Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford [Map]

Oxford, Oxfordshire is in Oxfordshire.

924 Death of King Edward Exile

1312 Capture, Trial and Execution of Piers Gaveston

1355 St Scholastica Day Riot

1400 Epiphany Rising

1555 Execution of Bishops

1556 Execution of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer

1560 Death of Amy Robsart wife of Robert Dudley

1681 Oxford Parliament 5C2

1688 Glorious Revolution

Death of King Edward Exile

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 17 Jul 924. This year died King Edward (age 50) at Farndon in Mercia; and Elward (age 22) his son died very soon after this, in Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. Their bodies lie at Winchester. And Athelstan (age 30) was chosen king in Mercia, and consecrated at Kingston [Map]. He gave his sister to Otho (age 11), son of the king of the Old-Saxons (age 48). St. Dunstan (age 15) was now born; and Wulfhelm took to the archbishopric in Canterbury. This year King Athelstan and Sihtric king of the Northumbrians came together at Tamworth, Staffordshire [Map], the sixth day before the calends of February, and Athelstan (age 30) gave away his sister to him.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1009. This year were the ships ready, that we before spoke about; and there were so many of them as never were in England before, in any king (age 43) days, as books tell us. And they were all transported together to Sandwich, Kent [Map]; that they should lie there, and defend this land against any out-force. But we have not yet had the prosperity and the honour, that the naval armament should be useful to this land, any more than it often before was. It was at this same time, or a little earlier, that Brihtric, brother of Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia, betrayed Wulnoth, the South-Saxon knight, father of Earl Godwin (age 8), to the king (age 43); and he went into exile, and enticed the navy, till he had with him twenty ships; with which he plundered everywhere by the south coast, and wrought every kind of mischief. When it was told the navy that they might easily seize him, if they would look about them, then took Brihtric with him eighty ships; and thought that he should acquire for himself much reputation, by getting Wulnoth into his hands alive or dead. But, whilst they were proceeding thitherward, there came such a wind against them, as no man remembered before; which beat and tossed the ships, and drove them aground; whereupon Wulnoth soon came, and burned them. When this was known to the remaining ships, where the king (age 43) was, how the others fared, it was then as if all were lost. The king (age 43) went home, with the aldermen and the nobility; and thus lightly did they forsake the ships; whilst the men that were in them rowed them back to London. Thus lightly did they suffer the labour of all the people to be in vain; nor was the terror lessened, as all England hoped. When this naval expedition was thus ended, then came, soon after Lammas, the formidable army of the enemy, called Thurkill's army, to Sandwich, Kent [Map]; and soon they bent their march to Canterbury, Kent [Map]; which city they would quickly have stormed, had they not rather desired peace; and all the men of East-Kent made peace with the army, and gave them 3,000 pounds for security. The army soon after that went about till they came to the Isle of Wight; and everywhere in Sussex, and in Hampshire, and also in Berkshire, they plundered and burned, as THEIR CUSTOM IS.54 Then ordered the king (age 43) to summon out all the population, that men might hold firm against them on every side; but nevertheless they marched as they pleased. On one occasion the king (age 43) had begun his march before them, as they proceeded to their ships, and all the people were ready to fall upon them; but the plan was then frustrated through Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia, AS IT EVER IS STILL. Then after Martinmas they went back again to Kent, and chose their winter-quarters on the Thames; obtaining their provisions from Essex, and from the shires that were next, on both sides of the Thames. And oft they fought against the city of London; but glory be to God, that it yet standeth firm: and they ever there met with ill fare. Then after midwinter took they an excursion up through Chiltern55, and so to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]; which city they burned, and plundered on both sides of the Thames to their ships. Being fore-warned that there was an army gathered against them at London, they went over at Staines; and thus were they in motion all the winter, and in spring, appeared again in Kent, and repaired their ships.

Note 54. These expressions in the present tense afford a strong proof that the original records of these transactions are nearly coeval with the transactions themselves. Later MSS. use the past tense.

