History of Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire is in Home Counties.

Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 917. This year, before Easter, King Edward (43) ordered his men to go to the town of Towcester, and to rebuild it. Then again, after that, in the same year, during the gang-days, he ordered the town of Wigmore to be repaired. The same summer, betwixt Lammas and midsummer, the army broke their parole from Northampton and from Leicester; and went thence northward to Towcester, and fought against the town all day, and thought that they should break into it; but the people that were therein defended it, till more aid came to them; and the enemy then abandoned the town, and went away. Then again, very soon after this, they went out at night for plunder, and came upon men unaware, and seized not a little, both in men and cattle, betwixt Burnham-wood and Aylesbury. At the same time went the army from Huntington and East-Anglia, and constructed that work at Ternsford which they inhabited and fortified; and abandoned the other at Huntingdon; and thought that they should thence oft with war and contention recover a good deal of this land. Thence they advanced till they came to Bedford; where the men who were within came out against them, and fought with them, and put them to flight, and slew a good number of them. Then again, after this, a great army yet collected itself from East-Anglia and from Mercia, and went to the town of Wigmore; which they besieged without, and fought against long in the day; and took the cattle about it; but the men defended the town, who were within; and the enemy left the town, and went away. After this, the same summer, a large force collected itself in King Edward's dominions, from the nighest towns that could go thither, and went to Temsford; and they beset the town, and fought thereon; until they broke into it, and slew the king, and Earl Toglos, and Earl Mann his son, and his brother, and all them that were therein, and who were resolved to defend it; and they took the others, and all that was therein. After this, a great force collected soon in harvest, from Kent, from Surrey, from Essex, and everywhere from the nighest towns; and went to Colchester, and beset the town, and fought thereon till they took it, and slew all the people, and seized all that was therein; except those men who escaped therefrom over the wall. After this again, this same harvest, a great army collected itself from East-Anglia, both of the land-forces and of the pirates, which they had enticed to their assistance, and thought that they should wreak their vengeance. They went to Maldon, and beset the town, and fought thereon, until more aid came to the townsmen from without to help. The enemy then abandoned the town, and went from it. And the men went after, out of the town, and also those that came from without to their aid; and put the army to flight, and slew many hundreds of them, both of the pirates and of the others. Soon after this, the same harvest, went King Edward (43) with the West-Saxon army to Passham; and sat there the while that men fortified the town of Towcester with a stone wall. And there returned to him Earl Thurferth, and the captains, and all the army that belonged to Northampton northward to the Welland, and sought him for their lord and protector. When this division of the army went home, then went another out, and marched to the town of Huntingdon; and repaired and renewed it, where it was broken down before, by command of King Edward (43). And all the people of the country that were left submitted to King Edward (43), and sought his peace and protection. After this, the same year, before Martinmas, went King Edward (43) with the West-Saxon army to Colchester; and repaired and renewed the town, where it was broken down before. And much people turned to him, both in East-Anglia and in Essex, that were before under the power of the Danes. And all the army in East-Anglia swore union with him; that they would all that he would, and would protect all that he protected, either by sea or land. And the army that belonged to Cambridge chose him separately for their lord and protector, and confirmed the same with oaths, as he had advised. This year King Edward (43) repaired the town of Gladmouth; and the same year King Sihtric slew Neil his brother.

Grendon Underwood Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

In 1252 Hawise St Amand Baroness Montagu 1252- was born at Grendon Underwood Aylesbury.

St Mary the Virgin Church Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

On 31 Dec 1590 Anne Paget -1590 died. She was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Aylesbury.

Stone Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

On 19 Sep 1534 Thomas Berkeley 6th Baron Berkeley 1505-1534 (29) died at Stone Aylesbury. He was buried at St John the Baptist Church Stone Aylesbury. On 26 Nov 1534 Henry Berkeley 7th Baron Berkeley 1534-1613 succeeded posthumously 7th Baron Berkeley 2C 1421.

St John the Baptist Church Stone Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

On 19 Sep 1534 Thomas Berkeley 6th Baron Berkeley 1505-1534 (29) died at Stone Aylesbury. He was buried at St John the Baptist Church Stone Aylesbury. On 26 Nov 1534 Henry Berkeley 7th Baron Berkeley 1534-1613 succeeded posthumously 7th Baron Berkeley 2C 1421.

Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire

On or before 12 Feb 1584 Cecily Bulstrode 1584-1609 was born to Edward Bulstrode of Hedgerley Bulstrode Buckinghamshire -1598 and Cecily Croke 1555- (29). She was baptised on 12 Feb 1584 at Beaconsfield.

John Evelyn's Diary 26 October 1664. 26 Oct 1664. We came back to Beaconsfield; next day to London, where we dined at the Lord Chancellor's (55), with my Lord Bellasis (50).

Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Around 1634 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of John Belasyse 1st Baron Belasyse 1614-1689. Around 1669 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of John Belasyse 1st Baron Belasyse 1614-1689.

Wilton Park, Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire

On 06 Jan 1911 John Aird 1st Baronet 1833-1911 (77) died at his home Wilton Park. He was buried at St Anne's Church. John Aird 2nd Baronet 1861-1934 (50) succeeded 2nd Baronet Aird of Hyde Park Terrace in Paddington in the County of London. Alicia Ellen Renton Lady Aird 1865-1951 (46) by marriage Lady Aird of Hyde Park Terrace in Paddington in the County of London.

Biddlesden, Buckinghamshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Bittlesden Abbey, Buckinghamshire

On 05 May 1481 Thomas Billing -1481 died. He was buried at Bittlesden Abbey.

Blackthorn, Buckinghamshire

The River Ray rises around 1500m north of Quainton from where it flows broadly west past Grendon Underwood, Blackthorn, Lower Arncott, Merton, Oddington to Islip where it joins the River Cherwell.

Bletchley, Buckinghamshire

St Mary's Church Bletchley, Buckinghamshire

St Mary's Church Bletchley. It is mostly very modern but there are some older towns which have been swallowed up. Bletchley is one such town and it has an older part with a medieval parish church, St Mary's. This contains the tomb of Richard Grey( 1393-1442), 6th Baron of Wilton. He accompanied Henry V to France at the time of the battle of Agincourt and was stationed at a port in France. He has a very fine? alabaster monument. The helmet is 17th century.

Bockmer End, Buckinghamshire

In 1642 John Borlase 2nd Baronet 1642-1689 was born to John Borlase 1st Baronet 1619-1672 (22) and Alice Bankes Lady Borlase 1621-1683 at Bockmer End.

Buckingham, Buckinghamshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 917. This year came a great naval armament over hither south from the Lidwiccians; (40) and two earls with it, Ohter and Rhoald. They went then west about, till they entered the mouth of the Severn; and plundered in North-Wales everywhere by the sea, where it then suited them; and took Camlac the bishop in Archenfield, and led him with them to their ships; whom King Edward (43) afterwards released for forty pounds. After this went the army all up; and would proceed yet on plunder against Archenfield [Note. South and west Herefordshire]; but the men of Hertford [Note. Probably a mistake for Hereforshire] met them, and of Glocester, and of the nighest towns; and fought with them, and put them to flight; and they slew the Earl Rhoald, and the brother of Ohter the other earl, and many of the army. And they drove them into a park; and beset them there without, until they gave them hostages, that they would depart from the realm of King Edward (43). And the king had contrived that a guard should be set against them on the south side of Severnmouth; west from Wales, eastward to the mouth of the Avon; so that they durst nowhere seek that land on that side. Nevertheless, they eluded them at night, by stealing up twice; at one time to the east of Watchet, and at another time at Porlock. There was a great slaughter each time; so that few of them came away, except those only who swam out to the ships. Then sat they outward on an island, called the Flat-holms; till they were very short of meat, and many men died of hunger, because they could not reach any meat. Thence went they to Dimmet [Note. Possibly Braunton], and then out to Ireland. This was in harvest. After this, in the same year, before Martinmas, went King Edward (43) to Buckingham with his army, and sat there four weeks, during which he built the two forts on either side of the water, ere he departed thence. And Earl Thurkytel sought him for his lord; and all the captains, and almost all the first men that belonged to Bedford; and also many of those that belonged to Northampton. This year Ethelfleda, lady of the Mercians (47), with the help of God, before Laminas, conquered the town called Derby, with all that thereto belonged; and there were also slain four of her thanes, that were most dear to her, within the gates.

