequest of a dote of 50,£000 for the marriage of Lady Mary (age 13) the King's daughter with Charles Prince of Spain (age 9), as contracted at Richmond (blank) Dec. 24 Henry VIII., or (if that fail) her marriage with any prince out of the realm by "consent of our said son the Prince (age 17), his Council and our said executors.".

Death of Henry VII

On 21 Apr 1509 [her father] King Henry VII of England and Ireland (age 52) died of tuberculosis at Richmond Palace [Map]. His son [her brother] Henry VIII  (age 17) succeeded VIII King England. Duke York and Earl Chester merged with the Crown.

Funeral of Henry VII

On 11 May 1509 [her father] King Henry VII of England and Ireland (deceased) was buried in the King Henry VII Chapel, Westminster Abbey [Map]. Henry Willoughby (age 58) and Anthony Wingfield (age 22) attended. The ladies given mantelets and kerchiefs were as follows:

Household of Mary Tudor:

Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 13).

[her aunt] Catherine York Countess Devon (age 29).

Elizabeth Stafford Countess Sussex (age 30). Possibly Margaret Whetehill.

Anne Percy (age 65) or Anne Percy Countess Arundel (age 23).

Elizabeth Hussey Countess Kent.

Eleanor Pole (age 47).

Mary Brandon.

Elizabeth Empson.

Mary Scrope (age 33).

Jane Popincourt.

Alice Vaux.

Household of the Princess of Wales Catherine of Aragon:

Catherine of Aragon (age 23).

Agnes or Inez Vanegas.

Maria de Salinas Baroness Willoughby (age 19).

Household of Margaret Beaufort the King's Mother:

[her grandmother] Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond (age 65).

Joan Vaux "Mother Guildford" (age 46).

Mary Hussey Baroness Willoughby of Eresby (age 25).

In 1513 [her future husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 29) was betrothed to Elizabeth Grey Countess Devon (age 7). He was created 1st Viscount Lisle in recognition of the betrothal.

Letters. 11 Jan 1513. Ferdinand King of Aragon (age 60) to Pedro De UREA, his Ambassador at the Imperial Court.

Shows that the treaty which the Cardinal of Gurk (age 45) has, with the consent of Urea and Vich, concluded at Rome, by excluding the Venetians, undoes all that has been done against France. Henceforth they must make no binding declaration without consulting Ferdinand. Had the English followed his plan they would now be masters of Guienne; and, like them, the Emperor has now hindered the accomplishment of his own wishes and made France stronger. Takes this as a command from God for Christian princes to unite in reforming the Church, and has therefore devised the measures explained in instructions sent by Beltrian. Gurk is to be shown the instructions, but not this letter. If the [her future husband] King of France (age 50) offers [her future step-daughter] Madame Renée (age 2) as security, or offers to put fortresses in trust of third persons, Urea shall point out to the Emperor how little these offers are to be trusted. The marriage of Prince Charles (age 12) with the King of England's (age 21) sister (age 16) must not be broken off; or France will gain the King of England (age 21), to the detriment of Spain and the House of Burgundy. Another essential condition is that all acts of the schismatical Council be annulled. Is glad to hear of the meeting between the Emperor and the King of England, whose alliance is both the guarantee that France will keep peace if concluded and the most valuable support in case of war.

In 1514 [her future husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 30) was created 1st Duke Suffolk by King Henry VIII of England and Ireland (age 22). Elizabeth Grey Countess Devon (age 8) by marriage Duchess Suffolk.

Marriage of Mary Tudor and Louis XII of France

On 13 Aug 1514 [her future husband] Louis XII King France (age 52) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 18) were married by proxy at the Palace of Placentia, Greenwich [Map]. Louis I d'Orléans Duc de Longueville 1480-1516, a hostage in England at the time, stood in for Louis XII King France (age 52).

On 09 Oct 1514 Louis XII King France (age 52) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 18) were married at Abbeville, Somme. She by marriage Queen Consort France. Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset (age 37), Thomas West 8th Baron De La Warr 5th Baron West (age 57), Thomas Brooke 8th Baron Cobham (age 44) and his son George Brooke 9th Baron Cobham (age 17), Bishop Thomas Ruthall (age 42) and Margaret Wotton Marchioness Dorset (age 27) attended. The difference in their ages was 33 years. She the daughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England. He the son of Charles Valois Duke Orléans and Mary La Marck Duchess Orléans. They were second cousin twice removed.

Ellis' Letters S1 V1 Letter XL. 12 Oct 1514. Mary Queen of France (age 18) to Thomas Wolsey (age 41), then Archbishop of York.

[MS. COTTON. CALIG. D. vi. fol. 143. Orig.]

... I recomaund me un to you as hertly as I can, and as schoth .... intreated as the kynge (age 23) and you thought I schuld have ben, for .... the morn next after the maryage, all my servants, both men and women . . a dyscharged. Insomoch that my mother Guldeford (age 51) was also dischargyd, whom as ze knowe the kynge and zou willed me in eny wyse to be cowncelled. But for eny thynge I myght do, yn no wyse myght I have any graunt for her abode here, which I assure you my lord is moch to my discomffort; besyd meny other discomffortis that ze wold full lyttyll have thought. I have not zet seen yn Fraunce eny lady or jentill woman so necessary for me as sche ys nor zet so mete to do the kynge my brother service as sche ys. And for my part my lord, as ze love the kynge my broder and me, fynd the meanes that sche may yn all hast com hither agayn, for I had as lefe lose the wynnynge I schall have yn France as to lose her counsell when I schall lacke it, which is not like long to be required, as I am sure the nobill men and jentillmen can schew you more then becometh me to wryte yn this matter. I pray you my Lord gyf credens forther to my moder Guldeford (age 51) yn every thyng concernynge thys matter. And albehit my Lord of Northfollke (age 41) h .. b nethyr deled best with me nor zet with her at thys tyme: zet I pray you allwayes to be good lord unto her. And wold to God my had ben so good o have had zou with me hither when I ha . . rd c of Northfolke. And thus fare ze weale

My Lord. Wryt ile a the xij the . daye of Octobr.

My Lord I pray you gyve credens to my .... ord yn my sorows she have delyve ... Yowr on whyl I lefe

MARY

To my lovynge frend Th'archebischop of Zorke.

Ellis' Letters S1 V1 Letter XXXIX. 12 Oct 1514. Mary Queen of France (age 18) to King Henry the Eighth (age 23).