Note 55. i.e. the Chiltern Hills; from which the south-eastern part of Oxfordshire is called the Chiltern district.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1013. The year after that Archbishop Elfeah was martyred, the king (age 47) appointed Lifing to the archiepiscopal see of Canterbury. And in the same year, before the month August, came King Sweyne (age 53) with his fleet to Sandwich, Kent [Map]; and very soon went about East-Anglia into the Humber-mouth, and so upward along the Trent, until he came to Gainsborough [Map]. Then soon submitted to him Earl Utred, and all the Northumbrians, and all the people of Lindsey, and afterwards the people of the Five Boroughs, and soon after all the army to the north of Watling-street; and hostages were given him from each shire. When he understood that all the people were subject to him, then ordered he that his army should have provision and horses; and he then went southward with his main army, committing his ships and the hostages to his son Knute (age 18). And after he came over Watling-street, they wrought the greatest mischief that any army could do. Then he went to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]; and the population soon submitted, and gave hostages; thence to Winchester, where they did the same. Thence went they eastward to London; and many of the party sunk in the Thames, because they kept not to any bridge. When he came to the city, the population would not submit; but held their ground in full fight against him, because therein was King Ethelred (age 47), and Thurkill with him. Then went King Sweyne (age 53) thence to Wallingford; and so over Thames westward to Bath, where he abode with his army. Thither came Alderman Ethelmar, and all the western thanes with him, and all submitted to Sweyne (age 53), and gave hostages. When he had thus settled all, then went he northward to his ships; and all the population fully received him, and considered him full king. The population of London also after this submitted to him, and gave hostages; because they dreaded that he would undo them. Then bade Sweyne (age 53) full tribute and forage for his army during the winter; and Thurkill bade the same for the army that lay at Greenwich, Kent [Map]: besides this, they plundered as oft as they would. And when this nation could neither resist in the south nor in the north, King Ethelred (age 47) abode some while with the fleet that lay in the Thames; and the lady (age 28)57 went afterwards over sea to her brother Richard (age 49), accompanied by Elfsy, Abbot of Peterborough. The king sent Bishop Elfun with the ethelings, Edward (age 10) and Alfred (age 8), over sea; that he might instruct them. Then went the king from the fleet, about midwinter, to the Isle of Wight [Map]; and there abode for the season; after which he went over sea to Richard (age 49), with whom he abode till the time when Sweyne (age 53) died. Whilst the lady (age 28) was with her brother (age 49) beyond sea, Elfsy, Abbot of Peterborough, who was there with her, went to the abbey called Boneval, where St. Florentine's body lay; and there found a miserable place, a miserable abbot, and miserable monks: because they had been plundered. There he bought of the abbot, and of the monks, the body of St. Florentine, all but the head, for 500 pounds; which, on his return home, he offered to Christ and St. Peter.

Note 57. This was a title bestowed on the queen.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1015. This year was the great council at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]; where Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia betrayed Sigferth and Morcar, the eldest thanes belonging to the Seven Towns. He allured them into his bower, where they were shamefully slain. Then the king took all their possessions, and ordered the widow of Sigferth to be secured, and brought within Malmsbury [Map]. After a little interval, Edmund Etheling (age 25) went and seized her, against the king's (age 49) will, and had her to wife. Then, before the Nativity of St. Mary, went the etheling west-north into the Five Towns58, and soon plundered all the property of Sigferth and Morcar; and all the people submitted to him. At the same time came King Knute (age 20) to Sandwich, Kent [Map], and went soon all about Kent into Wessex, until he came to the mouth of the Frome; and then plundered in Dorset, and in Wiltshire, and in Somerset. King Ethelred (age 49), meanwhile, lay sick at Corsham, Wiltshire; and Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia collected an army there, and Edmund the etheling (age 25) in the north. When they came together, the alderman designed to betray Edmund the etheling (age 25), but he could not; whereupon they separated without an engagement, and sheered off from their enemies. Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia then seduced forty ships from the king, and submitted to Knute (age 20). The West-Saxons also submitted, and gave hostages, and horsed the army. And he continued there until midwinter.

Note 58. The "seven" towns mentioned above are reduced here to "five"; probably because two had already submitted to the king on the death of the two thanes, Sigferth and Morcar. These five were, as originally, Leicester, Lincoln, Stamford, Nottingham, and Derby. Vid. an. 942, 1013.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1040. This year died King Harold (age 24) at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map], on the sixteenth before the calends of April; and he was buried at Westminster. He governed England four years and sixteen weeks; and in his days tribute was paid to sixteen ships, at the rate of eight marks for each steersman, as was done before in King Knute's days. The same year they sent after Hardacnute (age 22) to Bruges [Map], supposing they did well; and he came hither to Sandwich, Kent [Map] with sixty ships, seven nights before midsummer. He was soon received both by the Angles and Danes, though his advisers afterwards severely paid for it. They ordered a tribute for sixty-two ships, at the rate of eight marks for each steersman. Then were alienated from him all that before desired him; for he framed nothing royal during his whole reign. He ordered the dead Harold (age 24) to be dragged up and thrown into a ditch. This year rose the sester of wheat to fifty-five pence, and even further. This year Archbishop Edsy went to Rome.