40. The pirates of Armorica, now Bretagne; so called, because they abode day and night in their ships; from lid, a ship, and wiccian, to watch or abide day and night.

In 1184 Elena Clare 1154-1184 (30) died at Buckingham.

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Brickhill, Buckinghamshire

Diary of Henry Machyn March 1556. 09 Mar 1556. The ix day of Marche was hangyd at Brykhyll Benett Smyth, in Bokyngham-shyre, for the deyth of master Rufford, gentyllman, the wyche Conears and Spenser sluw—the iij yer of quen Mare.

Burnham-Wood, Buckinghamshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 917. This year, before Easter, King Edward (43) ordered his men to go to the town of Towcester, and to rebuild it. Then again, after that, in the same year, during the gang-days, he ordered the town of Wigmore to be repaired. The same summer, betwixt Lammas and midsummer, the army broke their parole from Northampton and from Leicester; and went thence northward to Towcester, and fought against the town all day, and thought that they should break into it; but the people that were therein defended it, till more aid came to them; and the enemy then abandoned the town, and went away. Then again, very soon after this, they went out at night for plunder, and came upon men unaware, and seized not a little, both in men and cattle, betwixt Burnham-wood and Aylesbury. At the same time went the army from Huntington and East-Anglia, and constructed that work at Ternsford which they inhabited and fortified; and abandoned the other at Huntingdon; and thought that they should thence oft with war and contention recover a good deal of this land. Thence they advanced till they came to Bedford; where the men who were within came out against them, and fought with them, and put them to flight, and slew a good number of them. Then again, after this, a great army yet collected itself from East-Anglia and from Mercia, and went to the town of Wigmore; which they besieged without, and fought against long in the day; and took the cattle about it; but the men defended the town, who were within; and the enemy left the town, and went away. After this, the same summer, a large force collected itself in King Edward's dominions, from the nighest towns that could go thither, and went to Temsford; and they beset the town, and fought thereon; until they broke into it, and slew the king, and Earl Toglos, and Earl Mann his son, and his brother, and all them that were therein, and who were resolved to defend it; and they took the others, and all that was therein. After this, a great force collected soon in harvest, from Kent, from Surrey, from Essex, and everywhere from the nighest towns; and went to Colchester, and beset the town, and fought thereon till they took it, and slew all the people, and seized all that was therein; except those men who escaped therefrom over the wall. After this again, this same harvest, a great army collected itself from East-Anglia, both of the land-forces and of the pirates, which they had enticed to their assistance, and thought that they should wreak their vengeance. They went to Maldon, and beset the town, and fought thereon, until more aid came to the townsmen from without to help. The enemy then abandoned the town, and went from it. And the men went after, out of the town, and also those that came from without to their aid; and put the army to flight, and slew many hundreds of them, both of the pirates and of the others. Soon after this, the same harvest, went King Edward (43) with the West-Saxon army to Passham; and sat there the while that men fortified the town of Towcester with a stone wall. And there returned to him Earl Thurferth, and the captains, and all the army that belonged to Northampton northward to the Welland, and sought him for their lord and protector. When this division of the army went home, then went another out, and marched to the town of Huntingdon; and repaired and renewed it, where it was broken down before, by command of King Edward (43). And all the people of the country that were left submitted to King Edward (43), and sought his peace and protection. After this, the same year, before Martinmas, went King Edward (43) with the West-Saxon army to Colchester; and repaired and renewed the town, where it was broken down before. And much people turned to him, both in East-Anglia and in Essex, that were before under the power of the Danes. And all the army in East-Anglia swore union with him; that they would all that he would, and would protect all that he protected, either by sea or land. And the army that belonged to Cambridge chose him separately for their lord and protector, and confirmed the same with oaths, as he had advised. This year King Edward (43) repaired the town of Gladmouth; and the same year King Sihtric slew Neil his brother.

Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire

On 17 Jul 1683 James Fleetwood Bishop 1603-1683 (80) died at Chalfont St Giles.

Chenies, Buckinghamshire

On 27 Aug 1562 Margaret St John Countess Bedford 1533-1562 (29) died at Woburn. She was buried at Chenies.

Diary of Henry Machyn September 1562. 09 Sep 1562. The ix day of September was bered the contes of Bedford (29) at Chennys with iij haroldes of armes, with a grett baners of mareges [marriages], and vj banar-rolles, and viij dosen of skochyons, and mony mornars in blake.

St Michael's Church Chenies, Buckinghamshire

Chesham, Buckinghamshire

Latimer House Chesham, Buckinghamshire

On 13 Oct 1642 King Charles I (41) stayed the night at the house of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 (25) at Latimer House Chesham.

In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649. In 1631 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684. Around 1647. Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 although the painting says somewhat curiously 2nd Earl Devonshire.

On 22 Apr 1897 Elizabeth Sackville West Duchess Bedford 1818-1897 (78) died at Latimer House Chesham. She was buried having been cremated at Bedford Chapel St Michael's Church Chenies.

Chesham Bois, Buckinghamshire

Around 1394 Thomas Cheney 1394-1468 was born to Roger Cheney 1362-1414 (31) at Chesham Bois.

Around 1446 John Cheney 1446-1466 was born to John Cheney 1420-1459 (26) at Chesham Bois.

On 17 May 1466 John Cheney 1446-1466 (20) died at Chesham Bois.

On 15 Aug 1468 Thomas Cheney 1394-1468 (74) died at Chesham Bois.

In Aug 1488 Robert Cheney 1488-1552 was born to John Cheney 1466-1522 (22) at Chesham Bois.

On 09 Dec 1552 Robert Cheney 1488-1552 (64) died at Chesham Bois.

On 14 Nov 1585 John Cheney 1515-1585 (70) died at Chesham Bois.

In 1644 Francis Cheyne of Chesham Bois in Buckinghamshire 1568-1644 (76) died at Chesham Bois.

Chilton, Buckinghamshire

Around 1506 John Croke 1506-1554 was born to Richard Blount 1468-1506 (38) at Chilton.

On 02 Sep 1554 John Croke 1506-1554 (48) died at Chilton.

On 23 Jan 1620 John Croke 1553-1620 (67) died in Chilton.

Cliveden, Buckinghamshire

Cliveden is an estate and house on the banks of the River Thames.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 July 1679. 23 Jul 1679. To Court: after dinner, I visited that excellent painter, Verrio (43), whose works in fresco in the King's (49) palace, at Windsor, will celebrate his name as long as those walls last. He showed us his pretty garden, choice flowers, and curiosities, he himself being a skillful gardener.

I went to Clifden, that stupendous natural rock, wood, and prospect, of the Duke of Buckingham's (51), and buildings of extraordinary expense. The grots in the chalky rocks are pretty: it is a romantic object, and the place altogether answers the most poetical description that can be made of solitude, precipice, prospect, or whatever can contribute to a thing so very like their imaginations. The stand, somewhat like Frascati as to its front, and on the platform is a circular view to the utmost verge of the horizon, which, with the serpenting of the Thames, is admirable. The staircase is for its materials singular; the cloisters, descents, gardens, and avenue through the wood, august and stately; but the land all about wretchedly barren, and producing nothing but fern. Indeed, as I told his Majesty (49) that evening (asking me how I liked Clifden) without flattery, that it did not please me so well as Windsor for the prospect and park, which is without compare; there being but one only opening, and that narrow, which led one to any variety; whereas that of Windsor is everywhere great and unconfined.