[MS. COTTON. CALIG. D. vi. fol. 253. Orig.]

MY good Brother (age 23) as hertly as I can I recomaund me unto your Grace, mervelynge moch that I never herd from you syns ... re depertynge, so often as I have sent and wrytten to you. And now am I left post a lone in effect; for on the morn next after . . e maryage my chambirlayn with all other men servants wer dischargd and in lyke wyse my mother Guldeford (age 51) with other my women and maydyns, except such as never had experiens nor knowlech how to advertyse or gyfe me counsell yn any tyme of nede, which is to be fered more schortly then your Grace thought at the tyme of my depertynge, as my mother Guldeford (age 51) can more playnly schew your Grace then I cann wryt; to whom I beseche you to gyve credens. And yf hit may be by eny meane possible, I humbly requyr you to cause my seyd mother Guldeford (age 51) to repayr hither once agayn. For ells if any chauns happe other then weale I schall not knowe wher nor of whom to aske any good counsell to your pleasur, nor yet to myn own proffit. I merveill moche that my Lord of Northfolke (age 41) wold at all tymes so lyghtly graunt every thynge at ther reqwests here. I am weale assured that when ze know the trouth of every thyng as my mother Guideford can schew you, ze wold full lyttyll have thowght I schold have ben thus intreated: that wold God my Lord of Zorke (age 41) had com with me yn the rome of Northfolke (age 41): for then am I sure I schuld have bene left moch more at my herti .... then I am now.

And thus I byd your Grace fare weale with .... as ever had Prince; and more herds ease then I have now ... a Abvile [Map] the xijth . day of October.

.... gef gredens to my mowder Geldeford.

Note B. your lowyng syster MARY QUENE OF FRANCE.

Note a. From.

Henry the Eighth and his Court accompanied the young Queen to Dover, whence on the second of October she sailed to Boulogne. She reached Abbeville on the 8th and was married on the 9th of that month. The original List of the persons who went in her retinue, signed by Louis himself, is still preserved among the Cottonian Manuscriptsb; though strange as it may seem, almost the whole were dismissed the morning after her marriage. "The Tewesdaye, being the x. daye of October," says Hall, "all th'Englishmen except a fewe that were officers with the sayde Quene, were discharged; whiche was a great sorowe for theim, for some had served her long in hope of prefermente, and some, that had honest romes, lefte them to serve her; and now they were with out service; which caused them to take thought, in so much that some dyed by the way returning, and some fell mad; but ther was no remedy." The Queen's own account of this Transaction will be found in this, and the following Letter. Mother Guldeford (age 51) who is so particularly mentioned in these Letters, was apparently the Governess, or, as she was sometimes called, the Mother to the Maids of Honor.

Note b. It was as follows:

"Premierement

Mons. le Conte de Nrushere.

Maistre docteur Denton aumosmer.

Messe. Richard Blounte escuyer de scuierie.

Enffans d'onneur: Le filz de Mons. Roos, Le filz de Mons. Cobham, Le filz de Messe. Seymor,

Evrard frere du Marquis.

Arthus Polle (age 12), frere de Monsr. de Montagu.

Le Poulayn.

Francoye Buddis, huissier de Chambre.

Maistre Guille, Medicin.

Henry Calays varler des robes.

Robert Wast.

Madamoyselle Grey, seur du Marquis. [Note. Possibly Elizabeth Grey Countess Kildare (age 17)]

Madamoyselle Marie finis fille de Monsr. Dacres. [Note. Possibly Mary Dacre (age 12)]

Madamoyselle Elizabet seur de Monsr. Grey.

Madamoyselle BOLEYNE. [Note. Unclear as to whether this is Queen Anne Boleyn of England (age 13) or Mary Boleyn (age 15)]

Maistres Anne Jenyngham (age 10). femme de Chambre.

Johanue Daruossc, chamberiere."

Louis XII King France succeeded by Francis I

On 01 Jan 1515 [her husband] Louis XII King France (age 52) died. His first cousin once removed King Francis I of France (age 20) succeeded I King France: Capet Valois Angoulême.

Wriothesley's Chronicle 1510-1519. 01 Jan 1515. The French King (age 52) died,h and a new peace concluded with the Kinge (age 23) and Francis (age 20),a that tyme new made King of France. And the Ladie Marye (age 18), French Queene, was grawnted her dowrie to be brought into England, and was suffred to have all her goodes and riches. The [her future husband] Duke of Suffolke (age 31), with Sir Richard Wingfeilde (age 46) and Dr. West, and other, sent into France as ambassadors.b A conclusion was made that the saide Duke was weddid to the saide Lady Marie in France and thereupon cam over into Englande, and with them brought oyer all thinges after their mynde.d

Note h. Louis XII (age 52) died 1st January, 1515.

Note a. The Duke of Valois (age 20), who succeeded under the title of Francis I, renewed the alliance with Henry.

Note b. Charles Brandon (age 31), Duke of Suffolk, Sir Richard Wingfield (age 46), and Dr. West, "with a goodly bande of yeomen, all in black" (says Hall), had been sent in embassy to Paris to negociate a settlement of the ex-queen's dower.

Note c. It had been arranged that the Duke (age 31) should conduct the ex-queen (age 18) back to England, and there have married her, but (says Stow) "for doubt of change he married her secretly at Paris, as was said;" it is now ascertained that such was the fact, and that the Duke was reproved for it by Wolsey (age 41), a draught of whose letter is still extant; as is also a letter of Mary to her brother, Heniy Ym., taking the blame on herself.

Note d. The French Chroniclers assert that Mary brought over with her into England jewels, plate, and tapestry belonging to Louis XII. to the value of 200,000 crowns, besides a great diamond called "le miroir de Naples."

In May 1515 Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 31) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 19) were married. She by marriage Duchess Suffolk. She had married Louis XII King France in Oct 1514; he had died on 01 Jan 1515. Around this time he surrendered the title Viscount Lisle which he had been created in anticipation of this marrige to Elizabeth Grey Countess Devon (age 10) which never took place. Viscount Lisle forfeit. She the daughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England.

On 11 Mar 1516 [her son] Henry Brandon was born to [her husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 32) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 19). He a grandson of King Henry VII of England and Ireland.

On 17 Jul 1517 [her daughter] Frances Brandon Duchess of Suffolk was born to [her husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 33) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 21). She a granddaughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland.