On 17 Mar 1040 Harold "Harefoot" King England (age 24) died at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. His half brother King Harthacnut of Denmark and England (age 22) succeeded King England.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1137. This year went the King Stephen (age 43) over sea to Normandy, and there was received; for that they concluded that he should be all such as the uncle was; and because he had got his treasure: but he dealed it out, and scattered it foolishly. Much had King Henry gathered, gold and silver, but no good did men for his soul thereof. When the King Stephen (age 43) came to England, he held his council at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]; where he seized the Bishop Roger of Sarum, and Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln, and the chancellor Roger, his nephew; and threw all into prison till they gave up their castles. When the traitors understood that he was a mild man, and soft, and good, and no justice executed, then did they all wonder. They had done him homage, and sworn oaths, but they no truth maintained. They were all forsworn, and forgetful of their troth; for every rich man built his castles, which they held against him: and they filled the land full of castles. They cruelly oppressed the wretched men of the land with castle-works; and when the castles were made, they filled them with devils and evil men. Then took they those whom they supposed to have any goods, both by night and by day, labouring men and women, and threw them into prison for their gold and silver, and inflicted on them unutterable tortures; for never were any martyrs so tortured as they were. Some they hanged up by the feet, and smoked them with foul smoke; and some by the thumbs, or by the head, and hung coats of mail on their feet. They tied knotted strings about their heads, and twisted them till the pain went to the brains. They put them into dungeons, wherein were adders, and snakes, and toads; and so destroyed them. Some they placed in a crucet-house; that is, in a chest that was short and narrow, and not deep; wherein they put sharp stones, and so thrust the man therein, that they broke all the limbs. In many of the castles were things loathsome and grim, called "Sachenteges", of which two or three men had enough to bear one. It was thus made: that is, fastened to a beam; and they placed a sharp iron [collar] about the man's throat and neck, so that he could in no direction either sit, or lie, or sleep, but bear all that iron. Many thousands they wore out with hunger. I neither can, nor may I tell all the wounds and all the pains which they inflicted on wretched men in this land. This lasted the nineteen winters while Stephen (age 43) was king; and it grew continually worse and worse. They constantly laid guilds on the towns, and called it "tenserie"; and when the wretched men had no more to give, then they plundered and burned all the towns; that well thou mightest go a whole day's journey and never shouldest thou find a man sitting in a town, nor the land tilled. Then was corn dear, and flesh, and cheese, and butter; for none was there in the land. Wretched men starved of hunger. Some had recourse to alms, who were for a while rich men, and some fled out of the land. Never yet was there more wretchedness in the land; nor ever did heathen men worse than they did: for, after a time, they spared neither church nor churchyard, but took all the goods that were therein, and then burned the church and all together. Neither did they spare a bishop's land, or an abbot's, or a priest's, but plundered both monks and clerks; and every man robbed another who could. If two men, or three, came riding to a town, all the township fled for them, concluding them to be robbers. The bishops and learned men cursed them continually, but the effect thereof was nothing to them; for they were all accursed, and forsworn, and abandoned. To till the ground was to plough the sea: the earth bare no corn, for the land was all laid waste by such deeds; and they said openly, that Christ slept, and his saints. Such things, and more than we can say, suffered we nineteen winters for our sins. In all this evil time held Abbot Martin his abbacy twenty years and a half, and eight days, with much tribulation; and found the monks and the guests everything that behoved them; and held much charity in the house; and, notwithstanding all this, wrought on the church, and set thereto lands and rents, and enriched it very much, and bestowed vestments upon it. And he brought them into the new minster on St. Peter's mass-day with much pomp; which was in the year, from the incarnation of our Lord, 1140, and in the twenty-third from the destruction of the place by fire. And he went to Rome, and there was well received by the Pope Eugenius; from whom he obtained their privileges:-one for all the lands of the abbey, and another for the lands that adjoin to the churchyard; and, if he might have lived longer, so he meant to do concerning the treasury. And he got in the lands that rich men retained by main strength. Of William Malduit, who held the castle of Rockingham, he won Cotingham and Easton; and of Hugh de Walteville, he won Hirtlingbury and Stanwick, and sixty shillings from Oldwinkle each year. And he made many monks, and planted a vine-yard, and constructed many works, and made the town better than it was before. He was a good monk, and a good man; and for this reason God and good men loved him. Now we will relate in part what happened in King Stephen's (age 43) time. In his reign the Jews of Norwich bought a Christian child before Easter, and tortured him after the same manner as our Lord was tortured; and on Long-Friday164 hanged him on a rood, in mockery of our Lord, and afterwards buried him. They supposed that it would be concealed, but our Lord showed that he was a holy martyr. And the monks took him, and buried him with high honour in the minster. And through our Lord he worketh wonderful and manifold miracles, and is called St. William.

Note 164. Now called "Good-Friday".

Around 1232 Lora de Vere was born to Hugh de Vere 4th Earl of Oxford (age 24) and Hawise Quincy Countess Oxford at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

Around 1234 Margaret de Vere was born to Hugh de Vere 4th Earl of Oxford (age 26) and Hawise Quincy Countess Oxford at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

On 26 Jun 1294 Phillip Burnell (age 29) died at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

Capture, Trial and Execution of Piers Gaveston

On 19 Jun 1312 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall (age 28) was taken to Blacklow Hill, Worcestershire where he was beheaded. Blacklow Hill, Worcestershire being outside of the lands of Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl of Warwick (age 40). Gaveston's body was left where it lay eventually being recovered by Dominican friars who took it to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. Earl Cornwall extinct.

St Scholastica Day Riot

On 10 Feb 1355, St Scholatica's Day, the St Scholastica Day Riot took place in Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. What started as a disagreement between students and the landlord over the quality of the wine at the Swindlestock Tavern Carfax Oxford, Oxfordshire grew into a three day riot in which around thirty townspeople and sixty students were killed.

Around 1400 Robert Babington was born to Arnold Babington (age 37) at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

Epiphany Rising

On 12 Jan 1400 Thomas Blount (age 48) was hanged at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map] by Thomas Erpingham (age 45).

1555 Execution of Bishops

On 16 Oct 1555 Bishop Hugh Latimer (age 68) and Bishop Nicholas Ridley (age 55) were burned at the stake at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. Archbishop Thomas Cranmer (age 66) was forced to watch.

Execution of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer

On 21 Mar 1556 Archbishop Thomas Cranmer (age 66) was burned at the stake at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

On 04 Oct 1643 Edward Ford (age 38) was knighted by King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland (age 42) at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

On 16 Apr 1644 Henry Wood 1st Baronet (age 46) was knighted at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

On 04 Jun 1645 Frances Coke Viscountess Purbeck (age 42) died at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. She was buried at the Church of St Mary the Virgin.

