Europe, British Isles, South-West England, Wiltshire, Salisbury Cathedral [Map]

Salisbury Cathedral is in Salisbury, Wiltshire.

1189 Richard I Appoints his Bishops

1189 Oct New Bishops Consecrated

1464 Battle of Hexham

1689 Coronation William III and Mary II

1906 Salisbury Railway Disaster

1916 Battle of the Somme

Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. On 18 Apr 1756 James Everard Arundell died. Monument to James Everard Arundell died aged one month.

James Everard Arundell: In Mar 1756 he was born to James Everard Arundell and Ann Wyndham.

Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. On 15 Dec 1922 Lieutenant General Sir George Montague Harper (age 57) died in a car accident when his car skidded and overturned fracturing his skull. Memorial in Salisbury Cathedral [Map] sculpted by Allan Gairdner Wyon (age 40).

Lieutenant General Sir George Montague Harper: On 11 Jan 1865 he was born.

South Transept. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Exterior Detail. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

General Interior Photographs. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Unknown Bishop. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

John of Worcester. 24 Jun 1070. The feast of St. John the Baptist being near, earl Asbiorn sailed to Denmark with the fleet which had wintered in the Humber; but his brother Sweyn (age 51) outlawed him, because he had accepted money from king William (age 42), to the great regret of the Danes. Edric, surnamed the Forester, a man of the most resolute courage, of whom we have spoken before, was reconciled with king William (age 42). After this, the king summoned from Normandy Lanfranc (age 65), abbot of Caen, a Lombard by birth, a man of unbounded learning, master of the liberal arts, and of both sacred and secular literature, and of the greatest prudence in counsel and the administration of worldly affairs; and on the day of the Assumption of St. Mary, appointed him archbishop of Canterbury, causing him to be consecrated at Canterbury on the feast of St. John the Baptist, being Sunday. He was consecrated by Giso, bishop of Wells, and Walter, bishop of Hereford, who were both ordained at Rome by pope Nicholas, when Aldred, archbishop of York, received the pallium,—for he evaded being ordained by Stigand, who then held the archbishopric of Canterbury, knowing him not to have received the pallium canonically. Bishop Heriman, who had already transferred the seat of his bishopric from Sherbourne to Salisbury, also assisted at his consecration, with some others. Afterwards, Lanfranc (age 65) consecrated Thomas, archbishop of York. The suit of the reverend Wulfstan (age 62), bishop of Worcester, was again prosecuted, there being now a bishop who could advocate the cause of the church of York; and the affair was, by the aid of God's grace, decided at a council held at a place called Pedred, before the king, archbishop Lanfranc (age 65), and the bishops, abbots, earls, and lords of all England. All the groundless assertions by which Thomas and his abettors strove to humble the church of Worcester, and reduce her to subjection and servitude to the church of York, were, by God's just judgement, entirely refuted and negatived by written documents, so that Wulfstan (age 62) not only recovered the possessions he claimed, but, by God's goodness, and the king's assent, regained for his see all the immunities and privileges freely granted to it by its first founders, the holy king Ethered, Oshere, sub-king of the Hwiccas, and the other kings of Mercia, Cenred, Ethelbald, Offa, Kenulf, Edward the Elder, Athelstan, Edmund, Edred, and Edgar.

On 29 Sep 1102 Bishop Roger of Salisbury was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 11 Aug 1107 Bishop Roger of Salisbury was consecrated Bishop of Salisbury.

In 1155 Henry Beaumont was appointed Dean of Salisbury which position he held until 1164.

Richard I Appoints his Bishops

On 15 Sep 1189 King Richard "Lionheart" I of England (age 32) held a Council meeting at Pipewell [Map] at which he appointed a number of Bishops:

Bishop William Longchamp was elected Bishop of Ely.

Bishop Godfrey Lucy was elected Bishop of Winchester.

Bishop Richard Fitzneal (age 59) was elected Bishop of London.

Archbishop Hubert Walter (age 29) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

1189 Oct New Bishops Consecrated

On 22 Oct 1189 two of Richard's new Bishops were consecrated ...

Bishop Godfrey Lucy was consecrated Bishop of Winchester.