Returning, I called at my cousin Evelyn's, who has a very pretty seat in the forest, two miles by hither Clifden, on a flat, with gardens exquisitely kept, though large, and the house a staunch good old building, and what was singular, some of the rooms floored dove tail-wise without a nail, exactly close. One of the closets is pargeted with plain deal, set in diamond, exceeding staunch and pretty.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Villiers 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1628-1687 wearing his Garter Collar.

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter IX: Deene and its History. The wicked Countess and her lover lived at Clieveden — "the bower of wanton Shrewsbury and of love " — and her spirit is supposed to haunt the beautiful riverside retreat, but I am thankful to say she has never appeared in the old home of her innocent girlhood. Her portrait by Sir Peter Lely hangs in the White Hall at Deene, and is a fine example of the artist's well-known very décolleté style of " robes loosely flowing, hair as free", with the usual mise en scène of a beauty of Charles II's time. The third Earl of Cardigan was Master of the Buckhounds to Queen Anne; he married a daughter of the Earl of Ailesbury, and their fourth son inherited the Ailesbury title and estates. Lord Cardigan's eldest son married the heiress of the Duke of Montagu in 1766 [Note. Married on 07 Jul 1730. He was created Duke in 1766]. He was a friend of Horace Walpole, the influence of whose pseudo-Gothic tastes may still be seen in the south front of Deene, built at this time, and which now incorporates the great ball-room built for me by my dear husband.

In 1659 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699 (attributed). Portrait of Anna Maria Brudenell Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1642-1702. Around 1668 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anna Maria Brudenell Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1642-1702. Around 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anna Maria Brudenell Countess Shrewsbury and Waterford 1642-1702. In 1703 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714. Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Possibly school of. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714. In 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714. Around 1705. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714. 1738.François Harrewijn Painter 1700-1764. Portrait of Thomas Bruce 3rd Earl Elgin 2nd Earl Ailesbury 1656-1741. Before 1790. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839. Portrait of George Brudenell aka Montagu 1st Duke Montagu 1712-1790 in the Windsor Uniform. Around 1735 Gavin Hamilton Painter 1723-1798. Portrait of John Montagu 2nd Duke Montagu 1690-1749 and Mary Churchill Duchess Montagu 1689-1751, and Mary Montagu Duchess Montagu 1711-1775. Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of John Montagu 2nd Duke Montagu 1690-1749. Around 1740 George Knapton Painter 1698-1778. Portrait of John Montagu 2nd Duke Montagu 1690-1749. Around 1735 Gavin Hamilton Painter 1723-1798. Portrait of John Montagu 2nd Duke Montagu 1690-1749 and Mary Churchill Duchess Montagu 1689-1751, and Mary Montagu Duchess Montagu 1711-1775. 1752. Arthur Devis Painter 1712-1787. Portrait of Joshua Vanneck 1st Baronet 1701-1777 and Family. Sitters believed to be left to right: Joshua Vanneck 1st Baronet 1701-1777, Mrs. de la Mont (likely his sister), Henry Uthoff (Anna Maria's husband), Gerard (son), Gertrude (daughter, with telescope), Joshua (son, on ground), Margaret (youngest daughter, on ground), Anna Mara, Elizabeth (eldest daughter), and Thomas Walpole (Elizabeth's husband and cousin of Horace Walpole).

In May 1906 Waldorf Astor 2nd Viscount Astor 1879-1925 (26) and Nancy Witcher Langhorne Viscountess Astor 1879-1964 (26) were married. The groom's father gave the couple the family estate of Cliveden.

1908 John Singer Sargent Painter 1856-1925. Portrait of Nancy Witcher Langhorne Viscountess Astor 1879-1964.

Coleshill, Buckinghamshire

Stocks Place Coleshill, Buckinghamshire

On 03 Mar 1606 Edmund Waller Poet 1606-1687 was born to Robert Waller 1560- (46) at Stocks Place Coleshill.

Around 1687. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Edmund Waller Poet 1606-1687.

Cuddington, Buckinghamshire

Around 1495 Bishop John Holyman 1495-1558 was born at Cuddington.

Datchet, Buckinghamshire

On 21 Aug 1836 John Gore 1772-1836 (64) died at Datchet.

Denham, Buckinghamshire

On 15 Jan 1596 Henry Carey 2nd Earl Monmouth 1596-1661 was born to Robert Carey 1st Earl Monmouth 1560-1639 (36) and Elizabeth Trevannion Countess Monmouth 1563-1641 (33) at Denham.

In 1736 William Bowyer 4th Baronet of Denham Court 1736-1799 was born to William Bowyer 3rd Baronet of Denham Court 1710-1767 (26) and Anne Stonhouse -1785 in Denham.

On 03 May 1740 George Bowyer 5th and 1st Baronet 1740-1800 was born to William Bowyer 3rd Baronet of Denham Court 1710-1767 (30) and Anne Stonhouse -1785 at Denham.

Denham Place, Buckinghamshire

From 1689 William Stanton Sculptor 1639-1705 (50) was commissioned to work at Denham Place.

Dorney, Buckinghamshire

Dorney Court Dorney, Buckinghamshire

In 1586 Martha Garrard 1586-1617 was born to William Garrard 1508-1607 (78) at Dorney Court Dorney.

In 1624 James Palmer 1585-1658 (38) purchased at Dorney Court Dorney.

Drayton Beauchamp, Buckinghamshire

In 1310 Thomas Cheney 1310-1356 was born to Bartholomew Cheney at Drayton Beauchamp.

Around 1328 William Cheney 1328-1375 was born to Thomas Cheney 1310-1356 (18) at Drayton Beauchamp.

Around 1356 Thomas Cheney 1310-1356 (46) died at Drayton Beauchamp.

On 01 Aug 1362 Roger Cheney 1362-1414 was born to William Cheney 1328-1375 (34) at Drayton Beauchamp.

On 29 Aug 1375 William Cheney 1328-1375 (47) died at Drayton Beauchamp.

Around 1390 John Cheney 1390-1468 was born to Roger Cheney 1362-1414 (27) at Drayton Beauchamp.

On 15 Aug 1468 John Cheney 1390-1468 (78) died at Drayton Beauchamp.

Around 1515 John Cheney 1515-1585 was born to Robert Cheney 1488-1552 (26) at Drayton Beauchamp.

On 30 Jun 1698 William Cheyne 2nd Viscount Newhaven 1657-1728 (40) died. Viscount Newhaven extinct. He was buried at Drayton Beauchamp.

Dropmore, Buckinghamshire

St Anne's Church, Dropmore, Buckinghamshire

On 04 Apr 1909 Sarah Smith of Lewisham Lady Aird -1909 died. She was buried at St Anne's Church.

On 06 Jan 1911 John Aird 1st Baronet 1833-1911 (77) died at his home Wilton Park. He was buried at St Anne's Church. John Aird 2nd Baronet 1861-1934 (50) succeeded 2nd Baronet Aird of Hyde Park Terrace in Paddington in the County of London. Alicia Ellen Renton Lady Aird 1865-1951 (46) by marriage Lady Aird of Hyde Park Terrace in Paddington in the County of London.

Farnham Royal, Buckinghamshire

In 1062 Bertram Verdun 1062-1100 was born at Farnham Royal.

On 30 Nov 1097 Norman Verdun 1097-1150 was born to Bertram Verdun 1062-1100 (35) and Maud Ferrers 1096-1190 (1) at Farnham Royal.

In 1100 Bertram Verdun 1062-1100 (38) died at Farnham Royal.

Around 1130 Betram Verdun 1130-1192 was born to Norman Verdun 1097-1150 (32) at Farnham Royal.

In 1136 Rohese Windsor 1136-1215 was born to Gerald Windsor 1120- (16) at Farnham Royal.

In 1150 Norman Verdun 1097-1150 (52) died at Farnham Royal.