On 27 Aug 1645 Edward Littleton 1st Baron Lyttelton (age 56) died at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map] without male issue. Baron Lyttelton of Munslow in Shropshire extinct.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Aug 1663. After the Queen (age 24) is come back she goes to the Bath, Somerset [Map]; and so to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map], where great entertainments are making for her.

Pepy's Diary. 22 Sep 1663. This day the King (age 33) and Queen (age 24) are to come to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. I hear my Baroness Castlemaine (age 22) is for certain gone to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map] to meet him, having lain within here at home this week or two, supposed to have miscarried; but for certain is as great in favour as heretofore;1 at least Mrs. Sarah at my Lord's, who hears all from their own family, do say so.

Note 1. According to Collins, Henry Fitzroy, Baroness Castlemaine's (age 22) second son by Charles II, was born on September 20th, 1663. He was the first Duke of Grafton. B.

Evelyn's Diary. 27 Nov 1665. The Duke of Albemarle (age 56) was going to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map], where both Court and Parliament had been most part of the summer. There was no small suspicion of my Lord Sandwich (age 40) having permitted divers commanders, who were at the taking of the East India prizes, to break bulk, and to take to themselves jewels, silks, etc.: though I believe some whom I could name filled their pockets, my Lord Sandwich (age 40) himself had the least share. However, he underwent the blame, and it created him enemies, and prepossessed the Lord General (age 56), for he spoke to me of it with much zeal and concern, and I believe laid load enough on Lord Sandwich (age 40) at Oxford.

In 1666 Mountjoy Blount 1st Earl Newport (age 69) died at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. His son Mountjoy Blount 2nd Earl Newport succeeded 2nd Earl Newport in the Isle of Wight.

Evelyn's Diary. 29 Jan 1666. I went to wait on his Majesty (age 35), now returned from Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map] to Hampton-Court [Map], where the Duke of Albemarle (age 57) presented me to him; he ran toward me, and in a most gracious manner gave me his hand to kiss, with many thanks for my care and faithfulness in his service in a time of such great danger, when everybody fled their employments; he told me he was much obliged to me, and said he was several times concerned for me, and the peril I underwent, and did receive my service most acceptably (though in truth I did but do my duty, and O that I had performed it as I ought!). After this, his Majesty (age 35) was pleased to talk with me alone, near an hour, of several particulars of my employment, and ordered me to attend him again on the Thursday following at Whitehall [Map]. Then the Duke (age 57) came toward me, and embraced me with much kindness, telling me if he had thought my danger would have been so great, he would not have suffered his Majesty (age 35) to employ me in that station. Then came to salute me my Lord of St. Albans (age 60), Lord Arlington (age 48), Sir William Coventry (age 38), and several great persons; after which, I got home, not being very well in health.

Evelyn's Diary. 08 Jul 1669. Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

On 02 Mar 1675 Justinian Isham 2nd Baronet (age 65) died of smallpox at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. He was buried at Church of All Saints, Lamport. His son Thomas Isham 3rd Baronet (age 17) succeeded 3rd Baronet Isham of Lamport in Northamptonshire.

Oxford Parliament 5C2

On 21 Mar 1681 Edward Hungerford (age 48) was elected MP Chippenham at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map] during the Oxford Parliament 5C2.

Glorious Revolution

Evelyn's Diary. 02 Dec 1688. Dr. Tenison (age 52) preached at St. Martin's [Map] on Psalm xxxvi. 5, 6, 7, concerning Providence. I received the blessed Sacrament. Afterward, visited my Lord Godolphin (age 43), then going with the Marquis of Halifax (age 55) and Earl of Nottingham (age 41) as Commissioners to the Prince of Orange (age 38); he told me they had little power. Plymouth, Devon [Map] declared for the Prince (age 38). Bath, Somerset [Map], York [Map], Hull [Map], Bristol, Gloucestershire [Map], and all the eminent nobility and persons of quality through England, declare for the Protestant religion and laws, and go to meet the Prince (age 38), who every day sets forth new Declarations against the Papists. The great favorites at Court, Priests and Jesuits, fly or abscond. Everything, till now concealed, flies abroad in public print, and is cried about the streets. Expectation of the Prince (age 38) coming to Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. The Prince of Wales and great treasure sent privily to Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], the Earl of Dover (age 52) being Governor. Address from the Fleet not grateful to his Majesty (age 55). The Papists in offices lay down their commissions, and fly. Universal consternation among them; it looks like a revolution.

Evelyn's Diary. 07 Dec 1688. My son went toward Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. I returned home.

Evelyn's Diary. 29 Sep 1695. Very cold weather. Sir Purbeck Temple, uncle to my son Draper, died suddenly. A great funeral at Addiscombe. His lady being own aunt to my son Draper, he hopes for a good fortune, there being no heir. There had been a new meeting of the commissioners about Greenwich Hospital [Map], on the new commission, where the Lord Mayor, etc. appeared, but I was prevented by indisposition from attending. The weather very sharp, winter approaching apace. The King (age 44) went a progress into the north, to show himself to the people against the elections, and was everywhere complimented, except at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map], where it was not as he expected, so that he hardly stopped an hour there, and having seen the theater, did not receive the banquet proposed. I dined with Dr. Gale (age 60) at St. Paul's school, who showed me many curious passages out of some ancient Platonists' MSS. concerning the Trinity, which this great and learned person would publish, with many other rare things, if he was encouraged, and eased of the burden of teaching.