Archbishop Hubert Walter (age 29) was consecrated Bishop of Salisbury.

On 05 May 1194 Bishop Herbert Poore was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 27 Jun 1217 Bishop Richard Poore was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 25 Sep 1228 Bishop Robert Bingham (age 48) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

Around 1300. Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Monument to Unknown Knight. Early Medieval Period. Right Leg over Left.

In 1382 Thomas Montagu was appointed Dean of Salisbury which position he held until his death on 31 Aug 1404.

After 1389. Monument to John Montagu 1st Baron Montagu, Baron Monthermer (deceased). Camail and Jupon Period. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 25 Oct 1395 Bishop Richard Mitford was translated to Bishop of Salisbury.

On 03 May 1407 Bishop Richard Mitford died. He was buried in the Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

In 1419 Archbishop John Stafford was appointed Archdeacon of Salisbury which position he held until 1423.

In 1438 Adam Moleyns was appointed Archdeacon of Salisbury.

On 11 Feb 1438 Bishop William Ayscough (age 43) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

On 20 Jul 1438 Bishop William Ayscough (age 43) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

From 1441 to 1446 Adam Moleyns was appointed Dean of Salisbury.

On 09 Aug 1449 Walter Hungerford 1st Baron Hungerford (age 71) died at Salisbury. He was buried at the Hungerford Chapel at Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. His son Robert Hungerford 2nd Baron Hungerford (age 49) succeeded 2nd Baron Hungerford. Margaret Botreaux 4th Baroness Botreaux Baroness Hungerford by marriage Baroness Hungerford.

In 1450 Bishop Richard Beauchamp (age 29) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

After 1459. Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Monument to Robert Hungerford 2nd Baron Hungerford (deceased). Fluted Period. Lancastrian Esses Collar.

Battle of Hexham

On 10 May 1468 King Edward IV of England (age 26), his brother Richard Duke of Gloucester (age 15), John "Butcher of England" Tiptoft 1st Earl of Worcester (age 41) and John Tuchet 6th Baron Audley, 3rd Baron Tuchet (age 42) met in the Chapter House at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 24 May 1468 King Edward IV of England (age 26) was admitted to the confraternity of the Chapter of Salisbury in the Chapter House at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 18 Oct 1481 Bishop Richard Beauchamp (age 60) died. Monument in Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Bishop Richard Beauchamp: Around 1421 he was born to Walter Beauchamp and Elizabeth Roches. In 1448 he was appointed Bishop of Hereford. In 1450 he was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 21 Apr 1482 Bishop Lionel Woodville (age 35) was consecrated as Bishop of Salisbury.

On 08 Feb 1485 Bishop Thomas Langton was translated to Bishop of Salisbury.

On 13 Nov 1493 Bishop John Blythe (age 33) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 23 Feb 1494 Bishop John Blythe (age 34) was consecrated Bishop of Salisbury.

On 30 May 1499 John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne (age 57) died. Fluted Period. Alabaster Monument at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Fluted armour typified by having no headwear, being clean shaven, a breastplate in two pieces and the neck protected by a Standard. Damaged angel, its head removed, holding the cushion on which his head rests. He wearing a Lancastrian Esses Collar with large Esses. Ringed fingers.

Detail of the heavily graffitied Shoulder Garter.

Detail of the heavily graffitied Leg Garter and Poleyn.

Mutilated Lion at his feet with its head missing. The figure beneath his right foot appears to be a Bedesman. That beneath his left foot may be the remains of the means by which a bedesman was originally fixed to the foot. What appears to be a birds foot lying across the lions body is the tail of the lion.

On 23 Aug 1499 Bishop John Blythe (age 39) died. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Monument bottom middle.

On 07 Dec 1499 Archbishop Henry Deane was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 10 Jan 1502 Bishop Edmund Tuchet (age 59) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

In 1503 Bishop Thomas Ruthall (age 31) was appointed Archdeacon of Gloucester Cathedral, Dean of Salisbury and Chancellor of Cambridge.

In 1514 Bishop John Longland (age 41) was appointed Dean of Salisbury.

In May 1521 Bishop Cuthbert Tunstall (age 47) was appointed Dean of Salisbury.