Betrothal of Mary Tudor and the Dauphin

On 15 Oct 1518 Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 22) and the Dauphin [her former husband] Louis XII King France were betrothed at Greenwich, Kent [Map].

Bishop Cuthbert Tunstall (age 44) delivered an oration in praise of matrimony.

In 1519 [her daughter] Eleanor Brandon Countess Cumberland was born to [her husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 35) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 22). She a granddaughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland.

In 1522 [her son] Henry Brandon (age 5) died.

Around 1523 [her son] Henry Brandon was born to [her husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 39) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 26). He a grandson of King Henry VII of England and Ireland.

On 20 Jul 1524 [her former step-daughter] Claude Valois Orléans Queen Consort France (age 24) died.

In 1525 Edward Grey 3rd Baron Grey of Powis (age 22) and [her illegitimate step-daughter] Anne Brandon Baroness Grey Powis (age 18) were married. She by marriage Baroness Grey of Powis. She the illegitmate daughter of Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 41) and Anne Browne. He a great x 4 grandson of King Henry IV of England.

Knighting of Henry Fitzroy

Around 18 Jun 1525 [her son-in-law] Henry Clifford 2nd Earl of Cumberland (age 8) and [her daughter] Eleanor Brandon Countess Cumberland (age 6) were married at Bridewell Palace [Map]. [her brother] King Henry VIII of England and Ireland (age 33) was present. She the daughter of Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 41) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 29). He the son of Henry Clifford 1st Earl of Cumberland (age 32) and Margaret Percy Baroness Clifford (age 25). They were half third cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of King Edward III of England. She a granddaughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland.

Before 1527 Thomas Stanley 2nd Baron Monteagle (age 19) and [her step-daughter] Mary Brandon Baroness Monteagle (age 16) were married. She by marriage Baroness Monteagle. She the daughter of Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 42) and Anne Browne. They were third cousin once removed. He a great x 4 grandson of King Edward III of England.

Visit of the French Ambassadors

Calendars. May 7. [1527] Sanuto Diaries, v. xlv. pp. 194–198.

105. Gasparo Spinelli, Venetian Secretary in London, to his brother Lodovico Spinelli, in Venice.

On the 4th instant all the ambassadors, with the exception of the Emperor's, were summoned to Greenwich, where, in the presence of the King and the chief personages of the Court, the French ambassador, the Bishop of Tarbes, delivered an oration, which was answered by the Bishop of London, who, on the morrow, Cardinal Wolsey being unable to officiate from indisposition, sang mass with the usual ceremonies; after which at the high altar, where the missal was opened by the Cardinal, the French ambassadors swore in his hands (“in mano dil R~mo Cardinal”) to observe the perpetual peace now concluded with the King of England, he on his part swearing in like manner.

Two of the ambassadors, namely the prelate and the soldier, dined with the King, the others dining together apart.

On rising from table they went to the Queen's apartment, where the Princess (age 11) danced with the French ambassador, the Viscount of Turenne, who considered her very handsome (“molto bella”), and admirable by reason of her great and uncommon mental endowments; but so thin, spare, and small (“cosi magreta et scarma et picola”) as to render it impossible for her to be married for the next three years.

Then yesterday1 there was a joust, the challengers at the tilt (“al campo”) being four2, the competitors (“concorrenti”) sixteen, each of whom ran six courses; a very delectable sight, by reason of the prowess of the knights. The joust ended with the day, not without rain, which rather impeded the jousting.

The King and the Queens3, with some 200 damsels (“damigelle”), then went to the apartments which I informed you in a former letter were being prepared [on one side of the list-yard at Greenwich] for the reception of the French ambassadors, the rest of the company following them. The site adjoined the other chambers from whence the King and the nobility view the jousts. They were but two halls, about thirty paces in length, and of proportional height and breadth. The centre of the ceiling of the first hall was entirely covered with brocatel of no great value, but producing a good effect; the walls were hung with the most costly tapestry in England, representing the history of David; and there was a row of torches closely set, illuminating the place very brilliantly, being ranged below the windows, which were at no great distance from the roof. The royal table was prepared in front of the hall, with a large canopy of tissue (“soprarizo”), beneath which was the King, with the Queens, his wife and sister, at the sides. Then came two long tables, at one of which, on the right-hand side, were seated the French ambassadors and the Princes, each pairing with some great lady. At the other table, to the left, the Venetian ambassador and the one from Milan placed themselves, with the rest of the lords and ladies. At no great distance from the two tables were two cupboards, reaching from the floor to the roof, forming a semicircle, on which was a large and varied assortment of vases, all of massive gold, the value of which it would be difficult to estimate, nor were any of them touched; silver gilt dishes of another sort being used for the viands of meat and fish, which were in such variety and abundance that the banquet lasted a long while.

The door of this hall was in the form of a very lofty triumphal arch, fashioned after the antique, beneath which were three vaulted entrances; through one passed the dishes for the table, through the other they were removed, and on each side of the centre one, which was the largest, stood two enormous cupboards bearing the wine to be served at table. Over the triumphal arch was a spacious balcony for the musicians, bearing the arms of the King and Queen, with sundry busts of Emperors, and the King's motto, “Dieu et mon droit” and other Greek (sic) words. Could never conceive anything so costly and well designed (“ben ordinata”) as what was witnessed on that night at Greenwich.

On rising from table all were marshalled, according to their rank, along a corridor of no great length to the other hall, which was of rather less size than the first. The floor was covered with cloth of silk embroidered with gold lilies. The ceiling, which was well nigh flat, was all painted, representing a map of the world (“mapamondo in Alpa forma”), the names of the principal provinces being legible; there were also the signs of the zodiac and their properties (“le loro proprietà”), these paintings being supported by giants. Along the sides of the hall were three tiers of seats, each of which had a beam placed lengthwise, for the spectators to lean on, nor did one tier interfere with the other. Above these tiers were in like manner three rows of torches, so well disposed and contrived as not to impede the view.

Within the space for the spectators, on the right-hand side, in the first tier, the ambassadors were placed, in the second the Princes, in the third those to whom admission was granted, they being few. On the opposite side, in the same order, were the ladies, whose various styles of beauty and apparel, enhanced by the brilliancy of the lights, caused me to think I was contemplating the choirs of angels; they, in like manner, being placed one above the other. Two-thirds of the distance down the hall, an arch of a single span had been erected, its depth being five feet and a half [English measure], all gilt with fine gold, the inside of the arch being decorated with a number of beautiful figures in low relief. The magnificence of this arch was such that it was difficult to comprehend how so grand a structure could have been raised in so short a space of time. In the centre, to the front (“nel fronte nel mezo”), stood the royal throne (“soglio”), on which the King sat, the two Queens being seated below at his feet.