Patent Rolls Henry VI 1452-1461. Membrane 27d. 30 Oct 1459. Farnham Royal. Commission of array to Richard Wydevyle of Ryvers (54), knight, and the sheriff of Kent in Kent, to resist Richard, duke of York (48), Edward earl of March (17), Richard, earl of Warwick (30), and Richard, earl of Salisbury (59), and their accomplices, leagued in rebellion against the king and crown and allowed by certain persons having the keeping of the town and castle of Calais to enter the same contrary to the king's mandates, and now preparing to arouse congregations and insur rections in the said county; and appointment of the same to arrest all ships and other vessels late of the said earl of Warwick and all the tackling thereof and to keep the same for the king's use. By K.

Fawley, Buckinghamshire

On 30 Mar 1231 Richard Cornwall 1st Earl Cornwall 1209-1272 (22) and Isabel Marshal Countess Cornwall, Gloucester and Hertford 1200-1240 (30) were married at Fawley. He a son of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216. She by marriage Countess Cornwall.

On 07 Nov 1817 Caroline Girle 1738-1817 (78) died at Fawley.

Fawley Court, Buckinghamshire

On 22 Jun 1632 James Whitelocke 1570-1632 (61) died at Fawley Court.

Fenny Stratford, Buckinghamshire

Fleet Marston, Buckinghamshire

Around 1410 Ralph Verney 1410-1478 was born in Fleet Marston.

Around 1455 Ralph Verney 1455-1528 was born to Ralph Verney 1410-1478 (45) in Fleet Marston.

Gayhurst, Buckinghamshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Great Hampden, Buckinghamshire

Hampden House Great Hampden, Buckinghamshire

On 06 May 1760 Robert Hobart 4th Earl Buckinghamshire 1760-1816 was born to George Hobart 3rd Earl Buckinghamshire 1731-1804 (28) and Albinia Bertie Countess Buckinghamshire 1738-1816 (22) at Hampden House Great Hampden.

Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire

On 23 Jul 1290 Henry Hussey of Harting & Standen 1246-1290 (43) died in Great Missenden.

Missenden Abbey, Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire

On 14 Aug 1390 John Fitzalan 2nd Baron Maltravers 2nd Baron Arundel 1364-1390 (25) died. He was buried at Missenden Abbey.

Grendon Underwood, Buckinghamshire

The River Ray rises around 1500m north of Quainton from where it flows broadly west past Grendon Underwood, Blackthorn, Lower Arncott, Merton, Oddington to Islip where it joins the River Cherwell.

Hambledon, Buckinghamshire

Around 1217 Nichole Cantilupe 1217-1252 was born to William Cantilupe -1251 in Hambledon.

In 1218 Thomas Cantilupe Bishop of Hereford 1218-1282 was born to William Cantilupe -1251 in Hambledon.

In 1518 Ralph Scrope 1518-1572 was born to John Scrope 1496-1576 (22) and Phyllis Rokeby at Hambledon.

In 1524 Adrian Scrope 1524-1577 was born to John Scrope 1496-1576 (28) and Phyllis Rokeby at Hambledon.

In 1534 Mary Scrope 1534-1607 was born to John Scrope 1496-1576 (38) and Phyllis Rokeby at Hambledon.

On 22 Jun 1569 Robert Scrope 1569- was born to Adrian Scrope 1524-1577 (45) and Ursula Ludlow 1547-1613 (22) at Hambledon.

On 10 May 1576 John Scrope 1496-1576 (80) died at Hambledon.

In 1577 Adrian Scrope 1524-1577 (53) died at Hambledon.

On 16 Oct 1797 James Brudenell 7th Earl Cardigan 1797-1868 was born to Robert Brudenell 6th Earl Cardigan 1769-1837 (28) and Penelope Cooke Countess Cardigan 1770-1826 (27) at Hambledon.

1841 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of James Brudenell 7th Earl Cardigan 1797-1868.

Hanslope, Buckinghamshire

Hardmead, Buckinghamshire

Around 1542 Thomas Catesby 1542- was born to Francis Catesby 1526-1544 (16) at Hardmead.

High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

John Mundy Lord Mayor -1537 was born at High Wycombe.

West Wycombe High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

Around 1658 Francis Dashwood 1st Baronet Dashwood 1658-1724 was born to Francis Dashwood 1603-1683 (55) and Alice Sleigh 1617-1694 (41) at West Wycombe High Wycombe.

On 04 Nov 1724 Francis Dashwood 1st Baronet Dashwood 1658-1724 (66) died. He was buried at West Wycombe High Wycombe. Francis Dashwood 11th Baron Despencer 1708-1781 (15) succeeded 2nd Baronet Dashwood of West Wycombe in Buckinghamshire.

Around 1774. Nathaniel Dance Holland Painter 1735-1811. Portrait of Francis Dashwood 11th Baron Despencer 1708-1781.

Hurley, Buckinghamshire

In 1564 Richard Lovelace 1st Baron Lovelace 1564-1634 was born in Hurley.

In Feb 1616 John Lovelace 2nd Baron Lovelace 1616-1670 was born to Richard Lovelace 1st Baron Lovelace 1564-1634 (52) in Hurley.

On 22 Apr 1634 Richard Lovelace 1st Baron Lovelace 1564-1634 (70) died in Hurley. John Lovelace 2nd Baron Lovelace 1616-1670 (18) succeeded 2nd Baron Lovelace.

In 1641 John Lovelace 3rd Baron Lovelace 1641-1693 was born to John Lovelace 2nd Baron Lovelace 1616-1670 (24) and Anne Wentworth 7th Baroness Wentworth Baroness Lovelace -1697 in Hurley.

Margaret Lovelace was born to Richard Lovelace 1st Baron Lovelace 1564-1634 in Hurley.

Iver, Buckinghamshire

Bangors Iver, Buckinghamshire

On 18 Jun 1928 Hilda Rose Montgomerie Baroness Anslow -1928 died at Bangors Iver.

Coppins Iver, Buckinghamshire

On 03 Dec 1935 Princess Victoria Windsor 1868-1935 (67) died at Coppins Iver.

1908. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Princess Victoria Windsor 1868-1935.

Richings, Iver, Buckinghamshire

In Jan 1735 a great storm occurred in London and elsewhere causing significant damage.

From London Prints:

Yesterday Morning the Wind being at W. and W.S.W. it blew hard; and in the Afternoon we had one of the strongest Storms that has been known for many Years, in which several Lighters and Boats in the River were sunk, and others dashed to Pieces; but all the Ships in the River rode out with Safety. On Shore, great Damage was done in the Houses, by ripping off the Tiles, blowing down Stacks of Chimneys, &c. and many People were killed and wounded; particularly, Five Houses were blown down in St. Giles's Parish, and another in Hartshorn Lane in the Strand, by which two Persons lost their Lives. A Stack of Chimneys fell upon a Footman near Gray's-Inn, and killed him. A House in the Broad-Way, Westminster, was blown down, and a Man and Boy killed. And Mr. Lancashire, a Carpenter in Two-Swan-Yard near Bishopsgate, was blown from the Top of a Twelve-Foot Ladder, by which he fractured his Skull, and died on the Spot.

It likewise blew up by the Roots several large Trees in St. James's Park, and did incredible Damage to a great many Houses, in all Parts of the Cities of London and Westminster.

From Tunbridge-Wells we have an Account that the Land-Floods came down upon them so suddenly, that all the Bridges upon the Brook which runs by the Walks, were carried away by the Torrent, and great Damages done besides, so that the like has not been known before in any one's Memory.

They write from [illegible] Abbey in Yorkshire that [several words illegible] happened such a Storm as had not been known in the Memory of Man; tho' it lasted no longer than three quarters of an Hour, yet four Houses were blown down, and several others damaged, and a great Number of large Trees were either broken or blown up by the Roots.

Moulsey in Surrey, Jan. 9. The River Thames is now rising here, and yet it is already so high, we are forced to live above Stairs; and when the Land Waters come down from the Hills in the West-Country, God knows the Consequence: The Thames rose between 5 and 12 this Morning, very near a Foot in Height.