On 23 Aug 1524 Bishop Edmund Tuchet (age 81) died. He was buried in Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Finely carved monument. Similar in style to Prince Arthur's Chantry in Worcester Cathedral [Map].

In 1533 Bishop Edward Fox (age 37) was appointed Dean of Salisbury.

In 1535 Bishop Richard Sampson was appointed Treasurer of Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 22 Feb 1535 Bishop Nicholas Shaxton (age 50) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

In 1560 Bishop John Jewel (age 37) was consecrated as Bishop of Salisbury.

After 26 Jan 1568. Monument at Salisbury Cathedral [Map] to Edward Seymour 1st Earl Hertford (age 28) and Catherine Grey Countess Hertford (deceased). She placed higher than her husband on the monument given her Royal descent; she was a great gran-daughter of King Henry VII.

In 1571 Bishop Edmund Gheast (age 57) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 23 Sep 1571 Bishop John Jewel (age 49) died at Monkton Farleigh, Wiltshire. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

In 1577 Bishop Edmund Gheast (age 63) was buried in Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 30 Mar 1610 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle (age 74) died. On 14 May 1635 Helena Snakenbourg Marchioness Northampton (deceased) was buried in Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle: In 1536 he was born to Edward Gorges and Mary Poyntz in Wraxall, Somerset. In 1573 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle acquired the manor of Longford, Wiltshire which had been owned by the Servington aka Cervington family. In 1576 after his marriage to Helena Snakenbourg Marchioness Northampton they commissioned the building of a house on the triangular Swedish style on the banks of the Wiltshire River Avon with money from a shipwreck of the Spanish Armada. In 1576 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle and Helena Snakenbourg Marchioness Northampton were married secretly. In 1586 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle was knighted at Beddington, Surrey.

In 1618 Bishop Martin Fortherby (age 58) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

In 1621 Bishop John Davenant (age 48) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 06 Apr 1621 Edward Seymour 1st Earl Hertford (age 81) died. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 25 Sep 1621 Mary Sidney Countess Pembroke (age 59) died of smallpox at Herbert Townhouse Aldersgate Street. Her funeral was held at St Paul's Cathedral [Map]. She was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

In 1627 Richard Montpesson died. Monument with his wife Katherine Pakington at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Katherine Pakington: She was born to Thomas Pakington of Aylesbury. After 1610 Richard Montpesson and she were married.

In 1641 Bishop Brian Duppa (age 51) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

On 20 Apr 1641 Bishop John Davenant (age 68) died. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Bishop John Davenant: On 20 May 1572 he was born. In 1621 he was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 23 Jan 1650 Philip Herbert 4th Earl Pembroke 1st Earl Montgomery (age 65) died at Whitehall Palace [Map]. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. His son Philip Herbert 5th Earl Pembroke 2nd Earl Montgomery (age 29) succeeded 5th Earl Pembroke, 2nd Earl Montgomery.

Evelyn's Diary. 20 Jul 1654. We proceeded to Salisbury; the cathedral [Map] I take to be the most complete piece of Gothic work in Europe, taken in all its uniformity. The Pillars, reputed to be cast, are of stone manifestly cut out of the quarry; most observable are those in the chapter house. There are some remarkable. Monuments, particularly the ancient Bishops, founders of the Church, Knights Templars, the Marquis of Hertford's, the cloisters of the palace and garden, and the great mural dial.

On 31 Dec 1665 Bishop Alexander Hyde (age 73) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jun 1668. Thursday. Up, and W. Hewer (age 26) and I up and down the town, and find it a very brave place. The river goes through every street; and a most capacious market-place. The city great, I think greater than Hereford. But the Minster [Map] most admirable; as big, I think, and handsomer than Westminster: and a most large Close about it, and houses for the Officers thereof, and a fine palace for the Bishop.

On 29 Apr 1675 John Seymour 4th Duke Somerset (age 30) died. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. His first cousin once removed Francis Seymour 5th Duke Somerset (age 17) succeeded 5th Duke Somerset, 5th Earl Hertford. Marquess Hertford extinct.

On 04 May 1675 Dean Thomas Pierce (age 53) was appointed Dean of Salisbury.