All the spectators being thus methodically placed, without the least noise or confusion, and precisely as pre-arranged, the entertainment commenced. One thing above all others surprised me most, never having witnessed the like any where, it being impossible to represent or credit with how much order, regularity, and silence such public entertainments proceed and are conducted in England. First of all, there entered the hall eight singers, forming two wings, and singing certain English songs; in their centre was a very handsome youth alone, clad in skyblue tatfety, a number of eyes being scattered over his gown; and having presented themselves before the King, the singers then withdrew in the same order, there remaining by himself the youth, who, in the guise of Mercury, sent to the King by Jupiter, delivered a learned Latin oration in praise of his Majesty; which panegyric being ended, he announced that Jupiter, having frequently listened to disputes between Love and Riches concerning their relative authority, and that being unable to decide the controversy, he appointed his Majesty as judge, and requested him to pronounce and pass sentence on both of them. Thereupon Mercury departed, and next came eight young choristers of the chapel, four on each side; those to the right were all clad in cloth of gold, much ornamented, and the first of them was Cupid (“Amor”); the others to the left were variously arrayed, and their chief was Plutus (“la Richesa”); in the centre walked one alone, in the guise of Justice, who sang.

In this order they presented themselves to the King, before whom Justice commenced narrating the dispute between the parties, in English, and desired Cupid (“Amor”) to begin with his defence, to which Plutus (“la Richeza”) replied, each of the choristers on either side defending their leaders, by reciting a number of verses. The altercation being ended, Cupid and Plutus determined that judgment should go by battle, and thus, having departed, three men-at-arms in white armour, with three naked swords in their hands, entered from the end of the hall, and having drawn up under the triumphal arch, an opening was made in its centre by some unseen means, and out of the arch fell down a bar, in front of which there appeared three well-armed knights. The combat then commenced valiantly, man to man, some of them dealing such blows that their swords broke. After they had fought some while, a second bar was let down, which separated them, the first three having vanquished the others, fighting with great courage; and the duel (“duello”) being thus ended, the combatants quitted the hall in like manner as they had entered it. Thereupon there fell to the ground at the extremity of the hall a painted canvas [curtain], from an aperture in which was seen a most verdant cave (“antro”) approachable by four steps, each side being guarded by four of the chief gentlemen of the Court, clad in tissue doublets and tall plumes, each of whom carried a torch. Well grouped within the cave were eight damsels of such rare beauty as to be supposed goddesses rather than human beings. They were arrayed in cloth of gold, their hair gathered into a net, with a very richly jewelled garland, surmounted by a velvet cap, the hanging sleeves of their surcoats (“camisa”) being so long that they well nigh touched the ground, and so well and richly wrought as to be no slight ornament to their beauty. They descended gracefully from their seats to the sound of trumpets, the first of them being the Princess, hand in hand with the Marchioness of Exeter (age 24). Her beauty in this array produced such effect on everybody that all the other marvellous sights previously witnessed were forgotten, and they gave themselves up solely to contemplation of so fair an angel. On her person were so many precious stones that their splendour and radiance dazzled the sight, in such wise as to make one believe that she was decked with all the gems of the eighth sphere. Dancing thus they presented themselves to the King, their dance being very delightful by reason of its variety, as they formed certain groups and figures most pleasing to the sight. Their dance being finished, they ranged themselves on one side, and in like order the eight youths, leaving their torches, came down from the cave, and after performing their dance, each of them took by the hand one of those beautiful nymphs, and having led a courant together (“menata una chorea”) for a while, returned to their places.

Six masks then entered. To detail their costume would be but to repeat the words “cloth of gold,” cloth of silver,” &c. They chose such ladies as they pleased for their partners, and commenced various dances, which being ended, the King appeared. The French ambassador, the Marquis of Turrene, was at his side, and behind him four couple of noblemen (“signori”), all masked, and all wearing black velvet slippers on their feet, this being done, lest the King should be distinguished from the others, as from the hurt which he received lately on his left foot when playing at tennis (“allo palla”) he wears a black velvet slipper. They were all clad in tissue doublets, over which was a very long and ample gown of black satin, with hoods of the same material, and on their heads caps of tawney velvet. They then took by the hand an equal number of ladies, dancing with great glee, and at the end of the dance unmasked; whereupon the Princess with her companions again descended, and came to the King, who in the presence of the French ambassadors took off her cap, and the net being displaced, a profusion of silver tresses as beautiful as ever seen on human head fell over her shoulders, forming a most agreeable sight. The aforesaid ambassadors then took leave of her; and all departing from that beautiful place returned to the supper hall, where the tables were spread with every sort of confection and choice wines for all who chose to cheer themselves with them. The sun, I believe, greatly hastened his course, having perhaps had a hint from Mercury of so rare a sight; so showing himself already on the horizon, warning being thus given of his presence, everybody thought it time to quit the royal chambers, returning to their own with such sleepy eyes that the daylight could not keep them open.

As the Bishop of Tarbes is departing tomorrow morning in haste, I will not be more diffuse. He will be accompanied by Master Poyntz [Sir Francis Poyntz] and Clarencieux, king-of-arms, to do what I wrote in a former letter. On their departure each of the ambassadors received a gold cup from his Majesty.

London, 7th May 1527. Registered by Sanuto, 3rd June.

[Italian.]

Note 1. 6th May, according to the date of Spinelli's letter. In Hall's Chronicle (pp. 721, 722, ed. London, 1809), mention is made of the mass at Greenwich on Sunday, 5 May, and of the jousts, but of these last he does not state the precise date, giving, however, the names of the challengers, and adding that whilst they tilted “yt rained apace.”

Note 2. Namely. Sir Nicholas Carew (age 31), Sir Robert Jernyngham, Sir Anthony Browne (age 27), and Nicholas Harvy. (See Hall, as above.)

Note 3. Catharine (age 41), and Mary Queen Dowager of France (age 31).

In Apr 1528 Ercole Este II Duke Ferrara (age 19) and [her former step-daughter] Renée of France Duchess of Ferrara (age 17) were married. She the daughter of Louis XII King France and Anne of Brittany Queen Consort France (age 51).