In 1743 Thomas Rowney of Dean Farm, Oxfordshire (age 50) was appointed High Steward of Oxford for life.

On 08 Aug 1908 John Strange "Jack" Spencer-Churchill (age 28) and Gwendoline Theresa Mary "Goonie" Bertie were married at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. She the daughter of Montagu Arthur Bertie 7th Earl of Abingdon (age 72) and Gwendoline Mary Dormer (age 43).

On 11 Nov 1931 Archie Primrose (age 21) died of blood poisoning at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

On 22 Oct 1941 Ann Fitzgerald Mackay Lady Simpson (age 84) died at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Ashmolean Museum [Map]

Evelyn's Diary. 17 Sep 1657. To see Sir Robert Needham, at Lambeth, Surrey [Map], a relation of mine; and thence to John Tradescant's museum, in which the chiefest rarities were, in my opinion, the ancient Roman, Indian, and other nations' armor, shields, and weapons; some habits of curiously-colored and wrought feathers, one from the phœnix wing, as tradition goes. Other innumerable things there were printed in his catalogue by Mr. Ashmole (age 40), to whom after the death of the widow they are bequeathed, and by him designed as a gift to Oxford [Map].

Evelyn's Diary. 03 Jul 1658. To London, and dined with Mr. Henshaw (age 40), Mr. Dorell, and Mr. Ashmole (age 41), founder of the Oxford repository of rarities [Map], with divers doctors of physic and virtuosos.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Beaumont Palace [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Carfax Oxford

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Swindlestock Tavern Carfax Oxford

On 10 Feb 1355, St Scholatica's Day, the St Scholastica Day Riot took place in Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. What started as a disagreement between students and the landlord over the quality of the wine at the Swindlestock Tavern Carfax Oxford, Oxfordshire grew into a three day riot in which around thirty townspeople and sixty students were killed.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Church of St Mary the Virgin

Evelyn's Diary. 10 May 1637. I was admitted a Fellow-commoner of Baliol College, Oxford; and, on the 29th, I was matriculated in the vestry of St. Mary's, where I subscribed the Articles, and took the oaths: Dr. Baily, head of St. John's, being vice-chancellor, afterward bishop. It appears by a letter of my father's (age 50), that he was upon treaty with one Mr. Bathurst (age 17) (afterward Doctor and President), of Trinity College, who should have been my tutor; but, lest my brother's tutor, Dr. Hobbs, more zealous in his life than industrious to his pupils, should receive it as an affront, and especially for that Fellow-commoners in Baliol were no more exempt from exercise than the meanest scholars there, my father (age 50) sent me thither to one Mr. George Bradshaw (nomen invisum! yet the son of an excellent father, beneficed in Surrey). I ever thought my tutor had parts enough; but as his ambition made him much suspected of the College, so his grudge to Dr. Lawrence, the governor of it (whom he afterward supplanted), took up so much of his time, that he seldom or never had the opportunity to discharge his duty to his scholars. This I perceiving, associated myself with one Mr. James Thicknesse (then a young man of the foundation, afterward a Fellow of the house), by whose learned and friendly conversation I received great advantage. At my first arrival, Dr. Parkhurst was master: and after his decease, Dr. Lawrence, a chaplain of his Majesty's and Margaret Professor, succeeded, an acute and learned person; nor do I much reproach his severity, considering that the extraordinary remissness of discipline had (till his coming) much detracted from the reputation of that College.

Evelyn's Diary. 14 Dec 1639. According to injunctions from the Heads of Colleges, I went (among the rest) to the Confirmation at St. Mary's, where, after sermon, the Bishop of Oxford (age 65) laid his hands upon us, with the usual form of benediction prescribed: but this received (I fear) for the more part out of curiosity, rather than with that due preparation and advice which had been requisite, could not be so effectual as otherwise that admirable and useful institution might have been, and as I have since deplored it.

On 04 Jun 1645 Frances Coke Viscountess Purbeck (age 42) died at Oxford, Oxfordshire [Map]. She was buried at the Church of St Mary the Virgin.

Evelyn's Diary. 11 Jul 1669. The Act sermon was this forenoon preached by Dr. Hall, in St. Mary's, in an honest, practical discourse against atheism. In the afternoon, the church was so crowded, that, not coming early, I could not approach to hear.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Convocation House