On 28 Aug 1683 Philip "Infamous Earl" Herbert 7th Earl Pembroke 4th Earl Montgomery (age 31) died. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. His brother Thomas Herbert 8th Earl Pembroke 5th Earl Montgomery (age 27) succeeded 8th Earl Pembroke, 5th Earl Montgomery.

In 1689 Bishop Gilbert Burnet (age 45) was consecrated Bishop of Salisbury.

Coronation William III and Mary II

Evelyn's Diary. 11 Apr 1689. I saw the procession to and from the Abbey Church of Westminster [Map], with the great feast in Westminster Hall [Map], at the coronation of King William and Queen Mary. What was different from former coronations, was some alteration in the coronation oath. Dr. Burnet (age 45), now made Bishop of Sarum, preached with great applause. The Parliament men had scaffolds and places which took up the one whole side of the Hall [Map]. When the King (age 38) and Queen (age 26) had dined, the ceremony of the Champion, and other services by tenure were performed. The Parliament men were feasted in the Exchequer chamber, and had each of them a gold medal given them, worth five-and-forty shillings. On the one side were the effigies of the King and Queen inclining one to the other; on the reverse was Jupiter throwing a bolt at Phäeton the words, "Ne totus absumatur": which was but dull, seeing they might have had out of the poet something as apposite. The sculpture was very mean.

Evelyn's Diary. 09 Jun 1689. Visited Dr. Burnet (age 45), now Bishop of Sarum; got him to let Mr. Kneller (age 42) draw his picture.

In 1690 Reverend Pierre Allix (age 49) was appointed Treasurer of Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Evelyn's Diary. 09 Mar 1690. Preached at Whitehall Dr. Burnet (age 46), late Bishop of Sarum, on Heb. iv. 13, anatomically describing the texture of the eye; and that, as it received such innumerable sorts of spies through so very small a passage to the brain, and that without the least confusion or trouble, and accordingly judged and reflected on them; so God who made this sensory, did with the greatest ease and at once see all that was done through the vast universe, even to the very thought as well as action. This similitude he continued with much perspicuity and aptness; and applied it accordingly, for the admonishing us how uprightly we ought to live and behave ourselves before such an all-seeing Deity; and how we were to conceive of other his attributes, which we could have no idea of than by comparing them by what we were able to conceive of the nature and power of things, which were the objects of our senses; and therefore it was that in Scripture we attribute those actions and affections of God by the same of man, not as adequately or in any proportion like them, but as the only expedient to make some resemblance of his divine perfections; as when the Scripture says, "God will remember the sins of the penitent no more:" not as if God could forget anything, but as intimating he would pass by such penitents and receive them to mercy.

On 21 Apr 1696 D'Aubigny Turbeville died. Memorial at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 21 Apr 1696 Daubigny Turberville (age 84) died at Salisbury. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 17 Mar 1715 Bishop Gilbert Burnet (age 71) died. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

On 23 Apr 1715 Bishop William Talbot (age 57) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

Stonehenge by William Stukeley. Table X. South East Prospect from Stonehenge. [Left to right, north to south, New King Barrows, a barrow named as Kingbarrow but is likely to be Coneybury Hill Barrow [Map], the spire of Salisbury Cathedral [Map]]

On 24 Nov 1745 Thomas Wyndham 1st Baron Wyndham (age 63) died unmarried. Baron Wyndham of Finglass extinct. Monument at Salisbury Cathedral [Map] sculpted by John Michael Rysbrack (age 51).

Thomas Wyndham 1st Baron Wyndham: On 27 Dec 1681 he was born to Colonel John Wyndham and Alice Fownes. In 1724 he was appointed Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. In 1726 he was appointed Lord Chancellor of Ireland. In 1731 Thomas Wyndham 1st Baron Wyndham was created 1st Baron Wyndham of Finglass.

On 04 May 1761 Bishop John Thomas (age 64) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

On 22 May 1766 Archdeacon William Whitworth was appointed Archdeacon of Sarum which office he held for life.

On 22 Dec 1780 James Harris (age 71) died at Malmesbury House, Salisbury Cathedral Close [Map]. On 28 Dec 1780 he was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. There is a memorial in the South Transept.