Coronation of Anne Boleyn

Hall's Chronicle 1533. On Midsomer day after, the lady Mary (age 35) the Frenche Queen died in Suffolk at the lordship of .... who was the late wife to [her former husband] Louis the 12th, and after married to [her husband] Charles Duke of Suffolk (age 47), and was buried at ....

Calendars. April 23 [1532]. Sanuto Diaries, v. lvi. p. 167. 761. Carlo Capello to the Signory.

Received the Signory's letters of the 8th January and 11th March, with the advices from Constantinople. Went to the Court, and by the King's order conferred with the Duke of Norfolk, to whom communicated the advices, and justified the Signory for having exacted a loan from the clergy, about which the Duke appeared to know nothing, but was not sorry to hear it, because at the last session of Parliament the annats payable at Rome were abolished.

At the moment of his arrival at the Court, one of the chief gentlemen in the service of said Duke of Norfolk, with 20 followers, assaulted and killed in the sanctuary of Westminster Sir (D'no) William Peninthum (sic) chief gentleman and kinsman of the [her husband] Duke of Suffolk (age 48). In consequence of this, the whole Court was in an uproar, and had the Duke of Suffolk (age 48) been there, it is supposed that a serious affray would have taken place. On hearing of what had happened, he (Suffolk) was on his way to remove the assailants by force from the sanctuary, when the King sent the Treasurer [Thomas Cromwell] to him, and made him return, and has adjusted the affair; and this turmoil displeased him. It is said to have been caused by a private quarrel, but I am assured it was owing to opprobrious language uttered against Madam Anne (age 31) by his Majesty's sister, the Duchess of Suffolk (age 36), Queen Dowager of France.

The affair of the divorce becomes daily more difficult. The Bishops of France and of this island replied lately that they could not assent to it without the Pope's consent, because, when created, they swear not to oppose the Pope's wishes; and the King's desire increases; whilst by letters from Rome it is heard that in all the debates the Queen may be styled King of this island, by reason of the love the people bear her, for her goodness and wisdom.

Yesterday, Monseigneur Falconetto arrived here in 15 days from the Emperor, to demand assistance against the Turk. He went this morning to the Court with another Imperial ambassador resident here.

London, 23rd April. Registered by Sanuto 31st May.

[Italian.]

In 1533 [her son-in-law] Henry Grey 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 16) and [her daughter] Frances Brandon Duchess of Suffolk (age 15) were married. She by marriage Marchioness Dorset. She the daughter of Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 49) and Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 36). He the son of Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset and Margaret Wotton Marchioness Dorset (age 46). They were half second cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of King Edward III of England. She a granddaughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland.

On 23 Jun 1533, or 25 Jun 1533 for which the source is unclear, Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 37) died at Westhorpe, Suffolk [Map].

Wriothesley's Chronicle 1530-1539. 23 Jun 1533. This yeare, on Midsommer eaven, died the French Queene (age 37),a sister to the Kinge (age 41), and wife to the [her husband] Duke of Suffolke (age 49), and was buried at Sainct Edmondesburie in Suffolke.

Note a. Mary (age 37), sister to Henry VIII (age 41) and Queen Dowager of France, died at the manor of Westhorpe [Map], in Suffolk, on the 23rd June, and was buried (July 22) at the monastery of St. Edmondsbury, where her corpse was found in a perfect state on September 6th, 1784, being 251 years after her interment.

After 25 Jun 1533 Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (age 37) was reburied at St Mary's Church, Bury St Edmunds.

Funeral of Mary Tudor

On 21 Jul 1533 Mary Tudor Queen Consort France (deceased) was buried at Bury St Edmund's Abbey. Catherine Willoughby Duchess Suffolk (age 14) chief mourner.

On 07 Sep 1533 [her former husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 49) and Catherine Willoughby Duchess Suffolk (age 14) were married. She by marriage Duchess Suffolk. The difference in their ages was 35 years.

Death of Catherine of Aragon

Calendars. 21 Jan 1536. Eustace Chapuys (age 46) to the Emperor (age 35).

The good Queen (deceased) breathed her last at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Eight hours afterwards, by the [her brother] King's (age 44) express commands, the inspection of her body was made, without her confessor or physician or any other officer of her household being present, save the fire-lighter in the house, a servant of his, and a companion of the latter, who proceeded at once to open the body. Neither of them had practised chirurgy, and yet they had often performed the same operation, especially the principal or head of them, who, after making the examination, went to the Bishop of Llandaff, the Queen's confessor, and declared to him in great secrecy, and as if his life depended on it, that he had found the Queen's (deceased) body and the intestines perfectly sound and healthy, as if nothing had happened, with the single exception of the heart, which was completely black, and of a most hideous aspect; after washing it in three different waters, and finding that it did not change colour, he cut it in two, and found that it was the same inside, so much so that after being washed several times it never changed colour. The man also said that he found inside the heart something black and round, which adhered strongly to the concavities. And moreover, after this spontaneous declaration on the part of the man, my secretary having asked the Queen's physician whether he thought the Queen (deceased) had died of poison, the latter answered that in his opinion there was no doubt about it, for the bishop had been told so under confession, and besides that, had not the secret been revealed, the symptoms, the course, and the fatal end of her illness were a proof of that.

No words can describe the joy and delight which this King (age 44) and the promoters of his concubinate (age 35) have felt at the demise of the good Queen (deceased), especially the earl of Vulcher (age 59), and his son (age 33), who must have said to themselves, What a pity it was that the Princess (age 19) had not kept her mother (deceased) company. The King (age 44) himself on Saturday, when he received the news, was heard to exclaim, "Thank God, we are now free from any fear of war, and the time has come for dealing with the French much more to our advantage than heretofore, for if they once suspect my becoming the Emperor's friend and ally now that the real cause of our enmity no longer exists I shall be able to do anything I like with them." On the following day, which was Sunday, the King (age 44) dressed entirely in yellow from head to foot, with the single exception of a white feather in his cap. His bastard daughter (age 2) was triumphantly taken to church to the sound of trumpets and with great display. Then, after dinner, the King (age 44) went to the hall, where the ladies were dancing, and there made great demonstration of joy, and at last went into his own apartments, took the little bastard (age 2), carried her in his (age 44) arms, and began to show her first to one, then to another, and did the same on the following days. Since then his joy has somewhat subsided; he has no longer made such demonstrations, but to make up for it, as it were, has been tilting and running lances at Grinduys [Map]. On the other hand, if I am to believe the reports that come to me from every quarter, I must say that the displeasure and grief generally felt at the Queen's (deceased) demise is really incredible, as well as the indignation of the people against the King (age 44). All charge him with being the cause of the Queen's (deceased) death, which I imagine has been produced partly by poison and partly by despondency and grief; besides which, the joy which the King (age 44) himself, as abovesaid, manifested upon hearing the news, has considerably confirmed people in that belief.