On the 8th Instant there were near 100 Elm Trees (and other Sorts) blown up by the Roots in this Parish during the violent Storm, all fine tall Sticks, and of a load of Timber in a Stick one with another; which will afford the Navy a fine Opportunity of furnishing the Stores in his Majesty's Dockyard this Year.

Extract of a Letter from Dover, dated Jan. 10. Our Accounts from Deal yesterday bring that 40 Sail were missing, that there is scarce a Ship but has met with Damage, and most people think the Gale of Wind little inferior to the November Storm, and lasted longer.

From several LONDON PRINTS Jan. 11. We have received further Accounts of the Misfortunes occasioned by the terrible Storm on Wednesday last: It was observed to be at the highest at 12 o'Clock, about which Time a Stack of Chimnies fell upon a Coachman near Golden-Square, and fractured his Skull: At Barnet, and the Villages adjacent, they perceived three loud Claps of Thunder, accompanied by Lightning; several Barns were blown down in that Neighbourhood; and in several of the Roads near London, the Trees lie in the Highway in such manner, that it is difficult to pass: The Seat was blow from the Mount in Kensington Gardens. At all Parts of the Town are seen Houses untiled, stript of their Lead, and the Chimnies demolish'd.

The Kitchen Chimney of the Lord Bruce was blown down, which broke thro' the Stables of his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland, and did very considerable Damage, some of the Servants narrowly escaping with their Lives.

36 Trees were broke down, and tore up by the Roots, in St. James's Park, particularly the large Tree entering the Mall, from St. James's Palace, under which stood a Centry-Box, which was blown down at the same Time, with the Soldier in it, who narrowly escaped with his Life.

About 300 Weight of Lead was blown off the House of Arundel, Esq; in Burlington Gardens, Surveyor of his Majesty's Roads.

About 500 Wt. of Lead was ript off the Parish Church of St. Laurence Jewry, by Guild-Hall.

At the Marquis de Montandre's House in Brook-street, a large Stack of Chimnies was blown down, which demolished an Office in the back Part of the House, dashing in Pieces a Table at which 9 Servants were to dine a quarter of an Hour after.

At Riskins, the seat of the Lord Bathurst (50) in Buckinghamshire, above 40 large Trees in his Lordship's Grounds were blown down.

At Fulham 2 or 3 Houses were blown down, and a Barn belonging to Mr. Gray, a Farmer.

A great many Wallnut-trees in the Park of Tryon, Esq; at Mickleham, were destroyed. We hear he has made above 300£. per Annum of the Wallnuts which the said Trees produced.

The same Day, as a Servant of Messieurs Frame and Berkley was going along the North Side of St. Paul's, he was thrown down by the Violence of the Winds, at which time his Letter-Case fell from his Side, and the Wind blew his Notes about; all which he found again, except one of £300. one of £139. 16s one of £40. and one of £25. for which Notes a Reward is offered.

Ivinghoe Beacon, Buckinghamshire

The Ridgeway Path is an ancient footpath that extends from Knap Hill, on the south of the Avebury Plateau, or The Sanctuary, to Ivinghoe Beacon - a distance of more than eighty miles following the scarp slopes. From Knap Hill the Ridgeway Path passes The Sanctuary, Prehistoric Avebury, Barbury Castle, Liddington Castle, Wayland's Smithy Long Barrow, Uffington Castle and White Horse, Segsbury Camp, Scutchamer Knob, Goring, Swyncome, Chinnor, Princes Risborough, Boddington Hill Fort, Tring, Ivinghoe Beacon.

Kelly's Kitchen Roundabout, Buckinghamshire

Kingsey, Buckinghamshire

On 04 Jul 1653 Walter Clarges 1st Baronet 1653-1706 was born to Thomas Clarges Physician 1618-1695 (35) in Kingsey.

Lamport, Buckinghamshire

Lamport Hall Lamport, Buckinghamshire

On 13 Feb 1645 Vere Fane 4th Earl Westmoreland 1645-1693 was born to Mildmay Fane 2nd Earl Westmoreland 1602-1666 (43) and Mary Vere Countess Westmoreland 1608-1669 (37) at Lamport Hall Lamport.

Langley, Buckinghamshire

On 11 Jun 1784 Catherine Compton Countess Egmont 1731-1784 (53) died at Langley. Charles George Perceval 2nd Baron Arden 1st Baron Arden Arden 1756-1840 (27) succeeded 2nd Baron Arden of Lohort Castle in County Cork.

Around 1759 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788. Portrait of John Perceval 2nd Earl Egmont 1711-1770 and Catherine Compton Countess Egmont 1731-1784.

Latimer, Buckinghamshire

In 1437 Henry Neville 1437-1469 was born to George Neville 1st Baron Latimer of Snape 1407-1469 (30) and Elizabeth Beauchamp Baroness Latimer 1417-1480 (20) at Latimer. He a great x 2 grandson of King Edward III England.

On 09 Mar 1494 Margaret Neville 1494-1532 was born to Richard Neville 2nd Baron Latimer of Snape 1468-1530 (26) and Anne Stafford Baroness Latimer 1471-1522 (23) at Latimer.

Around 1649 Anne Cavendish Countess Exeter 1649-1704 was born to William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 (31) and Elizabeth Cecil Countess Devonshire 1619-1689 (30) at Latimer.

In 1631 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684. Around 1647. Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of William Cavendish 3rd Earl Devonshire 1617-1684 although the painting says somewhat curiously 2nd Earl Devonshire.

Lillingstone Lovell, Buckinghamshire

Around 1482 Nicholas Wentworth 1482-1557 was born to Henry Wentworth 1429-1483 (53) and Elizabeth Howard 1418-1483 (64) at Lillingstone Lovell.

In 1529 Peter Wentworth 1529-1596 was born to Nicholas Wentworth 1482-1557 (47) at Lillingstone Lovell.

On 24 Jan 1557 Nicholas Wentworth 1482-1557 (75) died at Lillingstone Lovell.

Little Brick Hill, Buckinghamshire

Long Crendon, Buckinghamshire

On 29 Dec 1573 Elizabeth Drury 1573- was baptised at Long Crendon.

Malleforde, Buckinghamshire

Around 1372 Elizabeth Carew 1372-1410 was born to John Carew 1346-1372 (26) at Malleforde.

On 17 Aug 1390 Nicholas Carew 1322-1390 (68) died in Malleforde.

Marlow, Buckinghamshire

On 31 Jan 1232 John Cornwall 1232-1232 was born to Richard Cornwall 1st Earl Cornwall 1209-1272 (23) and Isabel Marshal Countess Cornwall, Gloucester and Hertford 1200-1240 (31) at Marlow. He a grandson of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

On 22 Sep 1232 John Cornwall 1232-1232 died at Marlow. He was buried at Reading Abbey.

On 09 Sep 1233 Isabel Cornwall 1233-1234 was born to Richard Cornwall 1st Earl Cornwall 1209-1272 (24) and Isabel Marshal Countess Cornwall, Gloucester and Hertford 1200-1240 (32) at Marlow. She a granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

On 06 Oct 1234 Isabel Cornwall 1233-1234 (1) died at Marlow.

Marlow Bridge, Buckinghamshire

Sir William Borlase's Grammar School, Marlow, Buckinghamshire

In 1624 William Borlase of Little Marlow 1564-1629 (60) founded Sir William Borlase's Grammar School in memory of his son Henry Borlase 1590-1624 (34) who had died that year.

Middle Claydon, Buckinghamshire

All Saints Church Middle Claydon, Buckinghamshire

All Saints Church Middle Claydon. The Church of England parish church of All Saints is in the grounds of Claydon House, a National Trust property. The house was the home of Sir Edmund Verney, an English Civil War Royalist, and of Florence Nightingale. Monument to the Verney Family. Erected 1653. The monument was commissioned by Sir Ralph Verney..