On 14 Aug 1782 Bishop Shute Barrington (age 48) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

On 27 Aug 1782 Bishop Shute Barrington (age 48) was translated to Bishop of Salisbury upon the confirmation of the election at St Mary-le-Bow Church, Cheapside [Map].

Effigy of Bishop Roger of Salisbury. Oct 1812. Plate 1. Monumental Effigy. On the south side of the Nave of Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

This is a coffin lid, on which is represented in very low relief a Bishop attired in his pontifical ornaments, in the act of giving the benediction, and trampling on a dragon or serpent; the ordinary mode with the sculptors of the middle age of expressing the fulfilment of the prophecy against Satan, by the power given through Christ to the Ministers of his Church. The figure is surrounded by a border of interlacing scroll work, in which are introduced bands of beads. These characteristic points shew the sculpture to have been executed in the twelfth century, and the effigy may, with much confidence, be asserted to be that of Roger, Bishop of Salisbury. This ecclesiastic was originally the priest of a small chapel in the vicinity of Caen in Normandy, which Prince Henry, the third son of William the Conqueror, chanced to enter while engaged in a hunting party. He was so pleased with the alacrity with which this obscure priest got through the service that he took him into his Household, and, on coming to the Crown, made him his Chief Counsellor, his Chancellor, Dean of St. Martin le Grand, London, and Bishop of Salisbury; in short he was invested by Henry 1. with authority, honours, and riches. Under the following reign of Stephen the picture was reversed, and he bitterly experienced "the wretchedness of that poor man who hangs on Princes' favours." Overwhelmed by reverses of fortune he expired in a state of phrensy on the 11th of December 1139, and was buried in the Cathedral of Sarum, there can be little doubt, in the tomb which has been above described. This, with his remains, were afterwards translated to the new Church, and is placed on the South side of the nave.

Effigy of William Longespee The Younger. THIS effigy is on the south side of the nave of Salisbury Cathedral [Map]; it is ascribed, with some uncertainty, to William, eldest son of William Longespee, Earl of Salisbury, by his wife Ela. He was girt with the sword of knighthood in 1233, but could not enforce his claim with King Henry III. to succeed his father as Earl of Salisbury. He married Idonea, daughter and heiress of Richard de Camville. He took the cross, joined the expedition of St. Louis to the Holy Land, and after many deeds of valour, perished in 1250, in an engagement with the Saracens at a fortress called Massourah, between Damietta and Cairo. Matthew Paris, and a poem recently publisheda, which accord together in the main particulars, give a circumstantial relation of the manner of his death. It appears that great jealousy of Longespee and his English companions was entertained by the Count d'Artois, who, on more than one occasion, derided them as a race to whom the curse of Heaven adhered in the form of tails of beasts alluding to the ridiculous legend of St. Augustine and the Kentish boors. The Count d'Artois urged, with many sneers at the Templars and their master, and many vulgar taunts at Longespee, similar to those described, an attack on the fortified town of Mansour or Massourah. The gallant Englishman exclaimed, "Lead on, Sir Count, I will set my foot in danger thus far to day that you shall not dare to touch a hair even of my horse's tail according to your vulgar jest." The Christians rushed forward into the fortress, where they met with so warm a reception that the Count d'Artois was the first to fly, and plunging his horse into the neighbouring river, perished by the weight of his harness in his attempt to escape. Longespee resisted all proposals of retreat, "Never," said he, "shall the son of my father flee before a Saracen!" Supported by a few knights, and surrounded by a host of infidels, his valour could purchase nothing for itself but honourable death. His right foot at first was cut off; sustained by Richard de Ascalon he still fought on; a Saracen sabre disabled his right arm, he grasped his sword in his left hand until that also was separated from his body. Then fell the valiant grandson of Plantagenet, and on his honoured corpse fell also Richard de Ascalon and De Guise his banner-bearer, disdaining to survive a master so noble. He was interred in the church of St. Cross at Acre, and it is conjectured that his mother Ela, the Abbess of Laycock, caused this monument to be placed in the cathedral of Salisbury to his memory. The figure is in the attitude of a Crusader, and the style of its costume very well agrees with the period in which Longespee the younger died. The hauberk, which before this time was entirely of chain mail, has now portions of plate armour attached, covering the knees and elbows. The triangular shield with curved sides, reaches, now, only from the shoulder to the middle of the thigh.