Great preparations are being made for the burial of the good Queen (deceased), and according to a message received from Master Cromwell (age 51) the funeral is to be conducted with such a pomp and magnificence that those present will scarcely believe their eyes. It is to take place on the 1st of February; the chief mourner to be the [her daughter] King's own niece (age 18), that is to say, the daughter of the [her former husband] duke of Suffolk (age 52); next to her will go the Duchess, her mother; then the wife of the duke of Norfolk (age 39), and several other ladies in great numbers. And from what I hear, it is intended to distribute mourning apparel to no less than 600 women of a lower class. As to the lords and gentlemen, nothing has yet transpired as to who they are to be, nor how many. Master Cromwell (age 51) himself, as I have written to Your Majesty (age 35), pressed me on two different occasions to accept the mourning cloth, which this King (age 44) offered for the purpose no doubt of securing my attendance at the funeral, which is what he greatly desires; but by the advice of the Queen Regent of Flanders (Mary), of the Princess herself, and of many other worthy personages, I have declined, and, refused the cloth proffered; alleging as an excuse that I was already prepared, and had some of it at home, but in reality because I was unwilling to attend a funeral, which, however costly and magnificent, is not that befitting a Queen of England.

The King (age 44), or his Privy Council, thought at first that very solemn obsequies ought to be performed at the cathedral church of this city. Numerous carpenters and other artizans had already set to work, but since then the order has been revoked, and there is no talk of it now. Whether they meant it in earnest, and then changed their mind, or whether it was merely a feint to keep people contented and remove suspicion, I cannot say for certain.

In 1544 Master John. Portrait of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France.

On 22 Aug 1545 [her former husband] Charles Brandon 1st Duke of Suffolk (age 61) died. His son Henry Brandon 2nd Duke of Suffolk (age 9) succeeded 2nd Duke Suffolk.

1562 News Years Day Gift Giving

On 01 Jan 1562 the New Years Gift Giving was held. Those who gave gifts provide an interesting who's who of the Elizabethan Court soon after Elizabeth I's Coronation. Queen Elizabeth (age 28) was present since a number are described as "With the Qene her Majestie."

For 'dimy' read 'demi' ie half-sovereigns.

Neweeyeur's Gyftes gevon to the Quene her Majestie by those Parsons whose Names hereafter ensue, the first of January, the Yere above wrytten.

By the Lady Margaret Strainge (age 22), a little round mounte of golde to conteyne a pomaunder in it. With the Qene her Majestie. Note. Lady Margaret Strange married Henry Stanley Lord Strange (age 30) on 07 Feb 1555. In 1561 he had not succeeded to Earldom of Derby and was known by the courtesy title Lord Strange. She is listed first since she was one of the few remaining direct descendants of [her father] Henry VII, being a great-granddaughter by his daughter Mary Tudor. Margaret Clifford (age 22) was first in line to succeed in 1568 but died in 1596 before Elizabeth I.

Dukes, Marquises and Earls.

By the Duke of Norfolke (age 25), in a purse of purple silke and golde knit, in sundry coynes of golde £20 0s 0d.

By the Marquis of Winchester (age 79), High Threasourer of Englande, in a purse of crymsen satten, in angells £20 0s 0d.

By the Marquis of Northampton (age 50), in a purse of crymsen silke and gold knit, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Arundell (age 49), Lord Steward, in a paper, in angels, £30 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Shrewesburye (age 34), in a red silke purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Darbye (age 52), in a purse of crymsen satten, embraudered with golde, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Pembroke (age 61), in a purse of black silk and silver knit, in new angells £30 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Bedforde (age 35), in a purse of black silk and golde knytt, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Rutlande (age 35), in a purse of red silk and golde knytt, in dimy soveraigns and angells £20 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Huntingdon, in a red silk purse, in angells £15 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Westmerlande (age 37), in a red silk purse, in dimy soveraigns £10 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Oxforde (age 46), in a red silk purse, in dimy soveraigns £10 0s 0d.

By the Earle of Northumberlande (age 34), in a purse of black silke and silver knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d. With the Quene her Highness.

By the Earle of Warwike (age 32), a smocke wrought with black silk, a peire of slevis, and a partelett wrought with gold, silver, and black silke. Delivered to the Baroness Cobham (age 23).

By the Viscounte Mountague (age 33), in a purse of cloth of golde, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.

Bishops. The list of Bishops ends with "With her said Majestie"; unclear whether this refers to all the Bishops listed.

By the Archbusshop of Caunterbury (age 57), in a red silk purse, in dimy soveraigns £40 0s 0d.

By the Archbusshop of York (age 61), in soveraigns £30 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Duresme (age 42), in a purse of crymson silk and gold knytt, in angells £30 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Ely (age 69), in a red vellat purse, in angells £30 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Wynchester (age 52), in a purse of crymsen silk and gold knytt and set with pearles, in angells £20 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of London (age 43), in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Salisbury (age 39), in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Worcester (age 43), in a black vellat purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Lyncoln (age 42), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Chychester (age 64), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Norwich (age 50), in a blew silk purse £13 6s 8d.

By the Busshop of Hereforde (age 52), in a green silk purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Lychfield and Coventry (age 48), in a red satten purse, in angells £13 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Rochester (age 48), in a red purse, in gold £13 6s 8d.

By the Busshop of Saint Davies (age 55), in a red silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Bathe, in a purse of red silk, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Exetour, in a blew silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Peterborowe, in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Busshop of Chester, in a red purse, in angells and soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

Duchesses and Countesses.

By the Duchess of Norfolke (age 22), in a prse of crymsen silk and gold knyt, in angells £20 0s 0d.

By the Duchess of Somerset (age 65), in a purse of silver and black silk, in royalls and ducketts £14 0s 0d. Probably the Dowager Duchess of Somerset since her husband Edward Seymour 1st Duke of Somerset had been executed in 1552, and their children disinherited as a result.