Evelyn's Diary. 15 Jul 1669. Having two days before had notice that the University intended me the honor of Doctorship, I was this morning attended by the beadles belonging to the Law, who conducted me to the Theater, where I found the Duke of Ormond (age 58) (now Chancellor of the University) with the Earl of Chesterfield (age 35) and Mr. Spencer (age 40) (brother to the late Earl of Sunderland). Thence, we marched to the Convocation House, a convocation having been called on purpose; here, being all of us robed in the porch, in scarlet with caps and hoods, we were led in by the Professor of Laws, and presented respectively by name, with a short eulogy, to the Vice-Chancellor, who sat in the chair, with all the Doctors and Heads of Houses and masters about the room, which was exceedingly full. Then, began the Public Orator his speech, directed chiefly to the Duke of Ormond, the Chancellor; but in which I had my compliment, in course. This ended, we were called up, and created Doctors according to the form, and seated by the Vice-Chancellor among the Doctors, on his right hand; then, the Vice-Chancellor made a short speech, and so, saluting our brother Doctors, the pageantry concluded, and the convocation was dissolved. So formal a creation of honorary Doctors had seldom been seen, that a convocation should be called on purpose, and speeches made by the Orator; but they could do no less, their Chancellor being to receive, or rather do them, this honor. I should have been made Doctor with the rest at the public Act, but their expectation of their Chancellor made them defer it. I was then led with my brother Doctors to an extraordinary entertainment at Doctor Mewes's, head of St John's College, Oxford University, and, after abundance of feasting and compliments, having visited the Vice-Chancellor and other Doctors, and given them thanks for the honor done me, I went toward home the 16th, and got as far as Windsor, Berkshire [Map], and so to my house the next day.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Cornmarket Street

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Cornmarket Street, St Michael at the Northgate Church

On 26 Apr 1859 William Morris (age 25) and Jane Morris nee Burden (age 19) were married at St Michael at the Northgate Church.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Cumnor Oxford [Map]

On 08 Sep 1560, the day of the Abingdon Fair, Amy Robsart (age 28) died from falling down stairs at Cumnor Place Abingdon, Berkshire [Map]. She was married to Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester (age 28), favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (age 27), who was with Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (age 27) at Windsor Castle [Map] at the time. Foul play was suspected but not proven. The event was regarded as suspicious by many. The Queen's reputation being tarnished she could not risk a marriage with Dudley.

The inquest into her death concluded ...

Inquisition as indenture held at Cumnor [Map] in the aforesaid county [Oxfordshire] on 9 September in the second year of the reign of the most dread Lady Elizabeth, by the grace of God queen of England, France, and Ireland, defend of the faith, etc., before John Pudsey, gent, a coroner of the said lady queen in the aforesaid county, on inspection of the body of Lady Amy Dudley, late wife of Robert Dudley, knight of the most noble order of the garter, there lying dead: by oath of Richard Smith, gent., Humphrey Lewis, gent., Thomas Moulder, gent., Richard Knight, Thomas Spyre, Edward Stevenson, John Stevenson, Richard Hughes, William Cantrell, William Noble, John Buck, John Keene, Henry Lanlgey, Stephen Ruffyn, and John Sire: which certain jurors, sworn to tell the truth at our request, were adjourned from the aforesaid ninth day onwards day by day very often; and finally various several days were given to them by the selfsame coroner to appear both before the justices of the aforesaid lady queen at the assizes assigned to be held in the aforesaid county and before the same coroner in order there to return their verdict truthfully and speedily, until 1 August in the third year of the reign of the said lady queen; on which day the same jurors say under oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy on 8 September in the aforesaid second year of the reign of the said lady queen, being alone in a certain chamber within the home of a certain Anthony Forster, esq., in the aforesaid Cumnor, and intending to descend the aforesaid chamber by way of certain steps (in English called 'steyres') of the aforesaid chamber there and then accidentally fell precipitously down the aforesaid steps to the very bottom of the same steps, through which the same Lady Amy there and then sustained not only two injuries to her head (in English called 'dyntes') - one of which was a quarter of an inch deep and the other two inches deep - but truly also, by reason of the accidental injury or of that fall and of Lady Amy's own body weight falling down the aforesaid stairs, the same Lady Amy there and then broke her own neck, on account of which certain fracture of the neck the same Lady Amy there and then died instantly; and the aforesaid Lady Amy was found there and then without any other mark or wound on her body; and thus the jurors say on their oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy in the manner and form aforesaid by misfortune came to her death and not otherwise, as they are able to agree at present; in testimony of which fact for this inquest both the aforesaid coroner and also the aforesaid jurors have in turn affixed their seals on the day.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Cumnor Oxford, Chawley Cumnor

On 11 Apr 1646 Edward Sackville was murdered by Parliamentary forces at Chawley Cumnor, Oxfordshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Cumnor Oxford, Cumnor Place Abingdon [Map]

On 08 Sep 1560, the day of the Abingdon Fair, Amy Robsart (age 28) died from falling down stairs at Cumnor Place Abingdon, Berkshire [Map]. She was married to Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester (age 28), favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (age 27), who was with Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (age 27) at Windsor Castle [Map] at the time. Foul play was suspected but not proven. The event was regarded as suspicious by many. The Queen's reputation being tarnished she could not risk a marriage with Dudley.

The inquest into her death concluded ...