Note a. See Matt. Paris, edit. Watts, pp. 785, 791. Excerpta Historica. Bentiey, 1830, p. 66.

Effigy of Jocelyn de Bailul Bishop of Salisbury. This, like the effigy of Jocelyn's predecessor in the See of Salisbury, is carved in low relief on a coffin lid. Jocelyn de Bailul was of a noble Norman family, and much in favour with King Henry the Second, whose views he espoused when the King sought to limit the extravagant privileges of the clergy by the constitutions of Clarendon. This drew upon Jocelyn the resentment of Becket, subjected him to ecclesiastical censures, and as much persecution as could by those means he directed against him. After the murder of Becket, nothing short of Jocelyn's entire submission could make his peace with the Pope. He retired into a Cistertian monastery, where he died on the 11th September 1184. He left a natural son, Richard Fitz-Jocelyn, Archdeacon of Sarum, Bishop of Bath and Wells, and afterwards elected to the See of Canterbury, but who died before his election was confirmed. The effigy of this Bishop represents him standing under an arch, the pastoral staff in the left hand, the right elevated in the act of giving the benediction. Mr. Gough, who conceived this to be the tomb of Bishop Roger, in 1770 procured it to be raised above the level of the floor of the nave, and was thus enabled to read the inscription which runs round the perpendicular sides of the edge of the stone. This commences at the head of the figure, and is as follows:

FLENT HODIE SALESBERIE, QVIA DECIDIT ENSIS

JVSTITIE, PATER ECCLESIE SALISBIRIENSIS,

DVM VIGVIT MISEROS ALV1T, FASTVSQVE FOTENTVM

NON TIMVIT, SED CLAVA FVIT TERRORQVE NOCENTVM,

DE DUCIBVS, DE NOBIEIBVS PRIMORDIA DVXIT

PRINCIPIBVS, PROPEQUE TIBI QVI GEMMA RELVXIT.

The line on the chasuble, "......AFFER OPEM, DEVENIES IN IDEM," is an admonition to the living to pray for the soul of the defunct, remembering their own mortality. Round the border of the same vestment was another inscription, which is now illegible.

Mr. Gough has endeavoured, by assigning particular allusions to the different lines of this inscription, to prove that this was the effigy of Bishop Roger; but these allusions, except in one point, are in a style of general compliment, which would apply equally well to Jocelyn as to Roger, while two circumstances lead confidently to the conclusion that this is the monument of Jocelyn: first, the only precise fact recorded in the epitaph, "deducibus, denobihbus primordia duxit principibus," seems at direct variance with the received history of Bishop Roger, while it perfectly accords with that of Bishop Jocelyn. The house of Bailul, or Bailleul, anglicised Baliol, whence he was descended, was one of the noblest in Normandy, distinguished for their voyages to the Holy Land, and their share in the conquest of England. The second circumstance is equally strong for its appropriation to Jocelyn. In searching the Chapter Records of Salisbury, several deeds were found bearing the seal of Bishop Jocelyn, the figure on which exactly resembled that on the monument which we are describing, and totally differed from that of earlier date which we have assigned to Bishop Rogera. The present situation of this effigy is on the south side of the nave of the cathedral church [Map].

Note a. See Dodsworth's Historical Account of the Episcopal See and Cathedral Church of Sarum or Salisbury, p. 191.

Memorials of Francis Chantrey RA in Hallamshire and Elsewhere Part V London Life and Works. In 1822, Chantrey (age 40) exhibited his admirable bust of George IV., now in the Royal College of Physicians; and in the following year - 1823 - the impressive cumbent figure of John, the first Earl of Malmsbury, deeply thoughtful, with a book in his hand, now in Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Dr. Carus, who accompanied the King of Saxony on his visit to this country, in 1844, says- "The image of a noble, intelligent man, who, in the midst of bodily sufferings, still continues to apply himself to the higher objects of mental development, is here so admirably delineated, that I must pronounce this work, which is also beautifully treated in marble, in a statuary point of view, one of the most peculiar and remarkable of modern times. "1

Note 1. King of Saxony's Journey, p. 193.