The church contains a very fine series of monuments, the earliest being a brass in the chancel to Isabella Giffard, 1523, with figure and inscription, and the next a figure of a priest, Alexander Anne, 1526. A third brass is to Roger Giffard, 1542, the builder of the chancel, and his wife Mary [Nansicles], with their thirteen sons and seven daughters, and has the arms of Giffard: three lions passant, impaling a cheveron between three lapwings with three stars on the cheveron. The brass is palimpsest on one to Walter Bellingham, 1487, Ireland King of Arms. The most interesting monument in the church is an alter-tomb in the chancel with the alabaster effigy of Margaret Giffard, 1539, a beautiful piece of late Gothic and Italian Renaissance detail. The effigy is of alabaster, and in general design follows the fashion of English effigies of the time, but with a freedom and mastery of detail which give evidence of the new influence. The tomb itself has shields of the Gothic type, but Italian baluster shafts at the angles, and the marginal inscription is in capital letters of mixed Gothic and Italian character. The heraldry gives the arms of Giffard and of Bradfield: three fleurs de lis on a bend quartered with quarterly a border ermine. On the north wall of the chancel is an uninscribed monument with the Giffard arms, of fine Italian detail and about contemporary with Margaret Giffard's monument. There are a number of monuments of the Verneys, who succeeded the Giffards, the earliest being that of Urian and Lettice Verney (d. 1608). Others are Col. Henry Verney (d. 1671), Sir Edmund Verney (d. 1642), Sir Ralph Verney (d. 1696), John Verney (d. 1694) and Mary Verney (d. 1694).

Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire

On 17 Jul 1436 Katherine Pavenham 1372-1436 (64) died at Milton Keynes.

Stony Stratford, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire

On 09 Dec 1290 Eleanor of Castile (49) body rested at Stony Stratford. The cross here was built between 1291 and 1293 by John of Battle at a total recorded cost of over £100.

On 30 Apr 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30) met Richard Grey 1457-1483 (26) and Anthony Woodville 2nd Earl Rivers 1440-1483 (43) at Stony Stratford who were accompanying Edward V King England 1470- (12) to from Ludlow to London. All three had dinner together.

1876. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896.

On 01 May 1483 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30) arrested Richard Grey 1457-1483 (26), Anthony Woodville 2nd Earl Rivers 1440-1483 (43) and Thomas Vaughan Master 1410-1483 (73) at Stony Stratford. Edward V King England 1470- (12) was taken under his uncle Richard's Protection to London.

Diary of Henry Machyn November 1557. 09 Nov 1557. The ix day of November was bered at Stonesthett ford master (blank) Langfold, with pennon and cote armour, a sqwyre.

Watling Street 1e St Albans to Towcester. From Verulamium aka St Albans Watling Street continues north-west through Redbourn, Friars Wash, Durocobrivis, Hockcliffe, Little Brick Hill, Kelly's Kitchen Roundabout, Magiovinium aka Dropshort, Stony Stratford and Lactodorum.

The History of King Richard the Third by Thomas More. Now when the King on his way to London had gone from Northampton, then these Dukes of Gloucester and Buckingham came thither. But the Lord Rivers, the King's uncle, remained behind, intending on the morrow to follow the King, and be with him at Stony Stratford, eleven miles thence, early before he departed. So was there made that night much friendly cheer between these dukes and the Lord Rivers a great while. But immediately after that, they openly and with great courtesy departed; and while the Lord Rivers lodged, the dukes secretly, with a few of their most private friends, set themselves down in council, wherein they spent a great part of the night. And at their rising in the dawning of the day, they sent about secretly to their servants, who were in their inns and lodgings about, giving the commandment to make themselves shortly ready, for their lords were ready to ride. Upon which messages, many of their folk were attendant when many of the Lord Rivers' servants were unready. Now had these dukes taken also into their custody the keys of the inn so that none should pass forth without their approval. And besides this, on the highway toward Stony Stratford, where the King lay, they had ordered certain of their folk that they should send back again and compel to return any man who were gotten out of Northampton toward Stony Stratford, till they should give permission, because the dukes themselves intended, for the show of their diligence, to be the first that should that day attend upon the King's Highness out of that town; thus did they deceive the folk at hand.

But when the Lord Rivers understood the gates closed and the ways on every side beset, neither his servants nor himself allowed to go out, perceiving well so great a thing without his knowledge was not begun for nothing, comparing this manner present with this last night's cheer, in so few hours so great a change he marvelously disliked. However, since he could not get away—and keep himself close, he would not do so lest he should seem to hide himself for some secret fear of his own fault, whereof he saw no such fault in himself—he determined, upon the surety of his own conscience, to go boldly to them and inquire what this matter might mean. Whom, as soon as they saw, they began to quarrel with him and say that he intended to set distance between the King and them and to bring them to confusion, but this plan would not lie in his power. And when he began (as he was a very well-spoken man) in goodly manner to excuse himself, they tarried not the end of his answer, but shortly took him and put him under guard, and that done, forthwith went to horseback and took the way to Stony Stratford, where they found the King with his company ready to leap on horseback and depart forward, to leave that lodging for them because it was too small for both companies.

Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire

Patent Rolls Edward IV 21 Feb 1478. 21 Feb 1478. Grant for life to Robert Pemberton (34), one of the ushers of the king's Westminster chamber, of the office of steward of the lordship of Neuport Paynell, in the king's hands by the forfeiture of George, late duke of Clarence (28), receiving the accustomed fees from the issues of the lordship, with all other profits. By K.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 08 June 1668. 08 Jun 1668. Monday. Father's servants (father having in the garden told me bad stories of my wife's ill words), 14s.; one that helped at the horses, 2s.; menders of the highway, 2s. Pleasant country to Bedford, where, while they stay, I rode through the town; and a good country-town; and there, drinking, 1s. We on to Newport; and there 'light, and I and W. Hewer (26) to the Church, and there give the boy 1s.

So to Buckingham, a good old town. Here I to see the Church, which very good, and the leads, and a school in it: did give the sexton's boy 1s. A fair bridge here, with many arches: vexed at my people's making me lose so much time; reckoning, 13s. 4d. Mighty pleased with the pleasure of the ground all the day. At night to Newport Pagnell; and there a good pleasant country-town, but few people in it. A very fair-and like a Cathedral-Church; and I saw the leads, and a vault that goes far under ground, and here lay with Betty Turner's sparrow: the town, and so most of this country, well watered. Lay here well, and rose next day by four o'clock: few people in the town: and so away. Reckoning for supper, 19s. 6d.; poor, 6d. Mischance to the coach, but no time lost.

In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715.

Roger Whitley's Diary 1690 February. 07 Feb 1690. Friday, set out about 8; called at Woborne (stayd not); that morning Alderman Mainwaring & Houseman overtook us; dined at the Swan in Newport; lay at the Rose & Crowne in Northampton:

Bishop John Harley -1558 was born at Newport Pagnell. He was educated at Magdalen Hall.

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

High Street, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire

Swan Inn, High Street, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire

Diary of Samuel Pepys 08 June 1668. 08 Jun 1668. Monday. Father's servants (father having in the garden told me bad stories of my wife's ill words), 14s.; one that helped at the horses, 2s.; menders of the highway, 2s. Pleasant country to Bedford, where, while they stay, I rode through the town; and a good country-town; and there, drinking, 1s. We on to Newport; and there 'light, and I and W. Hewer (26) to the Church, and there give the boy 1s.

So to Buckingham, a good old town. Here I to see the Church, which very good, and the leads, and a school in it: did give the sexton's boy 1s. A fair bridge here, with many arches: vexed at my people's making me lose so much time; reckoning, 13s. 4d. Mighty pleased with the pleasure of the ground all the day. At night to Newport Pagnell; and there a good pleasant country-town, but few people in it. A very fair-and like a Cathedral-Church; and I saw the leads, and a vault that goes far under ground, and here lay with Betty Turner's sparrow: the town, and so most of this country, well watered. Lay here well, and rose next day by four o'clock: few people in the town: and so away. Reckoning for supper, 19s. 6d.; poor, 6d. Mischance to the coach, but no time lost.