Inquisition as indenture held at Cumnor [Map] in the aforesaid county [Oxfordshire] on 9 September in the second year of the reign of the most dread Lady Elizabeth, by the grace of God queen of England, France, and Ireland, defend of the faith, etc., before John Pudsey, gent, a coroner of the said lady queen in the aforesaid county, on inspection of the body of Lady Amy Dudley, late wife of Robert Dudley, knight of the most noble order of the garter, there lying dead: by oath of Richard Smith, gent., Humphrey Lewis, gent., Thomas Moulder, gent., Richard Knight, Thomas Spyre, Edward Stevenson, John Stevenson, Richard Hughes, William Cantrell, William Noble, John Buck, John Keene, Henry Lanlgey, Stephen Ruffyn, and John Sire: which certain jurors, sworn to tell the truth at our request, were adjourned from the aforesaid ninth day onwards day by day very often; and finally various several days were given to them by the selfsame coroner to appear both before the justices of the aforesaid lady queen at the assizes assigned to be held in the aforesaid county and before the same coroner in order there to return their verdict truthfully and speedily, until 1 August in the third year of the reign of the said lady queen; on which day the same jurors say under oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy on 8 September in the aforesaid second year of the reign of the said lady queen, being alone in a certain chamber within the home of a certain Anthony Forster, esq., in the aforesaid Cumnor, and intending to descend the aforesaid chamber by way of certain steps (in English called 'steyres') of the aforesaid chamber there and then accidentally fell precipitously down the aforesaid steps to the very bottom of the same steps, through which the same Lady Amy there and then sustained not only two injuries to her head (in English called 'dyntes') - one of which was a quarter of an inch deep and the other two inches deep - but truly also, by reason of the accidental injury or of that fall and of Lady Amy's own body weight falling down the aforesaid stairs, the same Lady Amy there and then broke her own neck, on account of which certain fracture of the neck the same Lady Amy there and then died instantly; and the aforesaid Lady Amy was found there and then without any other mark or wound on her body; and thus the jurors say on their oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy in the manner and form aforesaid by misfortune came to her death and not otherwise, as they are able to agree at present; in testimony of which fact for this inquest both the aforesaid coroner and also the aforesaid jurors have in turn affixed their seals on the day.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Greyfriars Oxford

On 13 Jun 1455 William Lovell 7th Baron Lovel 4th Baron Holand (age 58) died at Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire [Map]. He was buried at Greyfriars Oxford, Oxfordshire. His son John Lovell 8th Baron Lovel 5th Baron Holand (age 22) succeeded 8th Baron Lovel of Titchmarsh, 5th Baron Holand.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Holywell

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Holywell St Cross Church

On or before 10 Feb 1864 Robert Burden Stableman (age 54) died. He was buried on 10 Feb 1864 at Holywell St Cross Church.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Holywell Street

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Holywell Street, St Helen's Passage

On 19 Oct 1839 Jane Morris nee Burden was born to Robert Burden Stableman (age 29) and Ann Maizey Domestic Servant (age 33) at St Helen's Passage.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Holywell, King's Head Gardens

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Holywell, 1 King's Head Gardens

In 1851 the Census records Robert Burden Stableman (age 41), Groom, Ann Maizey Domestic Servant (age 45), William Burden (age 14), Jane Morris nee Burden (age 11) and Elizabeth Burden (age 9) living at 1 King's Head Gardens.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, King's Weir Oxford

On 12 Feb 1892 Harold Lewis Henry Everard ffolkes was drowned whilst attempting to rescue a friend at King's Weir Oxford. Memorial in the Church of St Mary, Hillington [Map].

Harold Lewis Henry Everard ffolkes: he was born to Reverend Henry Edward Browne ffolkes.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Osney aka Oseney Abbey [Map]

Osney aka Oseney Abbey [Map] was a house of Augustinian canons at Osney in Oxfordshire, founded as a priory in 1129, becoming an abbey around 1154.

In 1152 Edith Forne (age 72) died at Osney aka Oseney Abbey [Map].

Oxford Castle

On 06 Apr 1752, Easter Monday, Mary Blandy (age 32) was hanged outside Oxford Castle for having murdered her father Francis Blandy with arsenic.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Queen's Lane

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Queen's Lane, St Peter-in-the-East Church

On 28 Dec 1840 Jane Morris nee Burden (age 1) was baptised at St Peter-in-the-East Church.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary

On 24 Jun 1991 James Fawcett (age 78) died at Radcliffe Infirmary.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Sheldonian Theatre

Evelyn's Diary. 09 Jul 1669. In the morning was celebrated the Encænia of the New Theater, so magnificently built by the munificence of Dr. Gilbert Sheldon (age 71), Archbishop of Canterbury, in which was spent,£25,000, as Sir Christopher Wren (age 45), the architect (as I remember), told me; and yet it was never seen by the benefactor, my Lord Archbishop having told me that he never did or ever would see it. It is, in truth, a fabric comparable to any of this kind of former ages, and doubtless exceeding any of the present, as this University does for colleges, libraries, schools, students, and order, all the universities in the world. To the theater is added the famous Sheldonian printing house. This being at the Act and the first time of opening the Theater (Acts being formerly kept in St. Mary's Church, which might be thought indecent, that being a place set apart for the immediate worship of God, and was the inducement for building this noble pile), it was now resolved to keep the present Act in it, and celebrate its dedication with the greatest splendor and formality that might be; and, therefore, drew a world of strangers, and other company, to the University, from all parts of the nation.

Evelyn's Diary. 12 Jul 1669. Monday. Was held the Divinity Act in the Theater again, when proceeded seventeen Doctors, in all Faculties some.