By the Countess of Surrey, in a purse of tawny silk and gold, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d. Dowager since her husband Henry Howard 1516-1547, by courtesy Earl Surrey, had been executed in 1547.

By the Countess of Pembroke (age 38), in a cherry bag of crymsen satten, in new angells £15 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Bedford (age 36), in a purse of crymsen silk and silver knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Darby (age 51), in a purse of crymson sattin embrodred with gold, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Oxford (age 36), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Shrewisbury, Dowager (age 62), in a purse of black silk knytt, in dimy soveraignes £12 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Shrewisbury (age 37), in a red silk purse knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Huntingdon, Dowager (age 51), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Huntingdon (age 24), in a red purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Northumberland (age 24), in a purse of black silk and silver knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Countess of Rutland (age 29), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £13 6s 8d.

Viscountesses.

By the Vicountess Hereford, Dowager (age 42), six hankercheffes edged with gold delivered to the said Baroness Cobham (age 23).

By the Vicountess Mountague (age 24), in a purse of cloth of gold, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

Lordes.

By the Lorde Keeper of the Great Seale, Bacon (age 51), in a purse of silver knytt, in angells £13 6s 8d.

By the Lorde William Howard, Lord Chamberlen (age 52), in a purse of crymsen silk and gold knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Pagett (age 56), in a greene purse in dimy soveraignes £13 6s 8d.

By the Lorde Clynton, Lord Admyrall (age 50), in gold £10 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Riche (age 65), in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Lorde North (age 66), in a purse of purple silk and silver, in dimy soveraignes £20 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Lumley (age 29), in a paper, in angells £20 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Hastings of Loughboro (age 41), in a red silk purse, in French crowns £13 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Stafford (age 60), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Windsor (age 30), in a purse of crymsn silk and gold knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.

by Lorde John Graye (age 38), a haunce pott of allabaster garnished with silver gilt. Delivered in charge to John Asteley, Esq Master and Threasourer of her Highnes Jewels and Plate. Lord John Grey assumed to be a courtesy title his father being Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset.

By the Lorde Barkeley (age 27), in a red purse, in gold £10 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Mountejoye (age 29), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Abergavennye (age 36), in a purse of red silke, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Scrowpe (age 28), in a purse of blak silk and silver knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Caree of Hundesdon (age 35), in a purse of crymsen silk, in double ducketts £13 6s 8d.

By the Lorde Strainge (age 30), in a purse of red silk and gold, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d. Lord Strange being the courtesy title for the Earldom of Derby. He wouldn't inherit until 1572.

By the Lorde Darcey of Chichey (age 30), in a red purse, in dimy soveraignes, £10 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Shefild (age 24), in a red silk purse, in gold £10 0s 0d.

By the Lorde Shandowes (age 40), in a blak silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.

Ladyes.

By the Baroness Howarde (age 47), in a purse of crymsen silk and knytt, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.

By the Baroness Clinton (age 35), a peire of sleevis of gold, pulled out with lawne. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham (age 23).

By the Baroness Genevillet, in gold £6 13s 4d.

By the Lady Barkeley (age 24), Lord Barkeley's wife, in gold £5 0s 0d.

By the Lady Mountejoye (age 30), in a red silk purse, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Lady Abergavenny, in a red satten purse, in dimy soveraignes £5 0s 0d.

By the Lady Caree of Hundesdon (age 33), in a blak purse knytt, in angells £10 0s 0d.

By the Lady Taylboyes, Sir Peter Carewe's (age 48) wyfe, in a purse of blak silk and silver, in dimy soveraignes £10 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.

By the Baroness Cobham (age 23), a partelett and a peire of sleeves of sypers wrought with silver and blak silke. Re-delivered to herself.

By the Lady Dakers (age 21), a warming ball of gold, per oz. 3 oz. dim. With her said Majestie.

By the Lady Shefilde (age 20), a paire of sleeves wrought with fringe of blak silk and lozeng of gold. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham.

By the Margaret Baroness Scrope (age 18), in a purse of blak silk and silver, in angells £7 0s 0d. With her said Majestie.

By the Lady Shandowes (age 38), a peire of sleeves and a partlett of gold and silver knytt, cawle fashion. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham.

By the Lady Knowlles (age 38), a feyne carpett of needleworke, theverende frienged and buttoned with gold and silk. Delivered to John Torneworth, Groom of the Privy Chamber.

By the Lady Butler, in a little white purse, in French crowns £6 0s 0d. With her said Majestie. Unclear as to who Lady Butler refers to.

By the Lady Raclyef, a peire of sleeves of cameryk, all over sett with purle, and two sweet bags. Delivered to the said Baroness Cobham.

Letters. Ferdinand King of Aragon to Ramon De CARDONA, his Viceroy of Naples and Captain-General in Italy.

Has received letters from Gurk, Urea and Vich announcing the alliance with exclusion of the Venetians. Nothing could be more favourable to France. Has revoked the unlimited powers of his ambassadors and ordered them henceforth to ask special orders for everything. While the present treaty has no other object than to prevent the Pope making a separate peace with France, the writer's plan was by an alliance of all the princes of Italy to expel the French; and, simultaneously, to concert an invasion of France by England on the side of Calais, himself on the side of Guienne and the Emperor on the side of Burgundy. The treaty with England was nearly concluded. England and Spain were to pay their own expenses; the Pope, Venetians and Milan to help the Emperor with the pay of 7,000 or 8,000 Germans. In six months the King of England might have conquered Guienne and Normandy, Prince Charles, Burgundy, Gueldres and his towns of Picardy; and after that Italy would have been safe from attacks by France. At the last moment the Emperor has spoilt all by his hatred of the Venetians. Thinks God is punishing them for their neglect of the Church and that wars will never cease until they unite for its thorough reformation.

Supposes the Emperor will soon make peace with Venice. Sketches the conditions for a peace with France and conquest of Venice. The Emperor must take care not to break off the marriage engagement of Prince Charles with the King of England's sister; but if the King should propose another marriage it might be accepted and the Prince married to a French princess. Other considerations. Reformation of the Church and conquest of Venice to be kept strictly secret.

Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533 appears on the following Descendants Family Trees:

King Edward IV of England 1442-1483

King Edward III of England 1312-1377

John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster 1340-1399

Ralph Neville 1st Earl of Westmoreland 1364-1425

Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495

Joan Beaufort Countess of Westmoreland 1379-1440

John Neville 3rd Baron Neville of Raby 1337-1388

Maud Percy Baroness Neville Raby

Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent 1350-1397

Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York 1411-1460

Katherine Roet Duchess Lancaster 1350-1403

Jacquetta of Luxemburg Duchess Bedford 1415-1472

King Henry VII of England and Ireland 1457-1509

Royal Ancestors of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533

Kings Wessex: Great x 14 Grand Daughter of King Edmund "Ironside" I of England

Kings Gwynedd: Great x 11 Grand Daughter of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn King Gwynedd King Powys

Kings Seisyllwg: Great x 15 Grand Daughter of Hywel "Dda aka Good" King Seisyllwg King Deheubarth

Kings Powys: Great x 10 Grand Daughter of Maredudd ap Bleddyn King Powys

Kings England: Daughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland

Kings Scotland: Great x 12 Grand Daughter of Malcolm III King Scotland

Kings Franks: Great x 10 Grand Daughter of Louis VII King Franks

Kings France: Great x 2 Grand Daughter of Charles "Beloved Mad" VI King France

Royal Descendants of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533

Jane "Nine Days Queen" Grey I Queen England and Ireland x 1

Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom x 1

Diana Spencer Princess Wales x 6

Ancestors of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533

Great x 4 Grandfather: Goronwy ap Tudur Hen Tudor

Great x 3 Grandfather: Tudur ap Goronwy Tudor

Great x 4 Grandmother: Gwerfyl verch Madog Hendwr

Great x 2 Grandfather: Maredudd Tudor 3 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas ap Llywelyn Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Marged verch Thomas 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 1 Grandfather: Owen Tudor 4 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

GrandFather: Edmund Tudor 1st Earl Richmond 5 x Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: King John "The Good" II of France 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: King Charles V of France 5 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Bonne Luxemburg Queen Consort France 7 x Great Grand Daughter of King William "Conqueror" I of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Charles "Beloved Mad" VI King France 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Peter Bourbon Duke Bourbon 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Joanna Bourbon Queen Consort France 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Isabella Valois Duchess Bourbon 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 1 Grandmother: Catherine of Valois Queen Consort England 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Stephen Wittelsbach II Duke Bavaria 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Stephen "Magnificient Fop" Wittelsbach III Duke Bavaria 5 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Elisabeth Barcelona Duchess Bavaria 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Isabeau Wittelsbach Queen Consort France 6 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Bernabò Visconti

Great x 3 Grandmother: Taddea Visconti Duchess Bavaria

Great x 4 Grandmother: Beatrice Regina della Scala

Father: King Henry VII of England and Ireland 3 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: King Edward III of England Son of King Edward II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Beaufort 1st Marquess Somerset and Dorset Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Giles "Payne" Roet

Great x 3 Grandmother: Katherine Roet Duchess Lancaster

Great x 1 Grandfather: John Beaufort 1st Duke of Somerset Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas Holland 1st Earl Kent 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Princess Wales Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Margaret Holland Duchess Clarence 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Richard Fitzalan 10th Earl of Arundel 8th Earl of Surrey 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Alice Fitzalan Countess Kent 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Eleanor Plantagenet Countess Arundel and Surrey Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

GrandMother: Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Roger Beauchamp 5 x Great Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Roger Beauchamp 2nd Baron Beauchamp Bletsoe 6 x Great Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Joan Clopton Baroness Beauchamp

Great x 2 Grandfather: John Beauchamp 3rd Baron Beauchamp Bletsoe 7 x Great Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 1 Grandmother: Margaret Beauchamp Duchess Somerset 6 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: William Stourton 3 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Stourton 4 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Edith Stourton Baroness Beauchamp Bletsoe 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Mary Tudor Queen Consort France Daughter of King Henry VII of England and Ireland

Great x 4 Grandfather: King Edward III of England Son of King Edward II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Edmund of Langley 1st Duke of York Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Richard of Conisbrough 1st Earl Cambridge Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Peter "Cruel" I King Castile 5 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Isabella of Castile Duchess York 6 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Maria Padilla

Great x 1 Grandfather: Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Edmund Mortimer 3rd Earl March, Earl Ulster 6 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Roger Mortimer 4th Earl March 6th Earl Ulster Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Philippa Plantagenet Countess March 5th Countess Ulster Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Anne Mortimer 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent Great Grand Son of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Eleanor Holland Countess March and Ulster 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Alice Fitzalan Countess Kent 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

GrandFather: King Edward IV of England 2 x Great Grand Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Ralph Neville 2nd Baron Neville of Raby 8 x Great Grand Son of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Neville 3rd Baron Neville of Raby 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Alice Audley Baroness Greystoke and Neville 3 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Ralph Neville 1st Earl of Westmoreland 5 x Great Grand Son of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Henry Percy 10th and 2nd Baron Percy 5 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Maud Percy Baroness Neville Raby 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Idonia Clifford Baroness Percy 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 1 Grandmother: Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York Great Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: King Edward III of England Son of King Edward II of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster Son of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England

Great x 2 Grandmother: Joan Beaufort Countess of Westmoreland Grand Daughter of King Edward III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Giles "Payne" Roet

Great x 3 Grandmother: Katherine Roet Duchess Lancaster

Mother: Elizabeth York Queen Consort England Daughter of King Edward IV of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Woodville

Great x 2 Grandfather: Richard Woodville

Great x 1 Grandfather: Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers

Great x 3 Grandfather: Thomas Bittelsgate

Great x 2 Grandmother: Joan Bittelsgate

Great x 4 Grandfather: John Beauchamp

Great x 3 Grandmother: Joan Beauchamp

GrandMother: Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 6 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Guy of Luxemburg I Count Saint Pol and Ligny 8 x Great Grand Son of King William "Conqueror" I of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: John Luxemburg Count St Pol 3 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Mathilde Chatillon Countess Saint Pol 2 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 2 Grandfather: Peter Luxemburg I Count Saint Pol 4 x Great Grand Son of King Henry III of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Louis Count of Enghien

Great x 3 Grandmother: Margaret Brienne

Great x 1 Grandmother: Jacquetta of Luxemburg Duchess Bedford 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King Henry III of England

Great x 3 Grandfather: Francesco Baux 1st Duke Andria

Great x 2 Grandmother: Margherita Baux 5 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandfather: Nicholas Orsini Count 3 x Great Grand Son of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 3 Grandmother: Sueva Orsini 4 x Great Grand Daughter of King John "Lackland" of England

Great x 4 Grandmother: Jeanne Sabran