In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715.

Roger Whitley's Diary 1690 February. 07 Feb 1690. Friday, set out about 8; called at Woborne (stayd not); that morning Alderman Mainwaring & Houseman overtook us; dined at the Swan in Newport; lay at the Rose & Crowne in Northampton:

Newton Blossomville, Buckinghamshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Olney, Buckinghamshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 18 Oct 1016. When the king (26) understood that the army was up, then collected he the fifth time all the English nation, and went behind them, and overtook them in Essex, on the down called Assingdon; where they fiercely came together. Then did Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017 as he often did before—he first began the flight with the Maisevethians, and so betrayed his natural lord and all the people of England. There had Knute (21) the victory, though all England fought against him! There was then slain Bishop Ednoth, and Abbot Wulsy, and Alderman Elfric, and Alderman Godwin of Lindsey, and Ulfkytel of East-Anglia, and Ethelward, the son of Alderman Ethelsy (59). And all the nobility of the English nation was there undone! After this fight went King Knute (21) up with his army into Glocestershire, where he heard say that King Edmund (26) was. Then advised Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017, and the counsellors that were there assembled, that the kings should make peace with each other, and produce hostages. Then both the kings met together at Olney, south of Deerhurst, and became allies and sworn brothers. There they confirmed their friendship both with pledges and with oaths, and settled the pay of the army. With this covenant they parted: King Edmund (26) took to Wessex, and Knute (21) to Mercia and the northern district. The army then went to their ships with the things they had taken; and the people of London made peace with them, and purchased their security, whereupon they brought their ships to London, and provided themselves winter-quarters therein.

After 26 Jul 1469 King Edward IV was captured by his brother George at Olney after the Battle of Edgecote Moor.

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Padbury Bridge, Buckinghamshire

Padbury Brook rises near Fritwell from where it flows past Ardley, Stoke Lyne, Fringford, Godington, Twyford, under Padbury and the medieval Thornbrough bridges, after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire

The Ridgeway Path is an ancient footpath that extends from Knap Hill, on the south of the Avebury Plateau, or The Sanctuary, to Ivinghoe Beacon - a distance of more than eighty miles following the scarp slopes. From Knap Hill the Ridgeway Path passes The Sanctuary, Prehistoric Avebury, Barbury Castle, Liddington Castle, Wayland's Smithy Long Barrow, Uffington Castle and White Horse, Segsbury Camp, Scutchamer Knob, Goring, Swyncome, Chinnor, Princes Risborough, Boddington Hill Fort, Tring, Ivinghoe Beacon.

Quainton, Buckinghamshire

The River Ray rises around 1500m north of Quainton from where it flows broadly west past Grendon Underwood, Blackthorn, Lower Arncott, Merton, Oddington to Islip where it joins the River Cherwell.

Radclive, Buckinghamshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Ravenstone, Buckinghamshire

On 05 Dec 1631 Heneage Finch Speaker of the House of Commons 1580-1631 (51) died. He was buried at Ravenstone.

Before 1631. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Heneage Finch Speaker of the House of Commons 1580-1631 in the robes of Serjeant at Law.

On 18 Dec 1682 Heneage Finch 1st Earl Nottingham 1621-1682 (60) died at Great Queen Street Covent Garden. He was buried at Ravenstone. Daniel Finch 2nd Earl Nottingham 7th Earl Winchilsea 1647-1730 (35) succeeded 2nd Earl Nottingham 7C 1681. Essex Rich 2nd Countess Nottingham 1652-1684 (30) by marriage Countess Nottingham.

In 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Heneage Finch 1st Earl Nottingham 1621-1682. Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Essex Rich 2nd Countess Nottingham 1652-1684. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Essex Rich 2nd Countess Nottingham 1652-1684.

On 11 Jul 1813 Charlotte Finch nee Fermor 1725-1813 (88) died at St James's Palace. She was buried at Ravenstone.

On 02 Aug 1826 George Finch 9th Earl Winchilsea 4th Earl Nottingham 1752-1826 (73) died without legitimate issue. George Finch Hatton 5th Earl Nottingham 10th Earl Winchilsea 1791-1858 (35) succeeded 5th Earl Nottingham 7C 1681, 10th Earl Winchilsea. Georgiana Charlotte Graham Countess Nottingham Winchelsea -1835 (32) by marriage Countess Nottingham, Earl Winchilsea. His illegitimate son George Finch 1794-1870 (31) inherited his manors at Burley-on-the-Hill House and Ravenstone.

Stantonbury, Buckinghamshire

On 10 Nov 1598 John Temple 1598-1632 was born to Thomas Temple 1st Baronet Temple 1567-1637 (31) and Hester Sandys 1569–1656 (29) at Stantonbury.

Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire

In 1331 William de Moleyns 1331-1380 was born at Stoke Poges.

On 12 Mar 1352 William de Moleyns 1331-1380 (21) and Margery Bacon 1336-1399 (16) were married at Stoke Poges.

In 1353 Richard Moleyns 1353-1384 was born to William de Moleyns 1331-1380 (22) and Margery Bacon 1336-1399 (17) at Stoke Poges.

On 11 Jun 1426 Eleanor Moleyns Baroness Hungerford 1426-1476 was born to William Moleyns 1405-1429 (20) at Stoke Poges.

In 1571 Edward Hastings 1st Baron Hastings of Loughborough 1521-1571 (50) died at Stoke Poges. Baron Hastings Loughborough extinct.

Ditton Church Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire

On 05 Feb 1344 Richard Fitzalan 10th Earl Arundel 8th Earl Surrey 1306-1376 (38) and Eleanor Plantagenet Countess Arundel Countess Surrey 1318-1372 (25) were married at Ditton Church Stoke Poges. They were half third cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216. She a great granddaughter of Henry III King England 1207-1272. She by marriage Countess Arundel Sussex.

Stony Straford, Buckinghamshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Stowe, Buckinghamshire

On or before 16 Jul 1742 Elizabeth Temple 1738-1742 (3) died. She was buried on 16 Jul 1742 at the family estate at Stowe. Hester Temple Countess Temple 1690-1752 (52) succeeded 2nd Viscount Cobham.

Stowe House, Buckinghamshire

On 11 Feb 1797 Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861 was born to Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 1st Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1776-1839 (20) and Anne Elizabeth Brydges Duchess Buckingham and Chandos 1779-1836 (18) at Stowe House.

Before 01 Jun 1831. John Jackson Painter 1778-1831. Portrait of Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861.

In Feb 1820 Anna Eliza Mary Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 1820-1879 was born to Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861 (22) and Mary Campbell Duchess Buckingham and Chandos 1795-1862 (24) at Stowe House.

In 1847 Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861 (49) was declared bankrupt with debts of over a million pounds. He was required to sell his estate in Keynsham, Avington Park Itchen Valley Winchester and the contents of Stowe House in 1848.

Taplow, Buckinghamshire

Taplow is on the River Thames.

On 21 Jan 1891 Henry Fitzgerald 1863-1955 (27) and Inez Charlotte Grace Boteler -1967 were married at Taplow. He a great x 5 grandson of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Thornborough Bridge, Buckinghamshire

Padbury Brook rises near Fritwell from where it flows past Ardley, Stoke Lyne, Fringford, Godington, Twyford, under Padbury and the medieval Thornbrough bridges, after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Thornton, Buckinghamshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

St Michael and All Angels' Church Thornton, Buckinghamshire

St Michael and All Angels' Church Thornton. On each side of the western entry to the nave, under the gallery, is an alabaster effigy; on the left of John Barton, who died in 1437, and on the north side is Isabella, his wife who died in 1457. In the body of the nave is the font, then the alabaster effigy of a 14th-century priest. Beyond these is the re-assembled tomb chest of Robert Ingylton. This had been moved from the church at the beginning of the 19th century and used to form a grotto in the grounds of the house. Its remains were discovered in 1945 and reassembled in the church the following year. The top of the tomb is covered by a large brass inscribed with the figures of a man in armour, three wives, and 14 children, all framed by a canopy with four gables. The sides of the freestone chest are carved with niches containing figures of saints.