Evelyn's Diary. 13 Jul 1669. I dined at the Vice-Chancellor's, and spent the afternoon in seeing the rarities of the public libraries, and visiting the noble marbles and inscriptions, now inserted in the walls that compass the area of the Theater, which were 150 of the most ancient and worthy treasures of that kind in the learned world. Now, observing that people approach them too near, some idle persons began to scratch and injure them, I advised that a hedge of holly should be planted at the foot of the wall, to be kept breast-high only to protect them; which the Vice-Chancellor promised to do the next season.

Evelyn's Diary. 15 Jul 1669. Having two days before had notice that the University intended me the honor of Doctorship, I was this morning attended by the beadles belonging to the Law, who conducted me to the Theater, where I found the Duke of Ormond (age 58) (now Chancellor of the University) with the Earl of Chesterfield (age 35) and Mr. Spencer (age 40) (brother to the late Earl of Sunderland). Thence, we marched to the Convocation House, a convocation having been called on purpose; here, being all of us robed in the porch, in scarlet with caps and hoods, we were led in by the Professor of Laws, and presented respectively by name, with a short eulogy, to the Vice-Chancellor, who sat in the chair, with all the Doctors and Heads of Houses and masters about the room, which was exceedingly full. Then, began the Public Orator his speech, directed chiefly to the Duke of Ormond, the Chancellor; but in which I had my compliment, in course. This ended, we were called up, and created Doctors according to the form, and seated by the Vice-Chancellor among the Doctors, on his right hand; then, the Vice-Chancellor made a short speech, and so, saluting our brother Doctors, the pageantry concluded, and the convocation was dissolved. So formal a creation of honorary Doctors had seldom been seen, that a convocation should be called on purpose, and speeches made by the Orator; but they could do no less, their Chancellor being to receive, or rather do them, this honor. I should have been made Doctor with the rest at the public Act, but their expectation of their Chancellor made them defer it. I was then led with my brother Doctors to an extraordinary entertainment at Doctor Mewes's, head of St John's College, Oxford University, and, after abundance of feasting and compliments, having visited the Vice-Chancellor and other Doctors, and given them thanks for the honor done me, I went toward home the 16th, and got as far as Windsor, Berkshire [Map], and so to my house the next day.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, St Aldgate's

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, 65 St Aldgate's [Map]

Carbon Date. 920. Early Medieval

Report: wood; from waterfront at rear end of a tenement fronting St Aldate's.

ID: 17169, C14 ID: HAR 5341 Date BP: 1080 +/- 70, Start Date BP: 1150, End BP: 1010

Abstract: Oxford: 65 St Aldate's [Map]; 1982-83

Reference Name: Bayliss, A, Hedges, R, Otlet, R, Switsur, R, and Walker, J 2012 'Radiocarbon dates: from samples funded by English Heritage between 1981 and 1988', Swindon: English Heritage

Council for British Archaeology (2012) Archaeological Site Index to Radiocarbon Dates from Great Britain and Ireland [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1017767

Carbon Date. 980. Early Medieval

Report: wood; from core of stone ford.

ID: 17168, C14 ID: HAR 5340 Date BP: 1020 +/- 70, Start Date BP: 1090, End BP: 950

Abstract: Oxford: 65 St Aldate's [Map]; 1982-83

Reference Name: Bayliss, A, Hedges, R, Otlet, R, Switsur, R, and Walker, J 2012 'Radiocarbon dates: from samples funded by English Heritage between 1981 and 1988', Swindon: English Heritage

Council for British Archaeology (2012) Archaeological Site Index to Radiocarbon Dates from Great Britain and Ireland [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1017767

Carbon Date. 1170. Late Medieval

Report: wood; from earliest silting after abandonment of Oxen Ford, from the first 0.3m silting.

ID: 17167, C14 ID: HAR 5339 Date BP: 830 +/- 70, Start Date BP: 900, End BP: 760

Abstract: Oxford: 65 St Aldate's [Map]; 1982-83

Reference Name: Bayliss, A, Hedges, R, Otlet, R, Switsur, R, and Walker, J 2012 'Radiocarbon dates: from samples funded by English Heritage between 1981 and 1988', Swindon: English Heritage

Council for British Archaeology (2012) Archaeological Site Index to Radiocarbon Dates from Great Britain and Ireland [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1017767

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, St Giles' Church

In 1623 Dean Thomas Turner (age 32) was presented to the vicarage of St Giles' Church, Oxford.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, St Mary Magdalen's Church

On 06 May 1833 Robert Burden Stableman (age 23) and Ann Maizey Domestic Servant (age 27) were married at St Mary Magdalen's Church.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Oxford, Wolvercot

On 23 Dec 1559 Bishop Henry Morgan died at Wolvercot, Oxfordshire. He was buried at Wolvercote Cemetery Oxford.

On 18 May 1644 Richard Fanshawe 1st Baronet (age 35) and Anne Harrison Lady Fanshawe (age 19) were married in Wolvercot, Oxfordshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-Central England, Oxfordshire, Wolvercote Cemetery Oxford

On 23 Dec 1559 Bishop Henry Morgan died at Wolvercot, Oxfordshire. He was buried at Wolvercote Cemetery Oxford.

On 18 Dec 1925 William Hamo Thornycroft (age 75) died. He was buried at Wolvercote Cemetery Oxford.