In 1854 Bishop Walter Kerr Hamilton (age 45) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

On 27 Feb 1861 George Lawrence (age 86) died. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

George Lawrence: Around 1775 he was born.

In 1869 George Moberly Bishop (age 65) was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 01 Aug 1869 Bishop Walter Kerr Hamilton (age 60) died. Monument in Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Bishop Walter Kerr Hamilton: On 16 Nov 1808 he was born to Archdeacon Anthony Hamilton. In 1832 Bishop Walter Kerr Hamilton was elected to a Fellowship of Merton College, Oxford University. In 1833 he was appointed Deacon. In 1854 Bishop Walter Kerr Hamilton was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

In 1885 Bishop John Wordsworth (age 42) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

On 06 Jul 1885 George Moberly Bishop (age 81) died. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

George Moberly Bishop: On 10 Oct 1803 he was born in St Petersburg. In 1869 he was appointed Bishop of Salisbury.

On 21 Mar 1901 George David Boyle (age 72) died. Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

George David Boyle: On 17 May 1828 he was born. In 1880 he was appointed Dean Salisbury Cathedral which position he held until he died.

Salisbury Railway Disaster

After 01 Jul 1906. Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Tablet in memory of those who lost their lives in the Salisbury Railway Disaster.

On 16 Aug 1911 Bishop John Wordsworth (age 68) died. He was buried in Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Monument sculpted by George Frampton (age 51).

Bishop John Wordsworth: In 1843 he was born to Bishop Christopher Wordsworth. In 1870 he was appointed Prebendary of Lincoln Cathedral. In 1885 Bishop John Wordsworth was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

After 21 Feb 1912. Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. Monument to James Eramus Philipps 12th Baronet and Mary Margaret Best (age 75).

James Eramus Philipps 12th Baronet: On 23 Oct 1824 he was born to James Evans Philipps 11th Baronet. Before 1860 James Eramus Philipps 12th Baronet and Mary Margaret Best were married. In 1873 James Evans Philipps 11th Baronet died. His son James Eramus Philipps 12th Baronet succeeded 12th Baronet Philips of Picton Castle. In 1912 James Eramus Philipps 12th Baronet died. His son John Wynford Philipps 1st Viscount St Davids succeeded 13th Baronet Philips of Picton Castle.

Mary Margaret Best: Around 1837 she was born. On 05 Sep 1913 she died.

Battle of the Somme

On 22 Sep 1916 Edward Wyndham Tennant (age 19) was killed in action at the Battle of the Somme. Sculpted by Allan Gairdner Wyon (age 34). Salisbury Cathedral [Map].

Edward Wyndham Tennant: On 01 Jul 1897 he was born to Edward Tennant 1st Baron Glenconner and Pamela Wyndham Viscountess Grey.

On 26 Jun 1930 Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 6th Earl Radnor (age 61) died. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral [Map]. His son William Pleydell-Bouverie 7th Earl of Radnor (age 34) succeeded 7th Earl Radnor, 8th Viscount Folkestone, 8th Baron Longford, 10th Baronet Bouverie of St Catherine Cree Church in London.

After 26 Jun 1930. Monument at Salisbury Cathedral [Map] to Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 6th Earl Radnor (deceased).

Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 6th Earl Radnor: On 08 Jul 1868 he was born to William Pleydell-Bouverie 5th Earl Radnor and Helen Matilda Chaplin Countess Radnor. On 20 Jan 1891 Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 6th Earl Radnor and Julian Eleanor Adelaide Balfour were married. He the son of William Pleydell-Bouverie 5th Earl Radnor and Helen Matilda Chaplin Countess Radnor. On 03 Jun 1900 William Pleydell-Bouverie 5th Earl Radnor died. His son Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 6th Earl Radnor succeeded 6th Earl Radnor, 7th Viscount Folkestone, 7th Baron Longford, 9th Baronet Bouverie of St Catherine Cree Church in London. On 26 Jun 1930 Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 6th Earl Radnor died. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral. His son William Pleydell-Bouverie 7th Earl of Radnor succeeded 7th Earl Radnor, 8th Viscount Folkestone, 8th Baron Longford, 10th Baronet Bouverie of St Catherine Cree Church in London.