Twyford, Buckinghamshire

Padbury Brook rises near Fritwell from where it flows past Ardley, Stoke Lyne, Fringford, Godington, Twyford, under Padbury and the medieval Thornbrough bridges, after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Upper Winchendon, Buckinghamshire

On 12 Apr 1715 Thomas Wharton 1st Marquess Wharton 1648-1715 (66) died. He was buried at Upper Winchendon. Philip Wharton 1st Duke Wharton -1731 succeeded 2nd Marquess Wharton, 2nd Earl Wharton, 6th Baron Wharton.

In 1715 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Thomas Wharton 1st Marquess Wharton 1648-1715.

Waddesdon, Buckinghamshire

Eythrope Waddesdon, Buckinghamshire

On 06 Jan 1538 Jane Dormer Duchess Feria 1538-1612 was born to William Dormer 1513-1575 (25) and Mary Sidney -1542 in Eythrope Waddesdon.

Around 1563 Alonso Sánchez Coello Painter 1531-1588. Portrait of Jane Dormer Duchess Feria 1538-1612. Around 1558 Antonis Mor Painter 1517-1577. Portrait of (probably) Jane Dormer Duchess Feria 1538-1612.

Wendover, Buckinghamshire

Boddington Hill Fort, Wendover, Buckinghamshire

The Ridgeway Path is an ancient footpath that extends from Knap Hill, on the south of the Avebury Plateau, or The Sanctuary, to Ivinghoe Beacon - a distance of more than eighty miles following the scarp slopes. From Knap Hill the Ridgeway Path passes The Sanctuary, Prehistoric Avebury, Barbury Castle, Liddington Castle, Wayland's Smithy Long Barrow, Uffington Castle and White Horse, Segsbury Camp, Scutchamer Knob, Goring, Swyncome, Chinnor, Princes Risborough, Boddington Hill Fort, Tring, Ivinghoe Beacon.

600BC. Date unclear. Boddington Hill Fort. A a slight Univallate Hill Fort on the summit of Boddington Hill

Historic England 1011304:

The monument includes a univallate hillfort occupying the summit of a steep sided chalk spur. The hillfort is oval in shape, measuring overall some 500m long by 220m wide, and has an internal area of some 6ha. It lies with its long axis along the hilltop orientated north-east to south-west. The defences run roughly around the 240m contour and comprise a single rampart and outer ditch. The defences are strongest around the south and east where the outer ditch is up to 1.6m deep and the outer scarp of the rampart up to 3.4m above the ditch bottom on its outer side and 1.7m high on its inner side. In places along this south-east side there are the remains of an outer or counterscarp bank which runs along the edge of the ditch; this averages 5m wide and 0.4m high. The defences become confused towards the north-east end of the hillfort as the result of later quarrying but their course can still be followed except where they have been destroyed in the northern corner of the enclosure. This position is almost certainly the site of the original hillfort entrance but today nothing of this can be recognised. This northern part has suffered considerable disturbance from occupation of the site by Calloway or Peacock Farm which stood in this vicinity until its demolition in the 1950s. Surface irregularities, along with tile and brick waste scattered on the surface here, relate to this phase of occupation. Around the north-western side of the hillfort the outer ditch has been overlain by a modern terraced forestry track. However the main rampart survives as a single well defined scarp averaging 2.6m high. Some 200m south along its length the rampart becomes stronger rising to an average height of 3.6m and an inner bank once more becomes recognisable, averaging 0.6m high. A modern entrance gap 5m wide has been cut through the rampart some 30m south of the commencement of this inner bank. The last 120m of this length of the rampart has an inner ditch 5m wide and 0.8m deep which probably served as the quarry for the inner bank. The outer ditch remains buried beneath the modern forestry track throughout the complete length of this western side. At the extreme south-western corner of the hillfort the outer rampart is lowered to form an entrance ramp which could be a second original approach to the interior of the fort. There is no outer ditch at this position, the ditch commencing some 40m to the east. Whether the ditch was originally intended to end short of this ramp or whether it has been subsequently infilled is unclear. The interior of the hillfort is today heavily afforested. Finds from the interior of the fort have in the past included fragments of Iron Age pottery, an ingot, part of a bronze dagger, a flint scraper and a spindle whorl. A section excavated through the rampart in the area of the southern entrance revealed fragments of pottery indicating occupation of the site during the 1st-2nd centuries BC. A series of lesser modern banks associated with the modern farm enclosure can be identified running inside and parallel to the prehistoric earthworks. A large circular concrete reservoir 33m in diameter lies approximately central to the site. The concrete reservoir, along with all modern boundary features, structures and metalled surfaces are excluded from the scheduling, although the ground beneath these is included.

Westbury, Buckinghamshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Weston Underwood, Buckinghamshire

On 07 Nov 1680 Francis Throckmorton 2nd Baronet Throckmorton 1641-1680 (39) died. He was buried at Weston Underwood. Robert Throckmorton 3rd Baronet Throckmorton 1662-1721 (18) succeeded 3rd Baronet Throckmorton of Coughton in Warwickshire.

Around 1680 Gilbert Soest Painter 1605-1681. Portrait of Francis Throckmorton 2nd Baronet Throckmorton 1641-1680.

On 22 Aug 1702 Robert Throckmorton 4th Baronet Throckmorton 1702-1791 was baptised at Weston Underwood.

Around 1738. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Robert Throckmorton 4th Baronet Throckmorton 1702-1791.

On 08 Mar 1721 Robert Throckmorton 3rd Baronet Throckmorton 1662-1721 (59) died. He was buried at Weston Underwood. Robert Throckmorton 4th Baronet Throckmorton 1702-1791 (18) succeeded 4th Baronet Throckmorton of Coughton in Warwickshire.

On 12 May 1722 Mary Yate Lady Throckmorton 1668-1722 (54) was buried at Weston Underwood.

Whaddon, Buckinghamshire

Around 1493 Bishop Richard Cox 1493-1581 was born in Whaddon. He was educated at Eton College and King's College.

In 1571 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Bishop Richard Cox 1493-1581. In 1577 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Bishop Richard Cox 1493-1581.

On 14 Oct 1593 Arthur Grey 14th Baron Grey Wilton 1536-1593 (57) died. He was buried at Whaddon. On 14 Oct 1593 Thomas Grey 15th Baron Grey Wilton 1576-1614 (17) succeeded 15th Baron Grey Wilton 1C 1295.

Wing, Buckinghamshire

In 1653 Elizabeth Dormer 2nd Countess Chesterfield 1653-1677 was born to Charles Dormer 2nd Earl Carnarvon 1632-1709 (20) and Elizabeth Capell Countess Carnarvon 1633-1678 (20) in Wing.

Worminghall, Buckinghamshire

In 1559 Bishop John King 1559-1621 was born in Worminghall.

In 1622 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Bishop John King 1559-1621.

Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

In 1155 Alan Basset 1155-1232 was born to Thomas Basset 1130-1182 (25) and Adeliza Dunstanville 1130-1186 (25) at Wycombe.

In 1189 Aline Aliva Basset 1189-1281 was born to Alan Basset 1155-1232 (34) at Wycombe and Aline Fitzrobert.

John Evelyn's Diary 17 October 1664. 17 Oct 1664. I went with my Lord Viscount Cornbury, to Cornbury, in Oxfordshire, to assist him in the planting of the park, and bear him company, with Mr. Belin and Mr. May (43), in a coach with six horses; dined at Uxbridge, lay at Wycombe.

Before 1661. Remigius van Leemput Painter 1607-1675. Copy of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 portrait of Henry Hyde, Viscount Cornbury and his first wife Theodosia Capell.